Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Roome, Mrs. John Stanton (Dolores or "Dodie" Murray) '57

1958 - 1982 Address: 1071 Cooper Road, Scotch Plains

1983 NOTE: Moves from 'Active' to 'Sustaining' Member

1990 Address: 40 Loeffler Road, Bloomfield, CT

1984 - 1985: Sustaining
1985 - 1997: Affiliate
1998 - 1999: Affiliate DID NOT WANT TO PAY 97 - 98
1999 - 2000: Resigned

Possibly related to the following members:

Joost, Mrs. Sherman Brownell (Marie Murray) '19
Murray, Mrs. J. Everett '20
Rushmore, Mrs. Murray (Helen Joy)
Rushmore, Mrs. Townsend (Jean Murray) '20
Barbara Sandford '50

December 12, 2000 John Stanton Roome

Roome, John S.
December 12, 2000
ROOME, John S.

John Stanton Roome, 90, of Bloomfield died Monday (December 4, 2000) at Hartford Hospital following a car accident on Election Day. He was born December 24, 1909 in North Plainfield, NJ to the late William J. Roome and Florence Weed Roome, later Florence Ulrich. He attended The Hartridge School and Evergreen School in Plainfield, NJ, the Hill School in Pottsdam, PA, The Floating University where he spent a year going around the world studying, the Hun School in Princeton, NJ and Yale University. He married Dolores Murray on August 8, 1931. He worked at the Hanover Bank (Manufacturer's Hanover Bank) in New York City, NY for more than 40 years. He served in the Air Force for three years during World War II. He lived in Scotch Plains, NJ for 50 years before moving to Duncaster in Bloomfield in 1985 where he served as the president of the Residents' Association. After he retired from the Manufacturer's Hanover Bank in 1972, he worked as the business manager of the Hartridge School in Plainfield, NJ. He also served as president of the Plainfield Historical Society for several years. He enjoyed playing the piano, violin, and clarinet and also enjoyed acting and taught speech for many years. Family members include his wife of almost 70 years, Dolores M. Roome of Duncaster in Bloomfield; and his daughter, Susan Roome Goodwin and two grandsons, Peter Huntington Goodwin, Jr. and John Roome Goodwin of Kent. He was predeceased by his two brothers, Sandford Roome and William J. Roome, Jr. A Memorial Service will be held, Saturday, December 16, 4 p.m. at Duncaster Meeting Room, 40 Loeffler Road, Bloomfield, with the Rev. Erl G. Purnell officiating. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Lake Wentworth Foundation, Box 2235, Wolfeboro, NH 03894 or to Kent School, P.O. Box 2006, Kent, CT 06757. The Dillon-Baxter Funeral Home, Wethersfield, has care of arrangements.

January 30, 1983

Change of membership status from Dody Roome

Dolores (Dody) Murray Roome

Roome, Dolores (dody) Murray
January 24, 2002
ROOME, Dolores (Dody) Murray

Dolores (Dody) Murray Roome, 92, of Duncaster in Bloomfield, died Thursday, (January 17, 2002). She was born June 5, 1909 in New York City, NY to Anna Kennedy and Timothy Murray and grew up in Yonkers, NY. Her three older brothers, William, Allan and Newby all predeceased her. She graduated from the Halstead School in Yonkers and then spent a year at Mrs. Dow's School in Briarcliff Manor, NY before going to Vassar College where she graduated in 1931. She married John Stanton Roome on August 8, 1931 and lived in Scotch Plains, NJ for 50 years before moving to Duncaster in 1985. Her husband predeceased her in December 2000 following almost 70 years of marriage. She is survived by a daughter, Susan Roome Goodwin; and two grandsons, Hunt and John Goodwin, of Kent. Arrangements are being made by Dillon-Baxter Funeral Home of Wethersfield. A memorial service is being held January 26, 4 p.m. at Duncaster, Bloomfield, with the Rev. Erl G. Purnell officiating. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Vassar College, Box 14, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604, to Old St. Andrew's Church, 59 Tariffville Rd., Bloomfield, CT 06002 or the The Lake Wentworth Foundation, Box 2235, Wolfeboro, NH 03894.

May 23, 1983

Shakespeare Garden 50th Anniversary Party

June 1978

Top Photo: Barbara Sandford

Bottom Photo: Annette Trewin
Dodie Roome

Shakespeare Garden 50th Anniversary Party

June 1978

Annette Trewin
Dodie Roome

Shakespeare Garden 50th Anniversary Party

Back of Photo

Annette Trewin - Dodie Roome

1894 Washington Park, North Plainfield

A unique feature of social life in Washington Park, North Plainfield, is the Park Club. In it has been demonstrated the possibility of a mixed club of ladies and gentlemen. The club was organized in March 1892. It at once purchased and moved the picturesque clubhouse which had erected for it on Washington Avenue, bordering on Green Brook. Its first officers were: President-Samuel Townsend; Vice-President-William J. Roome; Treasurer-George P. Dupee; Secretary-William L. Saunders.

The scheme of the club orginated in the minds of a few gentlemen, neighboring residents of the park, led by Foster Milliken and W. J. Roome, and organization was determined upon. The consummation of the work, in the purchase of the land and the erection of a clubhouse was largely due to the untiring energy of Mr. Milliken, which kept alive a flagging interest and compelled success. By an expenditure of $10,000, the club owns an attractive brick and shingled house, having on the main floor, which opens upon the street level, a Gothic-roofed assembly room, card and committee rooms, besides a ladies' dressing room.

On the floor below are capacious billiard and bowling rooms, and, as the land slopes from the street to the brook, this lower floor opens upon the level of the club grounds, and looks out on the tennis courts. The membeship numbers 100, of whom 4 are ladies, but every gentelmen's membership gives full club rights (except vote) to the lady members of his household and his sons, when they are expected to become members in their own right. It is roughly estimated that the membership of 100 means that 300 are entitled to club priviledges.

The ladies freely avail themselves of these privileges, and their constant prescence and participation in the active life of the club make it unique in club history.

The favorite club night is Saturday and in the season, it is not an unusual event to have present seventy-five ladies enjoying the club sports or engaging in social chats. Bowling and pool are their favorite excercises below, while dancing, singing and whist are enjoyed up stairs. Under the House Committee, invitation dances are given at intervals during the season, and under Junior Entertainment Committee monthly informal invitation dances are given for the younger set. Tuesday morning is devoted to the ladies exclusively, and then they gather in large numbers for club sports, gossip and tea.

Washington park is a quiet community of homes. A man's club could in no way live there; the participation of the ladies in the life of the Park Club has made club life possible, and to them the club acknoledges its debt. The club has become the centre of the social life of the community, and has made household entertainmnet less imperative and less burdensome. It extends the acquaintance and association of all, and promotes prompt interest in and recognition of desirable newcomers into the neighborhood. The entire debt of the club is represented by $9.500 of 5 per cent bonds, running twenty years, but payable at any time, at the option of the club. It has no other debt, and maintains itself from its revenues, without deficit. Because of the constant presence of ladies and children, no wines or liquors of any kind are permitted upon any part of the club property.

The present officers are: President - St. St. J. McCutchenl Vice-President - B. A. Hegeman, Jr.; Treasurer - George P. Dupee; Secretary - George D. Hallock. Other Governors are Charles A. Reed, George C. Evans, George C. Worth, B.M. Day, and M. S. Taylor.

August 26, 1894 New York Times Article: Plainfield, City of Homes

New York Times June 3, 1911

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=FB0D17F73F5D16738DDDAA0894DE405B818DF1D3

THREE CEREMONIES FOR MISS HEGEMAN

Bride of Baron Podmaniczky First Married by Plainfield Mayor and Then in Church

ANOTHER CIVIL CEREMONY

Hungarian Vice Consul to Officiate Before Couple Sail for Europe Today – Reception at Dalnashea

The wedding of Miss Virginia Hegeman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Arrowsmith Hegeman of New York and Plainfield, and Baron Tibor Podmaniczky of Budapest, Hungary, took place yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock in the Church of the Holy Cross, North Plainfield, N. J. Prior to the religious ceremony a civil marriage was performed by Mayor Newton B. Smalley of North Plainfield, at Dalnashea, the residence of C. W. McCutcheon, where the wedding reception and supper were also held.

The Rev. Dr. E. Vicars Stevenson, rector of the Grace Church, Plainfield, performed the service at the church, which was thronged with society folk, among the guests being Alexander von Nuber, the Hungarian Vice Consul at New York, Mrs. Albert S. Church of New York was matron of honor and Miss Alice B. McCutcheon of Greenwich, Conn., maid of honor. The bridesmaids were Miss Margaret McCutcheon of Plainfield and Miss Jessica S. Marshall of Duluth, Minn. Harold A. Hegeman, brother of the bride, was best man, and the ushers were Peter B. Matthews, Rougier Thorne, Howard L. C. Roome, and Clarence S. Roome. The wedding marches were played by Will S. O'Brien, organist and choirmaster of Holy Cross. The bride's father gave her in marriage.

The bride's gown was of moire antique silk, which was worn by her grandmother, Mrs. Charles Matthews, at her marriage, and the bocice was or point duchess lace worn by her mother at her wedding. The court train of satin matched the gown. The veil was of rare old honiton lace. The bride carried a shower bouquet of lilies of the valley and white orchids. The others in the bridal party were gowned in apple green chiffon over pale green satin, and they wore poke bonnets and carried bouquets of Tausendonchon roses.

Following the reception the couple left for New York, and will sail for Europe today after the Hungarian Vice Consul has performed another civil ceremony. They will reside at Freiberg, Germany, the Baron being a medical student in the university at that city. The bride's father is President of the United States Metal and Manufacturing Company of 165 Broadway, and is a former Mayor of North Plainfield.

Memories by Barbara Sandford March 20, 2012

Barbara reminisced about her years in the garden club. She said she was happy being a junior member but was not happy when "they" made her move to Active member in 1954 as she was busy raising her children.

She clearly remembered the skit performed by Meechy Loosli and Hazel Lockwood for the 1970 Zone IV Meeting. She said it was very funny. She said Hazel, Meechy and Jack Roome were all entertainers. They always put on skits, especially at the Monday Afternoon Club.

Barbara spoke about her trip to Japan as our delegate. She said that was her fondest memory of being part of the club, although she paid for the trip herself.

Barbara also spoke about the demise of the famous Iris Garden and said it was two members in particular that did it in – although she would not name them.

When Etheledreda Anderegg was mentioned, she exclaimed that she had not thought her in years, but alas, we were interrupted and our walk down memory lane ceased.

October 29, 1996 Treasurers Meeting by Dodie Roome

October 29, 1996 Treasurers Report by Dodie Roome page 2

October 29, 1996 Treasurers Report by Dodie Roome page 3

1894 Washington Park, North Plainfield

A unique feature of social life in Washington Park, North Plainfield, is the Park Club. In it has been demonstrated the possibility of a mixed club of ladies and gentlemen. The club was organized in March 1892. It at once purchased and moved the picturesque clubhouse which had erected for it on Washington Avenue, bordering on Green Brook. Its first officers were: President-Samuel Townsend; Vice-President-William J. Roome; Treasurer-George P. Dupee; Secretary-William L. Saunders.

The scheme of the club orginated in the minds of a few gentlemen, neighboring residents of the park, led by Foster Milliken and W. J. Roome, and organization was determined upon. The consummation of the work, in the purchase of the land and the erection of a clubhouse was largely due to the untiring energy of Mr. Milliken, which kept alive a flagging interest and compelled success. By an expenditure of $10,000, the club owns an attractive brick and shingled house, having on the main floor, which opens upon the street level, a Gothic-roofed assembly room, card and committee rooms, besides a ladies' dressing room.

On the floor below are capacious billiard and bowling rooms, and, as the land slopes from the street to the brook, this lower floor opens upon the level of the club grounds, and looks out on the tennis courts. The membeship numbers 100, of whom 4 are ladies, but every gentelmen's membership gives full club rights (except vote) to the lady members of his household and his sons, when they are expected to become members in their own right. It is roughly estimated that the membership of 100 means that 300 are entitled to club priviledges.

The ladies freely avail themselves of these privileges, and their constant prescence and participation in the active life of the club make it unique in club history.

The favorite club night is Saturday and in the season, it is not an unusual event to have present seventy-five ladies enjoying the club sports or engaging in social chats. Bowling and pool are their favorite excercises below, while dancing, singing and whist are enjoyed up stairs. Under the House Committee, invitation dances are given at intervals during the season, and under Junior Entertainment Committee monthly informal invitation dances are given for the younger set. Tuesday morning is devoted to the ladies exclusively, and then they gather in large numbers for club sports, gossip and tea.

Washington park is a quiet community of homes. A man's club could in no way live there; the participation of the ladies in the life of the Park Club has made club life possible, and to them the club acknoledges its debt. The club has become the centre of the social life of the community, and has made household entertainmnet less imperative and less burdensome. It extends the acquaintance and association of all, and promotes prompt interest in and recognition of desirable newcomers into the neighborhood. The entire debt of the club is represented by $9.500 of 5 per cent bonds, running twenty years, but payable at any time, at the option of the club. It has no other debt, and maintains itself from its revenues, without deficit. Because of the constant presence of ladies and children, no wines or liquors of any kind are permitted upon any part of the club property.

The present officers are: President - St. St. J. McCutchenl Vice-President - B. A. Hegeman, Jr.; Treasurer - George P. Dupee; Secretary - George D. Hallock. Other Governors are Charles A. Reed, George C. Evans, George C. Worth, B.M. Day, and M. S. Taylor.

August 26, 1894 New York Times Article: Plainfield, City of Homes

November 2, 1894 New York Times

Sanford - Murray

PLAINFIELD, N.J., Nov. 1 – There was a brilliant wedding in the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church at 7:30 o'clock this evening, when Miss Minnie Breckinridge Murray, daughter of John W. Murray of the German Insurance Company of New York, was married to Joseph Webster Sandford, Jr., son of Joseph W. Sanford of Westervelt Avenue. A large assemblage of society people witnessed the event. The Rev. Dr. William R. Richards, pastor of the church, performed the ceremony. The church was elaborately decorated with palms and chyrsanthemums.

The bride wore a handsome gown of white corded silk and carried a bouquet of beautiful roses. The maid of honor was Miss Augusta Knox Murray. The bridesmaids were Miss Stella Place, Miss May Sanford, and Miss May Grace Brewster of New York. Albert Tilney was best man. The ushers were Percy H. Stewart, George S. Beebe, Howard W. Beebe, Fred W. Walz, Walter F. Murray, and James E. Murray. A reception followed at the home of the bride's parents.

1984 Bev Reid's party

Dody Roome

Martie Samek wrote: Jack Roome was related to Barbara Sandford

October 29, 2013 Email with Sandy Furman

Hi Susan,

And here is a 1970 picture I took of my mother with some of her closest friends: "Dodi" Roome, Betty Fitzpatrick, "Dot" Genung, and Charlotte Montgomery, the Good Housekeeping columnist who lived in Westfield.

I've also included one of my mother with the poet and writer Adele DeLeeuw, who lived a few doors down from us on Oakland Avenue with her illustrator sister, Cateau.

By the way, Hazel Lockwood and her husband Fritz were my godparents. They also lived on Oakland Avenue.

Sandy

Click here to see a larger photograph Furman Family Archives

UPDATE: Sally Genung Booth has written to say that is not her mother. Can anyone identify the lady in the white dress?

1970 Dodie Roome

1970 Summer at the Furmans

Here are the two pictures I have of Shirley Barnhart, taken at a backyard barbecue given by my parents in the summer of 1970. They are not as good as the others, but maybe you can do something with them.

Victoria serves Dodie Roome and Shirley Barnhart

1970 Summer at the Furmans

Dodie Roome and Shirley Barnhart

1970 Summer at the Furmans

Dodie Roome

1970 Summer at the Furmans

Dodie Furman

1970 Summer at the Furmans with Dodie Roome and Shirley Barnhart

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

May 21, 1959

October 1, 1965

Personally Speaking

The Plainfield Garden Club will hold a reception for its members tomorrow evening at the Monday Afternoon Club to celebrate the 50th anniversary of its founding. Among those who will entertain at small dinner parties at their home are Mr. and Mrs. William P. Elliott, "Lee House," Scotch Plains; Mr. and Mrs. Gerald S. Furman of 1096 Oakland Ave., Mr. and Mrs. Wayne J. Holman Jr. of 1029 Rahway Rd., and Mr. and Mrs. John S. Roome of 1071 Cooper Rd.

1973-1974 PGC Directory

1973-1974 Recording Secretary

1974-1975 Directory

1975-1976 The Junior League of Plainfield

New Active Member: Miss Susan Roome

October 30, 2013 Furman Family Sends in Memorabilia

Sandy Furman sent her last two garden club photos and for the first time, we have a nice photo of Shirley Clark Barnhart '48.

October 29, 2013

Sandy Furman has sent in four more photos from her mother's momentos and they are worth taking a peek. She included a 1970 photo with three other PGC members: Dodie Roome; Betty Fitzpatrick; and Sally's mom, Dot Genung! UPDATE: Sally has just written to say that is not her mother . . . can anyone identify the lady in the white dress? Click here.

Also hilarious are two photos of Mrs. Furman dressed up for that crazy period-costume 1962 bake sale at the Drake house.

October 28, 2013

Another family contacts the PGC! Mrs. Furman's daughter has just stumbled across the website and was thrilled to see her mother's virtual scrapbook and has added to it – including a great photograph! See: Mrs. Gerald S. (Victoria Houck) Furman '62.

Mrs. Furman is particularly important to the PGC as it was she who wrote the incredible 50th Anniversary History in 1965. Betty Hackman had shared her copy and it is this document that began the research project into the 250-plus former members of the Club.

When informed of this huge contribution, Mrs. Furman's daughter was not surprised for it seems Mrs. Furman was a well known published author. She is most famous for penning a book on sleep-away camp titled Five in a Tent. It remains a childhood favorite for many.

So it is no wonder that the 50th Anniversary History is so well done – it was written by a published free lancer (Mrs. Furman) and illustrated by the well known artist and PGC member, Mrs. Acomb.

Minnie Murray Sandford

Minnie Murray Sandford's dress
c. late 1880's - 1890's
Given to Drake House November 2013 by the Sandford family

Minnie Murray Sandford

Minnie Murray Sandford's dress
c. late 1880's - 1890's
Given to Drake House November 2013 by the Sandford family

Minnie Murray Sandford

Minnie Murray Sandford's dress
c. late 1880's - 1890's
Given to Drake House November 2013 by the Sandford family

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1993-1994 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

Cocktail party circa 1984 at Bev Reid's

Cocktail party circa 1984

18 photographs were taken from negatives found, unmarked, at the Plainfield Library March 22, 2013.

Martie Samek was instrumental in helping to identify many of the attendees. Location unknown as well as date.

Jack Roome on left with wife Dodie in pink. Ned King (Victor...son of Elizabeth King) speaking to Betty Fitzpatrick. Ned's former wife, Ysmina, has her back to the photographer.

The party was held at the home of Mrs. Reid:

Reid, Mrs. Bruce A. (Beverly Paulson or "Bev") '61, President 1981 - 1984 on Clarke's Lane in Scotch Plains. The Garden was documented for the Smithsonian by the Club in 1999.

Cocktail party circa 1984 at Bev Reid's

Ed Samek at center. Martie Samek to his right and Ned King is to Martie's right. Jack Roome is wearing the plaid jacket.

Ann Wigton is in the center, speaking with Ned King.

Cocktail party circa 1984 at Bev Reid's

Bev Reid, Betty Fitzpatrick, Ned and Yamina King, Dodie and Jack Roome

Cocktail party circa 1984 at Bev Reid's

Suzie Callender in the spaghetti strap dress with most likely her husband, David to her left in the blue blazer.

Dodie (pink and white dress) & Jack Roome in the background

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

December 28, 2014

Local blogger Dan Damon wrote this article, Suspicious fire at historic Plainfield building, regarding a fire at the Samuel W. Rushmore building on South Avenue. Many Rushmore relatives have been members of the PGC including current Affiliate Member Ginny Rushmore.

To learn more about this prominent family, click on these member albums:

Rushmore, Mrs. Murray (Helen Joy)
Rushmore, Mrs. Townsend (Jean Betram Murray) '20
Joy, Mrs. James R. (Emma Prentice McGee) '33
Mooney, Mrs. Wandell McMaster (Alice Joy McGee) '47
Joost, Mrs. Sherman Brownell (Marie Murray) '19
Murray, Mrs. James Everett (Alice Marshall) '20
Roome, Mrs. John Stanton (Dolores or "Dody" Murray) '57
Tilney, Mrs. Albert Arthur (Augusta R. Murray) '20
McGee, Mrs. Harry Livingston (Susan M. Howell) '18
McGee, Mrs. Walter Miller (Mary Alice Yerkes) '22
Lockwood, Mrs. Frederick M. (Hazel Marshall) '52
Lockwood, Mrs. William L. (Amy M.) '25
Marshall, Mrs. Henry P. (Dorothy Burke) '30
Howell, Mrs. Josephus Halsey (Romaine Ray) '22
Chambliss, Mrs. Leopold A. (Anna Scott Yerkes) '50
Eddy, Mrs. Charles Brown (Ellen Coolidge Burke) '15

And through marriage on her husband's side, the late Mrs. Webster (Barbara Tracy) Sandford '50.

Plainfield firefighters responded early Saturday evening to a suspicious fire in a historic factory structure at South Avenue and Berckman Street.

The complex of three buildings, parts of which are over a hundred years old, most recently housed the Royal Apex Company, a manufacturer of gutters and other metal and plastic extruded products. The buildings have been vacant since 2007, when Royal Apex was bought out by Berger Building Products, Inc., and operations were moved to Pennsylvania.

Originally, the buildings housed the Rushmore Dynamo Works, owned by Plainfield entrepreneur and inventor Samuel W. Rushmore. Rushmore made his fortune in patents and manufacturing several key improvements in automobile technology.

Among his notable inventions – or improvements on those of others – are the automatic starter, cooling systems for internal combustion engines, the flared automobile headlamp, a searchlight, and locomotive headlights. At one time, half of all the automatic starters used in American automobiles were manufactured in the Plainfield location.

Rushmore sold the business in 1914 to the Bosch Magneto Company, with the proviso that the Rushmore name be used on its products for a number of years. When Bosch violated the terms of the agreement, Rushmore successfully sued (see here) for $100,000 (which would be over $2 million today).

Bosch, a German company with a U.S. branch, established a separate U.S. corporation, headquartered in New York City. Because of suspicions of its owners' loyalty, Bosch was nationalized in both the First and Second World Wars – with control returning to private hands in 1948.

Though several area fire companies responded to the blaze, it was quickly brought under control. A source told me the fire is suspected to be arson, a determination that will be made officially by arson investigators.