Plainfield Garden Club








Member: deForest, Mrs. Henry Lockwood (Amy Brighthurst Brown) '33

Childhood home was Brighthurst off Prospect Avenue, West Orange

1916 Social Registery address: 955 Hillside Avenue, Plainfield

1928 Treasurer Book June 27th $5.00 Listed as "Mrs. H. L. de Forest" Could Mrs. de Forest's join date be incorrect?
1929 Treasurer Book Active April $5.00
1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935 Treasurer Book Active

1932 Directory* Address: 955 Hillside Avenue, Plainfield

* = This directory was not dated but it is presumed it dates from the year 1932

1936 Treasurer Book: Mrs. Henry L. deForest 1/7/36 PAID Transferred Nov. 16, 1936

1937 Treasurer Book, listed under "Associate" Mrs. Henry L. de Forest 1/11/37 Pd.

1938 Treasurer Book, Associate: Mrs. Henry L. de Forest 1/6/38 Pd. 1/12/39 Pd. 1/10/40 Pd. 1/14/41 Pd. 11/29/41 Pd. 11/25/42 Pd. 12/7/43 Pd. 11/28/44 Pd. 12/3/45 May 14, 1946 May 10, 1947 June 4, 1948 June 8, 1949 May 29, 1950 June 1951 June 1952

1942 Directory: 955 Hillside Avenue
NOTE: Mrs. Henry L. de Forest is listed as an "Associate Member"

Other PGC resource material had Mrs. deForest's membership year as 1933 which would be inconsistent with the directory which was presumed to be from 1932.

Sister-in-law to Mrs. Pierre ( Frances Johnston) Mali '18

John Crosby Brown

John Crosby Brown
John Crosby Brown (1838-1909), was senior partner of Brown Brothers & Co. "Union Theological Seminary's share in Mr. Brown's life was unique, and of late almost absorbing. His father had been a large benefactor of the seminary, and Dr. William Adams, his father-in-law, was for seven years the President of its faculty. John Crosby Brown became a Director of it in 1868, before he was thirty, succeeding the late William E. Dodge, Sr., as Vice President of its Board of Directors in 1883." The Rev. Professor William Adams Brown, D.D., Scroll & Key 1886, of Union Seminary was a son. James Brown was his nephew. (John Crosby Brown Dead. New York Times, Jun. 26, 1909; Bulletin of Yale University, Obituary Record of Graduates of the Undergraduate Schools Deceased During the Year 1943-1944, pp 31- 33; William Adams Brown Papers, Columbia University.) Another daughter of Rev. Adams married Brown Brothers partner Eugene Delano of Philadelphia. (The Rev. Dr. Adams Dead. New York Times, Sep. 1, 1880.)

Yale Obituary Record 1943-44 / Yale University Library (pdf, 393 pp)
William Adams Brown Papers / Columbia University (pdf, 8pp)

Another son, James Crosby Brown, Wolf's Head 1894, was with Brown Brothers & Company ever since graduation. He was a director of numerous coke and coal companies in Pennsylvania. A sister, Amy, was Mrs. Henry L. deForest, Yale 1897. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1929-1930, p. 139.) Another son, Thatcher M. Brown, Wolf's Head 1897, also with Brown Brothers, was on the board of managers of Presbyterian Hospital from 1907 to 1946.


Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1929-1930 / Yale University Library (pdf, 398 pp)

John Crosby Brown (~1893-1950), Scroll & Key 1915, a son of Rev. William Adams Brown, was the president of Tamblyn & Brown, Inc., a public relations counsel and fund-raising firm. It raised over $150 million between 1920 and 1933, including $4,500,000 for the Presbyterian Hospital of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, and for the Yale University Fund. (John C. Brown, 57, Publicist, Is Dead. New York Times, Jul. 27, 1950; Bulletin of Yale University, Obituary Record of Graduates of the Undergraduate Schools Deceased During the Year 1950-1951, pp 79-80.) His cousin, Thatcher M. Brown, was on the board of managers of Presbyterian Hospital from 1907 to 1946.

Yale Obituary Record 1950-51 / Yale University Library (pdf, 160 pp)

John Crosby Brown

John Crosby Brown was born in New York City onMay 22, 1838, the son of James Brown and Eliza Maria Coe. James Brown was a well known banker, founder of the family company Brown Brothers & Co., and a great supporter of Union Theological Seminary. His interest in Union grew following the death of several of his children when the steamship Arctic sank in 1854. James Brown's generosity was most obvious in an 1873 donation fo $300,000, which helped establish several professorships.

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John Crosby Brown

Benevolent Spring House – Northfield Avenue Christian Path and the Pilgrim Cross

The progress of several centuries have all but eroded away any evidence of the first settlers to the Orange Mountains. For clarification the ridges of the first and second mountain of the Watchung Mountain Range encompassing West Orange are known as the Orange Mountains. These were known as the Newark Mountains to the early settlers dating back to at least 1782.

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One by one landmarks of that time have faded into oblivion and became extinct. Old colonial homes, ponds, brooks, paths and the like have all passed away without any formal eulogy. Few if any have been marked or designated in any manner for the benefit of future generations. But two priceless treasures survive today and wait to be rediscovered and assume their rightful place in this towns glorious past. Both neatly tucked away, perhaps unnoticed and not understood, but they bear silent witness like a centurion standing watch over West Orange history.

In the seventeenth century a small collection of hamlets we know today as The Oranges was then known as "The Mountain Society". These settlements had moved westward from the banks of the Passaic River in Newark shortly after 1666 into the outlying areas of current day Essex County. Early roads and paths primarily made this migration possible. Two of them passed through current day West Orange. One was known as the Swinefield road until 1832 when it was renamed Washington Street and Eagle Rock Avenue. The other route was known as the Christians Path. It was a path by which those from the Newark colony traveled over the mountain to settle in the fertile western farmlands. Here agricultural interests could be pursued with favorable outcome. This path was an old Indian trail also used by the settlers to attend weekly religious services at the old meeting house. This was the forerunner of The First Presbyterian Church of Orange and was once located just east of what is now Day Street in Orange. Every Sunday morning all that were able to travel would trudge down the mountain over the Christian Path on their way to worship services. They came by foot some walking from as far away as Caldwell then known as Horse Neck. The path was gradually widened by continuous usage and eventually able to accommodate ox carts. The journey could present hardships and take upwards of several hours. Legend has it that in order to save shoe leather the trip was often made barefooted until reaching Northfield Avenue on the final approach to Orange.

The route passed through West Orange along the ridge of the first mountain on a path (no longer accessible) paralleling Prospect Avenue before connecting with Northfield Avenue. In the 1870s John Crosby Brown, a prominent NY banker, owned a sprawling estate on the mountain ridge overlooking the Orange Valley named "Brighthurst". Mr. Brown was active in the St. Cloud Presbyterian Church which was founded in 1877. Upon realizing that the Christian Path came through his property he decided to erect a memorial to the early settlers who had passed this way. In 1878 on his property he erected the Pilgrim Cross along side the old route. Even at that time the Christians Path was slowly fading from memory. If not for John Crosby Brown we might not know it's story today. On the stone cross was inscribed " The Christian Path" and on it's base a plaque with the following phrase: " The Christian Path - The Christian Pilgrims who this pathway trod, are now in Heaven and walk with God (1878)"

John Crosby Brown was a generous man and several years later in about 1900 he constructed a spring house for weary travelers. It was a watering hole on his property bordering on Northfield Avenue in the old Spottiswoode Quarry. A plaque at the spring house read : "Stay weary traveler rest awhile, no banquet this nor merry feast. But here will flow at thy desire pure water for both man and beast" This plaque still exists on Northfield Avenue at the site of the old spring house sitting between two modern houses on the north side of Northfield Avenue just slightly below Prospect Avenue. The Pilgrim Cross also survives but was moved from it's original location on Crosby's property at Brighthurst which is now long gone. It proudly stands today at the entrance to the St. Cloud Presbyterian Church. They are forgotten treasures with a direct link to the last century that both sat along one of the earliest traveled routes through West Orange.

