Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Hedges, Mrs. Benjamin Van Doren (Adele Cutts Williams) '22

1922 Address: 1225 Watchung Avenue, Plainfield

1929 Treasurer Book Active $5.00 (not listed in the 1928 Treasurer Book)
1930, 1931 Treasurer Book Active

1932 Directory* Address: 1225 Watchung Avenue, Plainfield

* = This directory is not dated but presumed to be from the year 1932.

NOTE: Within this directory, the name "Mrs. B. V. D. Hedges, 1225 Watchung Avenue" is crossed out by hand.

1932 Treasurer Book: Hedges, Mrs. B. VanD. 1/32 Pd – Deceased

Most likely related to these PGC Members:

Williams, Mrs. Harry '37
Williams, Mrs. Lewis '31, President 1935 - 1936

Also may be related to Old Stone Cottage
Munger, Miss Jessie D. '32
as Miss Munger's mother's maiden name was "Hedges"

Dr. Hedges

Benjamin Van Doren Hedges, physician, of Plainfield, NJ. b. at Chester, May 19, 1866; living; m. June 6, 1906, Adele Cutts Williams. He graduated from Princeton in 1888, and from the NY College of Physicans and Surgeons, 1891. Children: Benjamin Van Doren Hedges, Jr. b. June 8, 1907; living. Robert Williams Hedges, b. July 31, 1908, living.

Benjamin van Doren Hedges, Jr.

Benjamin van Doren Hedges, Jr. (June 8, 1907 - December 31, 1969) was an American athlete who competed mainly in the high jump.

He competed for the United States in the 1928 Summer Olympics held in Amsterdam, Netherlands in the high jump where he won the silver medal.

Persondata
Name Hedges, Benjamin
Alternative names
Short description
Date of birth
Place of birth
Date of death
Place of death

Van Doren, Van Doorn, Van Dorn

All the spellings of the Dutch family

Hedges Family papers, 1866 - 1969 at Princeton Library

Hedges Family Papers, 1866-1969(bulk 1888-1935)
AC370


Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library
65 Olden Street
Princeton, New Jersey 08540 USA
Phone: 609-258-6345
Fax: 609-258-3385
mudd@princeton.edu
http://www.princeton.edu/~mudd
Published in December 2010.

2010 Princeton University Library

Summary Information
Creator:
Heges family
Title and dates:
Hedges family papers, 1866-1969(bulk 1888-1935)
Abstract:
The Hedges family produced three Princetonians in two generations: Benjamin van Doren Hedges, 1866-1930, Princeton class of 1888, and his sons Benjamin van Doren Hedges, 1907-1969, Princeton class of 1930 and Robert W. Hedges, 1908-1950, Princeton class of 1931. This collection contains scrapbooks, photographs, newspaper clippings, correspondence, lecture notes, and more belonging to all three Hedges family Princetonians, both while at Princeton and during other periods.
Size:
6.0 linear ft. (4 boxes)
Call number:
AC370
Location:
Princeton University Library. Department of Rare Books and Special Collections.
Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library.
Princeton University Archives.
Princeton, New Jersey 08540 USA
Language(s) of material:
English
Organizational History
The Hedges family produced three Princetonians in two generations: Benjamin van Doren Hedges, 1866-1930, Princeton class of 1888, and his sons Benjamin van Doren Hedges, 1907-1969, Princeton class of 1930 and Robert W. Hedges, 1908-1950, Princeton class of 1931. The elder Benjamin van Doren Hedges was a member of the Philadelpian Society, the Student Conference Committee and Clio Hall while at Princeton, and went on to become a prominent New Jersey physician. While at Princeton, the younger Benjamin van Doren Hedges competed in the 1928 Olymics, was elected class president and chair of the Undergraduate Council, was president of the Glee Club. Later, he worked extensivly with the national Big Brother movement, becoming National Director and Vice President of the organization. Robert W. Hedges was active in musical performance and acting at Princeton, including with Theatre Intime and Triangle Club, for which he helped write The Tiger Smiles. Credited as R.W. Hedges, he also wrote the musical score for The Golden Dog, which was performed at the opening of McCarter Theater. He later attended Cornell medical school and practiced medicine in New York.

Description
This collection contains scrapbooks, photographs, newspaper clippings, correspondence, lecture notes, and more belonging to all three Hedges family Princetonians, both while at Princeton and during other periods.

Access and Use
Access Restrictions
The collection is open for research.

Restrictions on Use and Copyright
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the University Archivist. Researchers are responsible for determining any copyright questions.

Processing and Other Information
Descriptive Rules Used
Finding aid content adheres to that prescribed by Describing Archives: A Content Standard.

Encoding
Machine-readable finding aid encoded in EAD 2002 created from MARC record via MarcEdit and XSL stylesheets in December 2010.

Finding aid written in English.

Preferred Citation
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Hedges Family Papers, Box and Folder Number; Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, Princeton University Library.

Subject Headings
These materials have been indexed in the Princeton University Library online catalogusing the following terms. Those seeking related materials should search under these terms.

