Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Ackerman, Mrs. Marion S. (Sarah M. Wills) '35

1909 Plainfield Directory:

ACKERMAN, ERNEST R., cement, h. 506 W 8th
ACKERMAN, MARION S, cement, h. 929 Madison av


No further mention of Mrs. Ackerman in the files after 1936. Marion S. Ackerman had married twice. It is not known if this member was his first or second wife.

1936 Treasurer Book Active: Mrs. Marion S. Ackerman 2/13/36 Paid Her name is then crossed off and a note: Resigned April 1936

Related to the following PGC Members:

Ackerman Nora L. Mrs. Ernest Robinson 1915 506 West 8th, Plainfield (1919)

Fraker Mrs. George W. 1932 Rahway Road (1932)
Fraker Mrs. H. C. 1926
Fraker Mrs. Philip W. 1932 757 West

Crescent Avenue (1896)
8th Street, Plainfield (1932)

Mrs. Ackerman is also related to the Rushmores and through them, several other PGC families. (ie. Warren Family)

NOTE: Unsure if maiden name was "Wills" or "Willis"

1919 Ship Roster for Allianca

Ellis Island Records
Port of NY Passenger Records

A list of 148 passengers on the Allianca. Listed are the following:

Margaret W. Fraker, Plainfield, NJ 50 years old
Mary Louise Fraker, Plainfield, NJ 6 years old
Philip J. Fraker, Plainfield, NJ 52 years old

Also on the passenger list are the Ackermans (which may be related to the Frakers)

Mrs. M. S. Ackerman, Plainfield, NJ 45 years old
Priscilla W. Ackerman, Plainfield, NJ 22 years old
Warren Ackerman, Plainfield NJ, 10 months
Warren Ackerman, Plainfield, NJ 24 years old

February 5, 1919 Cristobal Canal Zone

Marion "Mike" Ackerman

Marion "Mike" Ackerman
MARION "MIKE" ACKERMAN passed away peacefully on Saturday, February 25, 2006 at his apartment in Houston, Texas following a brief illness. He was born on October 20, 1923 in Plainsfield, New Jersey, but was raised at the family home Ivy Lawn, in Rumson, New Jersey. He was the third son of Warren and Priscilla Fraker Ackerman. He graduated from Lawrenceville School. He then attended Williams College. While there, he was a loyal member of the Psi Upsilon (PsiU) fraternity. His college education was interrupted by his voluntary enlistment in the U.S. Navy, where he proudly served his country in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. As a submariner in the Pacific Theatre on board the Sea Fox submarine, he was a member of the Sea Fox which was involved in the Battle of the China Sea. After being honorably discharged, he reentered Williams College to finish his studies. From there, he was accepted into and graduated from Yale College of Law in 1952. He was employed at the prestigious Wall Street law firm of Cadwallander, Wickersham and Taft. Marion then moved to Houston where he worked for the Humble Oil Company (Exxon /Mobil) in the land department. Subsequently, he went into private practice until his retirement in 1992. Afterward, he enjoyed himself immensely by taking numerous cruises and seeing the world. Marion was a member of Christ Church Cathedral in Houston, Allegro, the River Oaks Country Club and the Nantucket Yacht Club of Nantucket, Massachusetts. Marion is survived by his son, Asche Ackerman, his wife, Susan Vail Ackerman, and their children, Ashley, Calin and Ross Asche Ackerman; and his daughter, Sarah Ackerman Howell and husband, John Cleveland Howell. A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. on Thursday, March 2, 2006 in the chapel of The Settegast-Kopf Co. Funeral Directors, 3320 Kirby Drive in Houston,TX. A reception will immediately follow in the home of Asche and Susan Ackerman. In lieu of usual remembrances, the family suggests that contributions be made to MD Anderson Cancer Center or to the charity of your choice. Please visit www.mem.com to leave a personal tribute.

James Hervey Ackerman

Birth: 1837
New Brunswick
Middlesex County
New Jersey, USA
Death: Sep. 4, 1885
Plainfield
Union County
New Jersey, USA

James Hervey Ackerman was born 1837 in New Brunswick, Middlesex County, NC the youngest of 8 known children (4 boys/4 girls) born to prominent businessman and financier, Jonathan Coombs Ackerman and his wife, Maria Smith.

He was the paternal grandchild of Geleyn Ackerman & Jane Coombs of New Brunswick; and gr-grandchild of Abraham Ackerman and Janet Romeyn who had removed from Hackensack, Bergen County, NJ to settle in New Brunswick. He was a direct descendant of this family's patriarch, Abraham "David" Davidtse Ackerman, who came to New Netherlands from Holland and married Aeltie Adrianse Van Laer, later becoming one of the early Dutch settlers of Hackensack NJ.

James entered Rutgers (now University), but shortly after the death of his father in 1852, his mother removed the family to Manhattan, NY where he completed college at the University of New York, and studied law at Albany Law School. Following graduation he began his practice with Benedict & Boardman in New York City.

In 1862 the 25-year old attorney married 26-year old Ellen Robinson Morgan, daughter of Episcopal Rev. Richard U. Morgan DD and his (1st) wife, Sarah "Sally" Markley, of Montgomery County, PA. At the time of their marriage, her father was a widow and Rector of the Trinity Parish Episcopal Church in New Rochelle, New York and would later wed his (2nd) wife, Sarah P. Jarvis.

J. Hervey and Ellen would become parents to 4 known children (2 sons/2 daughters): Senator Ernest Robinson Ackerman (1863-1931), Marion S. Ackerman (c. 1869), Mary Louise Ackerman (c. 1870), and Lydia Platt Ackerman (1882).

In about 1870, the couple removed to Plainfield, Union Co, NJ where J. Hervey passed the NJ Bar in 1871. He was for many years counsel of the Newark India Rubber Company, the same firm in which his father held stock and from which his brother Warren earned great wealth. J. Hervey served for many years on the Common Council of the City of Plainfield and in 1874, he became a Judge in Plainfield.

Judge J. Hervey Ackerman died young, passing in 1885 at about age 48. His wife of 23 years would survive him another 20 years, passing in 1905 at about age 69.

Of his 4 children, both sons went into the portland cement business, no doubt because both were legatees in the will of their uncle Warren who held a large financial interest in the Lawrence Portland Cement Company, headquartered in New York City, for which both Ernest and Marion at one time carried the title President. Both married and resided in Plainfield, but only Marion was found to have children.

Ernest Ackerman was for six years the Senator from Union County. The passage of the first Civil Service law enacted in New Jersey was largely due to his efforts; it is known as the Ackerman Civil Service Law. Of interest to this researcher is that much of the biographical information on Warren mentions his maternal roots to the Markley family and their role in the Revolutionary War, with no mention of the greatness of his Ackerman ancestors. Ernest married Nora L. Weber of Maryland in 1892. No children were found from this union. He died in 1931 and is buried in Hillside Cemetery in Scotch Plains, NJ.

Marion S. Ackerman was married twice, having 2 sons (Marion Jr. and Warren) by his first wife, and a 3rd son, James Hervey Ackerman by his 2nd wife. They lived in Plainfield. It is not known by this researcher when he died and where he was buried.

Daughter Mary Louise Ackerman married Robert Rushmore in 1891, son of the prominent Rushmore family of Plainfield who founded Rushmore Dynamo Company in that city. Daughter, Lydia Platt Ackerman (named for her aunt who had married both George and Warren Ackerman) married in 1901 to Arthur Murphy, son of Episcopal Rev. T. Logan Murphy, who at the time was the newly appointed curate of the American Church at Paris, but one time rector of the Church of Holy Cross in Plainfield.


Family links:
Parents:
Jonathan Coombs Ackerman (1793 - 1852)
Maria Smith Ackerman (1793 - 1873)


Burial:
Willow Grove Cemetery
New Brunswick
Middlesex County
New Jersey, USA

Created by: pbfries
Record added: Jan 24, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 47043235

Marion S. Ackerman

Birth: 1910
Death: 1977

Burial:
Greenwood Cemetery
Tuckerton
Ocean County
New Jersey, USA

Created by: Jean Bower
Record added: Aug 23, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 41026794

New York Times February 17, 1895

SOCIAL JOTTINGS FROM PLAINFIELD

Entertainmnets Which Have Helped to Make the Week Pass Pleasantly

PLAINFIELD, N. J., Feb. 16 – On Wednesday evening a cotillion was danced at the home of ex-Mayor Q. V. F. Randolph of East Front Street.

Herman Simmonds of Watchung Avenue has gone to Florida, to remain until Spring.

Mrs. Dudley Insley of Tacoma and Miss See of Sing Sing are guests of Mrs. E. E. Runyon of Madison Avenue.

Mrs. Howell of Chester, who has been visiting her sister Mrs. F. D. Whiting of East Sixth Street, has returned home.

Next Tuesday evening the ladies of the Monroe Avenue Chapel will hold their annual supper.

Mrs. Robert Downy of Madison Avenue gave a tea this afternoon from 4 to 7.

By far the largest and most brilliant social function that has ever been given in this city was the Ackerman reception at the Casino on Monday night. About 500 guests were present, the largest number that has yet gathered in that pretty clubhouse and ballroom. Mrs. J. Hervey Ackerman received, assisted by Mrs. Robert Rushmore, Mrs. Ernest R. Ackerman, and Mrs. Marion S. Ackerman.

Plainfield Countil of the Royal Arcanum celebrated the addition of the two hundredth member to its ranks Monday night with an entertainment.

William C. Ayers, one of Plainfield's oldest residents, celebrated his eighty-sixth birthday Tuesday. He was born on Feb. 12, 1809, on the same day as Lincoln.

Wednesday evening the ladies of the Seventh Day Baptist Church held a sale and supper in the church.

An interesting meeting of the Monday Afternoon Club was held in the parlors of the Crescent Avenue Church Monday, at which David P. Hall gave a talk on parliamentary usage.

The Third Regiment Cadet Corps of this city will go to Bound Brook on Washington's Birthday to take part in the parade of that place.

Several new members were received into the Plainfield Bicycle Club at a meeting Monday night.

On Thursday evening, Feb. 21, a Martha Washington tea will be given in the First Presbyterian Church.

Tuesday evening Mr. and Mrs. B. O. Bowers of Franklin Place entertained the Musical Club.

The Ladies Committee of the Young Women's Christian Association met Tuesday afternoon and elected the following officers: President – Mrs. Henry M. Maxson; Vice-President – Mrs. J. Wesley Johnson; Treasurere – Mrs. J. H. Manning; Secretary – Miss Embury.

Next month Miss Fannie Westphal will be married to George Gray of Brooklyn.

Tuesday, Mrs. Marion S. Ackerman of West Seventh Street gave a dinner in honor of her guest, Miss Cox of New York. The guests present were Miss Gertrude Waly, Miss Cox, Miss Marion Dumont, Miss Waldron, Miss Lawrence, Miss Carey, Harry Munger, Laurens Van Buren, Fred Waly, Dr. B. Van D. Hedges, Mr. Waring and Mr. Wharton.

A union meeting of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Societies of the Crescent Avenue and First Presbyterian Churches as held Tuesday afternoon at the latter church. The subject discussed as "China," papers being read by Mrs. M. E. Dwight, Mrs. Luchey, Mrs. Cornelius Schenck, Mrs. Pruden, and Mrs. Wyckoff.

Next Saturday Mrs. Henry McGee of Washington Park will give an afternoon tea. The hours will be from 4 to 7 o'clock.

During the week Miss Florence Honneger of New Brighton, S. I., has been the guest of Mrs. J. R. Hill of Belvidere Avenue.

Plainfield's handsome new Young Men's Christian Association Building was formally opened Tuesday night. Addresses were made by Mayor Alexander Gilbert, the first President of the association; the Rev. Dr. William R. Richards and William D. Murray, the present President. The building cost about $50,000.

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?
res=FA0710F6395911738DDDAE0994DA405B8585F0D3

New York Times April 11, 1901

PLAINFIELD, N.J., April 10. – The wedding of Miss Lydia Platt Ackerman and Arthur Murphy took place this afternoon at Grace Church. The bride is a daughter of Mrs. Ellen R. and the late J. Hervey Ackerman. Her brothers are New York business men. The bridegroom is the son of the Rev. T. Logan Murphy, the newly appointed curate of the American Church at Paris.

Miss Ackerman was accompanied to the altar by her married sister, Mrs. Robert Rushmore, matron of honor, and by Miss Anna Riker of New York, Miss Mary Scott Denniston of the State College of Pennsylvania, and Miss Catherine DePauw of New Albany, Ind. The best man was Clarence L. Murphy, the groom's brother. The ushers were Marion S. Ackerman, James F. Middledith, and Rufus F. Finch of Plainfield, and Townsend Morgan of New York. The bride's three nephews, dressed in white sailor costumes, were pages.

The service was read by the Rev. T. Logan Murphy, assisted by the rector of Grace Church, the Rev. Erskine M. Rodman. After the marriage at the church a reception was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Rushmore.

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?
res=F60712FE3B5414728DDDA80994DC405B818CF1D3

The Elite of New York Society List and Club Register 1915

Ackerman, Mr. and Mrs. Marion S. (Wills)
829 Park Ave., Plainfield, N.J.
S.R.: South Dartmouth, Mass.
Mr. Marion S. Ackerman, Jr.
Mr. Warren Ackerman
Mrs. James Ackerman

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/lweb/digital
/collections/cul/texts/ldpd_5767518_000/
pages/ldpd_5767518_000_00000009.html

Courier News file

Ackerman Marion S. wife Sarah 12/13/1939 News
Ackerman Marion S. wife Sarah 12/15/1941 News
Ackerman Marion S. wife Sarah 12/16/1943 Obituary
Ackerman Marion S. wife Sarah 5/17/1969 News
Ackerman Sarah M. husband Marion 3/29/1965 Obituary
Ackerman Sarah M. husband Marion 5/17/1969 News

http://www.plainfieldlibrary.info/pdf/LH/LH_CNObituaryFileIndex.pdf

December 14, 2011

Hillside Cemetery

December 14, 2011

Hillside Cemetery

December 14, 2011

Hillside Cemetery

Warren Ackerman

Archive Name: Alumni Horae
Volume 48, Issue 3, Page 196, Obituaries 1
Originally published: Autumn 1968
Obituary: Warren Ackerman
1913-Warren Ackerman died on August 5, 1968, at Nantucket, Massachusetts. He was the son of Marion S. and Sarah Wills Ackerman, born in Plainfield, New Jersey, July 9, 1894. The second of three brothers to attend St. Paul's, he was cox of the first Shattuck crew in the Lower School in 1909, the last of his three years at the School. In 1916, he enlisted as a trumpeter in the National Guard, going to the Mexican border with Troop D from Plainfield, New Jersey. Later that year he transferred to the Navy United States. In World War II, he again served in the Navy, as an officer on the USS Breton, in the Atlantic and Pacific. He was a member of the New York Stock Exchange for more than forty-five years, retiring from it and from the Boston brokerage firm of Draper, Sears, only a few years ago. A lover of sailing and salt-water fishing, he had a summer home on Nantucket, where he spent the last months of his life. He is survived by his wife, Priscilla W. Ackerman; two sons, Warren, Jr. and Marion S. Ackerman, 3d, and two brothers, Marion S. Ackerman, Jr., '11, and James H. Ackerman, '15. A third son, Ernest R. Ackerman, died in World War II.

Ernest R. Ackerman

Ernest R. Ackerman - Class of 1944 - World War II
Ernest Robinson Ackerman - United States Army Air Corps - April 3 1944 - Budapest

Princeton University War Memorial – Princeton University West College - Princeton, New Jersey Google Map
West College was a dormitory.

January 12, 1896 New York Times

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F00914F9395515738DDDAB0994D9405B8685F0D3

A WEEK'S EVENTS IN PLAINFIELD.; Numerous Receptions – Doings of Clubs and Societies.

PLAINFIELD, Jan. 11. – A reception was given by Mrs. I C. Pierson of Watchung Avenue, Tuesday evening. She was assisted in receiving by her daughters, Mrs. Malcolm MacKenzie of New-York and Miss Mabel Pierson; Miss Corbitt of New-York, Miss Cochran of Wilmington, Del., and Miss Hunter of North Adams, Mass.

The members of the North Plainfield Dramatic Club were entertained at the home of Mr. and Mrs. James E. Bailey, Jackson Avenue, Tuesday evening. Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. Andrew E. Keneey, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Neeley, Mr. and Mrs. James Harper, Miss Mary Hughes, Miss Ellen Mullon, and Frank Off.

A Past Master's jewel was presented to Calvin H. Rugg of Jerusalem Lodge, F. and A.M., Tuesday evening. The same evening John J. Lynch, for several years President of the Plainfield Catholic Club, was presented with a gold-headed cane by the members of the club.

A. D. Shepard and family of the Gables have gone to Buckingham, New York, for the Winter.

The class of '96 of the North Plainfield school was entertained by Miss Emma and Miss Bertha Stevens Wednesday evening.