John Crosby Brown Information courtesy of Joseph Fagan (WestOrangeHistory.com)

The following information and photographs were kindly lent to this site by the author, Joseph Fagan. For more information, please visit www.westorangehistory.com

John Crosby Brown Benevolent Spring House

in 1900 John Crosby Brown, a prominent NY banker who lived in West Orange constructed a spring house on his property bordering on Northfield Avenue in the old Spottiswoode Quarry which can be seen in the background. Pictured below is the present day location. The cliffs of the former quarry still can be seen. The old plaque cannot be read in the postcard view but it stands at this site today

Vintage Pilgrim Postcards

June 26, 1909 New York Times obituary

Mr. Brown married on November 9, 1804. Miss Mary E. Adams of this city, who, with six children, survive him. These are the Rev. Professor William Adams Brown, D.D., of Union Seminary; Mrs. Eliza Coe Moore, wife of the Rev. Professsor Edward Caldwell Moore, D.D., of Harvard University; Miss Mary Magoun Brown, James Crosby Brown, of Brown Brothers & Co., resident in Philadelphia; Mrs. Amy Brighthurst de Forest, wife of Henry L. de Forest, Esq., and Thatcher Magoun Brown, of Brown Brothers & Co., resident in New York.

Mrs. John Crosby Brown

Mrs John Crosby Brown ca 1900
Museum: Met Museum of New York
Artist: Anders Leonard Zorn

Amy Brighhurst Brown

NameAmy Brighthurst Brown
Spouses
1Henry Lockwood DeForest
Birth1875
FatherRobert Weeks DeForest (1848-1931)
Mother Emily Johnston
Children
May
Emily (1903-1977)

August 3, 1909 New York Times article

Amy Brighthurst Brown named in John Crosby's will.

August 25, 1899 New York Times wedding announcement

Orange, NJ. August 24 – Miss Amy Brighthurst Brown, youngest daughter of J. Crosby Brown, and Henry Moorhead De Forst, were married this afternoon at Brighthurst, the residence of the bride's parents, on the Orange Mountain. On account of the illness of the bride's mother, only the families of the bride and bridegroom were present. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Edward Caldwell Moore of Providence, RI, the bride's brother-in-law. Miss May Brown, the bride's sister, was the maid of honor, and John De Forest, brother of the bridegroom, was the best man. The bride wore a gown of white moire antique and point lace, which was her mother's wedding dress.

Amy Brighthurst Brown

Amy Brighthurst5 Brown (John Crosby4, James3, Alexander2, William1) was born Apr 28, 1878, and died 1960. She married Henry Lockwood de Forest Aug 24, 1899. He was born Aug 6, 1875 in Plainfield, NJ, and died 1954.

Children of Amy Brown and Henry de Forest are:
+ 359 i. May6 de Forest, born Mar 27, 1902 in New York, NY; died 1990.
+ 360 ii. Emily Johnston de Forest, born May 22, 1903 in Superior, WI; died 1977.
361 iii. Robert Weeks de Forest, born Sep 11, 1909 in Superior, WI; died Sep 11, 1909.

Brighthurst, West Orange

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The History of "The Ridge"
The First Range of the Watchung Mountains was known to the families that lived there as "The Ridge". Its altitude of 610 feet was quite low as mountains go, but it towered over the land stretching the 15 miles to New York. In the 1870's, the "Ridge" had a number of well-known people who either moved from New York City, or spent their summers on the mountain, overlooking New York City. General George McClellan owned a gentleman's farm that stretched from Mt. Pleasant
Ave. to Northfield Rd., After the General's death in 1881, his mansion and part of the estate was purchased by Eugene Delano. The property was further subdivided into six or seven estates. John Crosby Brown, another NYC banker, purchased acreage that went as far south as Northfield Rd., and built two mansions, located where Seton Hall Prep now has a playing field. The mansions were called "Brighthurst" and "Holmhurst". The General's home was called "Maywood", and was farther north. The foundations of these three homes were lost when the field was built. The remains of the Delano Orchid Greenhouse and the overgrown formal gardens are still recognizable, west of the
"Maywood" location. Seton Hall Prep is using several of the drives from the estates as cross-country tracks. Further north on Prospect Ave., then called "Perry Lane" was the property of Maria Harding Farr. Barkley Farr was a prime force in establishing the Williamsburg Restoration. The next property was the Douglas Robinson estate. Mrs. Robinson was the sister of President Teddy Roosevelt.

McClellan, Brown, Delano, and Robinson were some of the Founding Fathers of the St. Cloud Presbyterian Church, founded in 1877. Overlooking the New York skyline, just west of the trap rock
quarry was one of the summer homes of the famous architect, Stanford White. It was a lovely Victorian mansion, with turrets and secret stairs for the hired help. Mr. White's claim to fame was
two-fold. He was the architect of Penn Station and the Boston Public Library. He was also known as quite the New York playboy, and was shot dead in Madison Square Garden by the new husband
of White's "girlfriend. Another of his designs is the "Crystal Plaza", on Northfield Ave. in Livingston. Continuing north to Mt. Pleasant Ave. and stretching from Prospect Ave. down to the sharp
bend on Mt. Pleasant Ave., was the estate of George Loree. Mr. Loree had controlling interest in Pennslyvania Railroad, before the company changed its name. His mansion became the dormitory
for Carteret Prep School, after Mr. Loree's death.
Moving north, across Mt. Pleasant Ave. we find the 100 acres of the estate of George Merck, of Merck Pharmacuticals. His property went as far north as the Crystal Lake property, which now
contains Route 280 and the Condominiums, across from Essex Green Shopping Center, and east to the border of Llewellyn Park. Mr. Merck also had a "gentleman's farm", with cows, pigs, horses, chickens, peacocks, and other animals. His tenant farmer, a man who was disabled at the Merck factory, managed the farm.
There were three working Trap Rock Quarries on the edge of the "Ridge". The first one to close was on Northfield Ave., behind the apartments. The second one to close in the late 20's is
located near the bend in Mt. Pleasant Ave. The last one, located on Eagle Rock Ave., continued operation until around the time Route 280 was cut through the "Ridge". The "cut" was considered
quite an attraction for geologists, who came to study the rock formations. Apartments have been
built on this site, also.
9

Mrs. Leslie Tillotson (Emily de Forest) Webster

Emily DeForest (Henry Lockwood DeForest , Robert Weeks DeForest , Henry Grant DeForest , Lockwood DeForest , Nehemiah DeForest , Samuel DeForeest , David DeForeest , Isaac DeForeest , Jesse , Jean , Melchoir III , Melchior II , Melchoir , Gaspard , Simon , Jean , Thomas , Louis , Jehan , Alard , Giles de L'Estoc , Gerard , Herbert , Waitier , Herbert ) was born in 1903. She died in 1977.

Emily married Leslie Tillotson Webster. Leslie was born in 1894. He died in 1943.


They had the following children.

3244 F i Emily Anne Webster.

Emily married Walter Williams.

Emily also married Harold T White. Harold was born in 1875. He died in 1960.

Mrs. Oliver H. (Mary deForest) Payne

May DeForest (Henry Lockwood DeForest , Robert Weeks DeForest , Henry Grant DeForest , Lockwood DeForest , Nehemiah DeForest , Samuel DeForeest , David DeForeest , Isaac DeForeest , Jesse , Jean , Melchoir III , Melchior II , Melchoir , Gaspard , Simon , Jean , Thomas , Louis , Jehan , Alard , Giles de L'Estoc , Gerard , Herbert , Waitier , Herbert ).

May married Oliver H Payne.


They had the following children.

+ 3242 M i Peter N Payne.
3243 F ii Joan B Payne was born on 16 Jan 1936 in New York, New York. She died on 11 Feb 1983 in Plattsburg, New York.

Joan married Richard Eugene Murphy. Richard was born on 15 May 1934 in New York, New York. He died on 2 Oct 1994 in Valcour, New York.[Notes]

December 15, 1900 New York Times

FIRE DESTROYED RARE FLOWERS

John Crosby Brown's Orange Mountain Greenhouses Burned
Special to the New York Times

ORANGE, N.J. Dec. 14 – Rare orchids, palms and chyrsanthemums to the value of several thousand dollars were destroyed in a fire in the big greenhouses of J. Crosby Brown, the banker, at his residence on top of Orange Mountain at 1 o'clock this morning. The blaze, which is supposed to have been caused by overheated pipes, was discovered by Policeman Tims, and it was due to the alarm given by him that the house and the other buildings were not destroyed. When firemen arrived they did not have water pressure enough to do more than keep the fire from spreading to other buildings on the place.

Mr. Brown and his family are at their Winter residence in New York. The banker is an enthusiastic collector and floriculturist, and his conservatories contained specimens of some of the finest orchids and chyrsanthemums known.

John Crosby Brown on Facebook

John Crosby Brown (1838–June 25, 1909) was a partner in Brown Bros. & Co. which was founded by his father James Brown and his uncles the sons of Alexander Brown of Baltimore. He married Mary E. Adams in 1864 the dauighter of John Adams (educator). He died on June 25, 1909 in Orange Mountain House, New Jersey.

Some records of John Crosby Brown are included in the Brown Brothers Harriman Collection, which is housed in New-York Historical Society's manuscript collection.

Sources

West Orange History: John Crosby Brown
Bulletin of the Metropolitan Museum of Art: John Crosby Brown, Treasurer
Biographic Dictionary of American Business Leaders: John Crosby Brown

स्रोत
Description above from the Wikipedia article John Crosby Brown, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors यहाँ. Community Pages are not affiliated with, or endorsed by, anyone associated with the topic.

John Adams on Facebook

Mrs. Henry Lockwood (Amy Brighthurst Brown) deForest's grandfather

John Adamsमनपर्‍योPersonवर्णन
खुला विश्वकोष विकिपेडियाबाट
John Adams (September 18, 1772 April 24, 1863) was an American educator noted for organizing several hundred Sunday schools. His life was celebrated by Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. in his poem, "The School Boy", which was read at the centennial celebration of Phillips Academy in 1878, thus recalls him:

Biography
Early life
Adams was born in 1772 at Canterbury, Connecticut, to Captain John Adams, a farmer of Canterbury and an officer in the American Revolutionary War and Mary Parker, the daughter of Dea. Joshua Parker and Jemima Davenport. He graduated from Yale University in 1795.

Marriage
John Adams married on May 8, 1798 as his first wife Elizabeth Ripley, with whom he had ten children. She was born on March 12, 1776 and died on February 23, 1829. She was a daughter of Gamaliel Ripley and Judith Perkins and was a Great-Great Granddaughter of Governor William Bradford (15901657) of the Plymouth Colony and a passenger on the Mayflower.

John Adams married, as his second wife, on August 30, 1831 in Troy, Rensselaer County, New York, Mrs. Mehitable/Mabel Burritt She was born July 19, 1779 in Williamstown, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, and died at Jacksonville, Illinois on July 17, 1856. She was a daughter of Dea. Ebenezer Stratton and Mary Blair.

Brown Bros. & Co. on Facebook

Brown Bros. & Co.मनपर्‍योOrganizationवर्णन
खुला विश्वकोष विकिपेडियाबाट
Brown Bros. & Co. was a merchant bank from 1818 until its merger with Harriman Brothers & Company in 1931 to form Brown Brothers Harriman & Co.

History
A merchant bank and trading company was founded in 1818 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania by George and John Brown, sons of former Ulster linen trader Alexander Brown (1764–1834) who had established a firm in Baltimore, Maryland. In 1825, third son James Brown (1791–1877) opened an affiliate in New York City under the name Brown Brothers and another in Boston, Massachusetts in 1845. These firms were later merged under the name. James Brown's son, John Crosby Brown (1838–1909), would be a driving force for growth, making Wall Street in New York the center for operations and seeing the bank become major lenders to the textile, commodities, and transportation industries.

In 1931, the firm merged with Harriman Brothers and Company, another Wall Street firm owned by W. Averell Harriman and E. Roland Harriman to form Brown Brothers Harriman & Co.

June 2, 1910 The New York Observer

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A Memorial to John Crosby Brown

The St. Cloud Church to Have a New Sunday School Building

A beautiful Sunday-school building is to be added to the St. Cloud Presbyterian Church on Orange Mountain which will carry over the entrance door on the interior this inscription:

This building in loving memory of John Crosby Brown, Born May 22nd, 1838. Died June 25th 1909. Was erected by his children.

Mr. Brown was for thirty-three years the superintendent of the Sabbath-school for the church, of which he was one of the founders, and into which he had built many years of his life. In comparison with the larger objects which occupied his attention this little Sunday school was an inconspicuous thing, but he believed that valuable manhood and womanhood were outgrowths of truth implanted in childhood, and he gave a touching patience and persistence to the planting. Every child was to him new territory compact of lasting possibilities. Each was considered not only as a special treasure for joy and comfort, but as a being belonging primarily to God's world, who must inevitably act his part in it. He wished, therefore, that all children should grow up in an atomosphere of unconscious preparation, with a fore-knowledge of the importance of life and its responsibilities.

[skip a few paragraphs . . .] The Church of St. Cloud was built in 1877 and is now under the care of the Rev. G. Kennedy Newell, a devoted pastor and a preacher of great excellence. It is beautifully situated on the brow of Orange Mountain, overlooking the near lands and waters of New Jersey, and the enormous stretch of New York City beyond, its innumberable steeples, and towering roofs fading into the distance misty with habitation.

A well traveled walk leads from the vicinity of this charming church through the forest, gardens and lawns of Brighthurst, Mr. Brown's country home. In the earliest days a chance Indian trail, this path later became the recognized route over which teh scattered families of the first and second mountains passed every Sabbath morning on their way to church in the valley beneath. These Christian pilgrims carried with them their shoes and stockings, possessions far too precious to be worn until within sight of the church, and also provisions for their midday meal. Upon the Brighthurst estate was a wayside spring, where they would often stop to rest. The "Christian Path" a it was long called, appears upon the old maps of New Jersey. The points where it enters and leaves Mr. Brown's grounds are marked by crosses. Upon the lower of these are chiseled these words:

The Christian pilgrims who this pathway tred
Are now in Heaven and walk with God

Mr. Brown and his family were accustomed to use the path on their return from service in the St. Cloud Church, and one familiar with the mental atompshere of his home would have found it incomplete without this close connection between the centers of daily living and of the religious life.

[skip a few paragraphs . . .]

Upon a piece of woodland not far from his house was a small log cabin, furnished as a pioneer home in the wilderness which had been built originally for hs children. In it as a matter of diversion and play the elemental principles of house-keeping had been practised. Later, as childhood passed, this log cabin became the center of a scheme of entertainment for the poor mothers of the tenements. One day of the week was called "Friends' Day," and mothers with their little children and babies, selected according to their needs by the City Mission workers of the lower east side of New York, were brought by train and carriage into the beautiful environment of Brownie Lodge. Here they found in abundance of garden vegetables, fruit, milk, tea, coffee, eggs and the added luxury of a joint of meat from the home house. Here they might cook their vegetables in perfect freedom and companionship, and divide the surplus upon going home after the joy of a restful day among trees and flowers.

Amy Brighthurst Brown

NameAmy Brighthurst Brown
Spouses
1Henry Lockwood DeForestBirth1875FatherRobert Weeks DeForest (1848-1931)MotherEmily Johnston
ChildrenMay Emily (1903-1977)

Emily Johnston DeForest (mother-in-law to Amy Brighthurst Brown DeForest)

Emily JohnstonFatherJohn Taylor Johnston
Spouses
1Robert Weeks DeForestBirth25 Apr 1848Death6 May 1931FatherHenry Grant DeForest (1820-1889)MotherJulia Mary Weeks
Marriage12 Nov 1872
ChildrenEthel (1876-1959) Frances Emily (1878-) Henry Lockwood (1875-) Johnston (1873-)
Notes for Emily Johnston
Author of "A Walloon Family in America"

955 Hillside Avenue

Courier News

http://www.plainfieldlibrary.info/pdf/LH/LH_CNO-D.pdf

De Foreest John De Witt wife Sidney Fisher 2/8/1936 News
De Foreest John De Witt wife Sidney Fisher 3/31/1937 News
De Foreest John De Witt wife Sidney Fisher 8/27/1940 News
De Foreest John De Witt wife Sidney Fisher 3/30/1955 News
De Foreest John De Witt wife Sidney Fisher 10/28/1968 Obituary
De Foreest John De Witt wife Sidney Fisher n.d. News
De Foreest Sidney Fisher husband John De Witt n.d. News
de Forest Henry Lockwood 11/25/1939 News
de Forest Henry Lockwood 3/19/1954 Obituary
de Forest Henry Lockwood 4/1/1954 News
De Forest Johnston 11/26/1952 Obituary

November 14, 1895 New York Times

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=FB0911FE355911738DDDAD0994D9415B8585F0D3

PLAINFIELD KIRMESS OPENED

In Aid of Muhlenberg Hospital – Good Attendance and Reason for Expecting Financial Success – The Booths.

PLAINFIELD, N. J., Nov. 13 – There was a grand opening of the kirmess at the Columbia Cycle Academy Monday night, and the building was decorated very elaborately.

Not since the charity ball have the society fold here been interested in a like event for such a worthy cause. The kirmess is given for the benefit of Muhlenberg Hospital, and, judging from the attendance at the opening night, the hospital will be greatly bettered financially.

Booths have been very prettily arranged about the academy, making an exceedingly tasty show. The equipment of the booths is as follows:

French Booth – Mrs. Albert Hoffman Atterbury, Mrs. Irving H. Brown, Mrs. Charles B. Corwin, Miss Bessie Ginna, Mrs. George C. Evans, Mrs. Charles J. Fisk, Mrs. Ellis W. Hedges, Miss E. E. Kenyon and Miss Whiton.

Florentine Booth – Mrs. I. N. Van Sickle, Mrs. David E. Titsworth, Mrs. W. M. Stillman, Mrs. John D. Titsworth, Mrs. F. A. Dunham, Miss Louise Clawson, Miss Bessie TItsworth, and Mrs. Lulu Lewis.

Gypsy Booth – Mrs. Joseph W. Reinhart, and Mrs. Howard Fleming.

Venetian Booth – Mrs. Hugh Hastings, Miss Emelie Schipper, Mrs. George A. Chapman, Miss Havbiland, Mrs. Samuel Huntingont, Mrs. Emil Woltman, Mrs. Samuel St. J. McCutchen, Mrs. Conklin, Mrs. C. S. West, Mrs. W. E. Lower, Miss E. R. Cock, Mrs. Frank O. Herring, Miss Huntington, Miss Maud Van Bosckerck, Miss MacCready, Miss Clara D. Finley, Miss Ahrens, Miss Aynne MacCready, Miss Mondanari, Miss Graff, Miss Yerkes, Miss Gertrude Walz, and Miss Pierson.

Japanese Booth – Mrs. Charles Seward Foote, Mrs. George Clay, Mrs. S.P. Simpson, Mrs. L. Finch, Mrs. Constantine P. Ralli, Mrs. William Lewis Brown, Mrs. L. Dennis, Mrs. WIlliam Pelletier, Miss Ellis, Miss Anthony, Miss Dryden, Miss Morgan, Miss Bowen, Miss Lawrence, and Miss Rodman.

Spanish Booth – Mrs. S. A. Cruikshank, Mrs. A. T. Slauson, Mrs. J. F. Wichers, Mrs. T. H. Curtis, Mrs. Marion S. Ackerman, Mrs. T. A. Hazell, Mrs. H. L. Moore, Mrs. D. T. Van Buren, Mrs. E. H. Mosher, Miss Harriott, Miss Louise Patton, Miss Maud Lord, Miss May Kirkner, Miss Louise Van Zandt, Miss Annie Horton, Miss Titsworth, and Miss Meredith.

German Booth – Mrs. Mason W. Tyler, Mrs. Logan Murphy, Mrs. John H. Oarman, Mrs. Charles J. Taggart, Mrs. Benjamin R. Western, Mrs. J. E. Turill, Mrs. Arthur T. Gallup, Mrs. Horsley Barker, Mrs. John Haviland, Mrs. George Wright, Mrs. Amra Hamragan, Mrs. William L. Saunders, Mrs. William Wright, Miss Annie Murphy, Miss Wright, Miss Western, Miss Bartling, Miss Helen Warman, Miss Emma Adams and Miss Ann Thorne.

Stationery Booth – Mrs. John Gray Foster, Mrs. Elliott Barrows, Mrs. A. W. Haviland, Mrs. John D. Miller, Mrs. James R. Joy, and Miss Emily R. Tracy.

Parisian Flower Stall – Mrs. Harry M. Stockton, Mrs. Evarts Tracy, Mrs. Daniel F. Ginna, Mrs. W. H. Ladd, Mrs. Frederick Yates, Miss Marlon Dumont, Miss Ginna, Miss Baker, Miss Huntington, and Miss Van Bosckerck.

Refreshments were dispensed by Mrs. Orville T. Waring, Mrs. George W. Van Bosckerck, Mrs. John Bushnell, Mrs. Gifford Mayer, Mrs. George H. Goddard, Mrs. Moore, Mrs. H. P. Reynolds, Mrs. C. C. Guion, Mrs. N. P. T. Finch, Mrs. Henry McGee, Mrs. De Revere, Mrs. Ruth C. Leonard, Mrs. George W. Rockfellow, Miss Annie Opdyke, Mrs. Van Alstyne, Mrs. Utzinger, Mrs. Nelson Runyon, Mrs. Henry Tapsley, Miss Martine, Miss Edith Allen, Mrs. J. Parker Mason, Mrs. J. K. Myers, Mrs. Walton, and Mrs. H. C. Adams

Courier News articles

de Forest Henry Lockwood 11/25/1939 News
de Forest Henry Lockwood 3/19/1954 Obituary
de Forest Henry Lockwood 4/1/1954 News
De Forest Johnston 11/26/1952 Obituary

New York Times March 25, 1893

John Taylor Johnston died yesterday morning at his residence, 8 Fifth Avenue, aged seventy-three. The cause of his death was creeping paralysis, which began in 1877. Mr. Johnston had been an invalid for a long time prior to his death, and his ailment caused him to withdraw from active business life at the time of its first symptoms. Mr. Johnston was known to th epublic principally by his founding of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and his connection with the Central Railroad of New Jersey.

Mr. Johnston was born in New York April 8, 1920. His father was John Johnston of Boorman, Johnston & Co., and his mother was Margaret Taylor, the duaghter of John Taylor. Both of his parents were of Scotch birth. John Taylor Johnston was their eldest son. He received his early education in Scotland at the Edinburgh High School. He was graduated from the University of the City of New York in 1829 at the age of nineteen. His father was one fo the founders of that institution. He studied las at the Yale Law School at New Haven with Charles Astor Bristed, Daniel D. Lord, and Henry G. De Forest. He went into the office of Daniel Lord and was admitted to the bar in 1849.

Mr. Johnston remained for a short time in the active practice of his profession, and in 1848 he was introduced to take the Presidency of the then insignificant Somerville and Easton Railroad, which he and his associates developed into what is now know as the Central Railroad of New Jersey, with which his business career will always be associated. His Presidency continued uninterrupted from 1848 until 1877, a period of twenty-nine years. In this railroad at one time his fortune was almost entirely occupied. After his resignation of the Presidency in 1877 he retired from business and the railroad passed into the hands of a receiver.

Mr. Johnston was the orginator, in fact, of the whole Central New Jersey Railroad system. It was his forethought that led to the acquistion of the Lehigh and Susquehanna Railraod to Pennsylvania and its appurtenant coal lands. In was his policy to develop the suburbs through which his railroad passed, and a number of the . . . .(not legible) . . . grades and good alignment and to avoid grade crossings were far in advance of the railroad science of his time and were ridiculed by some of his competition.

In art matters Mr. Johnston has been a conscpicuous figure for years. For two years after his graduation from the Law School he traveled abroad, visitng all the great art entres. At his handsome residence in Fifth Avenue, which on account of its architecture is a landmark in that part of the city, he had until 1877 one of the most important art collections in America. He opending his gallery once a week to the public and once ayer he was in the habit of assembling in it all the artists of New York. In 1877 he sold his collection. Among his pictures were Church's 'Niagra' now in the Corcoran Gallery at Washington; Turner's 'Slave Ship' and representative works of Meissonier, Jules Breton, Brion, Fortuny, Madrazo, Daubigny, and the Barbizon School.

In his collection, which was the result of many years' purchasing, were examples of the American, German, and English schools. This sale was one of the first great art sales in this city and it is said that the picutres realized a handsome profit.

Mr. Johnston was the founder of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and its first active President. He continued to occupy this office until 1889, when his helath required his resignation. He was succeeded by Henry C. Marquand. He was elected honorary President for life. His gifts to the musuem were many and its early collection was due to his generosity. His last appearance in public was at the annual meeting of the museum in 1892, and the annual meeting of teh present year was the first one from which he was ever absent.

Mr. Johnston was President of the Governing Board of the University of the City of New York and a member of the boards of the Presbyterian Hospital, the Women's Hospital, and the St. Andrew's Society. He was a member of the Century Club, a Trustee of the American Musuem of Natural History, the National Academy of Design, and the Yale Alumni Association. He was an Elder, like his father, of the old Scotch Presbyterian Chruch, and he took his full part in church councils. He was an influential member of several General Assemblies, in which he representated the New York Presbytery.

Mr. Johnston's wife died in 1888 and his eldest son died two years before that event. His wife, whom he married in 1851, was Frances Colles, daughter of James Colles. His three daughters, all married, are Mrs. Robert W. De Forest, Mrs. Henry E. Coe, and Mrs. Pierre Mali. His only surviving son, J. Herbert Johnston, is a manufacturer at 110 Worth Street. He married last Sprin, Miss Celestine Noel, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Auguste Noel.

The funeral will take place from the Scotch Presbyterian Church in Fourteenth Street, Monday. The burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Attractive arrangements of Spring flowers are featured in the section occupied by the Federated Garden Clubs of New Jersey at the International Flower Show in Grand Central Palace, New York, this week.

Upper Left – Four members of the Plainfield Garden Club with Mrs. H. P. Marshall's prize winning arrangemnet of early tulips. They are Miss H. R. Halloway, Mrs. James Devlin, Mrs. Lester R. Fort and Mrs. Henry L. DeForest. Mrs. Marshall, a fellow member, was not present when the award was made.

circa 1930's

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfield Library Archives

Wednesday, May 20, 1936

Garden Club Executives and Prize Cup

. . . Garden Center flower show yesterday in Cedar Brook Park were, left to right, Mrs. . . of the Plainfiled Garden Club; Mrs. Frederic W. Goddard, president of the Garden . . .; and Mrs. James L. Devlin, chairman of the county Garden Club arrangements. . . presented by Mrs. Goddard, may be seen in the center of the table. It was won by Mrs. William B. Tyler

County Garden Center Holds First Show

First flower show in the Union County Garden Center, Cedar Brook Park, was held yesterday afternoon, with Mrs. James L. Devlin as chairman of arrangements.

Associated with her were the following members of the Plainfield Garden Club, Mrs. Leslie Runyon Fort, president; Mrs. Henry L. deForest, Mrs. William A. Holliday and Mrs. Frederic W. Goddard, president of the Garden Club of New Jersey.

Member garden clubs in the county, which exhibited, included Mountainside Garden Club, Cranford, Westfield, Watchung Hills, Fanwood, Spade and Trowel and the Neighborhood Gardeners of Rahway and Colonia.

Judges for the show were Mrs. David L. George, South Orange; Mrs. Arthur Hetherington, Bound Brook, and Mrs. Frederick Hood, East Orange.

A coveted prize award was a silver cup offered by Mrs. Frederic W. Goddard to the exhibitor winning the greatest number of points. This resulted in a tie between Mrs. Leslie Runyon Fort and Mrs. William B. Tyler. On a draw, the award went to Mrs. Tyler.

There were a total of 90 entries in each of the 12 classes, with first, second and third awards and honorable mention in each.

Plainfield Public Library Archive

1936

Mrs. Clifford Baker Heads Garden Club; Reports Stress Recent Civic Improvements

Election of officers of the year's work, especailly that of a civic nature recently undertaken, and an address by Mrs. Otto Lane, who gave instructions in making conservation Christmas wreaths, featured the annual meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club yesterday at the home of Mrs. George W. Fraker in Rahway Road.

Mrs. Leslie Runyon Fort, retiring president, was in charge of the business session. These officers were chosen for the coming year: President, Mrs. Clifford M. Baker; vice-presidents, Mrs. Harry P. Marshall and Mrs. Raymond V. V. Miller; recording secretary, Mrs. Anna Stewartl corresponding secretary, Miss Laura Detwiller; treasurer, Mrs. Frederick W. Yates.

Mrs. Samuel T. Carter, Jr., gave a report of the work in the Shakespeare Garden in Cedar Brook Park. During the year there were a number of plantings in the garden which have added to its attractiveness.

Mrs. Thomas R. Van Boskerck requested donations of jellies for the Flower, Plant and Fruit Guild for distribution among the sick and shut-ins. They can be sent to her home, 1232 Prospect Avenue.

The following letter was received from Edward Baker, Jr., president of the Lions club:

"I am writing you in behalf of the Lions Club of Plainfield in regarde to the very wonderful work the Plainfield Garden Club is doing around our city. Some of the members of our club have seen the work in Cottage Place and also, the brook in Watchung Avenue, which is about completed. We just want you to know that we consider this one of the finest pieces of civic service which has been rendered Plainfield. As citizens and members of the Lions Club we certainly appreciate this work."

A report of unusual interest was presented by the conservation committe of the club. It was in part as follows:

"In early October, 1931, at the request of the Chamber of Commerce a survey was made by our president, Mrs. Leslie R. Fort and the chairman of the conservation committee of the Chamber of Commerce. This report embodied suggestions for work at conscpicuous places in the city . . . be of help in unemployment relief the club made an appropriation to be used as far as possible for wages only. Great interest was at once shown not only by club members, but also by people in many walks of life.

"Two projects were undertaken. The one first begun was Cottage Place close to the railroad tracks. Following some publicity for the work being attempted, gifts came freely – top soil, manure, plants, trees and shrubs. City officials, those of the park and street departments and the New Jersey Central, co-operated gernerously.

"Today a beautiful little park awaits the spring. There have been planted 31 trees where none stood before; 26 rose bushes and over 375 other plants and shurbs have been most carefully set out. This work employed 139 hours at 50 cents an hour and 312 hours at 40 cents an hour. The expenditure was $169.50. Cottage park has been evolved.

"It was evident when the work at Cottage Place was well underway that a second piece of work could be begun. The south bank of Green Brook at the Watchung Avenue bridge was chosen as the worst eyesore in the city. Here, as in Cottage Place, advice was generously given that nothing could be done. But the gardeners just kept on working. Gifts kept coming. A tractor was brought in to cope with stones and debris impossible for men to move. Today another pleasnt little park created by the garden club also awaits the spring.

"Because in pioneer days the little stream, now called Green Brook, was called the Sahcunk River, streams, and the tribe dwelling here along its banks were teh Sahcunk Indians, this little park made by our club is now called Sahcunk Park. In those early days from Rock Avenue to Bound Brook there was located Waccaho-vo-howiohy Village, the name meaning "where you can dig into the ground."

"In two projects 28 1/4 hours at 50 cents an hour and 211 3/4 hours at 40 cents an hour made an expenditure of $99.30. The total planting of 51 trees, 89 roses and 750 other plants and shrubs cost $268.60. Every cent went for wages so the garden club has the enviable record of being able to dispense 100 per cent relief. The fine co-operative spirit shown in every direction made every moment a delight.

"Those of us who really dug in the gardens are quite conscious that many defects may be discovered easily by those so minded. But we trust that these plots, slected as behicles for helping those in distress will be filled with flowers and restful shade. And we hope that each succeeding year will find these spots a little lovelier because of our civic interest in them and that this part of co-operative effort will not be forsaken."

Among the women who were actively engaged in these enterprises were Mrs. Leslie R. Fort, president; Mrs. J. L. Devlin, Mrs. Thomas R. VanBoskerck, Mrs. Garret Smith, Mrs. Henry L. DeForest, Mrs. Clinton Ivins, Miss Elsie Harman, Mrs. Charles A. Eaton and Mrs. Henry Wells.

Plainfield Public Library Archives

1936

Garden Club Plans For Flower Show

Plans were about completed for the flower show of the Plainfield Garden Club at a meeting yesterday in the home of the chairman. Mrs. Wallace Coriel, 963 Central Avenue. The show is to be held May 5 and 6 in the Assembly Room of the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church.

Mrs. Richard Lawton, a prize winner in many horticultural exhibitions, is schedule chairman, and is spected to have schedules printed soon for distribution.

Fully two-thirds of the 50 classes scheduled are listed as "horticultural." The flower arrangment classes are in the minority. The schedule is planned to be of educational value to both experienced gardeners and beginners.

The committee includes Mrs. Corriell, chairman, Mrs. Dudley H. Barrows, secretary; Mrs. Harry Williams, treasurer; Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler and Mrs. William K. Dunbar, decoration and floor plan; Mrs. Henry L. DeForest, properties; Mrs. Henry Marshall, staging; Mrs. Lawton and Mrs. Henry C. Wells, schedule; Mrs. William S. Tyler, exhibits.

Also Miss Harriette R. Halloway, specimens; Miss Josephine Lapslety, entries; Mrs. Garret Smith, publicity; Mrs. Leslie R. Fort and Mrs. Edward H. Ladd Jr., judges, and Mrs. Clifford M. Baker, prizes.

Plainfield Public Library Archives

New York Times Obituary March 25, 1893

John Taylor Johnston died yesterday morning at his residence, 8 Fifth Avenue, aged seventy-three. The cause of his death was creeping paralysis, which began in 1877. Mr. Johnston had been an invalid for a long time prior to his death, and his ailment caused him to withdraw from active business life at the time of its first symptoms. Mr. Johnston was known to the public principally by his founding of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and his connection with the Central Railroad of New Jersey.

Mr. Johnston was born in New York April 8, 1820. His father was John Johnston of Boorman, Johnston & Co. and his mother was Margaret Taylor, the daughter of John Taylor. Both is his parents were of Scotch birth. John Taylor Johnston was their eldest son. He received his early education in Scotland, at the Edinburgh High School. He was graduated from the University of the City of New York in 1839 at the age of nineteen. His father was once of the founders of that institution. He studied law at the Yale Law School at New Haven with Charles Astor Bristed, Daniel D. Lord, and Henry G. De Forest. He went into the office of Daniel, Lord and was admitted to the bar in 1843.

Mr. Johnston remained for a short time in the active practice of his profession, and in 1848 he was induced to take the Presidency of the then insignificant Somerville and Easton Railroad, which he and his associates developed into what is now known as the Central Railroad of New Jersey, with which his business career will alwasxy be associated. His Presidency continued uninterruptedly from 1848 until 1877, a period of twenty-nine years. In this railroad at one time his fortune was almost entirely occupied. After his resignation of the Presidencey n 1877 he reitred from business and the railroad passed into the hands of a receiver.

Mr. Johnston was the originator, in fact, of the whole Central New Jersey Railroad system. It was his forethought that led to the acquisition of the Lehigh and Susquehana Railroad in Pennsylvania and its appartenant coal lands. It was his policy to develop the suburbs through which his railroad passed, and a number of the towns in Central New Jersey owe their existence to him. His expenditure to secure low grades and good alignment and to avoid grade crossings were far in advance of the railroad science of his time and were ridculed by some of his competitors.

In art matters Mr. Johnston has been a conscpicuous figure for years. For two years after his graduation from the Law School he traveled aboard, visiting all the great art centres. At this handsome residence in Fifth Avenue, which on account of its architecture is a landmark in that part of the city, he had until 1877 one of the most important art collections in America. He opened his gallery once a week to the public and once a yar he was in the habit of assembling in it all the artists of New York. In 1877 he sold his collection. Among the pictures were Church's "Niagra," now in the Corcoran Gallery at Washington; Turner's "Slave Ship," and representative works of Meissenier, Jules Breton, Brion, Fortuny, Madrazo, Daubigny, and the Barbizon School.

In his collection, which was the result of many years' purchasing, were examples of the American, German, and English schools. This sale was one of the first great art sales in this city and it said that the pictures realized a handsome profit.

Mr. Johnston was the founder of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and its first active President. He continued to occupy this office until 1889, when his health required his resignation. He was succeeded by Henry G. Marquand. He was elected honorary President for life. His gifts to the museum were many and its early collection was due to his generosity. His last appearance in public was at the annual meeting of the museum in 1892, and the annual meeting of the present year was the firstr one from which he was ever absent.

Mr. Johnston was President of the Governoring Board of the University of the City of New York and a member of the boards of the Presbyterian Hospital, the Woman's Hospital, and the St. Andrew's Soceity. He was a member of the Century Club, a Trustee of the American Museum of Natural History, the National Academy of Design, and the Yale Alumni Association. He was an Elder, like his father, of the old Scotch Presbyterian Church, and he took his full part in church councils. He was influential member of several General Assemblies, in which he represented the New York Presbytery.

Mr. Johnston's wife died in 1888 and his edlest son died two years before that event. His wife, whom he married in 1851, was Frances Colles, daughter of James Colles. His three daughters, all married, are Mrs. Robert W. De Forest, Mrs. Henry E. Coe, and Mrs. Pierre Mali. His only surviving son, J. Herbert Johnston, is a manufacturer at 110 Worth Street. He marries, last Spring, Miss Celestine Noel, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Augnate Noel.

The funeral will take place from the Scotch Presybterian Church, in Fourteenth Street, Monday. The burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F30A13F83C5515738DDDAC0A94DB405B8385F0D3

Johnston - Mali - Lockwood - de Forest Connections

1404. Robert Weeks DeForest (Henry Grant DeForest , Lockwood DeForest , Nehemiah DeForest , Samuel DeForeest , David DeForeest , Isaac DeForeest , Jesse , Jean , Melchoir III , Melchior II , Melchoir , Gaspard , Simon , Jean , Thomas , Louis , Jehan , Alard , Giles de L'Estoc , Gerard , Herbert , Waitier , Herbert ) was born on 25 Apr 1848. He died on 6 May 1931.

Robert married Emily Johnston on 12 Nov 1872.

[Notes]

They had the following children.

2195 M i Johnston DeForest was born on 5 Sep 1873.

Johnston married Mary Elizabeth Ogden. Mary was born on 30 Nov 1883.

Johnston also married Natalie Coffin. Natalie was born in 1880. She died in 1906.

+ 2196 M ii Henry Lockwood DeForest was born in 1875.
+ 2197 F iii Ethel DeForest was born in 1876. She died in 1959.
+ 2198 F iv Frances Emily DeForest was born in 1878.

1405. Lockwood DeForest (Henry Grant DeForest , Lockwood DeForest , Nehemiah DeForest , Samuel DeForeest , David DeForeest , Isaac DeForeest , Jesse , Jean , Melchoir III , Melchior II , Melchoir , Gaspard , Simon , Jean , Thomas , Louis , Jehan , Alard , Giles de L'Estoc , Gerard , Herbert , Waitier , Herbert ) was born on 23 Jun 1850.

Lockwood married Meta Kemble on 11 Nov 1880.


They had the following children.

2199 F i Judith Brasher DeForest.
2200 M ii Alfred Victor DeForest.
2201 M iii Lockwood DeForest.

1407. Henry Wheeler DeForest (Henry Grant DeForest , Lockwood DeForest , Nehemiah DeForest , Samuel DeForeest , David DeForeest , Isaac DeForeest , Jesse , Jean , Melchoir III , Melchior II , Melchoir , Gaspard , Simon , Jean , Thomas , Louis , Jehan , Alard , Giles de L'Estoc , Gerard , Herbert , Waitier , Herbert ) was born on 29 Oct 1855.

Henry married Julia Gilman Noyes on 22 Aug 1898.


They had the following children.

2202 F i Julia Mary DeForest.
2203 M ii Henry Wheeler DeForest.
2204 M iii Charles Noyes DeForest.
2205 F iv Alice Delano DeForest.

1408. Louise Woodruff DeForest (James Goodrich DeForest , Lockwood DeForest , Nehemiah DeForest , Samuel DeForeest , David DeForeest , Isaac DeForeest , Jesse , Jean , Melchoir III , Melchior II , Melchoir , Gaspard , Simon , Jean , Thomas , Louis , Jehan , Alard , Giles de L'Estoc , Gerard , Herbert , Waitier , Herbert ) was born on 2 Feb 1853.

Louise married Maynard Hollister in 1886.


They had the following children.

2206 F i Louise Maynard Hollister.

1410. Eliza Hallett DeForest (James Goodrich DeForest , Lockwood DeForest , Nehemiah DeForest , Samuel DeForeest , David DeForeest , Isaac DeForeest , Jesse , Jean , Melchoir III , Melchior II , Melchoir , Gaspard , Simon , Jean , Thomas , Louis , Jehan , Alard , Giles de L'Estoc , Gerard , Herbert , Waitier , Herbert ) was born on 28 Mar 1856.

Eliza married Charles M Russell in 1885.


They had the following children.

2207 M i Louis DeForest Russell.

1416. Moulton DeForest (Isaac Newton DeForest , Joseph DeForest , David DeForest , Samuel DeForeest , David DeForeest , Isaac DeForeest , Jesse , Jean , Melchoir III , Melchior II , Melchoir , Gaspard , Simon , Jean , Thomas , Louis , Jehan , Alard , Giles de L'Estoc , Gerard , Herbert , Waitier , Herbert ) was born in 1839.

Moulton married Mary A Thomas.


They had the following children.

2208 M i Thomas DeForest.
2209 M ii Augusta DeForest.
2210 F iii Gwendolyn DeForest.

New York Times April 6, 1893

JOHN TAYLOR JOHNSTON'S WILL

Small Bequests to the Museum of Art and New York University

John Taylor Johnston's will disposing of a million and a half dollars was filed yesterday in the Surrogate's office. Mr. Taylor was the well-known railroad man and financier, who died on March 24 of this year at his residence, 8 Fifth Avenue. The will names John Herbert Johnston, the testator's son, and Henry E. Coe and Robert W. De Forest, sons-in-law, as executors.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, which Mr. Johnston was at one time President, and the University of the City of New York, of which he as a graduate, get $10,000 each. The residue of the estate, after $1,000 is given to each of the grandchildren, is bequeathed in four equal parts to his children, John Herbert Johnston of 20 Washington Square, Emily J. De Forest of 7 Washington Square, Frances Johhnsont Mail of 8 Fifth Avenue, and Eva Johnston Coe of 5 East Tenth Street. If any child dies without issue, his or her share is to be divided equally among the survivors.

There are five grandchildren under age – Johnston De Forest, Ethel De Forest, Frances Emily De Forest, Emily Coe, and Rosalie Coe. Of these, Thomas Nolan of 131 East Twelfth Street is appointed guardian. The only other grandchild is Henry L. De Forest.

The estate is composed of realty and personalty in about equal parts.

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F60917F9345B1A738DDDAF0894DC405B8385F0D3

History of the National Recreation Foundation

http://www.sagamorepub.com/files/lookinside/188/pages-nrf.pdf

Board of Directors:

Mrs. Francis DeLacy Hyde, New York, NY

and a few other "familiar" Plainfield GC names:
Henry W. deForest, New York, NY
James H. Perkins, New York, NY
John T. Pratt, New York, NY
Theodore N. Vail, New York, NY
Mrs. Thomas A. Edison, West Orange, NJ

1954 Check Book

No. 1078
April 22, 1954
N.Y. Botanical Garden
dues - sustaining
1954 - 55
$55.00

No. 1079
May 13, 1954
Constance T. Foster
Flowers for Mrs. W. Tyler
& Mrs. DeForest
$15.00

No. 1080
May 13, 1954
Esther B. Perkins
change for cash box for Garden Fair
$100.00

Residence of Henry L. deForest, 955 Hillside Avenue

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

Guide to the Records of Brown Brothers Harriman

Guide to the Records of Brown Brothers Harriman
1696 -1973, 1995 (bulk 1820-1968)
MS 78

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
New York, NY 10024
Phone: (212) 873-3400




@ 2010 New-York Historical Society

Collection processed by Celia Hartmann. Machine readable finding aid created by Celia Hartmann.

This finding aid was produced using the Archivists' Toolkit November 16, 2010
Description is in English.

Describing Archives: A Content Standard

Container List
Series IX. Artifacts and Memorabilia (1833-1968)1.72 Linear feet 4 document boxes


Scope and Content
The series contains artifactual materials collected by the Historical Files Department or donated by partners and other employees, some of which may have been displayed at one time in Brown Brothers Harriman's Wall Street offices; and objects from the 150th anniversary Pacific Northwest celebrations that were not included in the Historical Files.

Subseries A. Artifacts and Displayed Items (1833-1960s)

Scope and Contents
The subseries includes visual materials and captions, plaques, awards, and certificates collected by the Historical Files Department and probably displayed at one time; as well as commemorative medals.

The visual materials, which were originally framed, have been removed from their frames and rehoused in acid-free folders.

The captions for the ships "London" and "Enoch Train", which were also originally framed, accompany paintings that are not found elsewhere in the Collection.

Related Materials at New-York Historical Society
Artist Evelyn Beatrice Longman, who designed the 50th anniversary medal for John Crosby Brown's daughter Amy Brighthurst and her husband Henry DeForest Lockwood in 1949, had designed an almost identical medal in 1922 for Henry Lockwood's parents Emily Johnston and Robert Weeks DeForest, which is in the museum collections of the New-York Historical Society.

1938-1939 Meeting Minutes

Mrs. deForest

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

May 21, 1959

March 7, 2014 From Joseph Fagan

John Crosby Brown was a prominent New York banker whose family founded the investment firm of Brown Brothers Harriman still in existence today in New York City. By 1878 John Crosby Brown had built a sprawling 40 acre estate and summer home named Brighthurst on top of the mountain in West Orange between Ridge Road and Prospect Avenue. On the estate were several smaller out buildings such as a log cabin playhouse, an ice house, a deer house, cow barns, and a carriage house. There were also seven greenhouses including a separate rose and an orchid house.

The Brighthurst estate was famous for its beautiful gardens and landscaping and annual flower exhibits. Peter Duff was employed full time by Brown as the superintendent of landscaping and had a number of several men working under his direction. Often flowers grown in West Orange by Duff and his staff were entered by Brown in the New York Flower Show and won prizes with widespread acclaim. West Orange at the time was a rural countryside and offered a welcome change of scenery from hectic city live for Brown and his family.

His youngest daughter Amy Brighthurst Brown was named after the house. She was married there on August 24, 1899 to Henry Moorhead DeForrest of New York. I have spend years researching John Crosby Brown and his family and I am the town historian for West Orange where Brighthurst was located. I have dozens of pictures of the Brighthurst estate both in and out. The attached file is a picture of Brighthurst that you are free to use for you website just give me credit as you have done.

Thank you

Joe Fagan

August 3, 1909 New York Times

Woman's National Farm and Garden Association - 1918 - ‎World War, 1914-1918

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

East Woodbridge, NJ

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Hillside Historic District

August 29, 2015

Hillside Historic District has announced a new website: http://hillsideavenuedistrict.com

They have neatly listed the homes in the district in a similar fashion to our Homes & Gardens page.

It is no exaggeration to say that the PGC helped build Hillside. In fact our first club meeting took place at Mrs. Connor's home at 999 Hillside. Take a look at our PGC Hillside Historic District resident members:

807 Hillside Avenue
Browne, Miss Elizabeth B. '37

810 Hillside Avenue
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15

816 Hillside Avenue
Zerega, Miss Bertha Virginia '23

817 Hillside Avenue
Lawton, Mrs. Richard M. (Edith Clarke) '21

832 Hillside Avenue
Yates, Mrs. Frederick Washburn (Bertha Kedzie Cornwell) '15

921 Hillside Avenue
Detwiller, Miss Laura Cecelia '29
Detwiller, Mrs. Charles H. (Catherine or "Cath" Campbell), Jr. '57

922 Hillside Avenue
Atterbury, Mrs. Albert Hoffman (Emma H. Baker) '15

930 Hillside Avenue
Corey, Mrs. Ella J. '15

937 Hillside Avenue
Hunn, Mrs. John T. Sharpless (Hope Ivins) '37
Ivins, Mrs. DeWitt Clinton (Louise Morton Fox) '15
Ivins, Mrs. Clinton Fox (Marguerite Carpenter) '33

945 Hillside Avenue
Stevens, Mrs. Horace N. (Helen Coburn) '15

950 Hillside Avenue
Harlow, Mrs. Edward Dexter (Elise Cochran Martin) '15
Martin, Mrs. Francis A. (Mary Keech Turner) '22

955 Hillside Avenue
Wallace, Mrs. Frederick W. (Grace Seccomb) '15
deForest, Mrs. Henry Lockwood (Amy Brighthurst Brown) '33

966 Hillside Avenue
Warren, Mrs. Frank D. '15

970 Hillside Avenue
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15
Kroll, Mrs. Alexander (Nancy Dwinnell or Mrs. Prince H. Gordon) '60

975 Hillside Avenue
Runkle, Mrs. Harry Godley (Jennie Fitz Randolph) '15
Albin, Mrs. Leland D. (Jennie Hoag) '36
King, Mrs. Victor E. D. (Yasmina S.) '78
Whitehead, Mrs. James Harold (Jean Fitz-Randolph Heiberg) '43

980 Hillside Avenue
Hall, Mrs. Frederic L. (Anne Garrigues Wigton) '68
Stuart, Mrs. Linden (Jeanette W.), Jr. '52
Wigton, Mrs. Charles Benson (Garrigues) '45

982 Hillside Avenue
Baker, Mrs. Clifford Myron (Margaret Drayton) '32
Valiant, Mrs. John (Katharine Drayton) '40

985 Hillside Avenue
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P.") '15
Stevens, Mrs. Horace Nathaniel (Helen Coburn) '15
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P."), Jr. (Edith S.) '37
Stevens, Mrs. Robert Ten Broeck (Dorothy Goodwin Whitney) '37

996 Hillside Avenue
Wallace, Mrs. Frederick W. (Grace Seccomb) '15
Murray Townsend
Mooney, Mrs. Wandell McMaster (Alice Joy McGee) '47

999 Hillside Avenue
Conner, Mrs. William A. (Florence Tupper) '15
Wigton, Mrs. William Garrigues (Ann Hayes) '55

1000 Hillside Avenue
Lawrence, Mrs. Chester B. (Florence B.), Jr. '22

1005 Hillside Avenue
McWilliams, Mrs. Howard (Anna Louise Waldbridge/Mrs. Paul Taylor Brown) '22

1007 Hillside Avenue
Lockwood, Mrs. Frederick M. (Hazel Marshall) '52
Marshall, Mrs. Henry P. (Dorothy Burke) '30

1009 Hillside Avenue
Tracy, Mrs. Evarts '22
Tracy, Mrs. Howard Crosby (Minerva Bingham Lamson) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

1019 Hillside Avenue
Baker, Mrs. Clifford Myron (Margaret Drayton) '28

1030 Hillside Avenue
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Ethel Lucile Titsworth) '42

1035 Hillside Avenue
Streuli, Mrs. Alfred F. H. (Frederica Michelle Dwyer Hooper) '15

1045 Hillside Avenue
Timpson, Mrs. Lewis Gouverneur (Helen Frances Waring) '15
Waring, Mrs. Orville G. (Dorothy Fleming) '35

1046 Hillside Avenue
Genung, Mrs. Alfred Gawthrop (Dorothy or "Dot" Madsen) '69
Madsen, Mrs. John (Evelyn or "Evie" Wilson) '70

1300 Prospect Avenue
Streuli, Mrs. Alfred F. H. (Frederica Michelle Dwyer Hooper) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

1234 Watchung Avenue
Stevenson, Mrs. E. Vickers '41

1239 Watchung Avenue
Brown, Miss Edna M. '34