Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Loizeaux, Mrs. Charles E. (Elizabeth or "Betty" Manning Barr), Jr. '69

1946 - 1947 Treasurer Book: Listed under "Juniors" Mrs. Chas. Loizeaux Jr. Junior 11-4-46 May 14, 1947

1946- 1947 Treasurer Book, Active: Loizeaux, Mrs. Charles May 17, 1946 Her name is then crossed out.

1947 - 1948 Treasurer Book, Junior Members: Loizeaux, Mrs. Charles Jr. June 4, 1948 – her name is then crossed off

1970 Address: 169 Mt. Horeb Road, Warren NJ 07060

1975 Address: 845 East Avenue, Bay Head


Through her marriage to Charles Loizeaux,Jr., Betty was related to several other Plainfield Garden Club Members including Mrs. J. Harold (Marion Pratt Foster) Loizeaux '40; Mrs. Peter T. (Elisabeth K.) Loizeaux '78; and Mrs. Walter P. (Bernice Loizeaux) Swain, Jr. '86

Elizabeth Manning Barr Loizeaux was the daughter of Plainfield Garden Club Member Mrs. Raymond Van Vranken Miller, the former Mrs. Frank Seymour Barr. Mrs. V. V. Miller's maiden name was Helen Letitia Brewster.

Mayor Loizeaux's home on Westervelt and Brook Avenues

Mayor Charles Loizeaux was Betty Loizeaux's father-in-law. He served two terms as mayor Plainfield beginning in 1920.

From the Plainfield Library Archives
Charles Loizeaux

The Loizeaux gardens on Westervelt and Brook Avenues

Email from Elisabeth Loizeaux, February 15, 2011

Charles Loizeaux (my husbands uncle), was mayor of Plainfield from 1921 - 1924, apparently for one term. He then was a Republican State Senator from 1933 - 1941 for two terms, at some time he was the President of the NJ State Senate.

He married Berta R. Millar from Virginia, I believe in 1933. They lived on Westervelt and Brook Ave. If this Berta Loizeaux was a member of PGC, the photos of their garden make sense. Otherwise they seem unrelated to my mother-in-law's on-line album, (I have a feeling all these long deceased people are chuckling about our efforts to sort them out......)

Elisabeth

Email from Elisabeth Loizeaux, February 15, 2011

Hello again,

I now vaguely am starting to remember a Betty Loizeaux who sort of "left the scene" in Plainfield. Maybe Diana Madsen who spends sumers in Bay Head would know about Betty? - As you know I did not join the club until 1978. I can't remember ever seeing her at a meeting.

Her husband's sister, at the time called Elaine Greene, remarried after her husband's death, and I think still lives in Princeton.

My in-law's address was always 1600 Cooper Road. Marion Foster Loizeaux died in 1978.

I'm sorry I can't access the link you sent about Betty –- I get a message "access denied".

I just talked to my older sister-in-law, she can't remember anything about Betty either, but thinks her husband Charles is still living in Maine?

Elisabeth

September 29, 1948

Miss Barr Is Married
To C. E. Loizeaux Jr.
– –
Ate marriage of Miss Elizabeth
Manning Barr, daughter of Mrs.
Raymond Van Vranken Miller of
Plainfield, N. J., and of Frank
Seymour Barr of Sparta, N. J.,
to Charles Edward Loizeaux Jr.,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Loizeaux,
also of Plainf ield, i s taking place
today in the Crescent Avenue
Presbyterian Church in Plainfield.
The Rev. Dr. John J. Moment,
pastor of: the. church, Is
performing the ceremony, and a
reception will follow at the home
of the bride's parents.

Hillside Cemetery

September 14, 2011
Photo by S. Fraser

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

March 29, 2011 Westfield Leader

Teenage Tea Dance
Set for Tomorrow

Invitations have been sent to many teenager in the Plainfleld
area und surrounding communities for a spring tea dance to be held
tomorrow evening. This dance, which is being sponsored by the Junior League of Plainfteld, will be held at the Monday Afternoon Club in Piainfleld from 5 to 9 p.m. Supper will be served to all guests. Music for the dance will be supplied by "Ths Adelphia" from the Westfield High School. Chaperoning at the dance will be: Dr. and Mrs. Theodore. Loizeaux, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M, Miner, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Henderson, Mr. and Mrs. Asger P. Langlykke and Mr. and Mrs. Richard N. Sheble, all of Plainfield.

The chairman of the dance is Mrs. Theodore Loizeaux and working on her committee are: Mesdames John T. Moniani, Richard N. Sheble, Richard H. McMahon, Charles E. Loizeaux, James H. Darnhill and Asger F. Langlykke.

http://archive.wmlnj.org/TheWestfieldLeader/1962/1962-03-29/pg_0009.pdf

Residence of Jeremiah L. Manning, 1009 Kenyon Avenue

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

Residence of W. F. Manning, 807 West Seventh Street

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

September 29, 1945 The New York Sun

Miss Barr is Married to C. E. Loizeaux, Jr.

The marriage of Miss Elizabeth Manning Barr, daughter of Mrs. Raymond Van Vranken Miller of Plainfield, N.J., and Frank Seymour Barr of Sparta, N.J., to Charles Edward Louizeaux, also of Plainfield, is taking place today in the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church in Plainfield. The Rev. Dr. John J. Moment, pastor of the church, is performing the ceremony, and a reception will follow at the home of the bride's parents.

Email received May 13, 2013

name: Brian Manning Smith
email: montaukbrian@yahoo.com
phone: 214-559-7129

message:

I am the great grandson of Mary G. Manning (Born 1857, lived in Plainfield, died in Brooklyn 1938). In her will was written "bequeath to my nieces, ELIZABETH MANNING, MARGARET BAKER, and KATHARINE VALIANT, ......". I am trying to contact a current descendant of either Mrs. Baker or Mrs. Valiant to gather/confirm some family history. I wonder if one of your members could help me?


Barr, Mrs. Frank Seymour (Helen Letitia Brewster) '32
Barr, Mrs. W. Manning (Marjorie) '39
Valiant, Mrs. John (Katharine Drayton) '40
Baker, Mrs. Clifford Myron (Margaret Drayton) '32
Atterbury, Mrs. Albert Hoffmann (Emma H. Baker) '15
Baker, Mrs. John Whitney (Theodora Faber) '22
Loizeaux, Mrs. Charles E. (Elizabeth or "Betty" Manning Barr), Jr. '69


–––- Forwarded message –––-
From: <donotreply@andyswebtools.com>
Date: Mon, May 13, 2013 at 11:40 AM
Subject: New "Contact Us" submission from Brian Manning Smith
To: plainfieldgc@gmail.com


You've received a new submission from your "contact us" through your "Plainfield Garden Club" Andy's Web Tools web site.

name: Brian Manning Smith
email: montaukbrian@yahoo.com
phone:

message:

I am the great grandson of Mary G. Manning (Born 1857, lived in Plainfield, died in Brooklyn 1938). In her will was written "bequeath to my nieces, ELIZABETH MANNING, MARGARET BAKER, and KATHARINE VALIANT, ......". I am trying to contact a current descendant of either Mrs. Baker or Mrs. Valiant to gather/confirm some family history. I wonder if one of your members could help me?

1967 Acomb & Davis Art Exhibit at Swain's Gallery

http://csadams.com/begats.php

Sam, Harry and the Begats

All About the Harrigans, Adamses, Baileys and deMezas

By William B. deMeza

originally published 1982, Stowe, OH

HARRIGAN

There was a storybook touch to Patrick Harrigan's arrival in the United States in 1845 with his bride of a few weeks. Born in County Kerry, Ireland, Patrick was a carter. He was Catholic. Ellen Harvey, the girl he loved, was gentry. She was the daughter of a bishop of the Church of England. Their disparate backgrounds make it easy to imagine parental objections to any suggestion of their marriage and why Patrick and Ellen were unattached when they sailed together for New York. They were married at sea by the ship's master.

Patrick and Ellen were a part of one of history's great emigrations. The year they left home a blight wiped out the potato, Ireland's major food. There was famine. By the time it ended a few years later, a million Irish had died of disease or starvation and another 1.6 million had emigrated, most of them to the United States.

The Harrigans settled in Albany, N. Y. Their union solemnized by a priest, they became the parents of seven boys and two girls. Patrick and Ellen named their youngest Joseph (1858-1926). He was the smallest of the Harrigan boys, but he stood more than six feet tall when he married Emily Crowder (1862-1933).

She was an Albany girl, the daughter of John Crowder, a onetime yoeman in a British Guards regiment, and Elzena Van de Water, of Dutch ancestry. The young couple moved to New York City. Joseph worked as a drayman for W. and J. Sloan, the furniture house.

They settled on the West Side and began a peripatetic life style: They moved a lot, but never very far from the last place. And with each move, things got a little bit better. Lay out a map of New York City and you can cover most of the addresses with a five-cent piece. Among them was 66 Greenwich Avenue (over a liquor store); Sixth Avenue, just off Waverly Place; Charles Street and 343 West 15th Street. At the Charles Street and West 15th Street locations, the Harrigans took in borders and provided home-cooked meals for walk-ins.

There were four children, all born in Manhattan: Joseph and Eleanor, both of whom died in childhood; Emily ("Gram", 1888-1980) and Richard ("Uncle Dick", 1891-1957).

