Plainfield Garden Club








Member: McGee, Mrs. Walter Miller (Mary Alice Yerkes) '22

1922 Address: 101 Rockview Avenue, North Plainfield

1928 Treasurer Book April 15th $5.00
1929 Treasurer Book Associate April $10.00
1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936 Treasurer Book Associate

1932 Directory* Address: 101 Rockview Avenue
* = This directory is not dated but presumed to be from the year 1932.
NOTE: Mrs. Walter M. McGee, 101 Rockview Avenue is listed as an "Associate Member"

1937 Treasurer Book, under Associate: Mrs. Walter M. McGee 1/6/37 Pd.

1938 Treasurer Book, Associate: Mrs. Walter M. McGee 1/4/38 Pd 1/17/39 Pd. 2/5/40 Pd. 1/9/41 Pd. 11/24/41 Pd. 11/24/42 Pd. 11/29/43 Pd. 11/28/44 Pd. 12/6/45 May 16, 1946 May 12, 1947 Dec. 1, 1948

1949 - 1950 Treasurer Book, Associate: McGee, Mrs. Walter June 8 Then written next to the entry "deceased" Her name is crossed off.

1942 Address: 101 Rockview Avenue
NOTE: Associate Member

Mrs. Walter M. McGee '22 is daughter-in-law to Mrs. Henry Augustus (Emma Louise Whiting) McGee '22

She is related to Mrs. Henry L. (Sarah M. Howell) McGee '18

She is also related to Virginia Davison or "Ginny" Mrs. Murray J. Rushmore, Jr. '71

She is probably related to PGC Member: Mrs. Leopold A. (Anna S. Yerkes) Chambliss '50

January 18, 1903 New York Times Plainfield Trust Election

January 18, 1903 New York Times Plainfield Trust Election
Plainfield NJ January 17 The Plainfield Trust Company has elected these officers: President, Orville T. Waring of this city; Vice President, A. V. Heely of New York; Second Vice President, Henry A. McGee of North Plainfield; Secretary and Treasurer, J. Herbert Case of North Plainfield. The new Directors are Edwin S. Hooley, Charles J. Fisk, Charles W. McCutchen, J. Donald Morrow, Francis de L. Hyde, Edward H. Ladd, Jr., Henry A. McGee, Walter M. McGee, George P. Mellisk, Orville T. Waring, Henry G. Runkle, James W. Jackson and Frderick Geller.

November 3, 1895 New York Times Society article

In Plainfield Society
An Enjoyable Harvest Home Festival
Visitors Come and HGo

A very enjoyable harvest home festival was given by the Young Ladies Mission Band at the First Baptist Church Monday evening. The ladies at the tables were Mrs. Charles Smith, Mrs. Walter McGee, Miss Anna Bolce, Miss Ida Yerkes, Mrs. Clinton Randolph, Miss Grace Yerkes, Miss Grace Cooley, Miss Nora Williams, Miss Alice Woodland, Miss M. French, Mrs. Macintyre, Mrs. Ransome, and Mrs. James Manning.

Merklee Family Geneology

http://www.merklee.com/genealogy/CM/rr01_013.html#P5618

Fourth Generation (Continued)

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Family of Elizabeth Ann MERKLEE (15) & James McGEE


35. Henry Augustus McGEE. Born on 27 Dec 1850 in New York, NY. Died on 17 Oct 1914 in Plainfield, NJ.

He married Emma Louise WHITING. Born in 1853 in Brooklyn, Kings, NY. Died on 26 Oct 1930 in North Plainfield, NJ.

They had the following children:
53 i. Clifford Whiting (1873-1958)
ii. Harry Livingston. Born on 13 Feb 1876 in Plainfield, NJ. Died on 26 Nov 1960.

iii. Raymond. Born on 11 Nov 1879 in Plainfield, NJ.

54 iv. Donald Ashbrook (1883-1937)

36. Caroline "Carrie" Leake McGEE. Born on 12 May 1853 in Brooklyn, Kings, NY.

She married Charles E. HORNE. Died on 2 Oct 1922 in Plainfield, NJ.

They had the following children:
i. Elsie Rutherford. Born on 16 Sep 1876 in Plainfield, NJ.

55 ii. George Augustus (1877-)
iii. Arthur Whiting. Born on 5 Feb 1881 in Plainfield, NJ. Died on 26 Aug 1882 in Plainfield, NJ.

56 iv. Frederick Roland (1884-)

37. Gertrude Anne McGEE. Born on 20 Jul 1855 in Brooklyn, Kings, NY. Died abt 1955.

She married Edward Graham ASHBROOK. Died on 16 Mar 1901 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA.

They had the following children:
i. Myron G.. Born on 29 May 1883 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA. Died on 29 May 1883 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA.

57 ii. Charlotte Garwood (1885-)
58 iii. Margaret Garwood (1891-1990)

38. Walter Miller McGEE. Born on 27 Jan 1860 in Brooklyn, Kings, NY. Died on 30 May 1952 in North Plainfield, NJ. Occupation: Standard Oil Company.

He married Mary Alice YERKES, daughter of Rev. David John YERKES & Sarah E. TAYLOR. Born on 13 May 1861 in Brooklyn, Kings, NY. Died on 11 Jun 1949 in North Plainfield, NJ.

They had the following children:
i. Walter Vaughan. Born on 23 Jul 1884 in Plainfield, NJ. Died bef 30 May 1952. He married Florence WILDEY. Died in 1912.

ii. Alice Elizabeth. Born on 14 Feb 1891 in Plainfield, NJ. She married Herbert Sperry DUCRET.

39. Emma Prentice McGEE. Born on 9 Jul 1864 in Brooklyn, Kings, NY. Died on 5 Apr 1934 in Plainfield, NJ.

She married James R. JOY.

They had the following children:
i. Alice. She married Wandell MOONEY.

ii. Helen. She married Murray RUSHMORE.

40. Adelaide Frances McGEE. Born on 10 Aug 1866 in Brooklyn, Kings, NY. Died on 16 Sep 1958.

She married Herbert WELCH, son of Peter WELCH & Mary Louisa LOVELAND. Buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, NY.

They had the following children:
59 i. Dorothy McGee (1891-)
ii. Eleanor Loveland. Born on 3 Sep 1900 in Middletown, CT

November 14, 1895 New York Times

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=FB0911FE355911738DDDAD0994D9415B8585F0D3

PLAINFIELD KIRMESS OPENED

In Aid of Muhlenberg Hospital – Good Attendance and Reason for Expecting Financial Success – The Booths.

PLAINFIELD, N. J., Nov. 13 – There was a grand opening of the kirmess at the Columbia Cycle Academy Monday night, and the building was decorated very elaborately.

Not since the charity ball have the society fold here been interested in a like event for such a worthy cause. The kirmess is given for the benefit of Muhlenberg Hospital, and, judging from the attendance at the opening night, the hospital will be greatly bettered financially.

Booths have been very prettily arranged about the academy, making an exceedingly tasty show. The equipment of the booths is as follows:

French Booth – Mrs. Albert Hoffman Atterbury, Mrs. Irving H. Brown, Mrs. Charles B. Corwin, Miss Bessie Ginna, Mrs. George C. Evans, Mrs. Charles J. Fisk, Mrs. Ellis W. Hedges, Miss E. E. Kenyon and Miss Whiton.

Florentine Booth – Mrs. I. N. Van Sickle, Mrs. David E. Titsworth, Mrs. W. M. Stillman, Mrs. John D. Titsworth, Mrs. F. A. Dunham, Miss Louise Clawson, Miss Bessie TItsworth, and Mrs. Lulu Lewis.

Gypsy Booth – Mrs. Joseph W. Reinhart, and Mrs. Howard Fleming.

Venetian Booth – Mrs. Hugh Hastings, Miss Emelie Schipper, Mrs. George A. Chapman, Miss Haviland, Mrs. Samuel Huntington, Mrs. Emil Woltman, Mrs. Samuel St. J. McCutchen, Mrs. Conklin, Mrs. C. S. West, Mrs. W. E. Lower, Miss E. R. Cock, Mrs. Frank O. Herring, Miss Huntington, Miss Maud Van Bosckerck, Miss MacCready, Miss Clara D. Finley, Miss Ahrens, Miss Aynne MacCready, Miss Mondanari, Miss Graff, Miss Yerkes, Miss Gertrude Walz, and Miss Pierson.

Japanese Booth – Mrs. Charles Seward Foote, Mrs. George Clay, Mrs. S.P. Simpson, Mrs. L. Finch, Mrs. Constantine P. Ralli, Mrs. William Lewis Brown, Mrs. L. Dennis, Mrs. WIlliam Pelletier, Miss Ellis, Miss Anthony, Miss Dryden, Miss Morgan, Miss Bowen, Miss Lawrence, and Miss Rodman.

Spanish Booth – Mrs. S. A. Cruikshank, Mrs. A. T. Slauson, Mrs. J. F. Wichers, Mrs. T. H. Curtis, Mrs. Marion S. Ackerman, Mrs. T. A. Hazell, Mrs. H. L. Moore, Mrs. D. T. Van Buren, Mrs. E. H. Mosher, Miss Harriott, Miss Louise Patton, Miss Maud Lord, Miss May Kirkner, Miss Louise Van Zandt, Miss Annie Horton, Miss Titsworth, and Miss Meredith.

German Booth – Mrs. Mason W. Tyler, Mrs. Logan Murphy, Mrs. John H. Oarman, Mrs. Charles J. Taggart, Mrs. Benjamin R. Western, Mrs. J. E. Turill, Mrs. Arthur T. Gallup, Mrs. Horsley Barker, Mrs. John Haviland, Mrs. George Wright, Mrs. Amra Hamragan, Mrs. William L. Saunders, Mrs. William Wright, Miss Annie Murphy, Miss Wright, Miss Western, Miss Bartling, Miss Helen Warman, Miss Emma Adams and Miss Ann Thorne.

Stationery Booth – Mrs. John Gray Foster, Mrs. Elliott Barrows, Mrs. A. W. Haviland, Mrs. John D. Miller, Mrs. James R. Joy, and Miss Emily R. Tracy.

Parisian Flower Stall – Mrs. Harry M. Stockton, Mrs. Evarts Tracy, Mrs. Daniel F. Ginna, Mrs. W. H. Ladd, Mrs. Frederick Yates, Miss Marlon Dumont, Miss Ginna, Miss Baker, Miss Huntington, and Miss Van Bosckerck.

Refreshments were dispensed by Mrs. Orville T. Waring, Mrs. George W. Van Bosckerck, Mrs. John Bushnell, Mrs. Gifford Mayer, Mrs. George H. Goddard, Mrs. Moore, Mrs. H. P. Reynolds, Mrs. C. C. Guion, Mrs. N. P. T. Finch, Mrs. Henry McGee, Mrs. De Revere, Mrs. Ruth C. Leonard, Mrs. George W. Rockfellow, Miss Annie Opdyke, Mrs. Van Alstyne, Mrs. Utzinger, Mrs. Nelson Runyon, Mrs. Henry Tapsley, Miss Martine, Miss Edith Allen, Mrs. J. Parker Mason, Mrs. J. K. Myers, Mrs. Walton, and Mrs. H. C. Adams

December 11, 1903

Daily Princetonian, Volume 28, Number 140, 11 December 1903 – GLEE CLUB CONCERT In Plainfield To-night. Program and List of Patronesses.

GLEE CLUB CONCERT

In Plainfield To-night. Program and List of Patronesses.

The second concert of the Glee, Banjo and Mandolin Clubs will be given in the Casino of Plainfield, N. J., to-night at 8.15 o'clock. The clubs will leave Princeton to-day at 1.21 p. m., and arrive at Elizabeth at 2.20. Leaving Elizabeth on the C. R. R. of N. J. at 2.35, they will reach Plainfield at 3.03. The men will be entertained at the homes of the Princeton alumni, and immediately after the concert adance will be given in honor of the clubs. On the return trip the men will leave Plainfield on Saturday at 9.40 a. m., reaching Elizabeth at 10.04, leave at 10.06, and arrive in Princeton at 11. The program of the concert follows: PART FIRST. 1. Old Nassau, Carmina Princetonia Glee Club. 2. A Rag Time Ball, J. H.Jennings Banjo Club. 3. 1904 Medley, Arranged by K. S. Clark Glee Club. 4. Selections from Babes in Toyland, Herbert Mandolin Club. 5. Fantasienstuck, Arranged Banjo Club. PART SECOND. 1. Step Song, Carmina Princetonia Glee Club. 2. Gondoliere, Nevin Mandolin Club. 3. The 1904 Rakion, Joseph Chapman Banjo Club. 4. Solo, Selected Mr. Truesdale. 5. Espanola Viva, Arranged Glee and Mandolin Clubs. 6. The White Crow, Paul Eno Banjo Club. PART THIRD. 1. Bedelia, Schwartz Mandolin and Banjo Clubs. 2. Selection, Arranged Glee Club. 3. Danse Caprice, Grieg Mandolin Club. 4. Triangle Song, Carmina Princetonia Glee, Banjo and Mandolin Clubs. The patronesses are as follows : Mrs. Charles F. Abbott, Mrs. Frederick H. Andrews, Mrs. Ernest R. Ackerman, Mrs. John T. Baker, Mrs. Eliot T. Barrows, Mrs. James R. Blake, Mrs. Charles I. Brooks, Mrs Howard W. Beebe, Mrs. E. H. Booth, Mrs. P. W. Bakely, Mrs. P. T. Brown, Mrs. J. Hervey Buchanan, Mrs. J. Edgar Corlies, Mrs. George A. Chapman, Mrs. J. B. Dumont, Mrs. M. E. Egerton, Mrs. Chapman Fisk, Mrs. Howard Fleming, Mrs. Walter Gaston, Mrs. Wm. T. Gaugh, Mrs. John F. Harmon, Mrs. Ellis W. Hedges, Mrs. Eugene H. Hatch, Mrs. W. E. Honeyman, Mrs. James Hayes, Mrs. Samuel Huntington, Mrs. Henry L. Hall, Mrs. Henry C. Irons, Mrs. D. C. Ivins, Mrs. William T. Kaufman, Mrs. William E. Lowe, Mrs. Edward H. Ladd, Jr., Mrs. E. L. Mack, Mrs. George P. Mellick, Mrs. H. Raymond Munger, Mrs. William H. Murray, Mrs. Henry A. McGee, Mrs. Walter Mc- Gee, Mrs. Samuel St. J. McCutchen, Mrs. Frank S. Martin, Mrs. Theodore W. Morris, Jr., Mrs. F. G. Meade, Mrs. Arthur J. Otterson, Mrs. D. W. Pond, Mrs. W. G. Peckham, Mrs. W. A. Pinto, Mrs. Joseph W. Reinhart, Mrs. David Rowland, Mrs. George S. Ring, Mrs. George T. Rogers, Mrs. Joseph M. Shellabarger, Mrs. Walter E. Stewart, Mrs. Lemuel W. Serrell, Mrs. Alfred F. H. Streuli, Mrs. Henry M. Stockton, Mrs. Joseph W. Sandford, Jr., Mrs. C. L. Sykes, Mrs. R. B. Strong, Mrs. George A. Strong, Mrs Duncan W. Taylor, Mrs. Evarts Tracy, Mrs. Lewis G. Timpson, Mrs. Mason Tyler, Mrs. Edward M. Van Buren, Mrs. George W. Van Boskerck, Mrs. A. Vandewater, Mrs. J. Vandewater, Mrs. William B. Wadsworth, Mrs. Orville T. Waring, Mrs. Lewis E. Waring, Mrs. Theodore D. Wilson, Mrs. E. Woltman, Mrs. John S. Zelie.

Frank B. Bennett & Company 1912

The Plainfield Trust Co.

On the fourth day of June, ten years ago, the Plainfield Trust Company of Plainfield, N.J., opened for business in an unpretentious store on one of the principal streets on that city. In three years, when by its aggressive methods it had acquired a deposit line of one and a half million dollars, it moved into its handsome building on Park avenue which it now occupies, and which is not only the most imposing edifice in Plainfield but is one of the finest banking houses in the State of New Jersey. In its new home the business of the institution has continued to prosper under the efficient management of its energetic and capable staff of officers until today the company reports deposits of four millions of dollars and a surplus and undivided profit account of two hundred and forty thousand dollars, or nearly two and a half times the amount of its capital.

In addition to the four million of deposits, the company has in its custody a million and a half of trust funds which are kept separate and apart from its assets. This trust business is but another indication of the confidence which the institution has won during the comparatively short period of its existence – a confidence that is based on the character of the service which has been rendered but on the personnel of its directors, all of whom are representative men in the community and who bring to the business the inspiration of some New York City's most important business activities as may be seen from the following:

LIST OF DIRECTORS
and their connections: J. Herbert Case, vice-president Franklen Trust Co., Brooklyn; Frederick Geller, attorny and counseller-at-law, New York; Augustus V. Heely, vice-president The Farmers' Loan and Trust Co., New York; James W. Jackson, executor of the Jesse Hoyt Estate, New York; Edward H. Ladd, Jr. & Wood Bankers, New York; Charles W. McCutchen, Holt & Co., Commision Merchants, New York; Henry A. McGee, Standard Oil Co., New York; Walter M. McGee, Vacuum Oil Co., New York; Charles A. Reed, attorney and counsellor-at-law, New York; Isaac W. Rushmore, dairy products, New York; Frank H. Smith, register Union County, Elizabeth, N.J., Samuel Townsend, president Peoples National Bank, Westfield, N.J., Cornelius B. Tyler, Tyler & Tyler, attorneys, New York; Lewis E. Waring, Edward Sweet & Co., bankers, New York; and Orville T. Waring, Standard Oil Co., New Jersey.

Mr. H. H. Pond, secretary of the company, assumed this position two years ago, and during his uncumbency the deposits have increased from about $2,750,000 to $4,000,000. Mr. Pond has also been president of the New Jersey Bankers Association during the past year and in that capacity has won many friends both for himself and for the institution which he represents.

The Plainfield Trust Company conducts a banking trust, special, safe deposit and "banking by mail" department. Through the latter the institution has extended its operation all over New Jersey, and there are few towns in the state in which some of its deposits may not be found.

http://books.google.com/books?id=4wkhAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA2-PA44&lpg=RA2-PA44&dq=edward+h.+ladd+new+jersey&source=bl&ots=dm0GnDDx-W&sig=YQvKfBNAEj2-SnuL0oqvlP4dhJ8&hl=en#v=onepage&q=edward%20h.%20ladd%20new%20jersey&f=false

Washington Park Historic District North Plainfield

SATURDAY: NORTH PLAINFIELD: WASHINGTON PARK HD HOUSE TOUR

Saturday, December 10, 4:00 - 9:00 PM. Tour starts at Church of the Holy Cross, corner of Washington and Mercer Avenues.

Founded in 1988, North Plainfield's only historic district will be featured in a Holiday house tour titled 'Architectural Treasures of North Plainfield'. Nine of the District's homes – mostly Victorians – will be featured, all dressed up for the Christmas holidays.

Tickets are $25 the day of the tour and may be purchased the Holy Cross Church, the tour's starting point, where maps will also be available.

http://washingtonpark.homestead.com/

Dear Washington Park Association:

Please link our website www.plainfieldgardenclub.org to your website. We
will do the same.

Plainfield Garden Club was established in 1915 and many of our early
members were residents of North Plainfield. You can read about the 250+
ladies on the website under "History"

Probably most notable was founding member Mrs. Charles Walter (Mary
Isabella Simpson)McCutchen '15

Other North Plainfield-Plainfield Garden Club Residents include:

Campbell Mabel C. Raper Mrs. William Hall 1928
Eaton Mary Winifred Parlin Mrs. Charles Aubrey 1915
Fleming Helen Hyde Mrs. Austin Lloyd 1919
Foster Fannie C. Groendyke Mrs. John Gray 1915
Hackman Elizabeth or "Betty" Reppert Mrs. Robert K. 1970
Howell Romaine Ray Mrs. Josephus H. 1922
Hyde Helen Miss 1917
Hyde Elilzabeth Kepler Mrs. Charles L. 1917
Hyde Carolyn Knowland Mrs. Frank de Lacey 1919
McGee Emma Louise Whiting Mrs. Henry Augustus 1922
McGee Sarah M. Howell Mrs. Henry Livingston "Harry" 1918
McGee Mary Alice Yerkes Mrs. Walter Miller 1922
Middledith Sarah Augusta Flanders Mrs. James F. 1920
Morison Fanny C. Lemmon Mrs. Nathaniel H. 1916
Murray Mrs. J. Everett 1920
Tingley Miss Dorothea 1932
Trewin Annette Mrs. C. Sidney 1945
Wells Mrs. Henry C. 1920
Wells Nancy G. Mrs. John R., Jr. 1957

We have just begun to post our archival information on line. If
interested, we could send you the addresses of these members. We are
always interested in learning more about them and welcome photographs of
their homes and gardens.

Enjoy the season -

The Ladies of the Plainfield Garden Club

January 12, 1896 New York Times

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F00914F9395515738DDDAB0994D9405B8685F0D3

A WEEK'S EVENTS IN PLAINFIELD.; Numerous Receptions – Doings of Clubs and Societies.

PLAINFIELD, Jan. 11. – A reception was given by Mrs. I C. Pierson of Watchung Avenue, Tuesday evening. She was assisted in receiving by her daughters, Mrs. Malcolm MacKenzie of New-York and Miss Mabel Pierson; Miss Corbitt of New-York, Miss Cochran of Wilmington, Del., and Miss Hunter of North Adams, Mass.

The members of the North Plainfield Dramatic Club were entertained at the home of Mr. and Mrs. James E. Bailey, Jackson Avenue, Tuesday evening. Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. Andrew E. Keneey, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Neeley, Mr. and Mrs. James Harper, Miss Mary Hughes, Miss Ellen Mullon, and Frank Off.

A Past Master's jewel was presented to Calvin H. Rugg of Jerusalem Lodge, F. and A.M., Tuesday evening. The same evening John J. Lynch, for several years President of the Plainfield Catholic Club, was presented with a gold-headed cane by the members of the club.

A. D. Shepard and family of the Gables have gone to Buckingham, New York, for the Winter.

The class of '96 of the North Plainfield school was entertained by Miss Emma and Miss Bertha Stevens Wednesday evening.

Mrs. John Valiant of Craig Place gave a reception and tea Wednesday. She was assisted in receiving by Mrs. H.K. Carroll, Mrs. A. A. Tafty, Mrs. F. H. Randolph, Miss Grace Carroll, Miss Bessie Valiant, Miss Florence Valiant, and Miss Mary Steiner.

The Park Club gave an entertainment Wednesday night at the clubhouse on Washington Avenue. The patronesses were Mrs. C. A. Reed, Mrs. Samuel St. John McCutcheon, and Mrs. J. H. Howell.

Miss Imogene See of Sing Sing, N.Y., is a guest of Mrs. Elmer E. Runyon of Madison Avenue.

Miss Eda Mills of Summit Avenue gave a party to her friends Wednesday night.

Miss Mollie Lawrence of New York and Miss Mather of Bound Brook are guests of Mr. and Mrs. Marion S. Ackerman of Crescent Avenue.

Miss Emily Coriell of Church Street is visiting in Brooklyn.

Miss Edith Allen of Webster Place is spending the Winter in Flushing.

Mrs. J. H. Ackerman and daughter, Lydia, have returned from a two month's trip to the Pacific coast.

Miss Randolph, daughter of Thompson F. Randolph of New-York, is visiting her sister Mrs. Judson Bonnell of East Front Street.

Mrs. Lewis of Binghampton, N.Y., is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. D. F. Ginna of Watchung Avenue.

Miss Rachel Fay Buckley of Newburg, N.Y., and Harry Ellis Green of Plainfield were married Wednesday night at the bride's home.

Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Moore of Ithaca, N.Y., are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. George Squires of North Plainfield.

Miss Laura J. Runyon of East Fifth Street is visiting friends in Philadelphia.

Miss Harriet Loomis of New York City is a guest of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Morse of Franklin Place.

Miss Josie Burlingham of Albany Normal College is a guest of ex-Councilman Seymore G. Smith of Crescent Avenue.

Miss Jennie Foster of New York and Howard Foster of Princeton Colelge are guests of D. N. Groendyke of Mercer Avenue.

Miss Helen L. Moore of New York is the guest of her sister Mrs. S. A. Cruikshank, of Belvidere Avenue.

Miss Freeman of Rahway is visiting her aunt, Mrs. W. C. Ayres, of West Second Street.

Miss Baldwin of Baltimore has gone home, after a visit with her uncle Councilman J. H. Valiant of Craig Place.

Howell Division, no. 97, Sons of Temperance, celebrated its twenty-seventh anniversary Wednesday evening. AMong those present form the out of tow were A. P. Sutphen of Somerville, Grand Worthy Patriarch Ross Slack of Excelsior Division of Trenton, Past Grand Worthy Patriarch Fred Day of Newark and Worthy Patriarch Evenson of Newark, and Worthy Patriarch Evenson of Philadelphia. James J. Perine of Brooklyn is the only living charter member of the division.

Mrs. Yerkes, wife of the Rev. Dr. D. J. Yerkes of the First Baptist Church, has gone to Greenville, S.C., to visit a daughter.

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest R. Ackerman, who are making a tour around the world, are now at Hongkong.

1948 Check Book

No. 742
Dec. 1, 1948
Garden Club of America
Redwood Grove
in memory of Mrs. McCutcheon
Mrs. Eaton and Mrs. Huntington
$15.00
stopped payment

No. 743
Dec. 1, 1948
Mrs. Yones Arai
to pay for flowers used
in arrangements for lecture
$22.60

No. 744
Dec. 1, 1948
Interstate Printing Corp.
stamped envelopes for mailing
horticultural letter
$26.45

In left margin:

Dec. 3 Dues (Mrs. Walter McGee) 15.00

1949 Check Book

No. 787
June 21, 1949
Marjory Elliott
N. Y. Flower Show Exhibitor
$7.00

No. 788
June 21, 1949
The Garden Club of America
In memory of Mrs. Walter McGee – Redwood Grove
$5.00

No. 789
July 29, 1949
Dorothy de Hart
annual meeting
$100.00

Residence of Walter M. McGee, 101 Rockview Avenue

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

2002

Surnames: McGee, Ashbrook, Whiting, Horne, Joy, Welch
Classification: Query

Message Board URL:

http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec/msg/rw/Hez.2ACEB/1187

Message Board Post:

I had an old photograph of the McGEE family of Plainfield, Somerset County, NJ. Address of house in photo: 10 Willow Lane, Plainfield, NJ, dated 1892. It was a wonderful, large photo with numerous names written on the back, which I will list here:
Back row - left to right:
James McGee
Mrs. James McGee
Walter M. McGee
Harry L. McGee (seated on railing)
Alice Yerkes McGee (wife of Walter)
Clifford Whiting McGee, Sr.
Ed Ashbrook
Annie McGee Ashbrook (seated)
Emma Louise Whiting McGee (standing)
Henry A. McGee
Caroline McGee Horne
Charles E. Horne (faded)

Front row - seated left to right
Donald Ashbrook McGee
James R. Joy
Elizabeth McGee (daughter of Walter and Alice)
Emma McGee Joy
Herbert Welch
Adelaide McGee Welch
F. Rolande Horne (on bike)
George Horne (standing near bike)
Raymond Augustus McGee
Elsie Horne (daughter of Charles and Caroline Horne, on bike)
Vaughn McGee (son of Walter and Alice McGee, on bike)

A scanned image of the photo can be seen here:
http://www.geocities.com/jganis2/McGeePhoto.html

1920 Muhlenberg Hospital Womens Auxiliary

Mrs. Clifford McGee 60 Willow Avenue, N.P.
Mrs. Donald A. McGee 103 Sycamore Avenue, N.P.
Mrs. H. A. McGee 1 Orchard Place, N.P.
Mrs. W. M. McGee 101 Rockview Avenue, N.P.
Mrs. George B. Yerkes 1075 Central Avenue

1909 Plainfield Directory

Yerkes, Joseph B, oil, h. 1057 Central av

1936 - 1937 Meeting Minutes

1928 Plainfield City Directory

Yerkes Geo B (Grace B) broker h1075 Central av
Yerkes Ida r209 E 7th
Yerkes Jos B 1057 Central av

1908 Commercial and Financial Chronicle The Plainfield Trust Company

1914 Standard Oil Or the People: The End of Corporate Control in America

HENRY A. McGEE

Henry A. McGee is director in the Standard Ol Co. of N. Y., vice-president of the Plainfield Trust Co., and trustee of the N. Y. Produce Exchange Safe Deposit and Storage Co. He was formerly member of the board of managers of the N. Y. Produce Exchange, which fixes the price of oil for the trade and in the Bowling Green Trust Co.

W. C. McGee was director in the Plainfield Trust Co., N. Y. Petroleum Soap Co., and Central Electric Construction Co. His office is in the Standard Oil building.

December 7, 1898 New York Times

DEATH OF JAMES McGEE

He was Manager of the Devoe Works of the Standard Oil Company

James McGee, manager at 26 Broadway of the Devoe Works of the Standard Oil Company, died suddenly yesterday morning at his home, Washington Park, Plainfield, N.J., in his seventy-second year. Mr. McGee was in his office in the Standard Oil Building as late as Monday afternoon. He appeared to be in his usual health, and left o attend a meeting in the Methodist Book Concern Building. On reaching home in the evening he complained of illness, and Dr. Jenkins of Plainfield found cardiac irregularity, but under his care the symptoms abated and the patient retired. At the time he was usually called he was found dead in bed.

Mr. McGee was born in New York, and received a common-school education. He began his business career as a cotton broker, and was dealing in petroleum when he became a member of the New York Produce Exchange, of which he was a manager in 1875, Vice President in 1879 and 1886 and President 1886-17. In 1873 he became identified with the Standard Oil Company. As a business man he was widely esteemed. He had been since manhood deeply interested in the affairs and prosperity of the Methodist Episcopal Church and was its benefactor in various ways. At Plainfield he built the Monroe Avenue Church, and gave to the congregation the adjoining Epworth League Building. Part of the money for the newly erected parsonage came from him.

At the time of his death Mr. McGee was President and a Director of the New York Produce Exchange Safe Deposit and Storage Company and a member of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the American Fine Arts Society, the American Geographical Society, and the American Musuem of Natural History. He is survived by four daughters and two sons. Mrs. McGee died in 1896.

Roster of the general and department officials of the Standard Oil Company

Export trade committeemen: Livingston Roe, Wm. Donald and Walter M. McGee

The Plainfield Trust Company

Walter M. McGee, Standard Oil Company, New York

September 14, 2013 Trip to Kykuit

The road from Plainfield to Kykuit was traveled once again on Saturday as 19 made the trip to see the famed estate of John D. Rockefeller.

"Once again" you say?

Why, yes. Many Plainfielders worked for Mr. Rockefeller in his New York Standard Oil offices as well as offices located in the oil refineries right off Route 1 in Linden where the descendant companies of Standard Oil still store, refine and ship petroleum. These Plainfielders perhaps were not invited to Kykuit, but Rockefeller's lifelong friend and spirtual advisor most likely was an invited guest . . . and perhaps even his wife, founding PGC Member Mrs. Charles A. Eaton '15

Mrs. Eaton and her husband had their lives and fortunes changed upon meeting the owner of Kykuit. Mr. Eaton was the preacher at Euclid Avenue Baptist Church, situated on Cleveland's 'millionaire's row,' and as a result he came to the attention of John D. Rockefeller, a summer resident of Cleveland who attended church there. Rockefeller and Eaton became lifelong friends, and this connection influenced Eaton's future path.

This connection with Rockefeller also influenced Mr. Eaton's favorite nephew, Cyrus S. Eaton, who went to work for Rockefeller as a college student and later became one of America's greatest industrialists. He is best remembered (for those of us that can remember back to the '70's) for his role in US relations with the Soviet Union. In the late '60's his business deals with Communist Russia and the Rockefellers earned quite a bit of bad press.

In 1909, the Eatons followed Rockefeller by moving to what is now Watchung, but at one time was considered part of Plainfield. Their house still stands on Valley Road. Although a "dairy farmer" on their Valley Road estate "Sunbright," Mr. Eaton's main role was that of preacher to a prominent Madison Avenue Baptist Church congregation. However, after Mrs. Eaton helped found the PGC in 1915, in 1924, Mr. Eaton ran for Congress, won his seat and stayed there until 1952.

Congressman Eaton rose to become chairman of the Committee on Foreign Affairs and served on the Select Committee on Foreign Aid. Eaton signed the original United Nations Charter in San Francisco as part of a delegation representing the United States Government. He helped gain support for the Marshall Plan, also known as the Economic Cooperation Act of 1948, which was passed by Congress in 1948 by a vote of 329 to 74. For several years, he served in Congress alongside his nephew William R. Eaton, a Representative from Colorado.

Eaton was a steadfast opponent of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal. However, he was frequently invited to the White House for meetings with both presidents Roosevelt and Truman because of his sharp understanding of international politics.

While in Congress, he and Mrs. Eaton entertained many foreign dignitaries at their home. Between raising her family, and supporting her husband's career, Mrs. Eaton was very active in the PGC, serving as President twice, 1921 - 23, and then again in 1928-30.

The other likely Plainfielder to have made visits to Kykuit would have been the original owner of "The Castle" located at 900 Park Avenue. Mr. Orville T. Waring lovingly built that house and was partners with John D. Rockefeller, after selling his petroleum interests to him and then becoming Director of the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey. Mr. Waring's daughter was founding member Mrs. Lewis Gouveneur (Helen Frances Waring) Timpson '15. His daughter-in-law was Mrs. Orville G. Waring '35.

Mr. Waring had eight children and two wives, and many of his progeny were elite members of the Plainfield Garden Club: Fleming, Hyde, Mellick, Tweedy, and MacLeod. When Mr. Waring's daughters were wed, the news appeared in the New York Times along with reports of Mr. Rockefeller and John D. Rockefeller, Jr.'s attendance at the events and their gifts of "gold and silver ornaments."

To view the photos from the most recent trip to Kykuit, click here: Field Trip to Kykuit

Other members associated with the Standard Oil Company and the Rockefellers included the large McGee clan:
McGee, Henry Augustus (Emma Louise Whiting) '22
McGee, Mrs. Harry Livingston (Sarah M. Howell) '18
McGee, Mrs. Walter Miller (Mary Alice Yerkes) '22

And of course Barbara Sandford was Rockefeller's neighbor on Euclid Avenue in Cleveland, her father & John D. belonging to all the same clubs with the most notable distinction of being residents of "Millionaire's Row."

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

April 7, 1961 Courier News 25 Years Ago, 1936

Members of the Plainfield Garden Club exhibiting in the International Flower Show in New York were: Mrs. Leslie R. Fort, president, Mrs. Richard M. Lawton, Mrs. William S. Tyler, Mrs. Cornelius B. Tyler, Mrs. William K. Dunbar, Miss Dorothea Tingley, Mrs. Walter M. McGee, Mrs. Arthur G. Nelson, P. Marshall, Mrs. Edward H. Ladd Jr., Mrs. Stephen G. Van Hoesen, Mrs. Elliott C. Laidlaw, Mrs. Clinton F. Ivins, Miss Edna Brown, Mrs. Harold Brown, Mrs. Orville G. Waring, Mrs. DeWitt Hubbell, Mrs. Irwin Taylor and Mrs. Harry H. Pond.

1941 Courier-News Plainfield Merits Classification as 'City of Beautiful Trees'

November 30, 2013: Found in Barbara Tracy Sandford's memorabilia. Written by PGC Member Mrs. Garret Smith

"I call Plainfield the City of Beautiful Trees," and out-of-town visitor remarked to me the other day. "My business takes me to many towns about this size clear across the country. Trees, or their lack, always impress me most about a town. Beautiful building can't make up for the lack of them. Many towns seem to have choice trees only in one or two sections. Others have only a few tree-lined avenues. But every part of Plainfield has not only interesting individual trees, but long stretches of streets where treetops meet in green arches above the traffic. That doesn't just happen. This town must have been founded by tree-lovers."

The stranger was right, as many specimen trees on old private properties testify. They are trees that were rare and expensive when planted years ago. A number of well-to-do property owners appreciated trees and collected choice kinds. The street trees of about this age also show that far-sighted men planned to make the town keep growing more beautiful in ways that everyone enjoys.

Trees have always been essential to Plainfielders. In the early days elms stretched down North Ave. from east to the west city boundaries. Many still remain now 70 to 80 years old. That avenue helped to establish Plainfield's policy of "beautiful trees for every street."

Value Appreciated
The city's mayors and councilmen have appreciate the value of trees . . . Ginko . . . now ripening, in the edge of the station grounds, near the corner of the drug store.

Among its immediate neighbors, at this station are a Red Maple, Austrian Pine, English Elm, Horse Chestnut, several Magnolias and a Sycamore Maple, the latter near the middle of the grass oval. Purple Beech, White Pine and two Hemlocks stand at the west exit.

Lindens at Spot
On the North Ave. side of the station is an interesting clump of three Lindens – no two alike. Evergreens are represented by three Scotch Pines, an Austrian and a White Pine, and a tall, slender Spruce. In this little park are also Sugar Swamp and Silver Maples, and a clump of low-growing Beeches. Looking upward to the railroad level, one sees, besides the specimen Ginko mentioned, two Catalpas, a Weeping Mulberry, two Red Maples and an Austrian Pine. A big Pin Oak, two or three Scarlet Oaks, a . . . .

. . . boats glided over Green Brook and when Plainfield and New York social leaders came in big carriages, drawn by spanking teams, to garden musicals, gay dinners, dances and teas as the Johnston's guests.

All of Plainfield's school grounds are constantly growing more attractive. Environment of vines, trees, plants and shrubs awaken appreciation of Nature's beauty that is a lifelong source of pleasure.

Hubbard School, one of the city's architectural gems, has always been regarded as in a class by itself. Its beauty is greatly enhanced by choice plant material on its ample grounds, partly framed by Barberry. Large specimen Japanese Yews arrest attention, along with Sourwoods, or "Lily-of-the-Valley Tree," whose branches bear long one-sided racemes of white flowers in summer and whose leaves are vivid scarlet in autumn.

White Pine, Cedar, Pfitzer Junipers are shadowy evergreen foils for airy bloom of Weeping Japanese . . .

Among them are the old Elms in North Ave., mentioned before; London Planes from Watchung Ave. to Terrill Rd.; Ash in St. Mary's Ave.; Pin Oaks and Planes in Park Ave.; Sycamore Maples in Bellevue Ave.; Norway Maples in both Leland and Monroe Ave. sections. Tulip trees now grow in Central St., along Maxon School grounds, and Ginkos in Landsdowne Terr. In Cleveland Ave., near Grace Church, the lacy foliage of the decorative Mountain Ash, or Rowan Tree, contrasts at this season with bunches of bright hollylike berries. Many years ago the late Simeon Cruikshank planted Buckeyes along his corner property ["Sacmoore" 831 Belvidere] at Belvidere and Watchung Aves. Much smaller than familiar Horse Chestnut and with brighter pink flower-spikes they have always been greatly admired. In autumn the brilliant, scarlet, star-shape leaves of Liquid-ambar, or Sweetgum, glorifies a patch of Ravine Rd. After a shower, or if bruised, the foliage is fragrant. Corky bark and thorny-skinned fruit like little apples, complete this tree's unique characteristics.

Close to 150 trees, of many species, are part of the Muhlenberg Hospital landscape. The long front path beneath the Maples, and on the west the wide Elm-bordered stretch of green lawn leading to a quiet pool, with its amusing little bronze fountain figure, form two vistas of ever-increasing charm. Wide borders of intermingling trees and flowering shrubs frame the property.

The purple leaves of the two Schwedler Maples attract much attention in the spring. So do the Apple trees and Dogwoods that trim the grounds like big bouquets, set off by Hemlocks, Spruce and Pine. Chinese Dogwoods, given by graduate nurses, are especially prized. Devoted interest of the late Marie Louis, nature-lover and for years superintendent of Muhlenberg, helped turn once common-plant "grounds" into a tree-shaded garden spot both restful and diverting.

Dogwood Favorites
Native Dogwoods are favorites among the city's flowering trees. The Plainfield Garden Club, on its own recent 25th birthday, gave small grove of these "Jewels of the Forest" to Cedar Brook Park. On the T. H. Van Bosckerck grounds on Prospect Ave. is the handsome large group of Dogwoods on private property in town. On Dr. Elmer Weigel's lawn on Belvidere Ave [630 Belivdere – see Mrs. Joost]. Chinese Dogwood bears much larger and later blooms. Directly across the street from this, and close to the sidewalk, a low-growing Witch Hazel (Hamanelis) bears yellow Forsythia-like flowers in winter.

Before the Talmadge dwelling [714 Belvidere], in the the same street, are majestic Copper Beeches. In early days Beeches were popular selections for large grounds. Probably the finest Weeping Beech in the city grows in deserted grounds in Central Ave. Nearby on the Witon property is a huge Purple Beech – both almost perfect. Farther down the avenue, on Wardlaw School grounds [1030 Central Avenue - see Below], is a fine old Ginko.

The only Katsura Tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum) in Plainfield is owned by former Mayor Leighton Calkins [929 Madison – see Below]. Its strange trunk and heart-shaped leaves, purplish when young, are unusual. It grows in front of the house in Madison Ave.

Unique among Plainfield trees is a native Orange of the South. it is today laden with velvety, green fruit in Mrs. Howard Tracy's Prospect Ave. garden [1331 Prospect Ave]. Probably nowhere else in this region can one be found, according to Shade Tree Commissioner Lithgow Hunter. Sent north from Maryville College in Tennessee 50 years ago. . . .

. . . residents seeking permanent homes. These officials have always planned with the Shade Tree Commission since its organization, so that every year more trees come marching in. Some fill vacancies in the ranks of old trees along old streets. Others shade tireless blocks in new sections of town.

For the last 17 years, one man, Sidney Durant, the Shade Tree Commission's expert supervisor of trees, has directed its work. it includes feeding, pruning, watering and repairing the city's 25,000 street trees, as well removal of dead or too-badly-injured trees and planting new ones. For nearly 20 years Thomas F. Hylan has served on the commission, of which he is now president.

Of all the city's trees, the strange Ginko, or Maiden-hair tree, grows to a height of 80 feet or so. The delicacy of its little leaves, resembling those of the Maiden-Hair fern, contrast sharply with the arrow-straight upswept branches of what is considered one of the most beautiful and unusual of all hardy exotic trees. The Ginko's origin is a mystery. Nowhere on earth is it been found wild, yet fossils prove it was once scattered all over the world. Nothing else today resembles the Ginko, so paleontologists reason that some series of misfortunes destroyed all missing links. Today's closest relative is the Yew family, thought at a glance they appear as unrelated as a Chines and a New England Yankee.

Planted Near Temples
Early explorers found Ginkos planted around Chinese and Japanese temples. The Chinese called in Yin-Hing – "Silver Apricot" – referring to the greenish-yellow, fleshy fruit having a single stone. This fruit, slightly roasted, was served throughout the formal Chinese dinners which lasted all day. Guests nibble the finlike fruit between courses as an aid to digestion.

The Ginko did not reach England until 1754. The first specimen in this country was planted in Woodlands Cemetery, Philadelphia. In 1889 the Ginko fruited for the first time there on the grounds of Charles Wister. fifty years ago these newcomers to America were not only scarce, but expensive. That Plainfield has so many beautiful old specimens of these trees is possibly due to the fact that John Taylor Johnston, then president of the New Jersey Central Railroad and a resident of this city, was not only a patron of the arts, but a lover of trees. Each of Plainfield's railroad station grounds had not only fine specimens of the Ginko, but also a varied collection of other trees, evidently selected by an expert.

Netherwood, nearest the Johnston home [see Below], was especially favored. Here, beside the north track, stands a regal Ginko, carefully located as an artist would plan his canvas, so that its top is etched against the sky. This emphasizes the beauty of leaf and branch and trunk as viewed from the eastbound station platform. ?? may see a younger . . .

. . . White Oak and Elms are among the trees fringing the western boundary.

"The property as a whole is a remarkable small arboretum," said a well-known visiting tree scientist recently, after inspecting the Netherwood station park. "In my travels I've seen no other railroad station grounds with such a variety of trees. This landscaping, too, I can see was done by an expert."

In employing such an expert to beautify the railroad property in his home town, Mr. Johnston was carrying out the spirit of the statement he made at the time the Metropolitan Museum of New York City was founded at his Fifth Ave. mansion. He was quoted as saying:

"The public ought to have a chance to see, to hear and to know more about whatever feeds the mind and is inspiring, if we are to have the best kind in America."

To even a novice in landscaping, the Netherwood station grounds show that underlying motive. One could not imagine either the south or north oval either diminished of enlarged – so true is their scale. It would be hard to find more beautiful flowering trees than those Magnolias; or more intriguing contrast of leaf, branch and trunk than offered by the Ginko and the Pine. On the north side the clump of Lindens, combined with an apparently outcropping "pudding stone," make a "garden composition" that suggest to the home gardener similar effective arrangements, though not necessarily identical in material.

Beautiful Estate
Some old residents recall that Mr. Johnston's estate in E. Front St. was lavishly beautified with choice trees, as were those of most of his neighbors along that splendid avenue of that day. Some of those estates are still being kept up as homes of their owners today, while others have been divided into beautiful setting for developments of small homes.

The Johnston estate, however, furnished the basis of another public development of beauty spots. A portion of it became the site of the new Barlow School [see Below]. These school grounds are said to be unequaled in the state in the variety and placement of superb trees. What some consider the finest Weeping Beech in town grows here, also two majestic evergreens, one a White Pine, the other a Spruce. Elm, Ginko, Cucumber tree, Ash, "Button Ball," Willow and Sugar Maple are also outstanding.

Two of the most interesting, although not the most conspicuous of the group, are a true English Oak (Quercus Robur) and a Yellow Wood (Cladrastis lute). The first has smallish leaves, thick-set upon the branch. A strange characteristic is that the stem adheres to the side of the acorn. The writer knows of only one other English Oak in town – Central Ave., near Stelle Ave.

The Yellow Wood has wisteria-like racemes of white fragrant flowers in midsummer. Leaves resemble the locust. Another fine specimen grows on the property of Miss Laura Detwiller in Hillside Ave.

All were here in the days . . . .

. . . when Cherry, Dogwood and Crab. In early spring the large leathery-leaved evergreen Japanese Andromeda (Pieris) unfold delicate, coppery leaves and waxy white racemes of tiny flowers. These are classified as shrubs, but on these favorable grounds, are almost small trees of exceptional beauty.

Preservation is Theme
The good judgement of George R. Zimmer, who for many years has supervised Plainfield's school grounds, is shown not only in what has already been accomplished, but in developments being planned. "What can we preserve?" not "What can we cut down?" is his motto. Before clearing the recently purchased grounds adjoining Maxon School was begun this summer, Mr. Zimmer marked every large and small tree that "might some day be of use somewhere." Workmen were warned to cut not one of these.

The City Police Headquarters and also the old Public Library have a setting of trees. The little Library Park is said to have been reserved from farmland whose native trees – mostly, Red, White and Black Oaks – were left standing. Across the facade of Fire Headquarters are a Ginko, a London Plane and Horse Chestnut – each an unusually fine specimen. Among Netherwood firemen are enthusiastic gardeners. Each spring many of Plainfield's 3,000 commuters take great interest in "what the boys are doing to their grounds." Everything planted seems to do well, even the peonies, marking the line between the firemen's parklike grounds and the railroad cinder-bed.

On spacious City Hall grounds is not only a variety of evergreens, but also of deciduous trees, selected for beauty of form, leaf or flower. Two Cryptomeria, "Aristocrats of Evergreens," donated recently by Plainfield's near-centenarian, Miss Isabel Tweedy, and a tall Himalayan Pine in town was brought here by the late Harry K. Tetsuka, to adorn his well-known Japanese garden in Belvidere Ave [556 Belvidere].

The Holly tree on City Hall grounds is another tree found on but few properties. It was donated by Herbert Moody [see Below], when The Courier-news gift of 5,000 bulbs roused a widespread interest in more beautiful grounds, in keeping with the architectural beauty of the building. Evergreens were given immediately by former Mayor Marion F. Ackerman, and a Dogwood by Thomas F. Hylan, whose keen interest in the property extends back to 25 years ago, when, as Councilman, he served on the City Hall Building Committee. This season former Councilman Orville G. Waring, son of the late Mayor Waring, donated several valuable Pfitzer Junipers.

Not Monotonous
Many species of trees planted along our city streets make green lanes that are not monotonous.

. . . . stood for most of that time in this sheltered nook. The fruits, when ripe, are decorative, but not edible. Edible oranges grown only on grafted stock. The thorny branches of this small tree resemble Osage Orange, or "Indian Bow-wood."

Figs are also ripening now in Plainfield. Within a stone's throw of Netherwood station is Watson Ave. It is only three blocks long and from spring to fall it glows with flowers. In one little garden grows a carefully tended Fig tree that bears fruit yearly. Each fall the owner buries his Fig tree in a deep trench well below the frost-line. Each spring it is dug out and reset.

One great wide-spreading Mulberry (Morus Multicaulus) towers far above the roof-top of Leslie R. Fort's home in Cedarbrook Rd. This venerable tree is the historic survivor of a Mulberry plantation, established during the "Multicaulus Mania," by the late Senator Martine [11 Brook Lane, see Below], as a venture to yield gigantic profits on his farm that included the Cedar Brook tract. He believed with others that New Jersey would be one of the world's silk-growing centers. Convinced that silk was to take the place of cotton, New Jersey farmers set out thousands of acres of "silk-worm mulberries" about 100 years ago, only to cut down the trees when the bubble burst.

One of the most varied private collection of trees in the city is that of Miss Jessie D. Munger in Prospect Ave. In recent years instructors at Rutgers University have brought students to these grounds to study the trees and other plant material as well as the garden design. Last spring the general public enjoyed the same privilege.

Love of trees is part of the tradition that has helped mould Plainfield into a city of pleasant homes on quiet streets. The late Jonas Lie, one of our city's most distinguished citizens, sensed this characteristic of our community. In the Common Council Chamber at City Hall hangs his gift – a mountain woodland scene, interpreted by his illustrious brush as an inspiring message to us all.

To learn more about the history of some of the people and places mentioned in this article, visit these links:

[Maxson School]
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Elizabeth B. Atwood) '15

[630 Belvidere]
Joost, Mrs. Sherman Brownell (Marie Murray) '19

[714 Belvidere]
Dunbar, Mrs. William Kuhn '17
Rock, Mrs. Robert B. '43
Runkle, Mrs. Harry Godley (Jennie Fitz Randolph) '15
Whitehead, Mrs. James Harold (Jean Fitz-Randolph Heiberg) '43

[1030 Central Avenue – duCret School]
Huntington, Mrs. Howard (Agnes Fales Strong) '19
McGee, Mrs. Walter Miller (Mary Alice Yerkes) '22
Zerega, Miss Bertha Virginia '23

[929 Madison Avenue]
Ackerman, Mrs. Marion S.(Sarah M. Wills) '35

[Johnston Estate on Front Street & Netherwood]
Mali, Mrs. Pierre (Frances Johnston) '18

[Barlow School East front Street – former estate of "Blojocamavi" owned by Lewis V. Fitz Randolph/Johnston estate]
Barlow, Mrs. Carlton Montague (June Simms) '70
Barlow, Mrs. DeWitt Dukes (Mary Lee Brewer), Jr. '65
Dunbar, Mrs. William K., Jr. (Elizabeth or "Libby" Hail Barlow) '47
Perkins, Mrs. Seymour, Jr. (Esther Moody Barlow) '49
(Also see Mrs. Runkle and Mrs. Whitehead above)

[City Hall]
Moody, Mrs. George T. '22
Perkins, Mrs. Seymour, Jr. (Esther Moody Barlow) '49

[11 Brook Lane, Martine House]
MacLeod, Mrs. Robert F. (Carolyn Waring) '55

1941 Courier-News Plainfield Merits Classification as 'City of Beautiful Trees'

1941 Courier-News Plainfield Merits Classification as 'City of Beautiful Trees'

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Related to the Yerkes Family

1904 Chronicle of the Yerkes Family

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

December 28, 2014

Local blogger Dan Damon wrote this article, Suspicious fire at historic Plainfield building, regarding a fire at the Samuel W. Rushmore building on South Avenue. Many Rushmore relatives have been members of the PGC including current Affiliate Member Ginny Rushmore.

To learn more about this prominent family, click on these member albums:

Rushmore, Mrs. Murray (Helen Joy)
Rushmore, Mrs. Townsend (Jean Betram Murray) '20
Joy, Mrs. James R. (Emma Prentice McGee) '33
Mooney, Mrs. Wandell McMaster (Alice Joy McGee) '47
Joost, Mrs. Sherman Brownell (Marie Murray) '19
Murray, Mrs. James Everett (Alice Marshall) '20
Roome, Mrs. John Stanton (Dolores or "Dody" Murray) '57
Tilney, Mrs. Albert Arthur (Augusta R. Murray) '20
McGee, Mrs. Harry Livingston (Susan M. Howell) '18
McGee, Mrs. Walter Miller (Mary Alice Yerkes) '22
Lockwood, Mrs. Frederick M. (Hazel Marshall) '52
Lockwood, Mrs. William L. (Amy M.) '25
Marshall, Mrs. Henry P. (Dorothy Burke) '30
Howell, Mrs. Josephus Halsey (Romaine Ray) '22
Chambliss, Mrs. Leopold A. (Anna Scott Yerkes) '50
Eddy, Mrs. Charles Brown (Ellen Coolidge Burke) '15

And through marriage on her husband's side, the late Mrs. Webster (Barbara Tracy) Sandford '50.

Plainfield firefighters responded early Saturday evening to a suspicious fire in a historic factory structure at South Avenue and Berckman Street.

The complex of three buildings, parts of which are over a hundred years old, most recently housed the Royal Apex Company, a manufacturer of gutters and other metal and plastic extruded products. The buildings have been vacant since 2007, when Royal Apex was bought out by Berger Building Products, Inc., and operations were moved to Pennsylvania.

Originally, the buildings housed the Rushmore Dynamo Works, owned by Plainfield entrepreneur and inventor Samuel W. Rushmore. Rushmore made his fortune in patents and manufacturing several key improvements in automobile technology.

Among his notable inventions – or improvements on those of others – are the automatic starter, cooling systems for internal combustion engines, the flared automobile headlamp, a searchlight, and locomotive headlights. At one time, half of all the automatic starters used in American automobiles were manufactured in the Plainfield location.

Rushmore sold the business in 1914 to the Bosch Magneto Company, with the proviso that the Rushmore name be used on its products for a number of years. When Bosch violated the terms of the agreement, Rushmore successfully sued (see here) for $100,000 (which would be over $2 million today).

Bosch, a German company with a U.S. branch, established a separate U.S. corporation, headquartered in New York City. Because of suspicions of its owners' loyalty, Bosch was nationalized in both the First and Second World Wars – with control returning to private hands in 1948.

Though several area fire companies responded to the blaze, it was quickly brought under control. A source told me the fire is suspected to be arson, a determination that will be made officially by arson investigators.

January 31, 2015 Correspondence

Dear Ms. Nichols,

My sincerest apologies for getting back to you so late. Our website had an "issue" with emails and I am just figuring it out.

Unfortunately, the only thing I would know about your family are the things posted on www.plainfieldgardenclub.org for Mrs. Mead:

Mead, Mrs. Frederick Goodhue (Marie Louise Myers) '15

Mrs. Mead was relating to other members of the Plainfield Garden Club:

Myers, Mrs. J. Kirtland (Mary Ann Stillman) '15
Quarles, Mrs. Ernest Augustus (Anita Mary Stillman) '22
Stillman, Mrs. Albert Leeds (Virginia Brown) '41
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Elizabeth B. Atwood) '15
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Ethel Lucille Titsworth) '42
Joy, Mrs. James R. (Emma Prentice McGee) '33
McGee, Mrs. Harry Livingston (Susan M. Howell) '18
McGee, Mrs. Walter Miller (Mary Alice Yerkes) '22
Mooney, Mrs. Wandell McMaster (Alice Joy McGee) '47

I do recommend you contacting the genealogy department of the Plainfield Library 908-857-1111 as they would be more likely to help you further. Also, there may be information to be found at the Fanwood Library www.fanwoodlibrary.org

Best of luck to you –

Susan Fraser
Communications Chair
Plainfield Garden Club
Founded 1915
www.plainfieldgardenclub.org


December 27, 2014

My mother, Sandra Shepard Wright, was an only child and the great grand-daughter of Agustus D Shepard and Johanna Elizabeth Mead. I am looking for any information regarding great aunt Winifred Prentice Kay, and also Marie Riis [aka Rees] who was married to Agustus D. Shepard Jr. -Thanks!

Winifred Ohrstrom Nichols