Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Fort, Mrs. Osmun (Valentine or "Tine") '46

1946 - 1953 Treasurer Book: A Mrs. Osmun Fort was listed as a "Junior Member"

There is some confusion, but she most likely lived in 1953 at this ddress: 1126 Watchung Ave, Plainfield

She was the daughter-in-law of Mrs. Leslie Runyon (Helen Osmun) Fort '22. Her sister in law was Mrs. Robert Easton (Margaret H. Fort) Royes '44

To read about the Fort & Osmun Families

Mrs. Leslie Runyon Fort (Helen Osmun) '22

1984 Questover Designers Showhouse Program

Questover Program pages 1 through 55

Questover Program pages 56 through 106

Questover Program pages 107 through 131

1974 Junior League Designer Showcase: The Martine House

"In the program, the list of patrons has "Mr. and Mrs. Osmun Fort"

1974 Designer Showcase Martine House Cover to Page 25

1974 Designer Showcase Martine House Page 26 to End

In addition to saving the 1988 Program for the Designers Showhouse of Cedar Brook Farm (aka The Martine House) which was organized by the Muhlenberg Auxiliary, PGC Member Anne Shepherd also kept the 1974 Designers Showcase of the very same home, organized by the Junior League.

Within the program pages, you will find mentioned many PGC members. They include: Clawson, MacLeod, Kroll, Davis, Wyckoff, Stevens, Loizeaux, Swain, Hunziker, Connell, Foster, Dunbar, Elliott, Fitzpatrick, Gaston, Hackman, Holman, Lockwood, Morrison, Royes, Rushmore, Sanders, Williams, Barnhart, Bellows, Burger, Burner, Carter, Clendenin, DeHart, Detwiller, Eaton, Eckert, Fort, Frost, Gonder, Keating, Laidlaw, Loosli, Madsen, Mann, Marshall, Miller, Moody, Moon, Morse, Murray, Mygatt, Barrett, Peek, Perkins, Pfefferkorn, Pomeroy, Pond, Royes, Samek, Sandford, Sheble, Stevens, Shepherd, Stewart, Stout, Trewin, Vivian, Zeller, Cochran, Mooney and Hall.

1982 May Designer Showhouse: 1127 Watchung Avenue

**DONATIONS: Mrs. and Ms. Osmun Fort


Cover to Page 25

Page 26 to Page 51

Page 52 to Page 75

Page 76 to Back Cover

February 13, 2012 Anne Shepherd's Memories of Mrs. Osmun Fort

Mrs. Fort had one son, Osmun, who married Valentine or "Tine" as we all called her. They had a publishing business on the corner of Watchung and Fourth, across from the police station, which wasn't where the police station was at that time. They had two sons. She was a very good tennis player and played at Plainfield as well as paddle. The publishing business closed and they moved to Essex. She had a terrible disease which hardened her internal organs. She and her husband Osmun died very close to one another.

Cath Detwiller's Plainfield Garden Club Party ca. 1965

sent in by Rick Detwiller, June 13, 2012

Dear Susan -

I thought you would enjoy those photos and I'm glad they will be fun for the older members to see. I know that Betty Horn, Valentine Fort, Toni Mann, Peggy Brower Newberry-Burger, Betty Fitzpatrick, June Barlow and Dot Davis are among the group and it's good to know you recognized Mrs. Seybolt. I'm sure Mrs. Sandford will be glad to see so many friends with herself among them!

Laura Detwiller was Dad's Aunt - she was his father's sister. Attached are a few more of her watercolors she did when she lived in Greenville, NJ that you may want to add to her page. We have lots of them, but most are now in the collection of the Bronx Botanical Garden. Also attached is a picture of Dad, Charles H. Detwiller, Jr. with his mother Ethel Hassel Detwiller in what I believe is Aunt Laura Detwiller's garden at 971 Hillside Ave. in Plainfield when she would have been a Garden Club member. Aunt Laura or Charles Sr. must have taken the photo since I have another one of her in the garden, probably taken at the same time. I'll send that second photo along with more garden club related material as I find it.

Thanks,

Rick D.

1126 Watchung Avenue, Plainfield NJ

Saturday, May 21, 1966 Something to Be proud of . . . Many Worked Together for County Park Display

Caption: DOGWOOD IN FLOWER – Cedar Brook Park's Dogwood Arboretum is a horticultural collection of 61 varieties that is the pride of Plainfield Garden Club and the Union County Park Commission. The display of dogwood blossoms is not the showiest, but it's the most complete in the country. Each year the trees in bloom are a joy to those who visit the planting or follow the drive through Cedar Brook Park. The trees in the Cornus Collections line both sides of the Park Drive.