Mrs. John Valiant of Craig Place gave a reception and tea Wednesday. She was assisted in receiving by Mrs. H.K. Carroll, Mrs. A. A. Tafty, Mrs. F. H. Randolph, Miss Grace Carroll, Miss Bessie Valiant, Miss Florence Valiant, and Miss Mary Steiner.

The Park Club gave an entertainment Wednesday night at the clubhouse on Washington Avenue. The patronesses were Mrs. C. A. Reed, Mrs. Samuel St. John McCutcheon, and Mrs. J. H. Howell.

Miss Imogene See of Sing Sing, N.Y., is a guest of Mrs. Elmer E. Runyon of Madison Avenue.

Miss Eda Mills of Summit Avenue gave a party to her friends Wednesday night.

Miss Mollie Lawrence of New York and Miss Mather of Bound Brook are guests of Mr. and Mrs. Marion S. Ackerman of Crescent Avenue.

Miss Emily Coriell of Church Street is visiting in Brooklyn.

Miss Edith Allen of Webster Place is spending the Winter in Flushing.

Mrs. J. H. Ackerman and daughter, Lydia, have returned from a two month's trip to the Pacific coast.

Miss Randolph, daughter of Thompson F. Randolph of New-York, is visiting her sister Mrs. Judson Bonnell of East Front Street.

Mrs. Lewis of Binghampton, N.Y., is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. D. F. Ginna of Watchung Avenue.

Miss Rachel Fay Buckley of Newburg, N.Y., and Harry Ellis Green of Plainfield were married Wednesday night at the bride's home.

Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Moore of Ithaca, N.Y., are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. George Squires of North Plainfield.

Miss Laura J. Runyon of East Fifth Street is visiting friends in Philadelphia.

Miss Harriet Loomis of New York City is a guest of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Morse of Franklin Place.

Miss Josie Burlingham of Albany Normal College is a guest of ex-Councilman Seymore G. Smith of Crescent Avenue.

Miss Jennie Foster of New York and Howard Foster of Princeton Colelge are guests of D. N. Groendyke of Mercer Avenue.

Miss Helen L. Moore of New York is the guest of her sister Mrs. S. A. Cruikshank, of Belvidere Avenue.

Miss Freeman of Rahway is visiting her aunt, Mrs. W. C. Ayres, of West Second Street.

Miss Baldwin of Baltimore has gone home, after a visit with her uncle Councilman J. H. Valiant of Craig Place.

Howell Division, no. 97, Sons of Temperance, celebrated its twenty-seventh anniversary Wednesday evening. AMong those present form the out of tow were A. P. Sutphen of Somerville, Grand Worthy Patriarch Ross Slack of Excelsior Division of Trenton, Past Grand Worthy Patriarch Fred Day of Newark and Worthy Patriarch Evenson of Newark, and Worthy Patriarch Evenson of Philadelphia. James J. Perine of Brooklyn is the only living charter member of the division.

Mrs. Yerkes, wife of the Rev. Dr. D. J. Yerkes of the First Baptist Church, has gone to Greenville, S.C., to visit a daughter.

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest R. Ackerman, who are making a tour around the world, are now at Hongkong.

829 Park Avenue

1919 Muhlenberg Hospital

Mrs. M. S. Ackerman
131 Crescent Avenue

Email correspondence 2012 - 2013

Dear Ford:

Happy New Year. Yesterday a group of us were sorting through the '30's
archival boxes at the Plainfield Library and I discovered the attached.
Mrs. Frank D. Warren would be your great-grandmother. I thought you would like to read the tribute from her friends.

Since I was the one who discovered it (out of a room of about 10 people
sorting piles of paper) I am taking it as a sign that I am remiss from
calling your grandfather! I plan on calling next week – in the afternoon
– and I hope I don't have too many questions for him.

We just received another email from the great-granddaughter of Mrs. Mead. I have a feeling your grandfather will know the Meads as Mrs. Mead and
Mrs. Warren were good friends.

Enjoy – Susan

Susan,

Thank you for your detailed reply. I will discuss your questions with him
but can answer the following ones directly (my responses are below your
questions). I have also copied my uncles (Harrison, Ford and Chris Fraker) on this email and they may have additional comments and can correct anything I have wrong or also add additional information:

For starters, the first question would be: How is he related to the 3
Fraker members?

1. Fraker, Mrs. George Washington (Agnes Warren) '32
http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=4570

George was his father and Agnes was his mother.

Is Mrs. G. W. Fraker (Agnes Warren) related to Mrs. Frank D. Warren '15?
Here is the direct link to that album:

http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=4522

The Warrens were Agnes' family, so this was her mother.

2. Fraker, Mrs. Philip W. '32
http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=5367

I do not know but will ask.

Is your grandfather the "Harry" that recounts Nantucket in the 1920's?

Yes; he is the one. I think that article appeared originally in one of the
Nantucket magazines about three years ago.

Are the Frakers related to the Ackermans?

Yes; Harry had two sisters (can't remember their first names) and one of them married an Ackerman. I do not recognize the first names below but will inquire.

Ackerman, Mrs. Ernest Robinson (Nora L. Weber) '15
http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=4466

Ackerman, Mrs. Marion S.(Sarah M. Wills) '35
http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=5586

3. Fraker, Mrs. H. C. '26
http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=5585

We do not know too much about this member. Was she the mother-in-law of the other two Fraker members? A sister-in-law? Any idea who Margaret Fraker is?

I do not know who she is but will ask.

When you grandfather said he grew up on "Plainfield farm" – what is that location? Is it the house on Rahway Road?

Yes, that is the house. I heard it had been restored.

Tell him that house (now #1001) has been completely renovated and is a show place. I can try to get some photographs for him.

If you or your grandfather has any photos or memorabilia, we would love to include it. Did he know any of the Detwillers? They have sent in quite a bit for the ladies in their family that belonged to the club.

I do not know; he has moved several times and now lives with my uncle (his son) Chris Fraker in Nantucket. I know he would be delighted to discuss the above with you. He can be reached at (508) 228-9501. He is best in the middle of the day or early evening. You can reach Chris on his cell at (XXX) XXX-XXXX. His email is above.

Best, Ford


On Nov 29, 2012, at 9:10 AM,
PlainfieldGC@plainfieldgardenclub.org<mailto:PlainfieldGC@plainfieldgardenclub.org>
wrote:

Dear Mr. von Weise,

Thank you so much for writing to us. It is always a thrill when a
relative discovers our little website
www.plainfieldgardenclub.org<http://www.plainfieldgardenclub.org> The garden club was founded in 1915 and we are the second oldest remaining organization in Plainfield – the Music Club is a few years older!

Two years ago we began to collect the MANY boxes of archives that have
accumulated in members' attics and basements over the past 97 years. We have only scratched the surface of piecing together this memorabilia. We created the online membership list and any time we come across something that is remotely related to that member, we scan it into their album. The plan is to go back and organize later – we will see if this happens. This is our explanation for the jumble of information that appears in your family's files. Our apologies!

We have a record of 3 "Frakers" in the club. Below are the links and a
few questions if you could ask your grandfather (Please send him our
regards. Did he happen to know Barbara Sandford? We just celebrated her 94th birthday a few weeks ago. If he did, I will send you some photos to show him.)

For starters, the first question would be: How is he related to the 3
Fraker members?

1. Fraker, Mrs. George Washington (Agnes Warren) '32
http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=4570

Is Mrs. G. W. Fraker (Agnes Warren) related to Mrs. Frank D. Warren '15?
Here is the direct link to that album:

http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=4522

2. Fraker, Mrs. Philip W. '32
http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=5367

Is your grandfather the "Harry" that recounts Nantucket in the 1920's?
Are the Frakers related to the Ackermans?

Ackerman, Mrs. Ernest Robinson (Nora L. Weber) '15
http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=4466

Ackerman, Mrs. Marion S.(Sarah M. Wills) '35
http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=5586

3. Fraker, Mrs. H. C. '26
http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=5585

We do not know too much about this member. Was she the mother-in-law of the other two Fraker members? A sister-in-law? Any idea who Margaret Fraker is?

When you grandfather said he grew up on "Plainfield farm" – what is that location? Is it the house on Rahway Road? Tell him that house (now #1001) has been completely renovated and is a show place. I can try to get some photographs for him.

If you or your grandfather has any photos or memorabilia, we would love to include it. Did he know any of the Detwillers? They have sent in quite a bit for the ladies in their family that belonged to the club.

Thank you again for writing to us. Let me know about Barbara and the
house on Rahway Road – he would probably like to see the photos.

Sincerely,

Susan Fraser
co-President Plainfield Garden Club
www.plainfieldgardenclub.org


You've received a new submission from your "contact us" through your
"Plainfield Garden Club" Andy's Web Tools web site.

name: Ford von Weise
email: ford@vonweise.net
phone: (XXX) XXX-XXXX

message:

My daughter came across the article on your website about my grandfather,Harry Fraker, who is till alive today at 94 and living on Nantucket. He grew up in Plainfield on Plainfield Farm, went to Lawrenceville, and then Princeton served in WWII at an artillery officer and then raised his family in Princeton. The article asked questions regarding if he was Mrs. H.C. Fraker's husband. The answer is no; he is the husband of the former Marjorie Tomlinson. She died in 1986. I would be happy to answer any questions. Please feel free to call or email.

_______________________________________
Thanks for using Andy's Web Tools!

Bradford L von Weise
ford@vonweise.net<mailto:ford@vonweise.net>

+1 XXX XXX XXXX Work
+1 XXX XXX XXXX Work
+1 XXX XXX XXXX Mobile

July 13, 2013 Grace Church Yard Sale Saturday

Sale held in the Ackerman Garden

National Register of Historic Places

The church complex is sited between East Sixth and Seventh Streets and Cleveland Avenue, Block 837 Lot 1. On the west side the church complex is bordered by an approximately one acre garden enclosed by a wrought iron fence. This garden (Photo 10) was designed by the well known landscape architects mnocenti & Webel in 1969 and was the recipient in 1971 of the Church Garden Award made by the National Council of State Garden Clubs. It consists of mature shrubs(i.e.mountainlaurel, azalea, rhododendron, and holly) that follow the contour of the church and alongside the fence on SeventhStreet. Along the length of the property line from Seventh Street down towards Sixth Street is a row of pine trees. In between the row of pine trees and the shrubs by the church building is a wide lawn interrupted only by English yews in two square patterns begining in the middle of the lawn and continuing toward SixthStreet. Along the side of the parish house is a row of flowering cherry trees.

National Register of Historic Places

In November 1964, the carved white oak pulpit was dedicated as a memorial to Dorothy Fleming Waring. The transept chapel was dedicated in June, 1966 as a memorial to Walter Charles Scott, by his wife. In 1968, the last major memorial donation to the parish came into being: the Ackerman Memorial Garden. It was designed by the landscape design firm of Innocenti & Webel. It is located directly alongside the church on the opposite side from Cleveland Avenue. It was offered as a memorial by the Ackerman family in honor of Marion and Sarah Ackerman.

Crescent Avenue Historic District

Crescent Area Historic District

Post Office: Plainfiled
Zip: 07060

WHAT'S NEAR
Hillside Avenue Historic District
Van Wyck Brooks Historic District

The Crescent Area Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. Portions of the text below were adapted from a copy of the original nomination document. [] Adaptation copyright 2013, The Gombach Group.

Prior to the arrival of the white man, the Lenni-Lenape Indians, part of the Algonquin Tribe, lived in this area of New Jersey. The Ice Age had endowed this area with a protective terrain, productive farmlands and forests and "wonderful pure air and springs." Indian trails became the highways and streets still in use in Plainfield today.Watchung Avenue located in the heart of the Crescent Area Historic District was once one of those trails. Remains of an Indian village and burial grounds have been found in the locality of First, Second and Third Place which are within the boundaries of the Crescent Avenue Historic District.

The first white settlers from Scotland and Holland arrived in the area in the 1680's. The first permanent settler was Thomas Gordon whose home was on Cedarbrook Road adjacent to Crescent Avenue, and whose land holdings covered most of what is present-day Plainfield. The enthusiastic letters back home detailing the healthful climate, plentiful game, fish and fowl, good soil and water brought other settlers to New Jersey, in spite of the "Flee by the salt marshes, most troublesome in the summer." These elements continued through the years to attract new residents.

During the Revolutionary War, patriots from area families served in militia regiments as foot soldiers and officers. An important battle, the Battle of the Short Hills, was fought in the area in June of 1777 and was instrumental in repelling the British in New Jersey. Some of the homes of those who supported the cause of the Revolution still exist today: The Drake House Museum, where Washington rested and briefed his officers, and the Vermule Homestead, where the officers were quartered.
Following the war, industry and transportation began to grow and take on added importance, contributing to the economic prosperity. Plainfield became officially recognized on April 1, 1800 with a population of 215. The Gordon Gazetteer in 1834 gave a glowing account of all the rich resources in Plainfield and noted that "the society is moral and religious."

It was in Plainfield in 1847 that the model for the public school system for the state was devised. Through the efforts of Dr. Charles H. Stillman, Plainfield physician, the New Jersey Legislature empowered the city to raise money by taxation in order to establish a public school system. An account of the day declares, "No one can measure the effect of this enlightened policy in extending the fame of the city and building up its prosperity." Many of the people who were active in education and cultural activities lived within the bounds of the Crescent Area Historic District.

The most influential force to the development of Plainfield was the railroad, which brought about a change in the social and economic character of the town. When a direct connection was made between Plainfield and New York City, c.1850, Plainfield became a commuter town.

During the Civil War, many local residents were involved in the fighting. General Sterling, a general on McCleland's staff, built his home and settled on First Place after the War.

Job Male, a philanthropist, who became known as "Plainfield's Grand Old Man", settled in Plainfield in 1867, following the Civil War. An inventor, he had simplified the loading of ferry slips with a patented leveling device. He purchased with Evan Jones, twenty four acres of land "in the suburbs and laid it out in village lots and streets and erected twenty substantial residences of fine architectural design, drawing the plans for them all himself." He was his own contractor and owned a greater part of the land that includes Crescent Avenue and Watchung Avenue. He designed a particularly distinctive style of architecture "stucco-walled, Mansard roofed, still standing today." He continued to build homes in different parts of the city until his possessions included more than one hundred Plainfield houses. His obituary notice in 1891 noted that "his purse always ready to respond to the calls of deserving charity." He was a public benefactor, making possible the Public Library and the Job Male Art Gallery, and donating the land for the hospital, the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church, and the Unitarian Church.

A Central New Jersey Times account in 1870 of "Our Town Improvements" wrote, "The improvements in building is the expression of a spirit that leads to progressive movements in other directions. The old houses are not recognizable with tints of brown and cream and olive, their plain roofs metamorphosed by pediments, fancy gables and cornices, their primitive simplicity converted into modern beauty by wings, bay windows, recessed projections and every variety of architectural development." The writer further comments on the "new houses, with their aspiring towers, French roofs and cupolas." It was the kind of community that led the Elizabeth Herald in May of 1888 to write, "The bustling activity of the city of Plainfield...is remarkable." And to conclude, "The next move in Plainfield, no doubt, will be the horse cars."
Plainfield had become a fashionable summer resort and eventually attracted many wealthy New York businessmen to settle here year 'round. The Gas Light Age evokes memories of Plainfield with theatricals, minstrel shows, roller rinks and other forms of entertainment. The site of many hotels, the Netherwood was reputed to be one of the "most healthful, comfortable and accessible inland summer resorts in the country."

By 1890, with substantial wealth and improvements, Plainfield continued to advance and prosper, attracting people of substance to live here. As successful businessmen and their families settled in the Crescent Avenue area, they became active in the cultural, religious, and educational affairs of the city. James W. Jackson, William D. Murray both served as presidents of the newly-formed YMCA. Henry C. Squires established the Hope Chapel on January 1, 1888 as a branch of the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church. Augustus Baldwin worked closely with Job Male in establishing the first free public library and the art gallery. In 1883 some of the first subscribers to "the last word in modern efficiency," the telephone, lived in the District: George Goddard, F.O. Herring, Leander Lovell, and the Dumond family. Many served as members of the Common Council.

After Job Male's death, Plainfield continued to be a highly desirable neighborhood and remained that way until the 1930's, when many of the large homes were converted to apartments. This process continues with single family residences almost non-existent today. The alterations for the most part are tastefully done and are not detrimental to the basic style and charm of the original building. This makes for a particularly fine collection of buildings appropriate to an Historic District.
Notes on Recollections of Long-time Residents of the Area
Longtime residents of Plainfield have been interviewed regarding their recollections of famous residents of this area. Those persons interviewed were Mrs. Lawrence Heely, Mrs. Henry Noss, Mrs. Dorothy Wills, Mrs. Helen Mygatt, Mr. John Harmon, Miss Gwen Cochran, Mrs. Dorothy DeHart, Miss Dorothy Leal, Mr. Alfred Genung, Mr. Alex Kroll, Mr. A.L.C. Marsh, Mrs. Hendrick Van Oss and others.

Many people have lived there who were outstanding in cultural fields, education and politics, as well as very successful professional and business men, active both locally and in New York City. Also educators and statesmen lived here.

John Carlson, a renown artist and member of the National Academy lived on 3rd Place as did Alex Seidel who achieved international fame for his designs for Steuben Glass. Another prominent artist who lived here was Thomas Hart Benton whose brother lived for many years on Crescent Avenue. Also William Gilbert, a well known illustrator, lived on Crescent Avenue.

The author of the White Cliffs of Dover, Alice Duer Miller, A. Van Dorn Honeyman, the famous historian, lived on 9th Street, and also Van Wyk Brooks another well-known author. Ernest Ackerman, a representative in U.S. Congress in the 1870's and his brother Marion Ackerman, who lived on Crescent Avenue, founded the Lone Star Cement Company and were deeply involved in many large national important financial and industrial enterprises.

The famous opera singer, Mario Caruso, married a Goddard and was frequently a visitor to Plainfield to the Goddard House at 213 East 9th Street. This family had a profound influence on the musical advancement of the entire area.

The area abounded in lawyers, judges and politicians, including four Mayors of Plainfield, and people in the foreign service for 25 years, such as Hendrick Van Oss, most recently served as ambassador to Madagascar and other countries.

The Crescent Avenue area was truly the heart of the town and boasted the most important and influential people of the period 1860 through 1920. The homes of these people reflect their taste, affluence and are a tangible piece of architectural history reflecting a glorious past.

Summary
The Crescent Area Historic District is a great deal more than a lot of old houses. It is probably one of the finest collections of Victorian architecture in the country. The term Victorian is all inclusive and embraces numerous styles that echo tastes and decorative devices of other periods of architecture from other countries and other times than the one in which the present buildings were constructed. The majority of these have what in architectural terms is referred to as Italianate which stems from the architectural styles popular in Italy going back as far as Byzantine derivative styles, and 15th century Venetian palaces. These variety of design styles result in the sudden surge of interest in European cultures and an attempt by the suddenly successful and new class of wealthy businessmen who were anxious to reflect their success in the work of finance in their homes. These interests were stimulated by their travels abroad and what they had seen, which was considered elegant. Thus we have Tuscan towers, Italian villas, Palazzo's with loggia and arcaded window and arches, Renaissance, Egyptian motifs, classical elements, and finally the exuberant eclectic styles throwing the more American traits of Carpenter Gothic and Stick style in for good measure. English architecture is also reflected with half timber, projecting gables, Eastlake influence, Queen Anne and Edwardian styles. The detail photos of these buildings reflect the painstaking craftsmanship of the builders and imaginative design abilities of the architects. It is truly a tangible record of the past which should be preserved as close to its original state as practical, in their new role of many being converted for multi-family use.

The Crescent Area Historic District is one of the finest collections of suburban Victorian architecture in New Jersey. Developed as a speculative real estate venture in the 1870's by Job Male, the buildings are an impressive presentation of Italianate and Second Empire style architecture of the mid to late 19th century. The houses were primarily designed for wealthy businessmen and, consequently, visages within the district still retain a fine elegance in their total ambiance of buildings and their association with landscaping, rustic streets, sidewalks, and trees.

References
Blumenson, John J.G. Identifying American Architecture
Central New Jersey Times, 1870-1885.
Clayton, W. Woodford. History of Union & Middlesex Counties, 1882.
Cochran, Jean Carter. The History of Crescent Avenue Church
The Courier News, History of Plainfield, 1964.
The Courier News, November 1-4-8, 1954.
Devlin, Harry. To Grandfather's House We Go.
Downey, Andrew Jackson. The Architecture of Country Houses.
The Drake House Museum & The Plainfield Public Library, Scrapbooks and Files.
Dunham, F.A. Atlas City of Plainfield and Boro of North Plainfield, 1894.
Fitzgerald & Co. (Pub.). Springfield, Massachusetts, Plainfield City Directory, 1876-7.
Gowans, Alan. Images of American Living.
Honeyman, A. Van Dorn. History of Union County, Volumes I, II, & III.
Lapsley, Howard G. History of Plainfield, 1942.
League of Women Voters. This is Plainfield, 1954.
McCabe, Wayne. Historic Tour – Plainfield, N.J.
Plainfield Area Chamber of Commerce, Plainfield Area, N.J.
Pub. by Plainfield Courier News. Plainfield & Vicinity in Pictures, 1926.
Plainfield Daily Press, Friday & Saturday, January 30, 31, 1891.
Plainfield Evening News, Saturday, May 23, 1888.
Plainfield & North Plainfield City Directory, 1879-80.
Plainfield & North Plainfield City Directory, 1894-5.
Pratt, Dorothy & Richard, A Guide to Early American Homes.
Smiley, F.T. History of Plainfield, 1891.
Charles H. Detwiller, Jr., A.I.A., Architect and Marilyn Rupp, Architectural Historian, Crescent Area Historic District, Union County, New Jersey, nomination document, 1979, National Park Service, National Register of Historic Places, Washington, D.C.

Crescent Avenue Historic District

Crescent Area Historic District

Post Office: Plainfiled
Zip: 07060

WHAT'S NEAR
Hillside Avenue Historic District
Van Wyck Brooks Historic District

The Crescent Area Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. Portions of the text below were adapted from a copy of the original nomination document. [] Adaptation copyright 2013, The Gombach Group.

Prior to the arrival of the white man, the Lenni-Lenape Indians, part of the Algonquin Tribe, lived in this area of New Jersey. The Ice Age had endowed this area with a protective terrain, productive farmlands and forests and "wonderful pure air and springs." Indian trails became the highways and streets still in use in Plainfield today.Watchung Avenue located in the heart of the Crescent Area Historic District was once one of those trails. Remains of an Indian village and burial grounds have been found in the locality of First, Second and Third Place which are within the boundaries of the Crescent Avenue Historic District.

The first white settlers from Scotland and Holland arrived in the area in the 1680's. The first permanent settler was Thomas Gordon whose home was on Cedarbrook Road adjacent to Crescent Avenue, and whose land holdings covered most of what is present-day Plainfield. The enthusiastic letters back home detailing the healthful climate, plentiful game, fish and fowl, good soil and water brought other settlers to New Jersey, in spite of the "Flee by the salt marshes, most troublesome in the summer." These elements continued through the years to attract new residents.

During the Revolutionary War, patriots from area families served in militia regiments as foot soldiers and officers. An important battle, the Battle of the Short Hills, was fought in the area in June of 1777 and was instrumental in repelling the British in New Jersey. Some of the homes of those who supported the cause of the Revolution still exist today: The Drake House Museum, where Washington rested and briefed his officers, and the Vermule Homestead, where the officers were quartered.
Following the war, industry and transportation began to grow and take on added importance, contributing to the economic prosperity. Plainfield became officially recognized on April 1, 1800 with a population of 215. The Gordon Gazetteer in 1834 gave a glowing account of all the rich resources in Plainfield and noted that "the society is moral and religious."

It was in Plainfield in 1847 that the model for the public school system for the state was devised. Through the efforts of Dr. Charles H. Stillman, Plainfield physician, the New Jersey Legislature empowered the city to raise money by taxation in order to establish a public school system. An account of the day declares, "No one can measure the effect of this enlightened policy in extending the fame of the city and building up its prosperity." Many of the people who were active in education and cultural activities lived within the bounds of the Crescent Area Historic District.

The most influential force to the development of Plainfield was the railroad, which brought about a change in the social and economic character of the town. When a direct connection was made between Plainfield and New York City, c.1850, Plainfield became a commuter town.

During the Civil War, many local residents were involved in the fighting. General Sterling, a general on McCleland's staff, built his home and settled on First Place after the War.

Job Male, a philanthropist, who became known as "Plainfield's Grand Old Man", settled in Plainfield in 1867, following the Civil War. An inventor, he had simplified the loading of ferry slips with a patented leveling device. He purchased with Evan Jones, twenty four acres of land "in the suburbs and laid it out in village lots and streets and erected twenty substantial residences of fine architectural design, drawing the plans for them all himself." He was his own contractor and owned a greater part of the land that includes Crescent Avenue and Watchung Avenue. He designed a particularly distinctive style of architecture "stucco-walled, Mansard roofed, still standing today." He continued to build homes in different parts of the city until his possessions included more than one hundred Plainfield houses. His obituary notice in 1891 noted that "his purse always ready to respond to the calls of deserving charity." He was a public benefactor, making possible the Public Library and the Job Male Art Gallery, and donating the land for the hospital, the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church, and the Unitarian Church.

A Central New Jersey Times account in 1870 of "Our Town Improvements" wrote, "The improvements in building is the expression of a spirit that leads to progressive movements in other directions. The old houses are not recognizable with tints of brown and cream and olive, their plain roofs metamorphosed by pediments, fancy gables and cornices, their primitive simplicity converted into modern beauty by wings, bay windows, recessed projections and every variety of architectural development." The writer further comments on the "new houses, with their aspiring towers, French roofs and cupolas." It was the kind of community that led the Elizabeth Herald in May of 1888 to write, "The bustling activity of the city of Plainfield...is remarkable." And to conclude, "The next move in Plainfield, no doubt, will be the horse cars."
Plainfield had become a fashionable summer resort and eventually attracted many wealthy New York businessmen to settle here year 'round. The Gas Light Age evokes memories of Plainfield with theatricals, minstrel shows, roller rinks and other forms of entertainment. The site of many hotels, the Netherwood was reputed to be one of the "most healthful, comfortable and accessible inland summer resorts in the country."

By 1890, with substantial wealth and improvements, Plainfield continued to advance and prosper, attracting people of substance to live here. As successful businessmen and their families settled in the Crescent Avenue area, they became active in the cultural, religious, and educational affairs of the city. James W. Jackson, William D. Murray both served as presidents of the newly-formed YMCA. Henry C. Squires established the Hope Chapel on January 1, 1888 as a branch of the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church. Augustus Baldwin worked closely with Job Male in establishing the first free public library and the art gallery. In 1883 some of the first subscribers to "the last word in modern efficiency," the telephone, lived in the District: George Goddard, F.O. Herring, Leander Lovell, and the Dumond family. Many served as members of the Common Council.

After Job Male's death, Plainfield continued to be a highly desirable neighborhood and remained that way until the 1930's, when many of the large homes were converted to apartments. This process continues with single family residences almost non-existent today. The alterations for the most part are tastefully done and are not detrimental to the basic style and charm of the original building. This makes for a particularly fine collection of buildings appropriate to an Historic District.
Notes on Recollections of Long-time Residents of the Area
Longtime residents of Plainfield have been interviewed regarding their recollections of famous residents of this area. Those persons interviewed were Mrs. Lawrence Heely, Mrs. Henry Noss, Mrs. Dorothy Wills, Mrs. Helen Mygatt, Mr. John Harmon, Miss Gwen Cochran, Mrs. Dorothy DeHart, Miss Dorothy Leal, Mr. Alfred Genung, Mr. Alex Kroll, Mr. A.L.C. Marsh, Mrs. Hendrick Van Oss and others.

Many people have lived there who were outstanding in cultural fields, education and politics, as well as very successful professional and business men, active both locally and in New York City. Also educators and statesmen lived here.

John Carlson, a renown artist and member of the National Academy lived on 3rd Place as did Alex Seidel who achieved international fame for his designs for Steuben Glass. Another prominent artist who lived here was Thomas Hart Benton whose brother lived for many years on Crescent Avenue. Also William Gilbert, a well known illustrator, lived on Crescent Avenue.

The author of the White Cliffs of Dover, Alice Duer Miller, A. Van Dorn Honeyman, the famous historian, lived on 9th Street, and also Van Wyk Brooks another well-known author. Ernest Ackerman, a representative in U.S. Congress in the 1870's and his brother Marion Ackerman, who lived on Crescent Avenue, founded the Lone Star Cement Company and were deeply involved in many large national important financial and industrial enterprises.

The famous opera singer, Mario Caruso, married a Goddard and was frequently a visitor to Plainfield to the Goddard House at 213 East 9th Street. This family had a profound influence on the musical advancement of the entire area.

The area abounded in lawyers, judges and politicians, including four Mayors of Plainfield, and people in the foreign service for 25 years, such as Hendrick Van Oss, most recently served as ambassador to Madagascar and other countries.

The Crescent Avenue area was truly the heart of the town and boasted the most important and influential people of the period 1860 through 1920. The homes of these people reflect their taste, affluence and are a tangible piece of architectural history reflecting a glorious past.

Summary
The Crescent Area Historic District is a great deal more than a lot of old houses. It is probably one of the finest collections of Victorian architecture in the country. The term Victorian is all inclusive and embraces numerous styles that echo tastes and decorative devices of other periods of architecture from other countries and other times than the one in which the present buildings were constructed. The majority of these have what in architectural terms is referred to as Italianate which stems from the architectural styles popular in Italy going back as far as Byzantine derivative styles, and 15th century Venetian palaces. These variety of design styles result in the sudden surge of interest in European cultures and an attempt by the suddenly successful and new class of wealthy businessmen who were anxious to reflect their success in the work of finance in their homes. These interests were stimulated by their travels abroad and what they had seen, which was considered elegant. Thus we have Tuscan towers, Italian villas, Palazzo's with loggia and arcaded window and arches, Renaissance, Egyptian motifs, classical elements, and finally the exuberant eclectic styles throwing the more American traits of Carpenter Gothic and Stick style in for good measure. English architecture is also reflected with half timber, projecting gables, Eastlake influence, Queen Anne and Edwardian styles. The detail photos of these buildings reflect the painstaking craftsmanship of the builders and imaginative design abilities of the architects. It is truly a tangible record of the past which should be preserved as close to its original state as practical, in their new role of many being converted for multi-family use.

The Crescent Area Historic District is one of the finest collections of suburban Victorian architecture in New Jersey. Developed as a speculative real estate venture in the 1870's by Job Male, the buildings are an impressive presentation of Italianate and Second Empire style architecture of the mid to late 19th century. The houses were primarily designed for wealthy businessmen and, consequently, visages within the district still retain a fine elegance in their total ambiance of buildings and their association with landscaping, rustic streets, sidewalks, and trees.

References
Blumenson, John J.G. Identifying American Architecture
Central New Jersey Times, 1870-1885.
Clayton, W. Woodford. History of Union & Middlesex Counties, 1882.
Cochran, Jean Carter. The History of Crescent Avenue Church
The Courier News, History of Plainfield, 1964.
The Courier News, November 1-4-8, 1954.
Devlin, Harry. To Grandfather's House We Go.
Downey, Andrew Jackson. The Architecture of Country Houses.
The Drake House Museum & The Plainfield Public Library, Scrapbooks and Files.
Dunham, F.A. Atlas City of Plainfield and Boro of North Plainfield, 1894.
Fitzgerald & Co. (Pub.). Springfield, Massachusetts, Plainfield City Directory, 1876-7.
Gowans, Alan. Images of American Living.
Honeyman, A. Van Dorn. History of Union County, Volumes I, II, & III.
Lapsley, Howard G. History of Plainfield, 1942.
League of Women Voters. This is Plainfield, 1954.
McCabe, Wayne. Historic Tour – Plainfield, N.J.
Plainfield Area Chamber of Commerce, Plainfield Area, N.J.
Pub. by Plainfield Courier News. Plainfield & Vicinity in Pictures, 1926.
Plainfield Daily Press, Friday & Saturday, January 30, 31, 1891.
Plainfield Evening News, Saturday, May 23, 1888.
Plainfield & North Plainfield City Directory, 1879-80.
Plainfield & North Plainfield City Directory, 1894-5.
Pratt, Dorothy & Richard, A Guide to Early American Homes.
Smiley, F.T. History of Plainfield, 1891.
Charles H. Detwiller, Jr., A.I.A., Architect and Marilyn Rupp, Architectural Historian, Crescent Area Historic District, Union County, New Jersey, nomination document, 1979, National Park Service, National Register of Historic Places, Washington, D.C.

Crescent Avenue Historic District

Crescent Avenue Historic District form for the National Register of Historic Places

829 Park Avenue
c. 1890
In 1894, the home of James M. Middledith, "Broker, N.Y."

Projecting canopy head windows on the second story.
A building of a newer architectural style which supplanted the predominately Italianate in the rest of the area. It is not offensive to the spirit of the District and is a good example of the evolution in taste.

Crescent Avenue Historic District

Crescent Avenue Historic District form for the National Register of Historic Places

131 Crescent Avenue
c. 1880
Three car garage and gardener's cottage
In 1895, the home of E. B. Clark, "Insurance, N. Y."

One of the few surviving porte cocheres in the District. Abounds with Eastlake ornamentation in the gables and on the incised window heads and in the porch treatment with champered columns.

Seven apartments.

A most interesting house and of of the few and completely Eastlake influenced designs in the District, only slightly altered and posessing much style and interesting decorations.

Nov. 12, 1980

313 Franklin Place

Pinterest Page by current owner

1941 Courier-News Plainfield Merits Classification as 'City of Beautiful Trees'

November 30, 2013: Found in Barbara Tracy Sandford's memorabilia. Written by PGC Member Mrs. Garret Smith

"I call Plainfield the City of Beautiful Trees," and out-of-town visitor remarked to me the other day. "My business takes me to many towns about this size clear across the country. Trees, or their lack, always impress me most about a town. Beautiful building can't make up for the lack of them. Many towns seem to have choice trees only in one or two sections. Others have only a few tree-lined avenues. But every part of Plainfield has not only interesting individual trees, but long stretches of streets where treetops meet in green arches above the traffic. That doesn't just happen. This town must have been founded by tree-lovers."

The stranger was right, as many specimen trees on old private properties testify. They are trees that were rare and expensive when planted years ago. A number of well-to-do property owners appreciated trees and collected choice kinds. The street trees of about this age also show that far-sighted men planned to make the town keep growing more beautiful in ways that everyone enjoys.

Trees have always been essential to Plainfielders. In the early days elms stretched down North Ave. from east to the west city boundaries. Many still remain now 70 to 80 years old. That avenue helped to establish Plainfield's policy of "beautiful trees for every street."

Value Appreciated
The city's mayors and councilmen have appreciate the value of trees . . . Ginko . . . now ripening, in the edge of the station grounds, near the corner of the drug store.

Among its immediate neighbors, at this station are a Red Maple, Austrian Pine, English Elm, Horse Chestnut, several Magnolias and a Sycamore Maple, the latter near the middle of the grass oval. Purple Beech, White Pine and two Hemlocks stand at the west exit.

Lindens at Spot
On the North Ave. side of the station is an interesting clump of three Lindens – no two alike. Evergreens are represented by three Scotch Pines, an Austrian and a White Pine, and a tall, slender Spruce. In this little park are also Sugar Swamp and Silver Maples, and a clump of low-growing Beeches. Looking upward to the railroad level, one sees, besides the specimen Ginko mentioned, two Catalpas, a Weeping Mulberry, two Red Maples and an Austrian Pine. A big Pin Oak, two or three Scarlet Oaks, a . . . .

. . . boats glided over Green Brook and when Plainfield and New York social leaders came in big carriages, drawn by spanking teams, to garden musicals, gay dinners, dances and teas as the Johnston's guests.

All of Plainfield's school grounds are constantly growing more attractive. Environment of vines, trees, plants and shrubs awaken appreciation of Nature's beauty that is a lifelong source of pleasure.

Hubbard School, one of the city's architectural gems, has always been regarded as in a class by itself. Its beauty is greatly enhanced by choice plant material on its ample grounds, partly framed by Barberry. Large specimen Japanese Yews arrest attention, along with Sourwoods, or "Lily-of-the-Valley Tree," whose branches bear long one-sided racemes of white flowers in summer and whose leaves are vivid scarlet in autumn.

White Pine, Cedar, Pfitzer Junipers are shadowy evergreen foils for airy bloom of Weeping Japanese . . .

Among them are the old Elms in North Ave., mentioned before; London Planes from Watchung Ave. to Terrill Rd.; Ash in St. Mary's Ave.; Pin Oaks and Planes in Park Ave.; Sycamore Maples in Bellevue Ave.; Norway Maples in both Leland and Monroe Ave. sections. Tulip trees now grow in Central St., along Maxon School grounds, and Ginkos in Landsdowne Terr. In Cleveland Ave., near Grace Church, the lacy foliage of the decorative Mountain Ash, or Rowan Tree, contrasts at this season with bunches of bright hollylike berries. Many years ago the late Simeon Cruikshank planted Buckeyes along his corner property ["Sacmoore" 831 Belvidere] at Belvidere and Watchung Aves. Much smaller than familiar Horse Chestnut and with brighter pink flower-spikes they have always been greatly admired. In autumn the brilliant, scarlet, star-shape leaves of Liquid-ambar, or Sweetgum, glorifies a patch of Ravine Rd. After a shower, or if bruised, the foliage is fragrant. Corky bark and thorny-skinned fruit like little apples, complete this tree's unique characteristics.

Close to 150 trees, of many species, are part of the Muhlenberg Hospital landscape. The long front path beneath the Maples, and on the west the wide Elm-bordered stretch of green lawn leading to a quiet pool, with its amusing little bronze fountain figure, form two vistas of ever-increasing charm. Wide borders of intermingling trees and flowering shrubs frame the property.

The purple leaves of the two Schwedler Maples attract much attention in the spring. So do the Apple trees and Dogwoods that trim the grounds like big bouquets, set off by Hemlocks, Spruce and Pine. Chinese Dogwoods, given by graduate nurses, are especially prized. Devoted interest of the late Marie Louis, nature-lover and for years superintendent of Muhlenberg, helped turn once common-plant "grounds" into a tree-shaded garden spot both restful and diverting.

Dogwood Favorites
Native Dogwoods are favorites among the city's flowering trees. The Plainfield Garden Club, on its own recent 25th birthday, gave small grove of these "Jewels of the Forest" to Cedar Brook Park. On the T. H. Van Bosckerck grounds on Prospect Ave. is the handsome large group of Dogwoods on private property in town. On Dr. Elmer Weigel's lawn on Belvidere Ave [630 Belivdere – see Mrs. Joost]. Chinese Dogwood bears much larger and later blooms. Directly across the street from this, and close to the sidewalk, a low-growing Witch Hazel (Hamanelis) bears yellow Forsythia-like flowers in winter.

Before the Talmadge dwelling [714 Belvidere], in the the same street, are majestic Copper Beeches. In early days Beeches were popular selections for large grounds. Probably the finest Weeping Beech in the city grows in deserted grounds in Central Ave. Nearby on the Witon property is a huge Purple Beech – both almost perfect. Farther down the avenue, on Wardlaw School grounds [1030 Central Avenue - see Below], is a fine old Ginko.

The only Katsura Tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum) in Plainfield is owned by former Mayor Leighton Calkins [929 Madison – see Below]. Its strange trunk and heart-shaped leaves, purplish when young, are unusual. It grows in front of the house in Madison Ave.

Unique among Plainfield trees is a native Orange of the South. it is today laden with velvety, green fruit in Mrs. Howard Tracy's Prospect Ave. garden [1331 Prospect Ave]. Probably nowhere else in this region can one be found, according to Shade Tree Commissioner Lithgow Hunter. Sent north from Maryville College in Tennessee 50 years ago. . . .

. . . residents seeking permanent homes. These officials have always planned with the Shade Tree Commission since its organization, so that every year more trees come marching in. Some fill vacancies in the ranks of old trees along old streets. Others shade tireless blocks in new sections of town.

For the last 17 years, one man, Sidney Durant, the Shade Tree Commission's expert supervisor of trees, has directed its work. it includes feeding, pruning, watering and repairing the city's 25,000 street trees, as well removal of dead or too-badly-injured trees and planting new ones. For nearly 20 years Thomas F. Hylan has served on the commission, of which he is now president.

Of all the city's trees, the strange Ginko, or Maiden-hair tree, grows to a height of 80 feet or so. The delicacy of its little leaves, resembling those of the Maiden-Hair fern, contrast sharply with the arrow-straight upswept branches of what is considered one of the most beautiful and unusual of all hardy exotic trees. The Ginko's origin is a mystery. Nowhere on earth is it been found wild, yet fossils prove it was once scattered all over the world. Nothing else today resembles the Ginko, so paleontologists reason that some series of misfortunes destroyed all missing links. Today's closest relative is the Yew family, thought at a glance they appear as unrelated as a Chines and a New England Yankee.

Planted Near Temples
Early explorers found Ginkos planted around Chinese and Japanese temples. The Chinese called in Yin-Hing – "Silver Apricot" – referring to the greenish-yellow, fleshy fruit having a single stone. This fruit, slightly roasted, was served throughout the formal Chinese dinners which lasted all day. Guests nibble the finlike fruit between courses as an aid to digestion.

The Ginko did not reach England until 1754. The first specimen in this country was planted in Woodlands Cemetery, Philadelphia. In 1889 the Ginko fruited for the first time there on the grounds of Charles Wister. fifty years ago these newcomers to America were not only scarce, but expensive. That Plainfield has so many beautiful old specimens of these trees is possibly due to the fact that John Taylor Johnston, then president of the New Jersey Central Railroad and a resident of this city, was not only a patron of the arts, but a lover of trees. Each of Plainfield's railroad station grounds had not only fine specimens of the Ginko, but also a varied collection of other trees, evidently selected by an expert.