Hedges family
Hedges, Benjamin van Doren, 1866-1930.
Hedges, Benjamin van Doren, 1907-1969.
Hedges, R. W. (Robert Williams), 1908-1950.
Princeton University. Theatre Intime.
Princeton University. Triangle Club.
Princeton University – Students – 19th century.
Princeton University – Students – 20th century.
Cornell University. – Medical College
College musicals – 20th century.
College theater – New Jersey – Princeton – 20th century.
Scrapbooks.
Photographs.
Clippings.
Letters.
Correspondence.
Lecture notes.

A. Van Doren Honeyman's History of Union County

The 1923 edition of A. Van Doren Honeyman's History of Union County tells us Lewis V. F. Randolph, "built wonderful gardens, planting hundreds of varieties of rare and beautiful trees, flowers, and plants." Honeyman was not alone in his opinion. Both the postcard and the photograph offer views of "Blojocamavi, the Randolph estate on East Front Street near Farragut Road. Courtesy of Courier News – Bridgewater, New Jersey

From Plainfield, New Jersey's History & Architecture by John Grady & Dorothe Pollard

Dr. B. Van D. Hedges, usher in Yates wedding

Dr. Ellis W. Hedges

http://www.plainfieldlibrary.info/Departments/LH/FindingAids/ShakespeareSoc.html

Charter Member of the Shakespeare Society 1896 - 1998

Hillside Cemetery

September 14, 2011
Photo by S. Fraser

Hillside Cemetery

November 14, 1895 New York Times

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=FB0911FE355911738DDDAD0994D9415B8585F0D3

PLAINFIELD KIRMESS OPENED

In Aid of Muhlenberg Hospital – Good Attendance and Reason for Expecting Financial Success – The Booths.

PLAINFIELD, N. J., Nov. 13 – There was a grand opening of the kirmess at the Columbia Cycle Academy Monday night, and the building was decorated very elaborately.

Not since the charity ball have the society fold here been interested in a like event for such a worthy cause. The kirmess is given for the benefit of Muhlenberg Hospital, and, judging from the attendance at the opening night, the hospital will be greatly bettered financially.

Booths have been very prettily arranged about the academy, making an exceedingly tasty show. The equipment of the booths is as follows:

French Booth – Mrs. Albert Hoffman Atterbury, Mrs. Irving H. Brown, Mrs. Charles B. Corwin, Miss Bessie Ginna, Mrs. George C. Evans, Mrs. Charles J. Fisk, Mrs. Ellis W. Hedges, Miss E. E. Kenyon and Miss Whiton.

Florentine Booth – Mrs. I. N. Van Sickle, Mrs. David E. Titsworth, Mrs. W. M. Stillman, Mrs. John D. Titsworth, Mrs. F. A. Dunham, Miss Louise Clawson, Miss Bessie TItsworth, and Mrs. Lulu Lewis.

Gypsy Booth – Mrs. Joseph W. Reinhart, and Mrs. Howard Fleming.

Venetian Booth – Mrs. Hugh Hastings, Miss Emelie Schipper, Mrs. George A. Chapman, Miss Havbiland, Mrs. Samuel Huntingont, Mrs. Emil Woltman, Mrs. Samuel St. J. McCutchen, Mrs. Conklin, Mrs. C. S. West, Mrs. W. E. Lower, Miss E. R. Cock, Mrs. Frank O. Herring, Miss Huntington, Miss Maud Van Bosckerck, Miss MacCready, Miss Clara D. Finley, Miss Ahrens, Miss Aynne MacCready, Miss Mondanari, Miss Graff, Miss Yerkes, Miss Gertrude Walz, and Miss Pierson.

Japanese Booth – Mrs. Charles Seward Foote, Mrs. George Clay, Mrs. S.P. Simpson, Mrs. L. Finch, Mrs. Constantine P. Ralli, Mrs. William Lewis Brown, Mrs. L. Dennis, Mrs. WIlliam Pelletier, Miss Ellis, Miss Anthony, Miss Dryden, Miss Morgan, Miss Bowen, Miss Lawrence, and Miss Rodman.

Spanish Booth – Mrs. S. A. Cruikshank, Mrs. A. T. Slauson, Mrs. J. F. Wichers, Mrs. T. H. Curtis, Mrs. Marion S. Ackerman, Mrs. T. A. Hazell, Mrs. H. L. Moore, Mrs. D. T. Van Buren, Mrs. E. H. Mosher, Miss Harriott, Miss Louise Patton, Miss Maud Lord, Miss May Kirkner, Miss Louise Van Zandt, Miss Annie Horton, Miss Titsworth, and Miss Meredith.

German Booth – Mrs. Mason W. Tyler, Mrs. Logan Murphy, Mrs. John H. Oarman, Mrs. Charles J. Taggart, Mrs. Benjamin R. Western, Mrs. J. E. Turill, Mrs. Arthur T. Gallup, Mrs. Horsley Barker, Mrs. John Haviland, Mrs. George Wright, Mrs. Amra Hamragan, Mrs. William L. Saunders, Mrs. William Wright, Miss Annie Murphy, Miss Wright, Miss Western, Miss Bartling, Miss Helen Warman, Miss Emma Adams and Miss Ann Thorne.

Stationery Booth – Mrs. John Gray Foster, Mrs. Elliott Barrows, Mrs. A. W. Haviland, Mrs. John D. Miller, Mrs. James R. Joy, and Miss Emily R. Tracy.

Parisian Flower Stall – Mrs. Harry M. Stockton, Mrs. Evarts Tracy, Mrs. Daniel F. Ginna, Mrs. W. H. Ladd, Mrs. Frederick Yates, Miss Marlon Dumont, Miss Ginna, Miss Baker, Miss Huntington, and Miss Van Bosckerck.

Refreshments were dispensed by Mrs. Orville T. Waring, Mrs. George W. Van Bosckerck, Mrs. John Bushnell, Mrs. Gifford Mayer, Mrs. George H. Goddard, Mrs. Moore, Mrs. H. P. Reynolds, Mrs. C. C. Guion, Mrs. N. P. T. Finch, Mrs. Henry McGee, Mrs. De Revere, Mrs. Ruth C. Leonard, Mrs. George W. Rockfellow, Miss Annie Opdyke, Mrs. Van Alstyne, Mrs. Utzinger, Mrs. Nelson Runyon, Mrs. Henry Tapsley, Miss Martine, Miss Edith Allen, Mrs. J. Parker Mason, Mrs. J. K. Myers, Mrs. Walton, and Mrs. H. C. Adams

The New York Times November 8, 1932 Obituary

The New York Times Nov. 8, 1932:
Mrs. Benjamin Hedges
Special to The New York Times
PLAINFIELD, N.J.,Nov. 7.–Mrs. Adele Cutts Williams Hedges, widow of Dr. Benjamin Van Doren Hedges, died tonight at her home, 1225 Watchung Avenue, in her sixtieth year. She was born in Omaha, Neb., daughter of General Robert Williams, U.S.A., and with her parents long resided in Washington. She was a member of the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church and the Women's Auxiliary of Muhlenberg Hospital of Plainfield. Surviving are three sons, Benjamin Van Doren Hedges Jr., Robert W. and John C. Hedges, all of Plainfield; a sister, Mrs. Walter Farwell of Syossett, L.Il, and a brother, Captain Philip Williams, U.S.N., retired, of Washington.

Elyria Weekly Republican, Thursday, May 11, 1893.
A Bevy Of Buds
Pretty Girls Seen In Official Society at Washington.
Exquisitely fair and tall is Miss Addie Williams, daughter of General Robert Williams. Her mother, still a handsome woman, was the beautiful Addie Cutts, afterward Mrs. Stephen A. Douglas

Census Information

ID: I4757
Name: Adele Cutts WILLIAMS
Given Name: Adele Cutts
Surname: WILLIAMS
Sex: F
Birth: 1873 in Omaha, Nebraska
Death: 7 Nov 1932 in Plainfield, New Jersey
Change Date: 19 Nov 2006 at 00:09
Note:
1930 New Jersey, Union County, Plainfield District 111 Census April 4, 1930: Hedge, Benjamin head age 64 married at age 40, born New Jersey, both parent born New Jersey, occupation Physician in Private Practice veteran ww; Adele wife age 54 married at age 30, born Kansas, father born Virginia, mother born District of Columbia;
Benjamin, Jr. son age 23 born New Jersey;
Robert son age 21 born New Jersey;
John son age 20, born New Jersey;

Ship: Fort St. George, Sailing from Hamilton, Bermuda March 1st, 1927 Arriving at Port of New York, NY March 3rd 1927 Hedges, Benjamin age 50 male, married born 1866 Chester, N.J, address in US: 1225 Watchung Ave. Plainfield, NJ Hedges, Adele age 54 female, married, born 1872 Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. Address in US: 1225 Watchung Ave. Plainfield, NJ Farwell, Walter 64 male married born 1862 Chicago, Ill. Address in US: Syossett, N.Y. Farwell, Mildred age 48 female married born 1878 Washington, DC Address in US: Syossett, N.Y.

Adele Cutts Williams, Mrs. Hedge's Mother

Birth: 1835
Washington City
District of Columbia
District Of Columbia, USA
Death: Jan. 26, 1899
Washington City
District of Columbia
District Of Columbia, USA

Adele Cutts was the daughter of James Madison Cutts, a government official, and Ellen (O'Neale) Cutts. Tall, with striking features and chestnut hair, her beauty, intellect, and personality made her a leading belle in Washington society. In early 1856, Sen. Stephen A. Douglas (1813-1861) of Illinois, who was then a widower with two sons, met Adele Cutts and on November 20, 1856, they were married. From this union they had one daughter, but the child survived for only a few months. Senator Douglas was defeated in the Presidential election of 1860 and died of natural causes on June 3, 1861. In 1865, Adele Cutts Douglas met Capt. (later Gen.) Robert Williams, U.S.A., and they married in January 1866. They lived for many years in army posts in the West and had six children. Two of their sons served in the army and their eldest daughter married an army officer.

Source: FAMOUS AMERICAN BELLES OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY by Virginia Tatnall Peacock (Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott, 1901), pp. 175-89.