Something to be Proud of . . .

Many Worked Together for County Park Display

Horticulturalists know it as the "Cornus Collection in Plainfield." The Plainfield Garden Club speaks of it as "our dogwood plantings in Cedar Brook Park." Since last year, the double line of pink and white flowering trees at the Park Ave. entrance to the park as been officially named "The Harriette R. Halloway Cornus Collection."

But to most admirers of the annual evidence that spring is here, it is just "those beautiful trees in the park" whether they refer to them by their botanical or popular name – cornus or dogwood.

Many who come to see the trees are unaware that this collection includes ore than 60 varieties of dogwood, every kind that can grow in this climate. While the trees are beautiful, it is the horticultural collection of so many varieties that counts to the credit of the Plainfield Garden Club even more than the display. It is not the greatest show, but it's the most complete collection.

Dr. Benjamin Blackburn of Drew University in Madison has remarked that this group of trees, growing in a compact reserved area, is a marked achievement on the part of the Union Count Park Commission, the Plainfield Garden Club and Miss Halloway, who served for more than 35 years as a volunteer consultant to the Park Commission and in keeping records of all the plantings.

Miss Halloway, for whom the grove is named, still watches for the flowering season of the dogwood. Now 91, Miss Halloway is a resident at the McCutchen Nursing Home, North Plainfield.

Among the personal possession she treasurers is the Distinguished Service Medal of the Garden Club of America. Also she is a fellow of the Royal Horticultural Society of England and a member of the American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboretums. She is a member of the Plainfield Garden Club and has earned recognition from the New York Botanical Gardens, American Horticultural Society and other organizations for her work and her writings about gardens, flowers, and flowering shrubs and trees.

A great part of the reward to her and the Plainfield Garden Club is that so many people can enjoy the cornus collection in the park. Miss Halloway says: "Each year the trees continue to be beautiful and a joy, if not forever, at least for many years."

THE CEDAR BROOK Park Dogwood Collection is unique, Dr. Blackburn believes. "None other is known to exist in this county," he said, "and a match for it is not be found growing in the Royal Botanic Gardens in London or in Edinburgh or other famous gardens in Great Britain and Europe."

The dogwood collection got its start in 1931 when W. R. Tracy, superintendent of the Union County Park Commission, decided to turn an old city dump into a beauty spot and the Plainfield Garden Club contributed 75 white dogwoods to help the project.

In 1940 the club gave an additional 110 trees to balance the two sides of the drive and complete the groupings. The 61 species now flourishing in the park include nine from Asia, two from Europe and 12 from North America, a number of hybrids and "cultivars," special horticultural selections that have been propagated vegetatively.

The Park Commission has planted a background of evergreens, including hemlocks and pines, to enhance the effect of the dogwoods. Enlarging on its original purpose to beautify the area, the Plainfield Garden Club cooperated throughout the year with the commission in developing the collection and all varieties are now labelled with correct names. A boulder with a tablet also has been installed in the area..

At the 25th anniversary of the Garden Club, held in 1940, Mrs. Thomas R. VanBoskerck, who had written a history of the club's first quarter century, recalled that the members had anticipated the park's work in beautifying the dump area and first had presented 50 dogwood trees to the park through the generosity of Mrs. Charles A. Eaton who took them from her own woods in Watchung. A fund to beautify the park had been started originally in 1924 with Mrs. William Halliday in charge.

Dr. Blackburn points to the Cornus Collection in Plainfield as an admirable example of cooperation among groups interested in the cultural and horticultural riches of a municipality.

25 Years Ago, 1941

Clifford M. Baker, president of the Muhlenberg Hospital board of governors announced that Allen V. Heely, headmaster of the Lawrenceville School, would speak at the graduation exercises for the hospital's school of nursing. Mr. Heely's sister-in-law, Mrs. Lawrence S. Heely, was president of the Women's Auxiliary Hospital. Dr. William B. Fort, senior attending surgeon, was to award the prizes, and William Whitwell Robison and Mrs. Edward Leroy Voorhees were to present diplomas and pins.

The Rev. Harry James Knickle, rector of Grace Episcopal Church, was observing the 10th anniversary of his priesthood.

George A. Ballantyne of 30 Westervelt Ave. was honored by the First Presbyterian Church Session for years of faithful service as head usher.

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership