Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Newberry, Mrs. Charles Todd (Euphemia King Brower), Jr. '46

1946 - 1947 Treasurer Book: Listed under "Juniors" Mrs. C. T. Newberry Jr. June 11 - 46 and then again May 15, 1947

1947 - 1953 Treasurer Book: Listed under "Junior Members" Newberry, Mrs. Charles L. June 4

Mrs. Charles Todd Newberry, Jr. is the same as Mrs. E. B. Newberry Mrs. E. B. Newberry '54

Later, Mrs. Newberry remarries: Mrs. Frank Gregg (Peggy) Burger '54

Email Exchange with Sally Genung Booth

Yes on both counts...her son was (is?) Terry Newberry a Presbyterian minister and a classmate of Carter's at Brown. He assisted at our wedding. We have lost touch..She was Mrs.Thomas Mann's sister (I can't remember her first name for the minute.) She was the Aunt of that guy who I think was Tom (Tommy) Man who came to the garden with the ashes. Her first husband was a Newberry of the Newberry 5 and 10 cent stores. She grew up in the brick house on Charlotte Road. If I think of anything else of interest I'll let you know.
xoxo S.
––Original Message––
From: skf729 <skf729@aol.com>
To: absheps <absheps@aol.com>; SBooth1954 <SBooth1954@aol.com>
Sent: Thu, Sep 15, 2011 10:17 am
Subject: Question

Did either of you know Peggy Burger? Was her maiden name "Brower" by chance? Thanks – Susan

Newberry Five and Dime

.J. Newberry's was an American five and dime store chain in the twentieth century. It was founded in Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, USA, in 1911 by John Josiah Newberry (September 26, 1877 - March 6, 1954). J.J. Newberry had learned the variety store business by working at S.H. Kress stores for 12 years between 1899 and 1911, after having worked for department store Fowler, Dick, and Walker for five years. There were 7 stores in the chain by 1918.

A 1988 photo of a Newberry's store in Portland, Oregon

Newberry Five and Dime

The company was a family business. J.J. Newberry was joined in management by his brothers C.T. Newberry and Edgar A. Newberry in 1919, at which time there were 17 stores with yearly sales of $500,000.

Over the years, the Newberry chain acquired other stores including Hested in Wyoming, North Dakota, Colorado, and Nebraska, and Lee Stores in South Dakota, Minnesota, and Iowa. At the time of founder J.J. Newberry's death (1954), the chain had 475 stores. By 1961 the company operated 565 stores with total yearly sales of $291,000,000. The chain also operated a larger department store called Britt's Department Store.

The Newberry chain was ultimately purchased by McCrory Stores, and then folded slowly as McCrory's downsized [1] and eventually entered bankruptcy. [2] 300 stores closed in 1997, but some lingered on, with at least one closing as late as 2001. [3]

Early J.J. Newberry stores featured a recognizable logo composed of gold serif letters on a red background [1], [2] that usually occupied the entire width of the store. Later stores featured a cursive 1960s modern logo style, dropping the "J.J." altogether.

Poet Donald Hall wrote a poem, "Beans and Franks", about the closing of a J.J. Newberry store in Franklin, New Hampshire.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J.J._Newberry

.J. Newberry's was an American five and dime store chain in the twentieth century. It was founded in Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, USA, in 1911 by John Josiah Newberry (September 26, 1877 - March 6, 1954). J.J. Newberry had learned the variety store business by working at S.H. Kress stores for 12 years between 1899 and 1911, after having worked for department store Fowler, Dick, and Walker for five years. There were 7 stores in the chain by 1918.

The company was a family business. J.J. Newberry was joined in management by his brothers C.T. Newberry and Edgar A. Newberry in 1919, at which time there were 17 stores with yearly sales of $500,000.

Over the years, the Newberry chain acquired other stores including Hested in Wyoming, North Dakota, Colorado, and Nebraska, and Lee Stores in South Dakota, Minnesota, and Iowa. At the time of founder J.J. Newberry's death (1954), the chain had 475 stores. By 1961 the company operated 565 stores with total yearly sales of $291,000,000. The chain also operated a larger department store called Britt's Department Store.

