Member: Stout, Mrs. Harry Howard (Maxine Evans Carder), Jr. '72

922 Central Avenue, Plainfield

1975 - 1982 Address: 1220 Rahway Ave, Plainfield

1983: Mrs. Harry Howard (Maxine Garde) Stout passed away

From PGC Member Connie Foster's on-line album

New Years Eve 1970? in living room at Clarkes Lane. Front row Connie Foster, Muriel Stout, Sue Johnson and Jerry Bellows. Back row Bill Johnson, Dave Foster and Harry Stout

Seine Section, Paris France, 1945

resource

"PARIS IN THE SPRING"

Sure – it's Spring again – a nice one at that – and the lights are on once more in Paris.

We did our share of planning and working and sweating to help rekindle those lights – and we may well feel proud of the job we've done.

This booklet is dedicated to the men who helped complete that job. To the men who drove the trucks and carried the litters, repaired facilities and kept the supplies rolling forward; to the men who – ever willing – did a job of which they may well feel proud... This booklet, in other words, is dedicated to "YOU"!!

ASSIGNMENTS
TO
HEADQUARTERS STAFF

BRIGADIER GENERAL PLEAS B. ROGERS, Commanding
GENERAL STAFF

Chief of Staff ..... Col EUGENE J. BLAKELY, Jr, GSC ..... Lexington, Va.
Acting Chief of Staff ..... Lt Col JULIAN D. ABELL, CE ..... Nappanee, Ind.
Deputy Chief of Staff ..... Lt Col FRANCIS L. REMUS, GSC ..... Minneapolis, Minn.
Secretary of the General Staff ..... 1st Lt HARRY F. BEAR, MAC ..... Baltimore, Md.
Capt ROSE F. ROSS, WAC ..... Long Island, N. Y.
Capt DONALD E. WENTZEL, AC
A C of S, G-1 ..... Col PAUL K. BROWN, GSC ..... Norristown, Pa.
A C of S, G-2 & G-3 ..... Col HENRY C. AHALT, GSC ..... Blacksburg, Va.
A C of S, G-4 ..... Col LOREN W POTTER, GSC ..... Laclede, Mo.
A C of S, G-5 ..... Col ROBERT P. HAMILTON, GSC ..... Columbia University, N. Y., N. Y.
General Purchasing Agent ..... Col LEELAN E. WITNEY, GSC ..... Peabody, Mass.

SPECIAL STAFF

Adjutant General ..... Lt Col RAY C. SCOTT, AGD ..... Sacramento, Cal.
..... Lt Col DAVID C. MAYERS, AGD ..... San Francisco, Cal.
Army Exchange Officer ..... Major KAUFMAN R. KATZ, QMC ..... Baltimore, Md.
Chaplain ..... Chap (Maj) CHESTER R. MC CLELLAND ..... Dallas, Texas.
Chemical Warfare Officer ..... Lt Col HENRY G. BEAMER, CWS ..... East Pittsburgh, Pa.
..... Maj KENNETH E. KITCHEN, CWS
Chief, Control, Control Division ..... Cap ARTHUR E. NEIGLER, FA ..... Brooklyn, N. Y.
Maj HOWARD E. SOMMER, QMC ..... Chicago, Ill.
Lt Col HARRY H. STOUT, Jr, ORD

The Pillars 922 Central Avenue, Plainfield

resource

In 1951, Patricia Terry sold the house to Harry Howard and Maxine Garde Stout, who turned around and sold it to Emily Garde, widower, for $1.00. We can assume that Emily was Maxine's mother. Emily has a long history with the house, selling it in 1972 to Ira M. Fine, but apparently acquiring it back a short time later. During this time, The Pillars continued as a boarding house, with one, and sometimes two couples occupying each room, sharing the bathroom and kitchen facilities. We know that during the wild seventies, there were many parties on the porch roof, and more than one police raid. The grandeur of The Pillars had faded, and it was on the brink of being lost forever.

The entire neighborhood was now a hundred years old and rough around the edges, a far cry from its more stately beginnings. Concerned homeowners and others interested in historic preservation worked long and hard through the seventies, and they were rewarded with a National Historic District designation for the 152 properties in this region. The District was named in honor of Van Wyck Brooks, one of the better-known residents during the twenty-first century. Brooks was born in Plainfield on February 16, 1886. He spent his early years at 563 West 8th Street, a magnificent home built by his grandfather. After graduating from Harvard University in 1907, Brooks began his career as a prolific author, literary historian, and critic. In 1937, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in Literature for his book The Flowering of New England. Because of his love of history, it seemed fitting to name this Historic District in his honor.

Emily Garde sold the house again in 1982, this time to Robert and Lynne Wiley. The Wileys were here for only three years, but started to repair some of the damage that had been done during the boarding house years. They sold the house in 1985 to John and Barbara Ostrander, who continued the process of restoration. However, the financial strain for restoring over a hundred years of wear was daunting. By the early 1990s the house was in foreclosure and in the hands of a bank.

After much negotiating with the bank, Charles (Chuck) and Tom Hale bought the house with the goal of opening a bed & breakfast, the first in Plainfield and the first in this region of New Jersey. They bought the house in 1992, and they spent nearly two years restoring the porches and first floor rooms and renovating the unusable rooms on the third floor. By the time they opened The Pillars as a bed and breakfast in April of 1994, they were beyond broke. They were able to sell the house to Chuck's son, Ken Hale, in April of 1994, allowing it to continue as a B&B and gain recognition through the Internet. By April of 2001, Chuck and Tom Hale were able to purchase the house back from Ken and continue what had become a successful business.