Family links:
Spouses:
Stephen Arnold Douglas (1813 - 1861)
Robert Williams (1829 - 1901)


Burial:
Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington
Arlington County
Virginia, USA
Plot: Sec 2 - 972

Created by: Leon Basile
Record added: Jun 21, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 27718453

Adele Cutts Williams

Adele Cutts Williams

Adele Cutts Williams

General Robert Williams, Mrs. Hedge's Father

Birth: Nov. 5, 1829
Culpeper
Culpeper County
Virginia, USA
Death: Aug. 24, 1901
Plainfield
Union County
New Jersey, USA

General Robert Williams was adjutant general of the United States Army. Entered West Point in 1847, graduating in 1851. In beginning of the Civil War he served as Colonel of the First Massachusetts Cavalry. Was married to the widow of Stephen A. Douglas, Adele Cutts Douglas, a famous belle of Washington. Upon graduating from West Point was appointed brevet 2ndlt., 1st U.S. Cavalry (dragoons) Rgt. served on frontier; July 15, 1853 2ndlt. 1854 taught cavalry tactics at West Point; June 7, 1855, 1stlt. 1857-1861, taught cavalry tactics at West Point; May 7, 1861, resigned his regimental commission retaining his appointment as assistant adjutant general; May 11, 1861 brevet Capt., assistant adjutant general; August 3, 1861 Capt., assistant adjutant general; served in Department of Annapolis and Department of the Shenandoah; Oct. 7, 1861, Col., 1st Mass. Cavalry Rgt. July 17, 1862, Maj. assistant adjutant general; August-October 1862 at Secession-ville, James Island and Hilton before joining Army of the Potomac; Antietam, Md. Oct. 1, 1862 resigned; assistant in Adjutant General's office for remainder of war; Sept. 24, 1864 brevet Col., U.S. Army for war service; March 13, 1865 brevet Col. and Brig. Gen., U.S. Army for service in Adjutant General Department during the war; January 1866 married Adele Cutts Douglas (Dec. 27, 1835 born at Washington D.C. - died 1899; widow of Sen. Stephen Douglas); Feb. 22, 1869 Lt.Col., assistant adjutant general; served as adjutant general of Department of the Missouri, Department of the Platte and the Division of the Missouri; July 1, 1881, Col. assistant adjutant general; December 1890 returned to Adjutant General's Department at Washington D.C. July 5, 1892, Brig.Gen. and U.S. Army Adjutant General; Nov. 5, 1893 retired; August 24 or 25, 1901, died of apoplexy at Plainfield, N.J. and buried in Arlington, Va. National Cemetery.

Family links:
Parents:
Philip Williams (1803 - 1865)
Mildred Jett Catlett Phillips (1809 - 1837)

Spouses:
Adele Cutts Williams (1835 - 1899)*
Adele Cutts Douglas Williams (1835 - 1899)*

*Point here for explanation

Burial:
Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington
Arlington County
Virginia, USA
Plot: Site 972

Created by: Karen Mickel Bennett
Record added: Aug 14, 2005
Find A Grave Memorial# 11536219

Senator Stephen A. Douglas

Mrs. Hedge's mother's first husband

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_A._Douglas

Stephen Arnold Douglas (April 23, 1813 June 3, 1861) was an American politician from the western state of Illinois, and was the Northern Democratic Party nominee for President in 1860. He lost to the Republican Party's candidate, Abraham Lincoln, whom he had defeated two years earlier in a Senate contest following a famed series of debates. He was nicknamed the "Little Giant" because he was short of stature but was considered by many a "giant" in politics. Douglas was well known as a resourceful party leader, and an adroit, ready, skillful tactician in debate and passage of legislation. He was a leading proponent of democracy–and believed that the majority of citizens should decide, through the principle of Popular Sovereignty, contentious issues such as slavery and territorial expansion.

As chairman of the Committee on Territories, Douglas dominated the Senate in the 1850s. He was largely responsible for the Compromise of 1850 that apparently settled slavery issues. However, in 1854 he reopened the slavery question by the highly controversial Kansas-Nebraska Act, that allowed the people of the new territories to decide for themselves whether or not to have slavery (which is known as "popular sovereignty"). The protest movement against this became the Republican Party.

Douglas supported the Dred Scott Supreme Court decision of 1857, and denied that it was part of a Southern plot to introduce slavery in the Northern states; but also argued it could not be effective when the people of a territory declined to pass laws supporting it.[1] When President James Buchanan and his Southern allies attempted to pass a Federal slave code, to support slavery even against the wishes of the people of Kansas, he battled and defeated this movement as undemocratic. This caused the split in the Democratic Party in 1860, as Douglas won the nomination but a breakaway southern faction nominated their own candidate, Vice President John C. Breckinridge. Douglas deeply believed in democracy, arguing the will of the people should always be decisive.[2] When civil war came in April 1861, he rallied his supporters to the Union with all his energies, but he died a few weeks later.

He was born Arnold Douglass in Brandon, Vermont[3] to Stephen Arnold Douglass and Sarah Fisk. Douglas dropped the second "s" from his name some years later.[4]

He migrated to Winchester, Illinois in 1833, where he served as an itinerant teacher and once opened a school for three months at three dollars a pupil [5]. He also studied law, and settled in Jacksonville. By the end of the year, he wrote his Vermont relatives, "I have become a Western man, have imbibed Western feelings principles and interests and have selected Illinois as the favorite place of my adoption.

Douglas briefly courted Mary Todd (who married Abraham Lincoln instead). Douglas became a member of the Masonic fraternity in Springfield Lodge No. 4 in Springfield, Illinois in 1839. He was a member of several Masonic organizations in Springfield.

In March 1847 he married Martha Martin, the 21-year-old daughter of wealthy Colonel Robert Martin and his wife of North Carolina. The year after their marriage, her father died and bequeathed Martha a 2500-acre cotton plantation with 100 slaves on the Pearl River in Lawrence County, Mississippi.[11] He appointed Douglas the property manager but, as a senator of the free state of Illinois, and with presidential aspirations, Douglas found the Southern plantation presented difficulties. He created distance by hiring a manager to operate the plantation, while using his allocated 20 percent of the income to advance his political career.[12] His sole lengthy visit to Mississippi was in 1848, and he made only brief emergency trips thereafter.[13]

The newlyweds moved their Illinois home from Springfield to fast-growing Chicago in the summer of 1847. They had two sons: Robert M. Douglas (January 1849-1892) and Stephen Arnold Douglas, Jr., (November 1850-d. ?). Martha Douglas died young on January 19, 1853, after the birth of her third child, a daughter. The girl died a few weeks later, and Douglas and the boys were bereft.[13]

On November 20, 1856, Douglas married a second time, to 20-year-old Adele Cutts, another southern woman. She was the daughter of James Madison Cutts of Washington, DC, who was the nephew of President James Madison. Her great-aunt was the former U.S. First Lady Dolley Madison. As her mother was from a Maryland Catholic family, Adele Cutts was Catholic.[13] With Stephen's approval, she had his two sons baptized as Catholic and reared in that faith.[11]

She had a miscarriage in 1858 and became ill. The following year, Adele gave birth to a daughter, Ellen, who lived only a few weeks, and the mother was left weakened by childbirth.[11]

Adele Cutts Williams

She was the guest of honor at a dinner given in the early winter of 1865, just as the war drew to its close, by Miss Harris, whose name lives in history in a very different connection: she was sitting beside Lincoln in his box at the theatre on the night he was shot. Among the guests bidden to meet Mrs. Douglas was Captain, afterwards General, Robert Williams, one of the handsomest and most gallant officers of the army, and a member of a well-established family of Culpeper County, Virginia. Mrs. Douglas was already known to him by fame, and suspecting her to be possessed of all the caprices of a spoiled beauty, he had no desire whatever to meet her, though he accepted Miss Harris's invitation for the sake of the pleasure he would otherwise derive from her hospitality. After he had been presented to Mrs. Douglas, however, whatever enjoyment he had anticipated from meeting others there passed from his mind. Combined with a gentle dignity, there was about her all the sweet simplicity of a young girl, and nothing that ever so remotely suggested any consciousness of a fame that was as wide as her country. He followed her with all the earnestness with which he had meant to avoid her, and in January, 1866, she again became a bride.

The chronicle of the most magnificent ball ever given, not only in Washington, but probably in the country, and which occurred shortly after her marriage to General Williams, hands her name and that of Kate Chase Sprague down to fame as the two most beautiful women who participated in the brilliant event. It was given by the French minister. Count de Moutholon, by order of his Emperor, in honor of the officers of the French fleet then anchored at Annapolis.

Adele Cutts Williams

She was the guest of honor at a dinner given in the early winter of 1865, just as the war drew to its close, by Miss Harris, whose name lives in history in a very different connection: she was sitting beside Lincoln in his box at the theatre on the night he was shot. Among the guests bidden to meet Mrs. Douglas was Captain, afterwards General, Robert Williams, one of the handsomest and most gallant officers of the army, and a member of a well-established family of Culpeper County, Virginia. Mrs. Douglas was already known to him by fame, and suspecting her to be possessed of all the caprices of a spoiled beauty, he had no desire whatever to meet her, though he accepted Miss Harris's invitation for the sake of the pleasure he would otherwise derive from her hospitality. After he had been presented to Mrs. Douglas, however, whatever enjoyment he had anticipated from meeting others there passed from his mind. Combined with a gentle dignity, there was about her all the sweet simplicity of a young girl, and nothing that ever so remotely suggested any consciousness of a fame that was as wide as her country. He followed her with all the earnestness with which he had meant to avoid her, and in January, 1866, she again became a bride.

The chronicle of the most magnificent ball ever given, not only in Washington, but probably in the country, and which occurred shortly after her marriage to General Williams, hands her name and that of Kate Chase Sprague down to fame as the two most beautiful women who participated in the brilliant event. It was given by the French minister. Count de Moutholon, by order of his Emperor, in honor of the officers of the French fleet then anchored at Annapolis.

To read her life story: http://www.accessgenealogy.com/women/adele_cutts_mrs_robert_williams.htm

Adele Cutts
(Mrs. Robert Williams)
From portrait by George Peter A. Healy

Dolley Madison

Dolley Payne Todd Madison (May 20, 1768 July 12, 1849) was the spouse of the fourth President of the United States, James Madison, and was First Lady of the United States from 1809 to 1817. She also occasionally acted as First Lady during the administration of Thomas Jefferson, fulfilling the ceremonial functions more usually associated with the President's wife, since Jefferson was a widower.

Mrs. Hedge's Aunt

The Adele Douglas Letter

http://www.onealwebsite.com/RebelRose/Gaston.htm

Our "Rebel Rose" O'Neale was merely one among many women to volunteer her time in hospitals around her home in Washington DC. Rose's sister in law, Mary Greenhow Lee did the same near her home in Virginia. In her diary she speaks of the horrors of war and of the roles women played in the hospitals. Mary, a widow, also speaks of the fears she had, alone in a huge house, bereft of a male figure, afraid to sleep at night, lest she be robbed, her home taken, or an even worse fate awaken her from her slumber.


Recently we've come to learn that Rose's sister Eleanor Elizabeth O'Neale Cutts and her daughter Adele Cutts Douglas also volunteered their services in DC hospitals.

The letter was written to Tillie Gaston, wife of James Morrison Gaston. There was a large Gaston family settled in Somerville – not far from the Hedges estate in South Bound Brook. The PGC did have at least one Gaston in the club membership. Could Tillie be a relation to Adele?

James Morrison Gaston letter to his wife

"A small piece of shell passed through my overcoat near the collar, turning my whiskers to one side and afterward went into a horse's head nearby. Another ball from a sharpshooter struck me in the breast, passing through my overcoat cape and bruising me a little." Maj. James Morrison Gaston in one of the 400 letters he sent to his wife, Matilda, at their Union Township home during his involvement in numerous battles during the Civil War. Marilyn Palas, Gaston's great-great granddaughter, found the treasure trove of letters while cleaning out her late mother's basement in 1990. April 20.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/03362/254693-58.stm#ixzz1bp5xSRF0

The Year in Review 2003

New York Times February 5, 1895

SOCIAL JOTTINGS FROM PLAINFIELD

Entertainmnets Which Have Helped to Make the Week Pass Pleasantly

PLAINFIELD, N. J., Feb. 16 – On Wednesday evening a cotillion was danced at the home of ex-Mayor Q. V. F. Randolph of East Front Street.

Herman Simmonds of Watchung Avenue has gone to Florida, to remain until Spring.

Mrs. Dudley Insley of Tacoma and Miss See of Sing Sing are guests of Mrs. E. E. Runyon of Madison Avenue.

Mrs. Howell of Chester, who has been visiting her sister Mrs. F. D. Whiting of East Sixth Street, has returned home.

Next Tuesday evening the ladies of the Monroe Avenue Chapel will hold their annual supper.

Mrs. Robert Downy of Madison Avenue gave a tea this afternoon from 4 to 7.

By far the largest and most brilliant social function that has ever been given in this city was the Ackerman reception at the Casino on Monday night. About 500 guests were present, the largest number that has yet gathered in that pretty clubhouse and ballroom. Mrs. J. Hervey Ackerman received, assisted by Mrs. Robert Rushmore, Mrs. Ernest R. Ackerman, and Mrs. Marion S. Ackerman.

Plainfield Countil of the Royal Arcanum celebrated the addition of the two hundredth member to its ranks Monday night with an entertainment.

William C. Ayers, one of Plainfield's oldest residents, celebrated his eighty-sixth birthday Tuesday. He was born on Feb. 12, 1809, on the same day as Lincoln.

Wednesday evening the ladies of the Seventh Day Baptist Church held a sale and supper in the church.

An interesting meeting of the Monday Afternoon Club was held in the parlors of the Crescent Avenue Church Monday, at which David P. Hall gave a talk on parliamentary usage.

The Third Regiment Cadet Corps of this city will go to Bound Brook on Washington's Birthday to take part in the parade of that place.

Several new members were received into the Plainfield Bicycle Club at a meeting Monday night.

On Thursday evening, Feb. 21, a Martha Washington tea will be given in the First Presbyterian Church.

Tuesday evening Mr. and Mrs. B. O. Bowers of Franklin Place entertained the Musical Club.

The Ladies Committee of the Young Women's Christian Association met Tuesday afternoon and elected the following officers: President – Mrs. Henry M. Maxson; Vice-President – Mrs. J. Wesley Johnson; Treasurere – Mrs. J. H. Manning; Secretary – Miss Embury.

Next month Miss Fannie Westphal will be married to George Gray of Brooklyn.

Tuesday, Mrs. Marion S. Ackerman of West Seventh Street gave a dinner in honor of her guest, Miss Cox of New York. The guests present were Miss Gertrude Waly, Miss Cox, Miss Marion Dumont, Miss Waldron, Miss Lawrence, Miss Carey, Harry Munger, Laurens Van Buren, Fred Waly, Dr. B. Van D. Hedges, Mr. Waring and Mr. Wharton.

A union meeting of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Societies of the Crescent Avenue and First Presbyterian Churches as held Tuesday afternoon at the latter church. The subject discussed as "China," papers being read by Mrs. M. E. Dwight, Mrs. Luchey, Mrs. Cornelius Schenck, Mrs. Pruden, and Mrs. Wyckoff.

Next Saturday Mrs. Henry McGee of Washington Park will give an afternoon tea. The hours will be from 4 to 7 o'clock.

During the week Miss Florence Honneger of New Brighton, S. I., has been the guest of Mrs. J. R. Hill of Belvidere Avenue.

Plainfield's handsome new Young Men's Christian Association Building was formally opened Tuesday night. Addresses were made by Mayor Alexander Gilbert, the first President of the association; the Rev. Dr. William R. Richards and William D. Murray, the present President. The building cost about $50,000.

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=FA0710F6395911738DDDAE0994DA405B8585F0D3

Courier News articles on "Hedges"

Hedges Robert W. 6/9/1950 News
Hedges Robert W. 8/4/1950 News
Hedges Robert W. 11/21/1950 Obituary

April 24 - May 30, 1988 Cedar Brook Farm Designer Showhouse

Listed in the program is: Mr. and Mrs. Jerry W. Hedges – any relation?

Many PGC members were also members of the Muhlenberg Auxiliary that staged amazing designer homes in Plainfield in an effort to raise money for the hospital.

In 1988, the designer showcased home was Cedar Brook Farm which had also been the home of a PGC member, Mrs. Robert F. (Carolyn Waring) MacLeod '55, PGC President 1958 - 1960

To see the progam and learn the history of the house, click these links:

1988 Cedar Brook Farm Designer Showcase Program Cover to Page 25

1988 Cedar Brook Farm Designer Showcase Program Pages 26 to 50

1988 Cedar Brook Farm Designer Showcase Program Pages 51 to 75

1988 Cedar Brook Farm Designer Showcase Program Pages 76 to End

Plainfield CC

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F70C12FC3A5414728DDDA10994D0405B818CF1D3

New York Times August 18, 1901

CUP GOLF AT PLAINFIELD

Results of Weekly Marches at Hillside and Park Clubs.

PLAINFIELD, N. J. Aug. 17 – Notwithstanding the warm weather, there was a good attendance at the links of the Hillside Golf Club today. In the contest for the Mellick Cup, played this morning, Miss Maude Van Boskerck carried off the honors, the scores being: Miss Maude Van Boskerck 116, 12 - 104; Miss Herwarden, 110, 4 - 106, Miss May Holly, 137, 30 - 107; Miss May Wharton, 150, 35 - 115; Miss Louise Holly, 172, 25 - 137.

In the play for the Golf Committee Cup on the Hillside links, T. R. Van Boskerck led W. L. Glenny today by three points. The scores were: T. R. Van Boskerck, 92, 12 - 80; W. L. Glenny, 88 6 - 83; Walter Peterson, 99, 15 - 84; W. C. Faber, III, 27 -84; C. W. Abbott, 94, 8 - 86; C. A. Stevenson, 116, 24 - 92; C. C. Burke, Jr., 111, 19 - 92; E. W. Hedges, 115, 22-93; J. W. Sandford, 107, 13 -94; E. W. Newkirk, 122, 27 - 95; H. C. Tracey, 123, 17 - 96; L. H. Van Buren, 113, 15 - 98; J. R. Blake, 118, 18 -100; H. C. Munger, 114, 12 - 102; R. Rushmore, 127, 20 -107.

There was a comparatively small field in the weekly competition for the President's Cup at the Park Golf Club, and first and second honors went to Joseph L. Myers and Charles L. Nichols, respectively, who are newcomers in the race, while Charles B. Morse took third place. Senator Charles A. Reed still leads for the trophy.

The score cards better than 100 were: Joseph L. Myers, 117, 30 - 87; Charles L. Nichols, 119, 30 - 80; Charles B. Morse, 107, 15 - 92; William R. Faber, 113, 21 - 97; H. G. Phillips, 124, 25 - 90; Henry C. Wells, 118, 19 - 99.

New York Times September 29, 1901

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=FB0A16FE3F5415738DDDA00A94D1405B818CF1D3


Mixed Golf at Plainfield

Special to The New York Times

PLAINFIELD, N. J., Sept. 28 – Only two women played this morning for the Mellick Cup on the grouns of the Hillside Golf Club. Miss Edith Tracey carried off the honors, defeating Miss Mary Whiton by one point, the net scores being 108 - 109. In the afternoon play was continued for the Golf Committee Cup. Dr. B. Vand Hedges carried off the honors of the day, winning over Robert Abbott by one point, their scores being: B. Vand Hedges, 85-8-77; Robert Abbott, 85-7-78. The same players contested for the Reinhart Cup and the same scores counted. Dr. B. Vand Hedges won the cup for the first time. To become the owner of the trophy it will be necessary to win the cup three times. In the weekly competitionn for the President's Cup on the links of the Park Golf Club Samuel Townsend and George T. Rogers shared first honors. Their scores were: Samuel Townsend, 113-24-89; George T. Rogers, 112-23-89.

New York Times October 12, 1895

New York Times October 13, 1895

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F40E17F93A5911738DDDAA0994D8415B8585F0D3

THE WEEK IN PLAINFIELD

Entertainment by the Dorcas Society – Monday Afternoon Club

PLAINFIELD, N.J., Oct. 12 – A social event of the last week was the entertainment given by the Dorcas Society, King's Daughters, at the home of Miss Maude Lowrie, in Park Avenue, Monday evening. It was titled "The Circulating Library," and was given for the purpose of raising funds for the benefit of the poor of the city. The guests on arriving were given a blank catalogue, with only numbers on it, and they were to guess the titles of books represented. The Reception Committee was composed of Miss Bowers, Miss Brown, Miss Lowrie and Miss Langdon. Those presiding at the talbes were Mrs. Crane and Miss Wyckoff, assisted by Mrs. Clark, Mrs. C. T. Pond, Miss Minnie French, Miss Green, Miss Ella Blish, and Miss Maltly. In the library were Miss Crane, Miss Cornwell, Miss Lou French, Miss Millie Landgon, Miss Etta BLish, Miss Alice Hayners, Miss Bessie Titsworth, and Miss Kline.

S.E. Hull of Duer Street has returned from Broadway, where he spent the Summer.

The Monday Afternoon Club, Plainfield's leading woman's club, held it sifrst meeting of the Fall. On account of repairs being made at the Casino or the Union County Country Club, where the meeings are usually held, the ladies gathered in the parlors of the Congregational Church. The subject upon which papers are to be read for the coming year is "Some Great Florentines and Their Times." Two papers were read Monday – one by Mrs. Josiah Brown and the other by Mrs. Robert Lowry. Next month the paper will be read by Miss Kenyon, Principal of the Young Ladies' Seminary.

H. M. Stevens of Fanwood gave a reception at the Fanwood Clubhouse Friday evening.

Miss Nellie Saums of Ricefiled is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. R. V. Saums of Clinton Avenue.

George Barton has returned to Keyport after a visit with Mrs. Barton of Madison Avenue.

Edward Hooley of Rockview Avenue has gone to Atlanta.

The Rev. E. L. Hyde of Hyde Park, Mass., is visiting friends in Plainfield.

The Misses Anthony of Crescent Avenue have returned from Europe.

Miss Bessie Booker of Richmond, Va., has been visitng Miss Dryden of West Seventh Street.

James Smith of Elmwood Place has returned from Amesbury, Mass.

Miss May Haberle, who has been visitng her cousin, Miss Lillie Haberle, has returned to her home in Orange.

Miss Mary Ryder of Brooklyn, who has been visiting at the home of Robert Lucky of Fifth Street, has returned home.

Charles L. Case and family of Central Avenue returned this week from their European trip.

Miss Lydia Duffert of Morris County is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Van Dyke of East Front Street.

Mr. and Mrs. John Burnett of Brookyln have been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Charles Doane of Fifth Street.

Charles Potter of West Seventh Street has returned from Philadelphia.

Mrs. Florence Howe Hall of Madison Avenue is in Massachusetts delivering a course of lectures.

Miss Mary and Miss Grace Shreve of New York are guests of B. J. Shreve of Grove Street.

Miss Agnes Baldwin of Brooklyn is the guest of Miss Haviland of Washington Park.

Benjamin Terry of Bridgeport is the guest of the Misses Livergey of Park Avenue.

Thomas H. Keller of East Front Street left this week for a trip South.

C. C. Burke and family have left for their Winter home in New York, after spending the Summer at the cottage on Ravine Road Netherwood.

William Tyler of West Eigth Street has gone to Europe.

David Krymer of West Second Street has gone to Baltimore.

Dr. Frank Searles and Mrs. Searles have returned to Bayonne, after a visit with Dr. and Mrs. H. H. Lourie of Park Avenue.

Dr. John H. Carman and family of Somerset Street returned this week from the Adirondacks.

Dr. B. Van D. Hedges of Watchung Avenue is home from his outing in Maine.

Miss Caroline Fitz Randolph, daughter of ex-Mayor L. V. F. Randolph of East Front Street, sailed Saturday for Europe.

Bridesmaid House Colonia NJ

The Hedges Home, more commonly referred
to as the Bridesmaid House, stands at the
corner of Colonia Boulevard and Kent–now
New Dover–Road. The Cones invited many
of their friends and society acquaintances into
the neighborhood, as is exemplified here. This
house was constructed by a bridesmaid of
Helen Cone sometime in 1912, as a part of the
early "Colony" that Helen's husband, Ed Cone,
had developed. A nearby home, the Hull house,
was built around the same time by another of
Mrs. Cone's bridesmaids. This is the white
stucco house with French influences located at
550 New Dover Road.
By encouraging their friends to build in
Colonia and become a part of the Colony,
the Cones were able to effectively select the
inhabitants of the community and influence the
atmosphere around which it grew.

See PGC Member Mrs. Marge Ladd for more information about the Colony, Colonia, NJ

Residence of Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Van Doren, Moutainside

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

Residence of B. Van D. Hedges, M. D., 1225 Watchung Avenue

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

Residence of Weston Williams, 1402 Chetwynd Avenue

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

1920 Muhlenberg Hospital Womens Auxiliary

Mrs. B. vanD. Hedges
528 East Front Street

Mrs. E. W. Hedges
703 Watchung Avenue

Crescent Avenue Historic District

Crescent Avenue Historic District form for the National Register of Historic Places

703 Watchung Avenue
c. 1870

In 1895, the home of E. W. Hedges, "physician, home and office"

Original pair of doors with applied raised paneled molding and segmental beveled glass windows. The front porch entrance has a very sophisticated treatment with double columns and ornamentation combined with the open arch and pedimented roof. Two story, three part bay on front and east elevation – projecting incised wooden cabinet head windows – projecting cornice with nicely carved paired eave brackets.

This is a handsome structure largely unaltered and one of the best examples of Mansard in the District.

1922 Princeton University

B. VanD. Hedges '88
Henry C. Irons '89

Monday Afternoon Club Membership