Netherwood, nearest the Johnston home [see Below], was especially favored. Here, beside the north track, stands a regal Ginko, carefully located as an artist would plan his canvas, so that its top is etched against the sky. This emphasizes the beauty of leaf and branch and trunk as viewed from the eastbound station platform. ?? may see a younger . . .

. . . White Oak and Elms are among the trees fringing the western boundary.

"The property as a whole is a remarkable small arboretum," said a well-known visiting tree scientist recently, after inspecting the Netherwood station park. "In my travels I've seen no other railroad station grounds with such a variety of trees. This landscaping, too, I can see was done by an expert."

In employing such an expert to beautify the railroad property in his home town, Mr. Johnston was carrying out the spirit of the statement he made at the time the Metropolitan Museum of New York City was founded at his Fifth Ave. mansion. He was quoted as saying:

"The public ought to have a chance to see, to hear and to know more about whatever feeds the mind and is inspiring, if we are to have the best kind in America."

To even a novice in landscaping, the Netherwood station grounds show that underlying motive. One could not imagine either the south or north oval either diminished of enlarged – so true is their scale. It would be hard to find more beautiful flowering trees than those Magnolias; or more intriguing contrast of leaf, branch and trunk than offered by the Ginko and the Pine. On the north side the clump of Lindens, combined with an apparently outcropping "pudding stone," make a "garden composition" that suggest to the home gardener similar effective arrangements, though not necessarily identical in material.

Beautiful Estate
Some old residents recall that Mr. Johnston's estate in E. Front St. was lavishly beautified with choice trees, as were those of most of his neighbors along that splendid avenue of that day. Some of those estates are still being kept up as homes of their owners today, while others have been divided into beautiful setting for developments of small homes.

The Johnston estate, however, furnished the basis of another public development of beauty spots. A portion of it became the site of the new Barlow School [see Below]. These school grounds are said to be unequaled in the state in the variety and placement of superb trees. What some consider the finest Weeping Beech in town grows here, also two majestic evergreens, one a White Pine, the other a Spruce. Elm, Ginko, Cucumber tree, Ash, "Button Ball," Willow and Sugar Maple are also outstanding.

Two of the most interesting, although not the most conspicuous of the group, are a true English Oak (Quercus Robur) and a Yellow Wood (Cladrastis lute). The first has smallish leaves, thick-set upon the branch. A strange characteristic is that the stem adheres to the side of the acorn. The writer knows of only one other English Oak in town – Central Ave., near Stelle Ave.

The Yellow Wood has wisteria-like racemes of white fragrant flowers in midsummer. Leaves resemble the locust. Another fine specimen grows on the property of Miss Laura Detwiller in Hillside Ave.

All were here in the days . . . .

. . . when Cherry, Dogwood and Crab. In early spring the large leathery-leaved evergreen Japanese Andromeda (Pieris) unfold delicate, coppery leaves and waxy white racemes of tiny flowers. These are classified as shrubs, but on these favorable grounds, are almost small trees of exceptional beauty.

Preservation is Theme
The good judgement of George R. Zimmer, who for many years has supervised Plainfield's school grounds, is shown not only in what has already been accomplished, but in developments being planned. "What can we preserve?" not "What can we cut down?" is his motto. Before clearing the recently purchased grounds adjoining Maxon School was begun this summer, Mr. Zimmer marked every large and small tree that "might some day be of use somewhere." Workmen were warned to cut not one of these.

The City Police Headquarters and also the old Public Library have a setting of trees. The little Library Park is said to have been reserved from farmland whose native trees – mostly, Red, White and Black Oaks – were left standing. Across the facade of Fire Headquarters are a Ginko, a London Plane and Horse Chestnut – each an unusually fine specimen. Among Netherwood firemen are enthusiastic gardeners. Each spring many of Plainfield's 3,000 commuters take great interest in "what the boys are doing to their grounds." Everything planted seems to do well, even the peonies, marking the line between the firemen's parklike grounds and the railroad cinder-bed.

On spacious City Hall grounds is not only a variety of evergreens, but also of deciduous trees, selected for beauty of form, leaf or flower. Two Cryptomeria, "Aristocrats of Evergreens," donated recently by Plainfield's near-centenarian, Miss Isabel Tweedy, and a tall Himalayan Pine in town was brought here by the late Harry K. Tetsuka, to adorn his well-known Japanese garden in Belvidere Ave [556 Belvidere].

The Holly tree on City Hall grounds is another tree found on but few properties. It was donated by Herbert Moody [see Below], when The Courier-news gift of 5,000 bulbs roused a widespread interest in more beautiful grounds, in keeping with the architectural beauty of the building. Evergreens were given immediately by former Mayor Marion F. Ackerman, and a Dogwood by Thomas F. Hylan, whose keen interest in the property extends back to 25 years ago, when, as Councilman, he served on the City Hall Building Committee. This season former Councilman Orville G. Waring, son of the late Mayor Waring, donated several valuable Pfitzer Junipers.

Not Monotonous
Many species of trees planted along our city streets make green lanes that are not monotonous.

. . . . stood for most of that time in this sheltered nook. The fruits, when ripe, are decorative, but not edible. Edible oranges grown only on grafted stock. The thorny branches of this small tree resemble Osage Orange, or "Indian Bow-wood."

Figs are also ripening now in Plainfield. Within a stone's throw of Netherwood station is Watson Ave. It is only three blocks long and from spring to fall it glows with flowers. In one little garden grows a carefully tended Fig tree that bears fruit yearly. Each fall the owner buries his Fig tree in a deep trench well below the frost-line. Each spring it is dug out and reset.

One great wide-spreading Mulberry (Morus Multicaulus) towers far above the roof-top of Leslie R. Fort's home in Cedarbrook Rd. This venerable tree is the historic survivor of a Mulberry plantation, established during the "Multicaulus Mania," by the late Senator Martine [11 Brook Lane, see Below], as a venture to yield gigantic profits on his farm that included the Cedar Brook tract. He believed with others that New Jersey would be one of the world's silk-growing centers. Convinced that silk was to take the place of cotton, New Jersey farmers set out thousands of acres of "silk-worm mulberries" about 100 years ago, only to cut down the trees when the bubble burst.

One of the most varied private collection of trees in the city is that of Miss Jessie D. Munger in Prospect Ave. In recent years instructors at Rutgers University have brought students to these grounds to study the trees and other plant material as well as the garden design. Last spring the general public enjoyed the same privilege.

Love of trees is part of the tradition that has helped mould Plainfield into a city of pleasant homes on quiet streets. The late Jonas Lie, one of our city's most distinguished citizens, sensed this characteristic of our community. In the Common Council Chamber at City Hall hangs his gift – a mountain woodland scene, interpreted by his illustrious brush as an inspiring message to us all.

To learn more about the history of some of the people and places mentioned in this article, visit these links:

[Maxson School]
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Elizabeth B. Atwood) '15

[630 Belvidere]
Joost, Mrs. Sherman Brownell (Marie Murray) '19

[714 Belvidere]
Dunbar, Mrs. William Kuhn '17
Rock, Mrs. Robert B. '43
Runkle, Mrs. Harry Godley (Jennie Fitz Randolph) '15
Whitehead, Mrs. James Harold (Jean Fitz-Randolph Heiberg) '43

[1030 Central Avenue – duCret School]
Huntington, Mrs. Howard (Agnes Fales Strong) '19
McGee, Mrs. Walter Miller (Mary Alice Yerkes) '22
Zerega, Miss Bertha Virginia '23

[929 Madison Avenue]
Ackerman, Mrs. Marion S.(Sarah M. Wills) '35

[Johnston Estate on Front Street & Netherwood]
Mali, Mrs. Pierre (Frances Johnston) '18

[Barlow School East front Street – former estate of "Blojocamavi" owned by Lewis V. Fitz Randolph/Johnston estate]
Barlow, Mrs. Carlton Montague (June Simms) '70
Barlow, Mrs. DeWitt Dukes (Mary Lee Brewer), Jr. '65
Dunbar, Mrs. William K., Jr. (Elizabeth or "Libby" Hail Barlow) '47
Perkins, Mrs. Seymour, Jr. (Esther Moody Barlow) '49
(Also see Mrs. Runkle and Mrs. Whitehead above)

[City Hall]
Moody, Mrs. George T. '22
Perkins, Mrs. Seymour, Jr. (Esther Moody Barlow) '49

[11 Brook Lane, Martine House]
MacLeod, Mrs. Robert F. (Carolyn Waring) '55

1941 Courier-News Plainfield Merits Classification as 'City of Beautiful Trees'

1941 Courier-News Plainfield Merits Classification as 'City of Beautiful Trees'

Plainfield Library Bio Card

Monday Afternoon Club Membership