By 2005, Chuck and Tom decided it was time to retire as innkeepers, a second or third career for them. The husband and wife team of Lamont Blowe and Nancy Fiske purchased the house in early November of 2005, continuing to operate the house as The Pillars of Plainfield Bed & Breakfast Inn. We hope that The Pillars adds to its long and interesting story for many years to come, with additions and improvements to both the house and gardens. Please return often to see how we are progressing in the restoration of this gracious home.

The Pillars 922 Central Avenue, Plainfield

January 5, 1983

Email from Elisabeth Loizeaux February 28, 2011

Hello Susan,

Maxine Stout and her husband were friends of my in-laws. I met them socially there, and was at least once invited to their house, which I am almost sure was on Rahway Road. They had taken some interest in me, I think, because they had lived in Europe. I liked Maxine because she was a Little less provincial , she had "style" – or so I thought then, remember that was 50 years ago. ––- Sorry,
but absolutely no recollection of her being in the GC.

Aloha,

E.isabeth

Email from Martie Samek March 1, 2011

Sorry I was unable to get an answer from our friend Bob Stout..See below..

Martie
____________________________________
Sent: 2/28/2011 5:38:45 P.M. Eastern Standard Time
Subj: Re: Maxine Stout

Martie, sorry I never heard of her. Interestingly, I looked at a census
website and saw a Maxine Stout ( one of 57), age 107, listed in Plainfield. There are lots of us around as the early family was quite prolific. When Penelope, great grandmother x 10 died in 1711 in Holmdel N.J. she left 510 descendents according to an 1810 geneology which I have.

As to an event in your driveway, we may be in NE Harbor Memorial Day weekend, though plans are not yet definite. Will let you know

Our old home on Prospect Ave. is listed for sale at 1.2 M ! Do you think that if anyone would really pay so much in P-field ? Bob


On Feb 28, 2011, at 8:56 AM
wrote:

Hi Bob and Joan...
I received the enclosed email from the Plainfield Garden Club. This
inquiry is related to a club project to put together a comprehensive history of
the group and the Shakespeare Garden.

I think Maxine Stout might be related to you?

We hope to find you in our driveway in Maine very soon! That was such fun!

Trust this finds you and all your dear family doing well...

Fondly,

Martie

922 Central Avenue

922 Central Avenue

922 Central Avenue

922 Central Avenue

1984 Questover Designers Showhouse Program

Questover Program pages 1 through 55

Questover Program pages 56 through 106

Questover Program pages 107 through 131

1974 Junior Leage Designer Showcase: The Martine House

1974 Designer Showcase Martine House Cover to Page 25

1974 Designer Showcase Martine House Page 26 to End

In addition to saving the 1988 Program for the Designers Showhouse of Cedar Brook Farm (aka The Martine House) which was organized by the Muhlenberg Auxiliary, PGC Member Anne Shepherd also kept the 1974 Designers Showcase of the very same home, organized by the Junior League.

Within the program pages, you will find mentioned many PGC members. They include: Clawson, MacLeod, Kroll, Davis, Wyckoff, Stevens, Loizeaux, Swain, Hunziker, Connell, Foster, Dunbar, Elliott, Fitzpatrick, Gaston, Hackman, Holman, Lockwood, Morrison, Royes, Rushmore, Sanders, Williams, Barnhart, Bellows, Burger, Burner, Carter, Clendenin, DeHart, Detwiller, Eaton, Eckert, Fort, Frost, Gonder, Keating, Laidlaw, Loosli, Madsen, Mann, Marshall, Miller, Moody, Moon, Morse, Murray, Mygatt, Barrett, Peek, Perkins, Pfefferkorn, Pomeroy, Pond, Royes, Samek, Sandford, Sheble, Stevens, Shepherd, Stewart, Stout, Trewin, Vivian, Zeller, Cochran, Mooney and Hall.

February 8, 2012 Developer touches up a piece of newspaper history

Courier News http://www.mycentraljersey.com/article/20120205/NJNEWS/302050008/Developer-touches-up-piece-newspaper-s-history

PHOTO: The faded "COURIER-NEWS" sign at the top of a historic Park Avenue building in downtown Plainfield before its recent renovation. / Photo courtesy Bernice Paglia.

Landmark poised to open historic Plainfield building to renters, restaurant


PLAINFIELD – When Landmark Developers several years ago acquired the Frost Building on Park Avenue, one of a handful of city properties it purchased and tabbed for renovation as part of what many hope will be a wider effort to revitalize the downtown, company principal Frank Cretella had a big decision to make: what to do with the faded, crumbling, barely visible "COURIER-NEWS" sign running along the top of the majestic three-story historic structure.

It would have been easy just to cover it up with a fresh coat of paint, glossing over the portion of the newspaper's history that saw it move there in the early part of the 20th century with a new state-of-the-art printing press in tow. But something stopped Cretella.

"It's too cool to cover up," he explained. "I hope you guys don't mind."

Mind? On the contrary.

The Courier News' historic roots are in Plainfield," said Paul C. Grzella, general manager/editor of the Courier News and the Home News Tribune, "and though we have moved to different facilities over the past 128 years, we are proud of our long association with the Queen City."

What's more, the gesture by Cretella – which came along with a name change for the building, now known as the "Courier News Building" – came free of charge.

"Well," he added jokingly, "I may be sending you a bill."

The newspaper traces its earliest beginnings back to Plainfield, where on June 2, 1884 at 7 Somerset St., Thomas W. Morrison printed the first edition of The Evening News, a four-page product that sold for 2 cents.

It was the first daily newspaper in Plainfield, then a town of just 8,000 people, but competitors soon followed. Brothers William L. and Albert L. Force, who published a local weekly, The Constitutionalist, established the Daily Press at Park and North avenues in 1887, while Frank W. Runyon, the publisher of another weekly, established the Plainfield Courier in 1891 at Front and Somerset streets.

The three-way competition was short-lived. Runyon bought the Evening News from Morrison in November 1894, creating the Plainfield Courier News. The paper was purchased in 1904 by George H. Frost, who in 1909 moved it to what today is Cretella's building on the 200 block of Park Avenue. The Daily Press was sold to former New Jersey Gov. John Franklin Fort in 1911 but, lagging in circulation, was eventually bought in 1916 by the Plainfield Courier News.

The publication then became an early acquisition for Frank E. Gannett, founder of Gannett Company – today the nation's largest newspaper company as measured by daily circulation among its more than 80 sites spread across the country. The Plainfield Courier News was one of the first two papers that Gannett bought outside of New York and was part of a growth spurt beginning in 1925 that doubled the number of newspapers he owned.

Heirs of Frost sold the paper to Gannett, William Morrison and Chauncey Stout in April 1927, with Stout becoming publisher, then Gannett Group bought out the interests of Stout and Morrison in 1939. Ground was broken for the Plainfield Courier News' planned new offices on Church Street two years later – where Plainfield's Union County College campus exists today – and the newspaper published its first edition there in 1942.

The Courier moved to Bridgewater in 1972, where it stayed for nearly four decades before moving to its current location on East Main Street in Somerville in 2009. Along the way the newspaper dropped the "Plainfield" and the hyphen from its name, but despite a newfound focus on Somerset County news, it continued to cover the city of its birth.

It's a commitment that lives on today, Grzella explained.

"Just as residents will see the Courier News name in their city," he said, "they can be assured that they will continue to see the city's name and news on prominent display in our newspaper and digital platforms."

The future of the Courier's former home certainly sounds promising: Cretella, an established developer whose projects have included rental housing and fine-dining restaurants across North and Central Jersey, has plans to open eight apartments on the building's second and third floors. Residents could start moving in as early as March 1, Cretella added, and he's seeking a municipal liquor license to lure a restaurant into the space on the first floor. Recent renovations included additions on the back of the building, doubling the space on the top two floors to make them roughly match the 5,000 square feet on the first floor.

"It's a beautiful building. I really love it," Cretella said. "We're really putting a lot of effort into it."

Also slated to be preserved is the entrance marquee, reading "Frost Building A.D. 1909," Cretella added. The marquee recently was removed in order to restore it pending its replacement, he said.

"I feel that you just want to keep the character of the building where you can," Cretella explained. "I even liked the (Courier News) sign when it was just kind of a ghost sign, but it was just getting too faded."

"I think it's a cool element now," he said. "It identifies the building. And it's the newspaper's building."

The publication then became an early acquisition for Frank E. Gannett, founder of Gannett Company – today the nation's largest newspaper company as measured by daily circulation among its more than 80 sites spread across the country. The Plainfield Courier News was one of the first two papers that Gannett bought outside of New York and was part of a growth spurt beginning in 1925 that doubled the number of newspapers he owned.

Heirs of Frost sold the paper to Gannett, William Morrison and Chauncey Stout in April 1927, with Stout becoming publisher, then Gannett Group bought out the interests of Stout and Morrison in 1939. Ground was broken for the Plainfield Courier News' planned new offices on Church Street two years later – where Plainfield's Union County College campus exists today – and the newspaper published its first edition there in 1942.

The Courier moved to Bridgewater in 1972, where it stayed for nearly four decades before moving to its current location on East Main Street in Somerville in 2009. Along the way the newspaper dropped the "Plainfield" and the hyphen from its name, but despite a newfound focus on Somerset County news, it continued to cover the city of its birth.

It's a commitment that lives on today, Grzella explained.

"Just as residents will see the Courier News name in their city," he said, "they can be assured that they will continue to see the city's name and news on prominent display in our newspaper and digital platforms."

The future of the Courier's former home certainly sounds promising: Cretella, an established developer whose projects have included rental housing and fine-dining restaurants across North and Central Jersey, has plans to open eight apartments on the building's second and third floors. Residents could start moving in as early as March 1, Cretella added, and he's seeking a municipal liquor license to lure a restaurant into the space on the first floor. Recent renovations included additions on the back of the building, doubling the space on the top two floors to make them roughly match the 5,000 square feet on the first floor.

"It's a beautiful building. I really love it," Cretella said. "We're really putting a lot of effort into it."

Also slated to be preserved is the entrance marquee, reading "Frost Building A.D. 1909," Cretella added. The marquee recently was removed in order to restore it pending its replacement, he said.

I feel that you just want to keep the character of the building where you can, " Cretella explained. "I even liked the (Courier News) sign when it was just kind of a ghost sign, but it was just getting too faded."

"I think it's a cool element now," he said. "It identifies the building. And it's the newspaper's building."