The Newberry chain was ultimately purchased by McCrory Stores, and then folded slowly as McCrory's downsized[1] and eventually entered bankruptcy.[2] 300 stores closed in 1997, but some lingered on, with at least one closing as late as 2001.[3]

Early J.J. Newberry stores featured a recognizable logo composed of gold serif letters on a red background [1], [2] that usually occupied the entire width of the store. Later stores featured a cursive 1960s modern logo style, dropping the "J.J." altogether.

Poet Donald Hall wrote a poem, "Beans and Franks", about the closing of a J.J. Newberry store in Franklin, New Hampshire.

J. J. Newberry: A Euology

http://www.wweek.com/portland/article-238-j_j_newberry_a_eulogy.html

Though no one seems to know exactly when, the Lloyd Center J.J. Newberry, Portland's last honest-to-goodness five-and-dime, will close its doors soon. Mr. Biehl, a veteran store employee who has worked for both Newberry and the F.W. Woolworth Co. for more than 20 years, says details of the store's closure are a mystery–even to him.

"They're not too free with the information," said Mr. Biehl, "and they just shipped in a bunch of stuff from 10 other stores."

The SALE signs on the windows have gone from 20 to 50 percent off, and we can guess what's next: The 70-percent-off free-for-all.

Newberry's demise has been long and lingering. Its parent company, McCrory Corp., closed 300 Newberry stores in 1997. One by one, the remaining outposts have shuttered their doors on hometown main streets across the land, like Portland's beloved downtown Newberry (1927-1996). Only a combination of mall proximity and inertia could've kept the Lloyd Center shop going this long (it opened in 1960).

So what does one find at Newberry? Ladies' foundations, cocoa butter, keychains, hangers, plastic pill sorters, weed killer, hairbrushes, ankle socks–the essential sundries of modern life on a limited budget. Plus, things you couldn't possibly need to put on your shopping list–a can-opener cozy, garlic shampoo, CD-shaped potpourri sachets. All in all, the inside of a five-and-dime is a puzzling and (sort of) sweet collage of American desire. It has always been the home of the impulse buy, the modest trinket, the afternoon errand for a spool of thread and a box of popcorn. And when Newberry goes, so will small-scale shopping.

But enough hearts and roses, let's dig into Newberry's inky heart. Should we mourn the loss of the old-time discount store? It may have been starved into extinction by the likes of Wal-Mart and Target, but five and dimes were the Wal-Marts of their day. They paved the way for the convenience-besotted, junk-enamored culture we now know so well. Sure, the inventory of your average Newberry rarely topped 1,000 items (compared to Wal-Mart's 50,000-plus), but they did tend to knit themselves into the fabric of downtown (while Wal-Marts prefer to set up shop on the outskirts).

Still, most of what Newberry sold was, well...crap. Soap and talcum gift sets, toys and pulp paperbacks, calico remnants, flimsy greeting cards. Asking "Did you get that at Newberry's?" was a derisive appraisal, somewhere along the lines of Kmart's "Blue Light Special." So wherefore the affection for the five-and-dime? Maybe America waxes nostalgic about Woolworth and Newberry because those were the first places a kid could walk into, allowance in hand, and walk out with a toy train or a training bra on her own. Reminisce about your first assertion of independent buying power. Didn't it happen at a Payless or a Newberry?

Mr. Biehl says the Newberry closedown sale has gone largely unpublicized because the store can't afford ad rates in local publications. And on the weekday afternoon I visited, customers were sparse, mostly lone lurkers sifting passionlessly through hilariously misprinted T-shirts ($2) and bottles of Dreams by Tabu ($8.95). There were some finds: bright-hued umbrellas for $2.50, knit gloves for $1.50, and sweaters with Dr. Seuss flaws (too-long sleeves, or one longer than the other).

Ultimately, Newberry is not junk of the lowest order. Junk of the lowest order is yet to come. According to Mr. Biehl, McCrory Corporation plans to reopen it as a Dollar Zone Store. "Same kind of thing, then?" I asked. "No," Biehl corrected. "We've got things in here that go for more than a dollar." The thought of Newberry's inventory being replaced by even chintzier, more disposable merchandise depressed me so much that I purchased steak-shaped vinyl dog toys (50 cents) and day-glo fishing tackle ($1.69), just to grab onto the last evidence of a higher standard. I wish I could have done more, but not even nostalgia makes some of this stuff buyable. As one elderly customer remarked to the checker (with regret in her voice?), "Well, you have a lot of interesting things in here, but I don't know whether I would use any of them."

––––––––––––––––––––––
The employee I quote, "Mr. Biehl," wanted to be known as Mr. Biehl. He introduced himself as Mr. Biehl. His name tag said Mr. Biehl.

John Josiah Newberry

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/NEWBERRY/1999-10/0940906998

From: <BobNewbury@aol.com>
Subject: [NEWBERRY-L] John Josiah Newberry
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1999 23:03:18 EDT


With the risk of repeating already published info, some may find the
following of some interest.The text below comes from a photocopy of what appears to be a newspaper article with a photograph of John Josiah Newberry and a photo of a store-front with a 1950-ish car parked in front. The store is named "J.J. Newberry Co. 5-10-25c Store":

"Born in Sunbury, PA, September 26, 1877, Newberry was educated in the public schools. His first job was as a messenger for the Pennsylvania Railroad in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. In 1894 he went to work for a department store, Fowler, Dick and Walker.

In 1899 he joined S. H. Kress and Company and, after twelve years with the company, occupied a buyer's desk.

He resigned due to illness, and on December 26, 1911, opened the first J.J. Newberry Store in Stroudsburg, Pa.

J.J. Newberry served as buyer, manager, floor-walker, salesclerk, and
stockman in his first store, a single-minded dedication to duty that produced profits to finance the opening of a second store after just a year and a half of operation. By 1918, he was operating seven stores.

During the same period his brother, C.T. Newberry, was superindendent of buyers with F.W. Woolworth Company.

In 1919 the brothers joined forces in the Newberry stores. A third brother, Edgar A. Newberry joined the company as a stock clerk in Shamokin, Pa. in the same year, following his discharge from the U.S. Army. By the end of 1919 there were 17 stores in the chain with annual sales of $500,000.

The company was incorporated in 1923. Acquisitions included the Hested stores in Wyoming, North Dakota, Colorado, and Nebraska, and Lee Stores in South Dakota, Minnesota and Iowa. On the death of C.T. Newberry in 1939, J.J. Newberry became chairman of the board and his younger brother Edgar assumed the presidency, a post he retained until 1953 when he, in turn, advanced to the chairmanship.

By 1961 the company was operating 565 stores with annual sales of
$291,000,000."

Reverend Mr. Charles T. Newberry, III

http://www.marionfirstchurch.org/Staff/tabid/61998/Default.aspx

The Reverend Mr. Charles T. Newberry, III - Interim Minister

Phone: (508) 748-2197
Email: pastor@marionfirstchurch.org

Graduate of Brown University with a B.A., 1962
Princeton Theological Seminary with a M. Div., 1969

Lt. US Naval Reserve (Active Duty 1962-1966)

Reverend Newberry has served churches in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts

Married to Barbara; father to daughter, Abigail

August 1, 1941 Lake Placid Club Notes

http://news2.nnyln.net/lake-placid-news/1941/lake-placid-news-1941-july-september%20-%200049.pdf

Euphemia King Brower 1935 Miss Porter's

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/1935-Miss-Porters-School-Yearbook-Farmington-CT-Photos-History-Literature-/261011150237

September 21, 2013 Email from Tom Mann

Hi,

I can provide some more info to whoever is working on the genealogy of past members for the history portion of your website... Mrs. H.W. Brower '38 was my grandmother and both my mother and aunt were members. Sally Genung Booth thought it might have been me spreading ashes in the Garden...but it wasn't!

September 21, 2013

ear Tom,

Thank you for writing in! Yes, that was quite a day at the garden with the auntie's ashes! Sally Genung Booth had remembered babysitting for the family and had made a guess. As you can imagine, that young man just wanted to get on with his duties and leave.

Yes, we would love any information you could share with us about your family members that were in the garden club. We have become a resource for so many of these Plainfield families. It is very difficult to trace and preserve women's history when all the women are known by their husbands' names. Sadly, we cannot even find first names for many much less maiden names.

Did you know Sally? Her email is XXX if you wish to contact her directly.