Emily helped with boarding house chores after school. She waited tables and carried pitchers of warm water and clean towels to guest's rooms.

At about the century's turn, the Harrigans left New York and moved to Plainfield, N.J., 25 miles away. It had to be a calculated move, one that Joseph believed would improve his family's lot, but an incident involving the Sloan family may have helped it along.

Some of the Sloans returned from a trip to Europe and Joseph was dispatched dockside to take care of the baggage. But first would Joseph kindly pocket and carry past the customs agent a few things the Sloans had picked up abroad?

We're not sure of the outcome, but we do know that it wasn't long before the Harrigans were settled in Plainfield's East End, a neighborhood of struggling first- and second-generation Americans, a lot of them Irish.

Dominating the scene was the sooty, window-rattling, four-track main line of the Jersey Central Railroad. The line's freight station was two blocks away. Running a course through the area was Richmond Street, a drab avenue of trolley cars, small groceries, meat markets, barbers, shoe repair shops and other establishments dealing in the basics.

Joseph, Emily and the two children lived first at 221 Richmond in a walk-up rented for $12.50 a month. (Eighty years later, young Emily remembered the bed bugs most of all).

There were new friends for Dick and young Emily. Dick was to remain close to the Hochberger brothers, Sam and Morton, until he died. Alice Sweeney became a lifelong "best friend" of Emily's.

It wasn't long before Joe Harrigan moved again, this time a block and a half away. At 434 East Fourth Street he built a store with an upstairs apartment for the family. He sold coal, horse and poultry feed and a few live chickens. Upstairs, the front room looked out on the railroad. Trains thundered by 150 feet away.

Dick completed high school. Emily had all the formal education she was to get by the time she reached 14 when her father decided it was time for her to help in the business. Cheerful, she was quick with figures and an asset.

There was a vacant lot next door on Fourth Street and Joe Harrigan bought it and built three small houses there as an investment. Then he traded everything–the office, the upstairs apartment and the three small houses–for a coal yard, around the corner and up the street a couple of blocks at 929 South Avenue.

The new location had an office with a family apartment upstairs. There was a scale big enough to accommodate a horse pulling a wagon loaded with coal. Out back, in the big yard, there were stables, storage bins and a 220-foot-long railroad trestle where coal hoppers and feed cars could be unloaded. Joe Harrigan never moved again.

He put a help wanted ad in the newspaper in those days and it may tell as much about the nature of the man as anything:

WANTED–Two men to work in coal yard; steady work; and I want work, not company. Harrigan. Tel. 193. It wasn't long before Joe built five more houses fronting on the coal yard along South Avenue (young Emily and her husband, Sam Adams, lived in one of them for a while) and three Dutch Colonials on Dixie Lane in one of Plainfield's most fashionable residential areas.

By the twenties, the Harrigans were prosperous and successful. With the walkups of Manhattan's West Side and Plainfield's Richmond Street behind them, Joe and Emily lived well and enjoyed life.

Their tastes were simple. Saturday night belonged to Joe. After a week in the coal yard he bathed, dressed his best and went "down town" to meet with a circle of friends who would stand for hours watching the parade of shoppers while they gossiped and talked politics.

Emily enjoyed entertaining and her Sunday dinners were a time for it. Now and then her guests were members of the Plainfield Players. Some of them–Pat O'Brien, Percy Kilbride, Busby Berkeley and a local actor, Carroll Ashburn - - went on to Broadway and even to stardom in Hollywood.

(When she was 90 and living with her daughter in Stow, young Emily still was mildly bitter because Berkeley, the troupe's manager, had skipped town, 60 years earlier, owing the Harrigans for a load of coal used to heat the theater).

Joseph Harrigan died at 68 in 1926. The business passed to Dick. Eroded by The Great Depression, a growing use of oil for household heating, but most of all missing Joe Harrigan, the business foundered. It was sold in 1936, three years after Joe's wife, Emily, died at 71.

Dick Harrigan was a warm, amiable and generous man. Politics called him early. He responded joyfully.

He served in World War I, enlisting as a private and coming out a lieutenant. He saw action in the Argonne and remained in Germany for a while after the war with the Army of Occupation. He played guard on the Army's championship Division football team.

In 1921, in recognition of his handling of a Plainfield mayorality campaign for Charles Loizeaux, he was appointed to a vacancy on the Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders (county commissioners). He held the elective post until 1939 and then became a member of the State Board of Tax Appeals. He was a lover of dogs and judged dog shows all over the state. English bulldogs were his speciality.

1973-1974 PGC Directory

1973-1974 Horticulture Chairman

1974-1975 Directory

1975-1976 The Junior League of Plainfield

PAST PRESIDENTS
1963-1965: Mr. Charles E. Loizeaux

Monday Afternoon Club Membership