Frost Building

Paul S. Heteji, Sr.

http://higginsfuneralhome.com/obituary_view/46371

Paul S. Heteji served proudly as a 1st Lieutenant in the Armys 83rd Infantry division and participated in the invasion of France. Appropriately, Paul passed away peacefully on the dawn of Veterans day, November 11, 2007. Mr. Heteji was born on February 6, 1920; he grew up in Plainfield, N.J. and was the grandson of Chauncey Stout, who was the first publisher of the Courier News. Mr. Heteji attended Borden Town Military Institute, then the Pratt Institute of New York. His career began at Kingston Connolly as a machinist, Mack Truck as a machinist, Worthington as a draftsman and mechanical engineer, then finally at Ethicon where he retired as a senior mechanical engineer. Paul and his wife Catherine Frances (Phelan) Heteji raised their three sons in North Plainfield. In 1983, the loving parents and now grandparents retired and moved to Forked River. Catherine predeceased him in 1991. He is survived by his three sons; Paul Stout Heteji Jr. and his wife Jane of Linden; Thomas Phelan Heteji and his wife Bobbi of North Plainfield, and Peter Dunham Heteji of Toms River. Paul (Poppy) also has seven grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Paul Heteji was a wonderful person and loved by all who knew him. The stories of his life will live on in all of us. The funeral will be held on Saturday, November 17th at 9 a.m. from the Higgins Home for Funerals, 209 West 8th Street, Plainfield followed by a 10 a.m. Mass of Resurrection at St. Joseph R.C. Church in North Plainfield. Interment will be in Hillside Cemetery, Scotch Plains. Visitation will be on Friday from 2-4 & 7-9 p.m. in the funeral home. Donations may be made to your favorite charity in his memory.

New York Times October 4, 1900

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F50E11FB3C5B11738DDDAD0894D8415B808CF1D3

Sheppard - Darby

PLAINFIELD, N.J., Oct. 3. - The wedding of Miss Loretta Darby, daughter of Mrs. and Mrs. John Darby of Alton, N.J., and Edgar Felton Sheppard of Central Avenue, Plainfield, took place this afternoon at the home of the bride's parents. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. C. D. Herring, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in Plainfield. The maid of honor was Miss Edith M. Darby and the best man was Chauncey Field Stout of Plainfield. The ushers were Walter R. Darby of Alton and Charles M. Dolliver of Plainfield

Reading Eagle August

Reading Eagle August 11, 1972

Retired Newsman

PLAINFIELD, N.J. - Chauncey Field Stout, 94, retired publisher of The Courier-News, died at his home Thursday. Stout's newspaper career began as a delivery boy at 11 and culminated with his being named publisher of The Courier-News when it was purchased by Gannett Newspapers in 1927.

http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1955&dat=19720811&id=dgcrAAAAIBAJ&sjid=YZgFAAAAIBAJ&pg=5171,323135

St. Pauls Summer 1984

Archive Name: Alumni Horae
Volume 64, Issue 2, Page 119, Obituaries 89
Originally published: Summer 1984
Obituary: Harry Howard Stout

1919 - Harry Howard Stout died at his home in Plainfield, New Jersey, on May 15, 1984. Born on December 27, 1900, in Santa Cruz, California, he was the son of Helen Mar Craig Stout and Harry Howard Stout. He entered St. Paul's School as a IV Former in 1916 from Douglas, Arizona, received an appointment to the U. S. Military Academy for 1919, and under the accelerated conditions of World War I was ordered, at the start of his VI Form year, to report in November 1918 to West Point, from which he graduated in 1922. He did postgraduate work in metallurgy at Columbia University before joining International Smelter of Miami, Florida, in 1924. He worked for Phelps-Dodge Copper Corporation from 1926 to 1936, and in the years immediately preceding Pearl Harbor he lectured on metallurgy at Rutgers University and was a director of International Engineering and Inspection, a company involved in armaments manufacture.

In July 1942 he re-entered the Army as a major of ordnance and was stationed at Frankford Arsenal, Philadelphia, in charge of the research laboratory. Research teams under Major Stout's direction were responsible for the development of the recoilless cannon, the bazooka, and the first ejection seats for high speed aircraft. He was the first man to discover that the (then) little-known element uranium coated on an anti-tank projectile would on contact with a target liquidate with devastating effects –his efforts to obtain several tons of uranium in the 1940s were mysteriously turned down! Later in World War II he commanded the 196 th Ordnance Battalion and then served as executive officer of the 227 th Ordnance Group in Normandy and Northern France. He was a member of General Eisenhower's personal staff and was chief, metals branch, Production Control Agency, in the occupation of Germany, leaving the Army as a colonel.

He rejoined Phelps-Dodge after the war and retired in 1977. In 1980 he received the Copper Club Award for his contribution to

the advancement of copper production in the United States. He was a fellow of and had served as vice chairman of the American Society for Testing and Materials; had been chairman of the U.S.A. Technical Advisory Group to the American National Standards Institute; and during his retirement served in the International Executive Service to assist copper companies in Brazil.

He is survived by two sons, Harry Howard Stout 111 of Langhorne, Pennsylvania, and Anthony Carder Stout '57 of Washington, D.C; and four grandchildren, Antonia Armstrong Stout, Julie Shellabarger Stout, Craig Fitzhugh Stout '85, and Carder Jeppson Stout '87 of Washington, D.C. His wife, the former Maxine Evans Carder, died in 1982.

Seine Section, Paris France, 1945

Unit history published for the officers and men of the Seine Section, part of the Theater Service Forces, European Theater. This booklet was written by the unit historian, 1st Lt. Harry F. Bear, and published in Paris, France in 1945.

Lt Col HARRY H. STOUT, Jr, ORD

www.lonesentry.com

Westpoint

Harry Howard Stout, USMA 1895

Born:

Died:

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, USMA,


Genealogy:

His son Harry Howard Stout, Jr. (#6904) is a graudate.

References:

AR

Cullum, 4, 5, 6A, 7

www.onemine.org

In 1925, Harry Howard Stout, then metallurgist for Phelps Dodge Corporation, while investigating the cleaning of cathode copper by various gases at elevated temperatures below the melting point of the metal, observed in the laboratory that particles of pure copper heated in a closed tube filled with hydrogen seemingly "stuck together." By further investigation he found that there was actual crystal growth across the boundaries of the particles of pure metal; in other words, there was a complete new crystal realignment and growth throughout the newly formed copper mass. It was coalescence, not adhesion; the several particles had become one unit. From this discovery has been developed the coalescence process, whereby copper of cathode purity is squirted out in semifabricated form from an extrusion press, by the application of about 3000 tons pressure on a 10-in. piston. Stout decided that cathode copper produced by electrolytic deposition was the logical source of the pure copper required for the coalescence process, but as there was no way of reducing the ordinary tough commercial cathodes to the small particles required he was confronted by a serious problem at the outset. Under his direction, this problem was solved by William H. Osborn and Harry Howard Stout, Jr. They developed the process and technique for producing cathode copper in brittle, friable form, and to them must be given the greater part of the credit for this phase of the development program as well as for that relating to the gas cleaning of the cathode particles. Concurrently, the three metallurgists worked on the problem of effecting a complete union of the cathode particles. Adequate washing was all that was needed to free the particles from electrolyte solution and slimes. A press was designed to produce briquettes of the proper porosity and density, and a method was devised of removing surface oxidation from the particles of cathode, by treatment in an atmosphere of deoxidizing gas at an elevated temperature. The temperature was determined at which the surface cleansing and preheating could be done in one operation, and for this a charging and preheating furnace in which there is maintained a positive pressure of deoxidizing gas atmosphere was designed. And finally, a method of feeding the heated briquettes of deoxidized cathode copper into an extrusion press without contamination from the air was evolved. For the final stage, a press was required because not only heat but pressure was required to obtain complete growth of the new crystals between the cathode particles as well as the elimination of all voids or non-coalesced areas. All essential stages of the process are protected by patents or patent applications in the United States and principal foreign countries, and the copper is produced on a commercial scale.

Harry Howard Stout

related?

Harry H. Stout

October 14, 1946 - January 16, 2006

Burlington, Iowa and formerly of Oskaloosa, Iowa

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Visitation: Will begin at 9:00 a.m., Friday morning, January 20, 2006 at Garland-Van Arkel-Langkamp Funeral Chapel in Oskaloosa; the family will be at the funeral chapel from 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. preceding the funeral service.
Funeral Service: 2:00 p.m., Friday afternoon, January 20, 2006 at Garland-Van Arkel-Langkamp Funeral Chapel with Rev. Kate Stangl officiating.
Interment: Old Rose Hill Cemetery near Rose Hill, Iowa

Butch passed away Monday, January 16, 2006 at his home in Burlington at the age of 59 years, 3 months and 2 days.

Harry Howard Stout, son of Charles Evan and Genevieve Hollingsworth Stout, was born October 14, 1946 in Delta, IA. He attended Oskaloosa High School and served in the U.S. Army National Guard from 1965 to 1970 and then in the Army Reserve National Guard until 1971. He married Velma Foley, they later divorced. Butch lived in the Burlington and Lomax area for the past 33 years. He worked as an auto mechanic in Burlington and later owned and operated B& D Auto in Lomax, IL. He later worked as a cabinet maker for Kitchens Plus in Burlington. Butch enjoyed fishing, he was a former stockcar racer and was an avid Nascar fan and very loyal to Dale Earnhart.

Butch's family includes a daughter, Cheryl (Jason) Perry of Fort Madison, IA; two grandchildren, Jake and Jillian; his mother, Genevieve Wharton of Oskaloosa; a brother, H. Earl (Beth) Stout of Rose Hill; two nieces and a nephew.

He was preceded in death by his father and one sister, Darlene Gentz.

Memorials may be made in his name.

Maxine Stout

STOUT, MAXINE was born 28 February 1904; received Social Security number 156-38-2627, which corresponds to New Jersey; and died December 1982

922 Central Avenue, Westfield NJ

Chuck and Tom turned the mansion at 922 Central Avenue into Plainfield's first B&B, The Pillars.

Chuck Hale, who founded Plainfield's first bed and breakfast inn The Pillars, passed away recently. An obituary has been published in today's Star-Ledger (below).

There will be a memorial service this Sunday, August 26, at 1:30 PM at the First Presbyterian Church of Springfield, NJ.

Chuck and Tom opened The Pillars after Chuck retired from active ministry as a Presbyterian pastor, turning the large mansion at 922 Central Avenue into Plainfield's first bed and breakfast, of which they were the innkeepers and hosts.

Chuck and Tom also involved themselves in the Van Wyck Brooks Historic District, especially in the fight to prevent the despoliation of the Abbott Nursing Home by its absentee corporate owners.

Chuck was active in the Plainfield Chamber of Commerce and was a member and supporter of the Plainfield Area YMCA. After retiring from The Pillars, Chuck served the Presbytery of Elizabeth as an interim pastor, during which time he helped the congregation of historic First Presbyterian Church of Elizabeth refocus its ministry to the community.

The easiest way to the church is to take Route 22 East to the fork just before the island starts. Bear left at the fork (Western Termite will be on the left) onto Mountain Avenue and proceed north to where Mountain ends at Morris Avenue. The Presbyterian Church is across Morris Avenue on the right.

Star Ledger Obituary August 24, 2012:

A memorial service for Rev. Charles L. Hale Jr. is planned for Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012, at 1:30 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, 210 Morris Ave., Springfield, N.J. Born May 5, 1933, the only child of Charles and Jenny Hale in Cleveland, Ohio, Rev. Hale graduated from Cleveland Heights High School, Ohio State University, and McCormick Theological Seminary. He was ordained a Presbyterian minister in 1960. He married Marilyn Cain in 1957; they had four children, Kenneth, Catherine, Stuart Christian, and Stephen Charles. Chuck served churches as pastor in Ohio and Indiana. After getting divorced in 1986, he entered interim ministry, eventually moving to New Jersey, where he was active in the Presbytery of Elizabeth, N.J. Chuck adopted Thomas Hale in 1990 and they built the Pillars of Plainfield Bed and Breakfast. Chuck belonged to the Masonic Lodge and was member of a Scandinavian Lodge called Lodge Linne. He also founded the Red Ribbon Fellowship in Elizabeth. In lieu of flowers, donations are requested to The First Presbyterian Church in Springfield Chapel Fund.
.Published in Star-Ledger on August 24, 2012

1958 Check Book

No. 1319
Oct 3, 1958
Chauncey Stout
reimbursement for Sat. A???
planting
$10.00

"Villa Emmyka," Residence of Chauncey F. Stout, 511 East Front Street

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

September 2012 1400 Prospect

The current owner (September 2012) of 1400 Prospect Avenue entertained the Plainfield GC member with stories of the house which included how Plainfield GC Mrs. William J. Cooke '16 and her husband traveled a lot (he had some sort of professional connections in Washington, DC) and their son Billy Cooke was left at the house with a governess.

The Stouts (who lived across the street) could remember how they attended Billy Cooke's birthday parties.

The homeowner said that a pyschic came to the house once and said there were 6 ghosts there. One was detectable by the almond-scented pipe tobacco. Another ghost was detectable by the strong smell of chocolate. And yet another ghost would tug the hair of only true blonds. Upon reading the physical description of Bill Murrie, who lived and died in the house, as "towheaded" one should wonder if the tugging of the hair and the strong smell of chocolate are related. (Mr. Murrie being the well known, powerful Hershey executive.)

The homeowner also reported that one day, Mr. Murrie's son, Bruce, showed up in the driveway and asked to see the house.

Once the house was on a house tour and Plainfield Garden Club member Toddy Pond served as the docent in the dining room. Toddy Pond was the daughter-in-law of Plainfield Garden Club member Mrs. Harry H. Pond, who lived at 1400 Prospect circa 1917.

1909 Plainfield City Directory

Stout Arthur D, salesman, h 38 Sycamore av, N P
Stout Carrie wid Randolph, h 428 Spooner av
STOUT, CHAUNCEY F sales and distributing agent Courier-News, 201 Park av, h 420 W 5th
Stout Frank, salesman, h 1009 Putnam av

1915 - 1923 List of Meetings

1925 Meeting Minutes

1920 Meeting Minutes

August 26, 2013 Red Chair Travels

Has everyone heard of this blog: Red Chair Travels? It seems it stayed the night at The Pillars this month and on an excursion, went to the Shakespeare Garden where it was photographed!

This is the entry: Did you know that there is such a thing as Shakespeare's Garden? Well the Red Chair was able to visit one of the less than 100 certified Shakespeare Gardens in the entire country! What this means is that this garden is entirely composed of plants that Shakespeare himself has mentioned in any of his works. It was started in the 1920's by the Plainfield Garden Club, founded by a former owner of The Pillars and was recently completely refurbished.

The Red Chair recounted the many literary works of Shakespeare as it wandered through the gardens. Red felt as if it had traveled back in time for just a short while. Thank you Pillars of Plainfield for showing the Red Chair one of your favorite places!


UPDATE: Brenda has written in to say that she has been following the Red Chair and alerts us to this article & film in the Courier News

Watch the music video here – how fun that we are part of this national "inspiration!"

1973-1974 Park Schedule Chairman

1974-1975 Directory

Westpoint Memorial 1949

Harry H. Stout 1895

Cullum No. 3623 • Apr 13, 1949 • Died in Plainfield, New Jersey

Our dynamic Harry Stout died in his sleep In his hotel suite in Plainfield, New Jersey; apparently taken unawares by death. His faith In tomorrow undaunted, it was to be another day in pursuing his course of continuing a life worth living; and throughout his career he seems never to have recognized defeat. Although late In life he found himself decidedly handicapped physically, he was never so mentally, and his mind proved equal to the occasion under all circumstances.

Born in Arizona. December 8, 1872, the family moved to Pennsylvania when he was but a youngster; and there, some twelve years later, in 1891, he was appointed to the Military Academy. Liberally endowed with intellect and energy, his cadet days were a series of well-balanced activities; free from care in class standing, he could well afford to participate in the various athletics and all else going to the making of a fully-equipped cadet. A corporal and then a sergeant in "B" Company, he was in turn a cadet lieutenant in "D" Company; while in athletic sports he played four years of baseball either second base or shortstop, and four years of football, as quarterback; the Academy records showing that he won letters on both counts–baseball and football.

In our Hundredth Night play, "Under Two Flags", Stout took the part of Harvey Howard, a "cit" and a villain, alias Charles Neville, Aide-de-Camp. Nothing like that would have been complete without Stout; although if my memory is correct and as a matter of interest, he was one of the two of the Class on furlough who wired regrets in waiving the opportunity to accompany the Corps to the World's Fair in Chicago in 1893.

Commissioned a second lieutenant upon graduation, he was assigned to the 6th Cavalry, at Fort Myer. There he married Miss Helen Craig, not only a popular, but a very popular, Cadet girl of our time at West Point, while her father Captain Craig was the senior Cavalry instructor and highly regarded by the Cadets. Quoting from the Washington Morning Times, December 29, 1896, in covering the wedding;

"A brilliant military wedding was celebrated at Fort Myer, Va., yesterday evening, the bride being Miss Helen Craig, only daughter of Captain and Mrs. Louis'A. Craig, and the groom, Lieutenant H. H. Stout, of the Sixth Cavalry, U.S.A. The ceremony was performed at the residence of the bride's parents, in the presence of only the immediate relatives of the young people. The house was beautifully adorned with palms and yellow roses, while the yellow of the cavalry was used entirely as the color scheme throughout the house. The Sixth Cavalry Band furnished the music, playing the wedding march very softly as the bride entered the parlor on the arm of her father. The groom and his best man, Mr. G. B. Grandin, of this city, awaited the coming of the bride with the officiating clergyman. Reverend D. J. Stafford, D.D., of St. Patrick's Church, Washingon.

"There were no bridesmaids, but Louis Craig, Jr., the six-year-old son of the house, held his sister's bouquet during the ceremony, which was performed under the crossed flags of the Sixth Cavalry and the United States government. The bride, who is a graceful and pretty brunette, was born under the same regimental colors in a tent in Arizona, less than twenty years-ago. The wedding gown was of heavy cream white satin, with plain trained skirt and youthful looking bodice of white chiffon, with girdle of white velvet and particularly stylish sleeves. No ornaments were worn, and the veil was fastened by two tulle rosettes. The band played Gounod's ‘Ave Maria' during the ceremony and other appropriate selections throughout the evening. In addition to the two large flags mentioned, the company guidons of the groom and the father of the bride were crossed at the end of the room, and in the hall were crossed sabers, with the cavalry trumpet and regimental colors surmounting them. A reception followed the ceremony, which was attended by all the officers and their families at the post,
and a number of personal friends from this city.

"Among the gueBts were: Mr. J. H. Stout, the father of the groom; Mrs. Malin and Mrs. H. M. Craig, the two grandmothers of the bride; Cadet Malin Craig of West Point, the Secretary of War and Mrs. Lamont, Colonel and MrB. Barry, Major and Mrs. Poole, Miss Poole, Miss Miles, daughter of the General of the Army; Colonel and Mrs. Sumner, Major Lebo, Captain and Mrs. Arthur, Captain and Mrs. Cheever, Major and Mrs. Car-lington. Colonel and Mrs. Weeks, Major and Mrs. Babcock, Captain and Mrs. Kendall, Major and Mrs. Hall, Lieut, and Mrs. Wilcox, Mr. and Mrs. Grandin and Miss Grandin, Lieut, and Mrs. Rhodes and Lieuts. Guignard and Fleming of the Fourth Artillery.

"The gifts were unusually handsome and numerous and included a very large assortment of silver and exquisite cut glass. Mr. and Mrs. Stout were driven to Washington after the reception, from which point they started on a honeymoon trip of two weeks, after which they will reside at Fort Myer"
From Fort Myer, in 1898, Stout went to Cuba, participating in the Santiago Campaign; and returning to the U.S. he was an instructor in mathematics for a short time at the Military Academy and assistant football coach, which tour terminated with his transfer to the Ordnance Department and subsequent change of station to Watertown Arsenal, in January, 1899. A few months later, in June, he was transferred to Benicia Arsenal; and from early in January, 1900, until he resigned from the Army, December 28, 1901, he was Inspector of Powder, California Powder Works, and Santa Cruz, California.

Entering civil life at San Francisco, he was General Manager of the Peyton Chemical Company until December 3, 1907. The next four years he was Consulting Engineer, General Chemical Co., at Bay Point, California. From there he moved to New York, where he was Constructing Engineer of the General Chemical Company for three years. From 1914 to 1917 he was Superintendent of the Nichols Copper Company in New York. For the next four years he was Superintendent of the Copper Queen Smelter of the Phelps Dodge Company at Douglas, Arizona, transferring to New York as Chief Metallurgist with the same company in 1921, and so continuing until 1933. Also In 1930, he Joined the Independent Consultant Engineering Office in New York, remaining with it until he retired from active business in 1936, while making his home at Ardsley-on-Hudson, New York.
The holder of some twenty patents in connection with methods of smelting and refining copper, one of Stout's contributions to industry in this connection is set forth in a paragraph quoted here from the June 1930 number of Mining and Metallurgy:

"In 1918 H. H. Stout, then superintendent of the Copper Queen Smelter, a man experienced in theoretical combustion, came to the conclusion that a reverberatory furnace should be constructed to burn the maximum amount of fuel in such a manner as to give the hottest possible flame that the refractory brick would stand. He therefore remodeled his oil burners so as to produce an Intense hot short flame, raised his arch in the skimming end and enlarged the uptake so as to give approximately 70 sq. ft. area. Dampers were closed until the furnace was up to smelting temperature and were then opened. The practical reverberatory men on the job predicted that slag would never be sufficiently liquid to skim and after smelting for some time it was impossible to skim, as the bath was frozen over at the bay and the operators called for help. Mr. Stout arrived, looked at the furnace and said, ‘I have provided outlet for burning plenty of fuel. Just put on three more oil burners; it is just a matter of burning sufficient fuel.' They got their burners on and in two hours everything was ready for skimming. A new reverberatory doctrine was evolved, namely, build your reverberatory to satisfy the principles of combustion and then dump in your charge. It does not make much difference how it goes in as long as it is uniformly fed at the rate it will smelt. This paved the way for the present tonnages of from 750 to 1,000 tons per furnace day. If one studies the changes in reverberatory construction as I have endeavored to outline them here it will be seen that there was a gradual awakening to open outlet areas so more fuel could be burned. One furnace I have described in 1912 had large outlets, and if they had but put on 2 or 3 more burners at that time they would not have had to reduce their outlet dimensions."

His time with the Phelps Dodge Company, in Douglas, however, was interrupted by his returning to the Army for active duty in World War I. Commissioned a Lieutenant Colonel in the Ordnance Department in 1918, he was Chief Ammunition Officer, 1st Army, at Souilly, in France, from October 28, 1918, to April 4, 1919; and in Washington after that, until he was honorably discharged April 21, 1919. For this service he has an official commendation by General Pershing; and Colonel Joseph S. Herron, a classmate, writes that Stout's mission with the 1st Army "was to gather up, sort, and classify all the artillery shells, gas shells, bombs, grenades, and shrapnel–American, German, British, French, and Belgian–of all calibres, live and duds, above ground or buried, used or new, shipping the good ammunition to the U.S.A. or the appropriate ally, and demolishing all duds and unusable projectiles by blowing them up either In place or in huge piles. The American sectors and areas covered a large part of the country from Chateau Thierry to Belgium, and from near Switzerland to the sea; and great dumps as well as scattered missiles reminded me of the pyramids and the sands of the desert. We have read about the dangerous jobs of the British in removing the fuses from buried duds and moving all the people to a safe distance, but Stout was doing that every day and often many times a day. They had to run for their lives when the explosions took place, if clouds of mustard gas, coming out of the dumps, and a shift in the wind took place, pursued them. The Job had to be done to the satisfaction of the French Government, in accordance with treaty obligations, and It was. No reclaimer, law suits, claims for damages, or criticism came out of the monster undertaking, thanks to Stout. Nor were any of his men Injured but one, who carelessly threw down some duds In violation of orders–a phenomenal record. Stout was one of God's noblemen."

Throughout his busy life, at no time did he lag In Class spirit. He was the Class representative, from the beginning, In the Installation of the Class window, "The Boy Christ in The Temple", in the Cadet Chapel. The window was duly dedicated at the ceremony on June 10. 1917, at West Point. A generous and consistent contributor to the Class fund, he was a, if not the, prime mover in our having a Class memorial tree; supporting the idea with a liberal contribution of funds. The tree, now well advanced in growth, a beautiful pink horsechestnut, planted in 1937, is in the vicinity of the Commandant's quarters, honoring Lieutenant Colonel Morton F. Smith and Colonel Jens Bugge, Jr., Class of 1895, who were Commandants when they died.

In 1940, Stout and Mrs. Stout moved from Ardsley-on-Hudson to Plainfield, New Jersey, making their home in an attractive suite in the Park Hotel; there to be near their son. Harry Howard Stout, Jr., now Colonel, and family–his wife and their two young sons.

At one period of their retirement, they were making seasonable visits to North Carolina, where appreciative friends write of them admiringly and miss them accordingly.

Mrs. Stout died April 9, 1944; and quoting from the New York Times of April 10, in connection with her death:

‘‘Plainfield, N. J., April 9–Mrs. Helen Craig Stout, wife of Colonel Harry H. Stout. U.S.A., retired, and sister of General Malin Craig, formerly Chief of Staff of the United States Army, died here today at her home, the Park Hotel, after a long illness. Her age was 67.

"Mrs. Stout, daughter of Major Louis A. and Georgianna Malin Craig of St. Louis, was born in April, 1877, in an army tent at Fort Huachuca, Arizona, while her father was pursuing Apache Indians. Major Craig was then with one of four troops of the Sixth Cavalry, which had been sent to establish a new army post on the Mexican border.

‘‘The only cradle the daughter ever knew was a hardtack box. Her childhood and youth were passed at Forts Huachuca, Wingate, Lowell and Bayard, all in the heart of the Apache country when Chiefs Natches and Geronimo were on the warpath. While at Fort Bayard she met General John J. Pershing, then a second lieutenant of the Sixth Cavalry, and formed a friendship which lasted until her death.
‘‘A long line of military and naval officers is to be found in Mrs. Stout's family. Her paternal grandfather was General James Craig of the Union Army, later a member of the House of Representatives from Missouri. Her mother's father was Doctor Joseph Malin. a Union Army surgeon. Mrs. Stout's father was graduated from West Point in 1874, her husband in 1895, her older brother, Malin, who was Chief of Staff from 1935 to 1939. in 1898; her younger brother, Louis A. Craig, now major general commanding the Twenty-third Army Corps, in 1913. and her son, Major Harry H. Stout. Jr., in 1922.

"Mrs. Stout was a member of the Colony Club of New York.

"Besides her husband, her son, and two brothers she leaves two grand-children."

Stout's death followed Mrs. Stout's by five years–almost to the day. He was buried with military honors in Arlington National Cemetery, where she and their infant firstborn, Malin. had preceded him. Deeply mourned, they have left a grievous break in our ranks; which nobody failB to realize.

–Frank Bingley Watson, '95.

May 14, 1983 Centennial The Wardlaw Hartridge School

December 12, 2013 Email from the Current Owner

I have attached a pen and ink drawing of the front and back of 1220 Rahway Road (not Avenue), which really is an extraordinary home. The construction is steel-reinforced concrete, much to the chagrin of all who have worked here! It was built no later than 1929, as that is the date on one wall on the third floor, in the attic area.

The property looks different since we moved here in 1984, with the most drastic change thanks to Sandy last year. But we have an amazing tree that is quite unusual. I will get more information on it as well as any pictures I can find.

Thanks for your help and your interest in the wonderful history of Plainfield!

1220 Rahway Road