Hope to hear from you –

Susan Fraser
co-President

September 21, 2013


Hi Susan,

I wil be glad to share pictures, etc. with you and maybe clear up some questions.... for example, my aunt, Euphemia (Peggy) Newberry Burger is listed 3 times in your list of notables!

Yes, I knew Sally. Her Mom and Dad were great friends of my parents and yes, she certainly did babysit for me! I think she went to Hartridge and was a few years younger than my sister.

Whoever did the research for your site did a fabulous job. I would like to contact that person or people because there was an old family manuscript that my mother and aunt had transcribed in the early 70's which is great but I have not been able to find the original manuscript in any of the family "treasure troves" – it is listed in the genealogy info for my grandmother and transcriptions are listed as being in the Plainfield Public Library which is good. I am trying to find the original to try to get it into a museum in Pittsburgh because it was written by a woman who was the daughter of one of the early "industrialists" there. I have her diary that covers a few years of her life in the 1820's and it includes a recipe for "serum" for rattlesnake venum! Very cool and I plan to give it to the Pittsburgh museum (the Frick Art & History Center).

Anyway, thanks for connecting!

Tom

September 21, 2013

Hi Tom –

I did the whole website! It has taken me a long time – I literally just sort through the boxes we have from peoples' attics and basements and throw stuff up in these "member files." I have many more boxes to go. I would love to work with you – where to begin? Maybe tell me the three names I have Aunt Euphemia under – ha!

At the Plainfield Public Library are some of our archives and of course they have an entire genealogy department that I haven't even begun to crack. The person I work with there is Sarah Hull and she is terrific. To find that manuscript (which is fascinating) I would start with Sarah, tell her you are working with me, etc.

I will probably see Sally this week so I will be sure to let her know you wrote in. She is fantastic – a third generation member of the PGC. Susan

September 21, 2013


Susan,
You really have done great work sorting through all the stuff. Thank you!
In looking through the "notables" I or my parents knew most of them.
Tom


September 21, 2013

Take notes! The personal stories are the best. We are not really interested in who's husband worked at the Plainfield Trust, etc., etc. Susan

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

September 9, 2014 John James Audubon

September 9, 2014

Everyone might enjoy reading the NY Times article from the National Audubon Society. Can yo post this?

Thanks!
Kathy
PGC NAL Chairman and PGC co-Chair Conservation
GCA National Chair Founders Fund

––– Original message –––
From: Suzette Dewey
GCA Zone IV NAL and Conservation Rep
Garden Club of Somerset Hills
Date:09/09/2014 5:36 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Betse Gump ,Carrie Dyckman ,Diana Madsen ,Gwendolyn Wisely ,Joan White ,Kathleen Biggins ,Kathy Andrews ,Katy Kinsolving ,KV Dresdner ,Liz Silvernail ,Lynn Nebel ,Marit Robinson ,Mary Lewis ,Maureen Ogden ,Meryl Carmel ,Pam Mayer ,Susan Gordon
Subject:
FW: National Audubon Society scientific report

More good reading,

Dear Committees,
I was pleased to see that the much anticipated National Audubon Society scientific report was released yesterday. I woke up this morning to David Yarnold being interviewed on NPR about the science. Mr. Yarnold, President of the National Audubon Society, spoke to the delegates at 2014 NAL. He is quoted in a New York Times article today saying" birds are resilient, but that climate change will test their limits."

Hearing the songs of birds,
Lindsay

Climate Change Will Disrupt Half of North America's Bird Species, Study Says

Lindsay Marshall
GCA Chairman National Affairs and Legislation Committee
lindsaywmarshall@gmail.com
mobile: 404-234-1099

EDITOR'S NOTE: Do you know that Plainfield, and more specifically, the PGC has a special connection to THE John James Audubon? His niece was Mrs. Henry Wyckoff (Euphemia Bakewell) Brower '38. The Plainfield Library has three original Audubon prints. One was inherited from the Catherine Webster's famed Ladies Home of Plainfield – where one seemingly went to live in their dotage and many of our members were residents. The Library hasn't connected the dots that the print is probably not from the Webster family, but most likely from the Bakewell-Brower-Newberry-Mann clan (we have many members from this family on our roster) as Mrs. Brower lived at the now defunct Ladies Home of Plainfield at 313 Franklin Place.

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership