Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Tracy, Mrs. Howard Crosby (Minerva Bingham Lamson) '15

1900 Address: (directory of NYC) 440 West 8th Street, Plainfield

1919 Plainfield Garden Club directory: not listed

1920 Address: (Yale directory) 1331 Prospect Avenue, Plainfield

Mother-in-law to Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) Tracy '22

Most likely related to PGC Member:
Williams, Mrs. Harry (Isabel Lamson) '36

May 31, 1901 New York Times article on golf

May 27, 1894 New York Times society article

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Von Boskerck

440 West Eighth Street

Plainfield Library

G-513 1934 Grimstead House at 440 West Eighth Street 440 West 8th Street House at 440 West Eighth Street, image is not available, Mrs. Charles B. Crane. Van Wyck Brooks

440 West 8th Street, Plainfield

Photo by S. Fraser
2011/09/27

440 West 8th Street

1331 Prospect

Plainfield Public Library

http://collections.plainfieldlibrary.info
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Collection Detwiller
Title Addition to Residence Mr. & Mrs. Richard K. Williams Plainfield N.J.
Description Single sheet plans for an addition to a house.
Building Type Residence
Building Use Single Family
Work Type Alteration and/or Addition
Elevation Yes
Condition Dark
Blueprint ID D-2140
Permit 44763
Year of Permit 1973
Microfilm Roll 0011
Microfilm Frame 0044
Condition 1001
Address 1331 Prospect Avenue
Historic District
City Plainfield
Architect Thomas W. Smith
Architect Firm
Owner Richard K. Williams
Business Owner

Yale

HOWARD CROSBY TRACY (1866-1934), B.A. 1887.

Born August 1, 1866, in Westboro, Mass. Died April 19, 1934, in New York City.

Father, J. Evarts Tracy, '57 L. Mother, Martha Sherman (Greene) Tracy. Yale relatives include: Timothy Todd (B.A. 1747) (great-great-great-grandfather); Roger Sherman (honorary M.A. 1768) (great-great-grandfather); Jeremiah Evarts (B.A, 1802) (great-grandfather); Rev. David Greene (B.A. 1821) (grandfather); John J. Evarts (B.A. 1832) and William M. Evarts, (B.A. 1837) (great-uncles); J. Evarts Greene, '53, and Dr. Roger S. Tracy, '62 (uncles); Evarts Tracy, '90, Dr. Robert S. Tracy, '93, and William E. Tracy, '00 (brothers); and William E. Tracy, '34 E. (nephew).

John Leal's School in Plainfield, N.J., and Dr. Pingree's School, Elizabeth, N.J. Dissertation appointment Junior and Senior years; on Class Lacrosse Team Sophomore year; member Pundits, Gamma Nu, and Psi Upsilon.

LL.B. cum laude Columbia 1889; had since practiced law in New York and Brooklyn; clerk in office of his father's firm, Evarts, Choate & Beaman, 1889-1893; in partnership with Wolcott G. Lane, '88, under firm name of Tracy & Lane 1893-1902; practiced alone 1902-1903; connected with Lawyers Title Insurance Company 1903-1905, engaged in examination of titles to real estate; assistant attorney of its successor, Lawyers Title Insurance & Trust Company, 1905-1913; member of law firm of Dean, McBarron & Tracy 1913-1918, Dean, Tracy & Stanfield 1918-1919, and of Dean, King, Tracy & Smith 1919-1921; took three months' course in stock salesmanship with James W. Elliott's Business Builders November 1921 - February 1922; manager of closing department of U.S. Title Guaranty Company of Brooklyn 1925-1926, New York Title & Mortgage Company, Brooklyn 1926-1927, and since then an attorney in the department of general litigation; member of Republican City Committee of Plainfield, N.J., for several years from 1906; member district committee of Organized Aid Association of Plainfield (secretary 1899-1904); one of commissioners of sewer assessments of Plainfield in 1911 and 1912; secretary of reorganization committee of Oregon Railway & Navigation Company 1896; Private, Troop A, Cavalry, New York National Guard, 1889-1892; member Association of the Bar of the City of New York, and Grace Episcopal Church, Plainfield (vestryman 1917-1929).

Married June 24, 1893, in St. Paul, Minn., Minerva Bingham, daughter of Eastburn Ebenezer Lamson, Brown ex -'64, and Martha (Wardner) Lamson. No children.

Death due to a heart attack. Buried in Hillside Cemetery, Plainfield. Survived by wife and five sisters: Miss Emily B. Tracy and Dr. Martha Tracy (B.A. Bryn Mawr 1898; M.D. Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania 1904), both of Germantown, Pa.; Miss Mary Evarts Tracy, of Yokohama, Japan; Miss Edith H. Tracy, of Stockbridge, Mass.; and Mrs. Margaret Tracy Mix, of Muncie, Ind.

( Yale Obituary Record , No. 93, 1934, pp. 63-64)

"Cranehurst," Residence of Charles B. Crane, 440 West Eighth Street

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

Yale University Library

Repository: Manuscripts and Archives
Sterling Memorial Library
128 Wall Street
P.O. Box 208240
New Haven, CT 06520
Web: http://www.library.yale.edu/mssa/
Email: mssa.assist@yale.edu
Phone: (203) 432-1735
Fax: (203) 432-7441
Call Number: MS 816
Creator: Tracy Family.
Title: Tracy family papers
Dates: 1794-1937
Physical Description: 4 linear feet
Language(s): The materials are in English.
Summary: Papers of ten members of the Tracy family, originating in Litchfield, Connecticut. The most prominent figures are Uriah Tracy, Roger Sherman Tracy, Howard Crosby Tracy, and Evarts Tracy. The papers of Uriah Tracy include letters to his children written while he was in Congress (1794-1806), letters to others on Congressional business, and his journal of a trip to the West in 1800. The papers of Roger Sherman Tracy consist chiefly of letters written to his family from Yale College in 1859 and from Berlin where he had gone to study in 1869. Included also are two letters from Jacob Riis. The correspondence of Howard Crosby Tracy contains twelve of his letters to his parents from Yale College and elsewhere and sixty-four letters to him from members of the Class of 1887. The largest part of his correspondence reflects his activities as a Republican on both the local and national level. Evarts Tracy's papers deal largely with World War I, and consist of letters written to Tracy as well as notebooks kept by Tracy during the war, a sketchbook, poems and other memorabilia. The women in the family are represented by only a scattering of letters. There are also miscellaneous financial papers and materials on Tracy genealogy.
View/Search: To view and/or search the entire finding aid, see the Full HTML(NOTE: for large finding aids, the full HTML view may take up to 30 seconds to render) or the Printable PDF.
Finding Aid Link: To cite or bookmark this finding aid, use the following address:
http://hdl.handle.net/10079/fa/mssa.ms.0816
Catalog Record: A record for this collection, including location information, may be available in Orbis, the Yale University Library catalog.

Administrative Information
Provenance
Gift of Mrs. Howard C. Tracy, 1937, and Emily Baldwin Tracy, 1952.

Cite As
Tracy Family Papers. Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University Library.

Biographical Sketch
Howard Crosby Tracy: lawyer in New York and Brooklyn, 1899-; worked for U.S. Title Guarantee Company, 1925-1926, and for New York Title & Mortgage Company, 1926-1927; member of Republican City Committee of Plainfield, New Jersey, from 1906.

Biographical History
ROGER SHERMAN TRACY (1841-1926), B.A. 1862.

Born December 9, 1841, in Windsor, Vt. Died March 6, 1926, in Ballardvale, Mass.

Father, the Rev. Ebenezer, Carter Tracy (B.A. Dartmouth 1819); studied at Andover Theological Seminary; editor and publisher of Vermont Chronicle for over thirty years; son of Joseph and Ruth (Carter) Tracy; sixth in direct descent from Stephen Tracy, who came from England to Plymouth, Mass., in 1623 and later settled in Duxbury, Mass. Mother, Martha Sherman (Evarts) Tracy; daughter of Jeremiah Evarts (B.A. 1802) and Mehitabel (Sherman) Evarts; sister of John Jay Evarts (B.A. 1832) and William Maxwell Evarts (B.A. 1837); sister-in-law of the Rev. David Greene (B.A. 1821); granddaughter of Roger Sherman (honorary M.A. 1768), a signer of the Declaration of Independence, a member of the Continental Congress and of the Constitutional Convention, and treasurer of Yale College 1765-1776; great-granddaughter of Timothy Todd (B.A. 1747); descendant of John Evarts, who came to this country during the first half of the seventeenth century and settled in New England. Yale relatives include: J. Evarts Tracy, '57 L. (brother); Howard C. Tracy, '87, Evarts Tracy, '90, Robert S. Tracy, '93, and William E. Tracy, '00 (nephews); and Charles B. Evarts, ex -'66, Allen W. Evarts, '69, William Evarts, ex -'71, Sherman Evarts, '81, Maxwell Evarts, '84, Jeremiah M. and Roger S. Evarts, both '17, Effingham C. Evarts, '19, and Prescott Evarts, ex -'23 (cousins).

Windsor High School. High oration appointments Junior and Senior years; member Phi Beta Kappa.

Taught at Peekskill (N.Y.) Military Academy 1862-1864; studied medicine at College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia, 1864-1867, (M.D. 1868); connected with Bellevue Hospital, New York City, as junior and senior assistant and house surgeon 1867-1869; spent the next year abroad, during most of the time studying in Berlin; practiced medicine in New York City 1870-1873, then obliged to give up practice because of increasing deafness; member New York Board of Health 1870-1901 (deputy registrar and registrar of records 1870-1901; also assistant sanitary inspector 1870-1873, sanitary inspector 1873-1887, and chief sanitary inspector 1887); retired from public service in 1901, but for some time kept his room at the Department of Health, where he did much of his writing; in 1904 bought a farm in Winsted, Conn., where he lived two years; had since resided at Ballardvale. Author: Handbook of Sanitary Information for Householders (1884); The Essentials of Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene (1884); Outlines of Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene (1889); The White Man's Burden (under nom de plume of T. Shirby Hodge; 1915); monographs on vital statistics for Wood's Reference Handbook of the Medical Sciences (1893) and on sanitary subjects for the Annual Reports of the New York Health Department; contributed articles to the appendix of the American edition of Parke's Hygiene , to Michael Foster's Primer of Physiology , one of the series of Science Primers edited by Huxley, Roscoe & Balfour Stewart (1883), to Buck's Hygiene and Public Health , and to the Popular Science Monthly and the Century ; affiliated with the Congregational Church.

Unmarried.

Death due to chronic myocarditis. Buried in Old South Cemetery, Windsor. Survived by a sister, Mrs. George P. Byington, of Ballardvale.

( Yale Obituary Record , Number 85, pages 18-20)


* * * * *


HOWARD CROSBY TRACY (1866-1934), B.A. 1887.

Born August 1, 1866, in Westboro, Mass. Died April 19, 1934, in New York City.

Father, J. Evarts Tracy, '57 L. Mother, Martha Sherman (Greene) Tracy. Yale relatives include: Timothy Todd (B.A. 1747) (great-great-great-grandfather); Roger Sherman (honorary M.A. 1768) (great-great-grandfather); Jeremiah Evarts (B.A, 1802) (great-grandfather); Rev. David Greene (B.A. 1821) (grandfather); John J. Evarts (B.A. 1832) and William M. Evarts, (B.A. 1837) (great-uncles); J. Evarts Greene, '53, and Dr. Roger S. Tracy, '62 (uncles); Evarts Tracy, '90, Dr. Robert S. Tracy, '93, and William E. Tracy, '00 (brothers); and William E. Tracy, '34 E. (nephew).

John Leal's School in Plainfield, N.J., and Dr. Pingree's School, Elizabeth, N.J. Dissertation appointment Junior and Senior years; on Class Lacrosse Team Sophomore year; member Pundits, Gamma Nu, and Psi Upsilon.

LL.B. cum laude Columbia 1889; had since practiced law in New York and Brooklyn; clerk in office of his father's firm, Evarts, Choate & Beaman, 1889-1893; in partnership with Wolcott G. Lane, '88, under firm name of Tracy & Lane 1893-1902; practiced alone 1902-1903; connected with Lawyers Title Insurance Company 1903-1905, engaged in examination of titles to real estate; assistant attorney of its successor, Lawyers Title Insurance & Trust Company, 1905-1913; member of law firm of Dean, McBarron & Tracy 1913-1918, Dean, Tracy & Stanfield 1918-1919, and of Dean, King, Tracy & Smith 1919-1921; took three months' course in stock salesmanship with James W. Elliott's Business Builders November 1921 - February 1922; manager of closing department of U.S. Title Guaranty Company of Brooklyn 1925-1926, New York Title & Mortgage Company, Brooklyn 1926-1927, and since then an attorney in the department of general litigation; member of Republican City Committee of Plainfield, N.J., for several years from 1906; member district committee of Organized Aid Association of Plainfield (secretary 1899-1904); one of commissioners of sewer assessments of Plainfield in 1911 and 1912; secretary of reorganization committee of Oregon Railway & Navigation Company 1896; Private, Troop A, Cavalry, New York National Guard, 1889-1892; member Association of the Bar of the City of New York, and Grace Episcopal Church, Plainfield (vestryman 1917-1929).

Married June 24, 1893, in St. Paul, Minn., Minerva Bingham, daughter of Eastburn Ebenezer Lamson, Brown ex -'64, and Martha (Wardner) Lamson. No children.

Death due to a heart attack. Buried in Hillside Cemetery, Plainfield. Survived by wife and five sisters: Miss Emily B. Tracy and Dr. Martha Tracy (B.A. Bryn Mawr 1898; M.D. Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania 1904), both of Germantown, Pa.; Miss Mary Evarts Tracy, of Yokohama, Japan; Miss Edith H. Tracy, of Stockbridge, Mass.; and Mrs. Margaret Tracy Mix, of Muncie, Ind.

( Yale Obituary Record , No. 93, 1934, pp. 63-64)


* * * * *


EVARTS TRACY (1868-1922), B.A. 1890.

Born May 23, 1868, in New York City. Died January 31, 1922, in Paris, France.

Evarts Tracy, who was the second of the four sons of Jeremiah Evarts Tracy (LL.B. 1857) and Martha Sherman (Greene) Tracy, was born May 23, 1868, in New York City, where his father practiced law for fifty years. The latter's parents were the Rev. Ebenezer Carter Tracy (B.A. Dartmouth 1819) and Martha Sherman (Evarts) Tracy. He is a direct descendant in the seventh generation of Stephen Tracy, an Englishman who came to Plymouth, Mass., in 1623, later removing to Duxbury. Martha Evarts Tracy was the daughter of Jeremiah Evarts (B.A. 1802) and Mehetable Sherman, the latter being a daughter of Roger Sherman, treasurer of Yale College from 1765 to 1776, and one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. Evarts Tracy's maternal grandparents were the Rev. David Greene (B.A. 1821) and Mary (Evarts) Greene, the eldest daughter of Jeremiah Evarts, whose mother was the daughter of Timothy Todd (B.A. 1747). The first member of the Greene family to come to America was William Green, who came from Oxford, England, and settled at Charlestown, Mass., between 1640 and 1680. He later returned to England and died there, leaving a posthumous son, William Green, born on his mother's return voyage to America.

Evarts Tracy was prepared for college at the school conducted by John Leal (B.A. 1874) in Plainfield, N.J., where he had lived since he was eight years old. He was a member of the Intercollegiate Athletic Team for three years.

He studied architecture in the office of McKim, Mead & White in New York City until March 1892 and then continued his studies for his profession at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, graduating there in 1894. Upon his return to the United States he was again associated with McKim, Mead & White, continuing in this connection until 1896, when he opened an office of his own. Since 1900 Egerton Swartwout, '91, had been associated with him under the firm name of Tracy & Swartwout. The firm acquired a wide reputation by their work in designing important buildings in various parts of the country, and won a number of competitions, including the Cathedral and the U.S. Post Office and Court House at Denver, Colo., the National Metropolitan Bank and the George Washington and Victory Memorial in Washington, D.C. (the corner stone of the latter of these buildings was laid in November 1921); the Connecticut Savings Bank in New Haven; and the Missouri State Capitol. Other buildings designed by the firm included the National Armory at Washington, D.C., not yet under construction, and the original Yale Club in New York City. Mr. Tracy also made the plans for the remodelling of the sales offices of the Brick Row Print and Book Shop and the Yale University Press in New York City. In 1920 the firm of Tracy & Swartwout was awarded by the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects the Medal of Honor in recognition of their distinguished achievements in architecture, as exemplified in the Missouri State Capitol and the U.S. Post Office and Court House at Denver.

Evarts Tracy was one of the first men to offer his services to the government for the World War. He attended the Plattsburg Camp in 1917, where he commanded Company 15, and also underwent training at the American University in Washington. When plans were made for the organization of the Camouflage Section he was assigned to the staff of the Chief of Engineers for the purpose of recruiting, organizing, and equipping the section. At that time he held the rank of Captain in the Engineer Corps, but before going abroad in September 1917 he had received a commission as Major. After spending a brief period in England, he proceeded to France, where he commanded the 40th Engineers, a camouflage regiment, organized in France, largely from companies sent over from the United States. He was ordered to the British front and was at the first battle of Cambrai, where he received a slight wound. In January 1918 he was put in charge of camouflage training at the Army Engineer school at Langres. He was appointed Army Camouflage Officer in July 1918, having at one time over one hundred and fifty kilometres to look after, and by the following September was in charge of all camouflage sections, covering a large area of the western front. He was cited by General Pershing, and was recommended for the Distinguished Service Medal, which was awarded to him shortly before his death. In October 1918 he returned to America to recruit and train two additional battalions of men for his sections, but the armistice rendered this unnecessary.

He then served on the staff of the Chief of Engineers in Washington for several months, and subsequently went to Panama to make a report on the defenses of the Canal Zone. He was relieved from active duty August 29, 1919, and resumed the practice of his profession. In July 1921 he was at Camp Knox, where he gave instruction to various Field Artillery units. He then went to France, and while there unofficially represented the U.S. Army at French manoeuvres. Upon returning to the United States in September, he was assigned to General Headquarters, with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the Engineer Reserve Corps. He had been in France since December 13, 1921, and for several months before his death he had been engaged in reconstruction work, making his headquarters in Paris. He was a member of the council of the National Sculpture Society and of the committee of experts of the Advisory Council of Real Estate Interests of New York. He also belonged to the Beaux Arts Society of Architects, the American Institute of Architects, and the Architectural League of New York.

Colonel Tracy died at the American Hospital at Neuilly, France, January 31, 1922, after a brief illness from heart trouble. Interment was in Hillside Cemetery, Plainfield, N.J.

He was married June 23, 1894, in Plainfield, to Caroline Fredericka [(Streuli)], daughter of Alfred H. and Fredericka (Hooper) Streuli, who survives him. They had no children. In addition to his wife, Colonel Tracy is survived by his father; a brother, Howard C. Tracy, '87; and five sisters. Two other brothers graduated at Yale, Robert S. Tracy in 1893, and William E. Tracy in 1900. Other relatives who have attended Yale include two great-uncles, John Jay Evarts (B.A. 1832) and William Maxwell Evarts (B.A. 1837); two uncles, Jeremiah Evarts Green (B.A. 1853), and Roger Sherman Tracy (B.A. 1862); and seven cousins, Charles B. Evarts, ex -'66, Allen W. Evarts, '69, Sherman Evarts, '81, Maxwell Evarts, '84, Jeremiah M. Evarts, '17, Roger S. Evarts,'17, and Effingham C. Evarts, '19.

( Yale Obituary Record , No. 81, 1922, pp. 441-444)

Description of the Papers
This collection consists of papers of various members of the Tracy family. The materials are arranged in chronological order by individual, as follows:

Uriah Tracy, of Litchfield, Connecticut. His papers consist of twelve letters to his children, principally his daughter Susan, written while he was in Congress, 1794-1806; and seven letters to James McHenry and others. The letters concern appointments in the army, actions in Congress, and other matters. There is also a copy of Tracy's journal of a trip to the western part of the country in 1800.

Susan (Tracy) Howe, daughter of Uriah Tracy. We have one letter from her to her future husband, Judge Samuel Howe.

Martha Sherman (Evarts) Tracy, wife of Ebenezer C. Tracy. Her papers consist of nine letters to her cousin Sarah [Tracy?], written from Windsor, Connecticut. The letters discuss family matters.

Martha Sherman (Greene) Tracy, wife of Jeremiah Evarts Tracy. There is one letter from her to her husband.

Roger Sherman Tracy. His papers consist of fourteen letters to his parents and brother Jeremiah Evarts Tracy written from Yale College and from Berlin, describing his study in both places, and from other parts of Europe. There are also two letters from Jacob Riis and one from Roger Sherman Tracy about Riis to Jeremiah E. Tracy, enclosing four photographs, and an essay by Roger Sherman Tracy.

Howard Crosby Tracy. Included are twelve letters to his parents from Madison, Wisconsin, where he was visiting relatives, and from Yale College, and one letter from his mother written just before his marriage; sixty-four letters from friends and Yale classmates discussing travel, social events, and activities of the class of 1887; seventeen letters exchanged with service men and others during World War I, largely concerning gifts of knitted goods to the soldiers; and seven folders of political correspondence. The latter, which forms the largest part of Howard C. Tracy's papers, reflects his interests as an active Republican during the first third of this century. He writes opposing the re-election of John Dryden as New Jersey senator in 1907, and urges American entrance into World War I, ratification of the peace treaty, and participation in the League of Nations. Among the letters are two from Herbert Hoover concerning Tracy's views on the peace treaty (1920 Jun 4, 11) and one from Henry Cabot Lodge on the Court of International Justice (1923 Mar 3). Tracy also writes in favor of prohibition and other issues. The political correspondence is supplemented by a series of letters to the editor and other writings and notes by Tracy and others, and newspaper clippings. Also among Tracy's writings is an autobiographical sketch written in 1931.

Minerva Bingham (Lamson) Tracy, wife of Howard Crosby Tracy. Her papers consist of notes on her husband's life and letters of condolence for his death from friends of the family.

Evarts Tracy. His papers deal largely with World War I, except for five letters to his family from Madison, Wisconsin, and one from Paris. There are forty-five letters written to Tracy by friends in the States and from fellow servicemen during the war, concerning both his service in the army and non-military matters. In addition, there are three notebooks kept by Tracy during the war and a sketchbook; poems and other literary fragments written during the war by Tracy and others; military papers such as orders, memoranda, reports, and so forth, dealing for the most part with camouflage; and over sixty photographs of camouflage, army officers, and other military subjects, taken in both Europe and Panama. Other papers include a photograph of a portrait of Tracy in uniform; architectural materials such as photographs; printed matter; and plans for the George Washington Memorial Hall in Washington, D.C. There is also a selection of memorabilia such as Tracy's birth certificate, menus, and so forth.

Caroline Fredericka (Streuli) Tracy, wife of Evarts Tracy. There is one letter to her from Homer Saint-Gaudens concerning her husband and his work with camouflage.

Robert Storer Tracy. His papers consist of one letter to his mother, written from Madison, Wisconsin.

Micellaneous Tracy family papers. Included here are an unidentified letter, several early financial papers, assorted printed material about Tracy family members, and a notebook containing details about the Tracy family genealogy.

These papers were given to Yale University in part by Mrs. Howard C. Tracy in 1937 and by Emily Baldwin Tracy in 1952.

Arrangement
Arranged by name of family member.

1915 - 1923 Book: Meetings of The Plainfield Garden Club

1915 - 1923 List of Meetings

1997 Mansions of May

Once the home of Jane Inge, aunt of the playwright William Inge, this shingle-style house was once the site of "theatricals" stage in the basement. Currently the home of a professed "train nut", one can find a small portion of the owner's model train collection displayed in the library, and it is difficult to miss one of the first steel cabooses manufactured after World War II situated on the ample property. Inside this 1916 house built by J. Wyman & Son, one will find original architectural details melding with later structural additions. The warm country kitchen features a tailor's table cut to fit the room, and the expansive living room measures over 30' in length.

Tracy-Streuli

PLAINFIELD, N. J., June 28. Miss Caroline Frederica Streuli, daughter of H. Alfred Streuli of Hillside Avenue, a New-York silk manufacturer, was married at high noon to-day to Evarts Tracy, son of J. Evarts Tracy, a New-York lawyer, who lives in West Eighth Street here. The ceremony was witnessed by a large and fashionable gathering, which entirely filled the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church. The Rev. Dr. William R. Richards officiated.

The bride wore a beautiful gown of white satin with old lace trimmings. Miss Kathryn Yates was the maid of honor. The bridesmaids were Miss Bessie Ginna, Miss Marion Dumont, Miss May Tracy, Miss Margaret Tracy of Plainfield, Miss Lillian Brooks of New-York, and Miss Sidney Wharton of Pittsburg. Percy A. Stewart was best man. The ushers were Lewis S. Haslan of New-York, Yale Kneeland of Brooklyn, Wallace D. Simmons of St. Louis, Henry M. Sage of Albany, and Alfred Streuli and Robert S. Tracy of Plainfield.

1331 Prospect Avenue

Listing 7-19-13

For Sale: $365,000
ZestimateŽ: $359,437
Est. Mortgage:
$1,429/mo
Get Pre-approved

Bedrooms:5 beds
Bathrooms:2.5 baths
Single Family:Contact for details
Lot:1 sq ft
Year Built:1916
Heating Type:Forced air

1331 Prospect Avenue

1331 Prospect Avenue

1331 Prospect Avenue

1331 Prospect Avenue

1331 Prospect Avenue

1331 Prospect Avenue

1331 Prospect Avenue

1331 Prospect Avenue

1331 Prospect Avenue

1331 Prospect Avenue

Edith Hastings Tracy

Photographer. Mrs. Tracy's sister-in-law

1911 Social Register

1941 Courier-News Plainfield Merits Classification as 'City of Beautiful Trees'

November 30, 2013: Found in Barbara Tracy Sandford's memorabilia. Written by PGC Member Mrs. Garret Smith

"I call Plainfield the City of Beautiful Trees," and out-of-town visitor remarked to me the other day. "My business takes me to many towns about this size clear across the country. Trees, or their lack, always impress me most about a town. Beautiful building can't make up for the lack of them. Many towns seem to have choice trees only in one or two sections. Others have only a few tree-lined avenues. But every part of Plainfield has not only interesting individual trees, but long stretches of streets where treetops meet in green arches above the traffic. That doesn't just happen. This town must have been founded by tree-lovers."

The stranger was right, as many specimen trees on old private properties testify. They are trees that were rare and expensive when planted years ago. A number of well-to-do property owners appreciated trees and collected choice kinds. The street trees of about this age also show that far-sighted men planned to make the town keep growing more beautiful in ways that everyone enjoys.

Trees have always been essential to Plainfielders. In the early days elms stretched down North Ave. from east to the west city boundaries. Many still remain now 70 to 80 years old. That avenue helped to establish Plainfield's policy of "beautiful trees for every street."

Value Appreciated
The city's mayors and councilmen have appreciate the value of trees . . . Ginko . . . now ripening, in the edge of the station grounds, near the corner of the drug store.

Among its immediate neighbors, at this station are a Red Maple, Austrian Pine, English Elm, Horse Chestnut, several Magnolias and a Sycamore Maple, the latter near the middle of the grass oval. Purple Beech, White Pine and two Hemlocks stand at the west exit.

Lindens at Spot
On the North Ave. side of the station is an interesting clump of three Lindens – no two alike. Evergreens are represented by three Scotch Pines, an Austrian and a White Pine, and a tall, slender Spruce. In this little park are also Sugar Swamp and Silver Maples, and a clump of low-growing Beeches. Looking upward to the railroad level, one sees, besides the specimen Ginko mentioned, two Catalpas, a Weeping Mulberry, two Red Maples and an Austrian Pine. A big Pin Oak, two or three Scarlet Oaks, a . . . .

. . . boats glided over Green Brook and when Plainfield and New York social leaders came in big carriages, drawn by spanking teams, to garden musicals, gay dinners, dances and teas as the Johnston's guests.

All of Plainfield's school grounds are constantly growing more attractive. Environment of vines, trees, plants and shrubs awaken appreciation of Nature's beauty that is a lifelong source of pleasure.

Hubbard School, one of the city's architectural gems, has always been regarded as in a class by itself. Its beauty is greatly enhanced by choice plant material on its ample grounds, partly framed by Barberry. Large specimen Japanese Yews arrest attention, along with Sourwoods, or "Lily-of-the-Valley Tree," whose branches bear long one-sided racemes of white flowers in summer and whose leaves are vivid scarlet in autumn.

White Pine, Cedar, Pfitzer Junipers are shadowy evergreen foils for airy bloom of Weeping Japanese . . .

Among them are the old Elms in North Ave., mentioned before; London Planes from Watchung Ave. to Terrill Rd.; Ash in St. Mary's Ave.; Pin Oaks and Planes in Park Ave.; Sycamore Maples in Bellevue Ave.; Norway Maples in both Leland and Monroe Ave. sections. Tulip trees now grow in Central St., along Maxon School grounds, and Ginkos in Landsdowne Terr. In Cleveland Ave., near Grace Church, the lacy foliage of the decorative Mountain Ash, or Rowan Tree, contrasts at this season with bunches of bright hollylike berries. Many years ago the late Simeon Cruikshank planted Buckeyes along his corner property ["Sacmoore" 831 Belvidere] at Belvidere and Watchung Aves. Much smaller than familiar Horse Chestnut and with brighter pink flower-spikes they have always been greatly admired. In autumn the brilliant, scarlet, star-shape leaves of Liquid-ambar, or Sweetgum, glorifies a patch of Ravine Rd. After a shower, or if bruised, the foliage is fragrant. Corky bark and thorny-skinned fruit like little apples, complete this tree's unique characteristics.

Close to 150 trees, of many species, are part of the Muhlenberg Hospital landscape. The long front path beneath the Maples, and on the west the wide Elm-bordered stretch of green lawn leading to a quiet pool, with its amusing little bronze fountain figure, form two vistas of ever-increasing charm. Wide borders of intermingling trees and flowering shrubs frame the property.

The purple leaves of the two Schwedler Maples attract much attention in the spring. So do the Apple trees and Dogwoods that trim the grounds like big bouquets, set off by Hemlocks, Spruce and Pine. Chinese Dogwoods, given by graduate nurses, are especially prized. Devoted interest of the late Marie Louis, nature-lover and for years superintendent of Muhlenberg, helped turn once common-plant "grounds" into a tree-shaded garden spot both restful and diverting.

Dogwood Favorites
Native Dogwoods are favorites among the city's flowering trees. The Plainfield Garden Club, on its own recent 25th birthday, gave small grove of these "Jewels of the Forest" to Cedar Brook Park. On the T. H. Van Bosckerck grounds on Prospect Ave. is the handsome large group of Dogwoods on private property in town. On Dr. Elmer Weigel's lawn on Belvidere Ave [630 Belivdere – see Mrs. Joost]. Chinese Dogwood bears much larger and later blooms. Directly across the street from this, and close to the sidewalk, a low-growing Witch Hazel (Hamanelis) bears yellow Forsythia-like flowers in winter.

Before the Talmadge dwelling [714 Belvidere], in the the same street, are majestic Copper Beeches. In early days Beeches were popular selections for large grounds. Probably the finest Weeping Beech in the city grows in deserted grounds in Central Ave. Nearby on the Witon property is a huge Purple Beech – both almost perfect. Farther down the avenue, on Wardlaw School grounds [1030 Central Avenue - see Below], is a fine old Ginko.

The only Katsura Tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum) in Plainfield is owned by former Mayor Leighton Calkins [929 Madison – see Below]. Its strange trunk and heart-shaped leaves, purplish when young, are unusual. It grows in front of the house in Madison Ave.

Unique among Plainfield trees is a native Orange of the South. it is today laden with velvety, green fruit in Mrs. Howard Tracy's Prospect Ave. garden [1331 Prospect Ave]. Probably nowhere else in this region can one be found, according to Shade Tree Commissioner Lithgow Hunter. Sent north from Maryville College in Tennessee 50 years ago. . . .

. . . residents seeking permanent homes. These officials have always planned with the Shade Tree Commission since its organization, so that every year more trees come marching in. Some fill vacancies in the ranks of old trees along old streets. Others shade tireless blocks in new sections of town.

For the last 17 years, one man, Sidney Durant, the Shade Tree Commission's expert supervisor of trees, has directed its work. it includes feeding, pruning, watering and repairing the city's 25,000 street trees, as well removal of dead or too-badly-injured trees and planting new ones. For nearly 20 years Thomas F. Hylan has served on the commission, of which he is now president.

Of all the city's trees, the strange Ginko, or Maiden-hair tree, grows to a height of 80 feet or so. The delicacy of its little leaves, resembling those of the Maiden-Hair fern, contrast sharply with the arrow-straight upswept branches of what is considered one of the most beautiful and unusual of all hardy exotic trees. The Ginko's origin is a mystery. Nowhere on earth is it been found wild, yet fossils prove it was once scattered all over the world. Nothing else today resembles the Ginko, so paleontologists reason that some series of misfortunes destroyed all missing links. Today's closest relative is the Yew family, thought at a glance they appear as unrelated as a Chines and a New England Yankee.

Planted Near Temples
Early explorers found Ginkos planted around Chinese and Japanese temples. The Chinese called in Yin-Hing – "Silver Apricot" – referring to the greenish-yellow, fleshy fruit having a single stone. This fruit, slightly roasted, was served throughout the formal Chinese dinners which lasted all day. Guests nibble the finlike fruit between courses as an aid to digestion.

The Ginko did not reach England until 1754. The first specimen in this country was planted in Woodlands Cemetery, Philadelphia. In 1889 the Ginko fruited for the first time there on the grounds of Charles Wister. fifty years ago these newcomers to America were not only scarce, but expensive. That Plainfield has so many beautiful old specimens of these trees is possibly due to the fact that John Taylor Johnston, then president of the New Jersey Central Railroad and a resident of this city, was not only a patron of the arts, but a lover of trees. Each of Plainfield's railroad station grounds had not only fine specimens of the Ginko, but also a varied collection of other trees, evidently selected by an expert.

Netherwood, nearest the Johnston home [see Below], was especially favored. Here, beside the north track, stands a regal Ginko, carefully located as an artist would plan his canvas, so that its top is etched against the sky. This emphasizes the beauty of leaf and branch and trunk as viewed from the eastbound station platform. ?? may see a younger . . .

. . . White Oak and Elms are among the trees fringing the western boundary.

"The property as a whole is a remarkable small arboretum," said a well-known visiting tree scientist recently, after inspecting the Netherwood station park. "In my travels I've seen no other railroad station grounds with such a variety of trees. This landscaping, too, I can see was done by an expert."

In employing such an expert to beautify the railroad property in his home town, Mr. Johnston was carrying out the spirit of the statement he made at the time the Metropolitan Museum of New York City was founded at his Fifth Ave. mansion. He was quoted as saying:

"The public ought to have a chance to see, to hear and to know more about whatever feeds the mind and is inspiring, if we are to have the best kind in America."

To even a novice in landscaping, the Netherwood station grounds show that underlying motive. One could not imagine either the south or north oval either diminished of enlarged – so true is their scale. It would be hard to find more beautiful flowering trees than those Magnolias; or more intriguing contrast of leaf, branch and trunk than offered by the Ginko and the Pine. On the north side the clump of Lindens, combined with an apparently outcropping "pudding stone," make a "garden composition" that suggest to the home gardener similar effective arrangements, though not necessarily identical in material.

Beautiful Estate
Some old residents recall that Mr. Johnston's estate in E. Front St. was lavishly beautified with choice trees, as were those of most of his neighbors along that splendid avenue of that day. Some of those estates are still being kept up as homes of their owners today, while others have been divided into beautiful setting for developments of small homes.

The Johnston estate, however, furnished the basis of another public development of beauty spots. A portion of it became the site of the new Barlow School [see Below]. These school grounds are said to be unequaled in the state in the variety and placement of superb trees. What some consider the finest Weeping Beech in town grows here, also two majestic evergreens, one a White Pine, the other a Spruce. Elm, Ginko, Cucumber tree, Ash, "Button Ball," Willow and Sugar Maple are also outstanding.

Two of the most interesting, although not the most conspicuous of the group, are a true English Oak (Quercus Robur) and a Yellow Wood (Cladrastis lute). The first has smallish leaves, thick-set upon the branch. A strange characteristic is that the stem adheres to the side of the acorn. The writer knows of only one other English Oak in town – Central Ave., near Stelle Ave.

The Yellow Wood has wisteria-like racemes of white fragrant flowers in midsummer. Leaves resemble the locust. Another fine specimen grows on the property of Miss Laura Detwiller in Hillside Ave.

All were here in the days . . . .

. . . when Cherry, Dogwood and Crab. In early spring the large leathery-leaved evergreen Japanese Andromeda (Pieris) unfold delicate, coppery leaves and waxy white racemes of tiny flowers. These are classified as shrubs, but on these favorable grounds, are almost small trees of exceptional beauty.

Preservation is Theme
The good judgement of George R. Zimmer, who for many years has supervised Plainfield's school grounds, is shown not only in what has already been accomplished, but in developments being planned. "What can we preserve?" not "What can we cut down?" is his motto. Before clearing the recently purchased grounds adjoining Maxon School was begun this summer, Mr. Zimmer marked every large and small tree that "might some day be of use somewhere." Workmen were warned to cut not one of these.

The City Police Headquarters and also the old Public Library have a setting of trees. The little Library Park is said to have been reserved from farmland whose native trees – mostly, Red, White and Black Oaks – were left standing. Across the facade of Fire Headquarters are a Ginko, a London Plane and Horse Chestnut – each an unusually fine specimen. Among Netherwood firemen are enthusiastic gardeners. Each spring many of Plainfield's 3,000 commuters take great interest in "what the boys are doing to their grounds." Everything planted seems to do well, even the peonies, marking the line between the firemen's parklike grounds and the railroad cinder-bed.

On spacious City Hall grounds is not only a variety of evergreens, but also of deciduous trees, selected for beauty of form, leaf or flower. Two Cryptomeria, "Aristocrats of Evergreens," donated recently by Plainfield's near-centenarian, Miss Isabel Tweedy, and a tall Himalayan Pine in town was brought here by the late Harry K. Tetsuka, to adorn his well-known Japanese garden in Belvidere Ave [556 Belvidere].

The Holly tree on City Hall grounds is another tree found on but few properties. It was donated by Herbert Moody [see Below], when The Courier-news gift of 5,000 bulbs roused a widespread interest in more beautiful grounds, in keeping with the architectural beauty of the building. Evergreens were given immediately by former Mayor Marion F. Ackerman, and a Dogwood by Thomas F. Hylan, whose keen interest in the property extends back to 25 years ago, when, as Councilman, he served on the City Hall Building Committee. This season former Councilman Orville G. Waring, son of the late Mayor Waring, donated several valuable Pfitzer Junipers.

Not Monotonous
Many species of trees planted along our city streets make green lanes that are not monotonous.

. . . . stood for most of that time in this sheltered nook. The fruits, when ripe, are decorative, but not edible. Edible oranges grown only on grafted stock. The thorny branches of this small tree resemble Osage Orange, or "Indian Bow-wood."

Figs are also ripening now in Plainfield. Within a stone's throw of Netherwood station is Watson Ave. It is only three blocks long and from spring to fall it glows with flowers. In one little garden grows a carefully tended Fig tree that bears fruit yearly. Each fall the owner buries his Fig tree in a deep trench well below the frost-line. Each spring it is dug out and reset.

One great wide-spreading Mulberry (Morus Multicaulus) towers far above the roof-top of Leslie R. Fort's home in Cedarbrook Rd. This venerable tree is the historic survivor of a Mulberry plantation, established during the "Multicaulus Mania," by the late Senator Martine [11 Brook Lane, see Below], as a venture to yield gigantic profits on his farm that included the Cedar Brook tract. He believed with others that New Jersey would be one of the world's silk-growing centers. Convinced that silk was to take the place of cotton, New Jersey farmers set out thousands of acres of "silk-worm mulberries" about 100 years ago, only to cut down the trees when the bubble burst.

One of the most varied private collection of trees in the city is that of Miss Jessie D. Munger in Prospect Ave. In recent years instructors at Rutgers University have brought students to these grounds to study the trees and other plant material as well as the garden design. Last spring the general public enjoyed the same privilege.

Love of trees is part of the tradition that has helped mould Plainfield into a city of pleasant homes on quiet streets. The late Jonas Lie, one of our city's most distinguished citizens, sensed this characteristic of our community. In the Common Council Chamber at City Hall hangs his gift – a mountain woodland scene, interpreted by his illustrious brush as an inspiring message to us all.

To learn more about the history of some of the people and places mentioned in this article, visit these links:

[Maxson School]
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Elizabeth B. Atwood) '15

[630 Belvidere]
Joost, Mrs. Sherman Brownell (Marie Murray) '19

[714 Belvidere]
Dunbar, Mrs. William Kuhn '17
Rock, Mrs. Robert B. '43
Runkle, Mrs. Harry Godley (Jennie Fitz Randolph) '15
Whitehead, Mrs. James Harold (Jean Fitz-Randolph Heiberg) '43

[1030 Central Avenue – duCret School]
Huntington, Mrs. Howard (Agnes Fales Strong) '19
McGee, Mrs. Walter Miller (Mary Alice Yerkes) '22
Zerega, Miss Bertha Virginia '23

[929 Madison Avenue]
Ackerman, Mrs. Marion S.(Sarah M. Wills) '35

[Johnston Estate on Front Street & Netherwood]
Mali, Mrs. Pierre (Frances Johnston) '18

[Barlow School East front Street – former estate of "Blojocamavi" owned by Lewis V. Fitz Randolph/Johnston estate]
Barlow, Mrs. Carlton Montague (June Simms) '70
Barlow, Mrs. DeWitt Dukes (Mary Lee Brewer), Jr. '65
Dunbar, Mrs. William K., Jr. (Elizabeth or "Libby" Hail Barlow) '47
Perkins, Mrs. Seymour, Jr. (Esther Moody Barlow) '49
(Also see Mrs. Runkle and Mrs. Whitehead above)

[City Hall]
Moody, Mrs. George T. '22
Perkins, Mrs. Seymour, Jr. (Esther Moody Barlow) '49

[11 Brook Lane, Martine House]
MacLeod, Mrs. Robert F. (Carolyn Waring) '55

1941 Courier-News Plainfield Merits Classification as 'City of Beautiful Trees'

1941 Courier-News Plainfield Merits Classification as 'City of Beautiful Trees'

May 14, 1983 Centennial The Wardlaw Hartridge School

1973 Images from Barbara Tracy Sandford

January 26, 2014

1973 was an historic year for our nation. The Watergate scandal occupied most headlines and the stand-off between Nixon and his nemesis, Plainfield's own son, Archibald Cox, riveted not only Plainfield and the U.S., but the world.

Archibald Cox grew up at 1010 Rahway Road. "Archie's" mother was Plainfield Garden Club member Frances Perkins Cox '25.

In May 1973, Professor Cox (Harvard Law) was named special prosecutor to the Watergate scandal. It was he that demanded Nixon release the tapes and he refused Nixon's attempts at compromise. It was this tough stand that eventually led to Nixon's resignation.

Also in May 1973, the Washington Post, upon learning of Cox's appointment, was quick to announce that Archibald Cox was in no way related to Nixon's new son-in-law, Ed Cox. (Remember he and Tricia Nixon were married in the White House rose garden in 1971.) Hmm.

Well, the PGC suspects that there is some DNA that floats between the two men. At the very least, the Washington Post missed the familial relationships between the two "Cox" factions – and probably because they were known to one another through the female sides of the family, which is frequently ignored when tracing genealogy.

Nixon's son-in-law, Edward Ridley Crane Cox, was named for his great-grandmother, PGC member Annie Ridley Crane Finch '21 who lived in "Graystone" on Park Avenue and was a fellow PGC club member with Archibald's mother, Frances. Archibald had many relatives in the PGC (most notably the Perkins and Tracy families) so other than the PGC (and most likely Archibald) no man made the press at the time any wiser to their "circle of acquaintance" back in Plainfield.

Meanwhile Barbara Tracy Sandford began a new endeavor: Childrens Gardens. She solicited large corporations (Bell Labs, Sears) and received monies to start the gardens. Most notably, she started the Elmwood Garden Club, near the now famous Elmwood apartments in the West End. Local award-winning filmmaker Alrick Brown is working on a new film titled My Manz which is about growing up in the Elmwood Garden Projects of Plainfield.

To see what Elmwood looked like in '73 and other parts of the Queen City:

1973 Plainfield, New Jersey

August 28, 2014 Evarts Tracy

Email today from the Drake House:

There is a Netherwood House Tour on September 14, 2014, from 1-5PM. Details are on the attached flyer. [See Below]

One of the homes was designed by Evarts Tracy, architect. He also built the old Muhlenberg Hospital and the old Plainfield Police Station, and was the pioneering camouflage officer for the US government during WWI. It is spectacular on the outside.

Thank you for your support of Plainfield.

Nancy Piwowar
President
Historical Society of Plainfield


The Tracy Family had many many family members in the Plainfield Garden Club. They included:

Tracy, Mrs. Evarts '22
Tracy, Mrs. Howard Crosby (Minerva Bingham Lamson) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

These three women open the doors for many more familial Plainfield relations which include the Cox, Streuli and Perkins clans. The Tracy family also boasts a special architectural & artist relationship to Mrs. Mead. In fact, there should be a home tour just using these families' abodes!

The Tracy family lived at 1009 Hillside Avenue – which sits directly behind 1330 Prospect Avenue which is currently owned by Shakespeare Garden helper Virginia Carroll.

Interestingly enough, 1330 Prospect Avenue was said to have been built by Mrs. Streuli, who lived on the next block of Hillside at #1035. Mrs. Streuli also lived at 1331 Prospect Avenue. Yes, that's correct – the next house over! Mrs. Streuli's daughter, PGC member Caroline, married the Tracy boy at 1009 Hillside and well, lets just say, Caroline didn't get too far from both her PGC mother and mother-in-law. Did she have any choice about joining the PGC!?!

Eight homes in Netherwood are photographed on the flyer – does anyone know the addresses? It would be interesting for all of us to see if they once belonged to one of our members!

Netherwood Heights Tour of Homes September 14, 2014

To help you figure out WHO lived WHERE consult our "Home & Garden" page.

September 15, 2014 Netherwood Home Tour

By all accounts the Netherwood Home Tour was a big success. Check out the "thank you note" here and the photos here. Again, we had four members (that we know so far) affiliated with three of the homes on the tour:

1. Evie's house at 601 Belvidere Avenue
Madsen, Mrs. John (Evelyn or "Evie" Wilson) '70

2. Mrs. Hamilton's house (as well as that of her daughter, former PGC President Meechy) at 1210 Denmark Avenue
Hamilton, Mrs. Christie Paterson (Louise May) '27
Loosli, Mrs. Alden R. (Demetria or "Meechy" Hamilton) '64, President 1974 - 1977

3. Mrs. Hall's husband's relations' home at 734 Berkeley Avenue
Hall, Mrs. Frederick Learned (Anne Garrigues Wigton) '68

October 2014 WWI Centennial

Evarts Tracy, pioneer of American military camouflage, was renowned architect
By Nancy Piwowar
Plainfield, NJ – Evarts Tracy was one of the foremost architects in America in 1915, but as World War One came closer to America, he was one of the first men to offer his services to the government. Such patriotism was a family tradition: Tracy was the great-great grandson of Roger Sherman, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence and the only one to sign three other historic documents: The Association of 1774, The Articles of Confederation, and the Constitution of the United States.
Tracy was born in New York on May 23, 1868, and moved with his family at the age of six to Plainfield, New Jersey. His parents' house is located on West Eighth Street in the Van Wyck Brooks Historic District, Plainfield, New Jersey. He graduated from Yale in 1890.
Tracy married Caroline Streuli on June 23, 1894. In 1900, Evarts Tracy built his own house in Plainfield, New Jersey and occupied it in 1901. Tracy's residence was built perpendicular to the road, and one could surmise that he watched the construction of Muhlenberg Hospital from his residence on Hillside Avenue, which is on a hill overlooking Muhlenberg. His residence was also built to the points of the compass just like his Muhlenberg buildings. Tracy's residence is now part of the Hillside Avenue Historic District, Plainfield, New Jersey.

October 2014 WWI Centennial

Earlier in 1896, Tracy designed a Nurses' Home for the "old" Muhlenberg in the west end of Plainfield, and it was completed in 1897 (now demolished).
Tracy was into the latest inventions of his time. He purchased a locomobile, "Best Built Car in America," and it was expensive and elegant. He thought so much of his locomobile that the architectural plans of his Hillside Avenue residence shows that he designed a large locomobile opening and door so that he could drive his locomobile right into the basement of his house. This no longer exists at the residence. He enjoyed giving rides to people around the city in his locomobile.
References are made that Tracy retired from the Tracy and Swartwout architectural firm in 1915, but in actuality he offered his services to the country in the Great World War.
Tracy attended the Plattsburg Camp in 1917, where he commanded Company 15, and also underwent training at the American University in Washington. When plans were made for the organization of the Camouflage Section he was assigned to the staff of the Chief of Engineers for the purpose of recruiting, organizing, and equipping the section. At that time he held the rank of Captain in the Engineer Corps, but before going abroad in September 1917 he had received a commission as Major. After spending a brief period in England, he proceeded to France, where he commanded the 40th Engineers, a camouflage regiment, organized in France, largely from companies sent over from the United States. He was ordered to the British front and was at the first battle of Cambrai, where he received a slight wound. In January 1918 he was put in charge of camouflage training at the Army Engineer school at Langres. He was appointed Army Camouflage Officer in July 1918, having at one time over one hundred and fifty kilometers to look after, and by the following September was in charge of all camouflage sections, covering a large area of the western front. He was cited by General Pershing, and was recommended for the Distinguished Service Medal, which was awarded to him shortly before his death. In October 1918 he returned to America to recruit and train two additional battalions of men for his sections, but the armistice rendered this unnecessary. (1)

October 2014 WWI Centennial

Tracy had become well known to the French government during his war service, and he was selected to work on the reconstruction of France. Tracy was in Paris for two months in 1922, when he developed heart disease and died in the American Hospital on January 31, 1922. He was survived by his wife Caroline and five sisters and one brother. (He was one of nine children of Jeremiah and Martha Sherman Evarts Tracy, and two of his brothers pre-deceased him.) His military service during World War One was memorialized on the Plainfield City Hall bronze memorial tablet.
One of his other early buildings extant in Plainfield is the Old Plainfield Police Headquarters located at West Fourth Street and Cleveland Avenue. Another one of his buildings in Plainfield, Muhlenberg Hospital, is in danger of demolition, and is on Preservation New Jersey's "10 Most Endangered" list.
Tracy is buried in Hillside Cemetery, Scotch Plains, New Jersey, on a hill overlooking Muhlenberg Hospital.
(1) Yale University Library

October 13, 2014

Nancy Piwowar, custodian of all things Drake House-related, penned an article on Mrs. Tracy's husband which made the front page of the World War I Centennial!

Read all about the Tracy family and their many contributions to Plainfield and the WORLD:
Tracy, Mrs. Evarts (Martha Sherman) '22
Tracy, Mrs. Howard Crosby (Minerva Bingham Lamson) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

Hillside Historic District

August 29, 2015

Hillside Historic District has announced a new website: http://hillsideavenuedistrict.com

They have neatly listed the homes in the district in a similar fashion to our Homes & Gardens page.

It is no exaggeration to say that the PGC helped build Hillside. In fact our first club meeting took place at Mrs. Connor's home at 999 Hillside. Take a look at our PGC Hillside Historic District resident members:

807 Hillside Avenue
Browne, Miss Elizabeth B. '37

810 Hillside Avenue
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15

816 Hillside Avenue
Zerega, Miss Bertha Virginia '23

817 Hillside Avenue
Lawton, Mrs. Richard M. (Edith Clarke) '21

832 Hillside Avenue
Yates, Mrs. Frederick Washburn (Bertha Kedzie Cornwell) '15

921 Hillside Avenue
Detwiller, Miss Laura Cecelia '29
Detwiller, Mrs. Charles H. (Catherine or "Cath" Campbell), Jr. '57

922 Hillside Avenue
Atterbury, Mrs. Albert Hoffman (Emma H. Baker) '15

930 Hillside Avenue
Corey, Mrs. Ella J. '15

937 Hillside Avenue
Hunn, Mrs. John T. Sharpless (Hope Ivins) '37
Ivins, Mrs. DeWitt Clinton (Louise Morton Fox) '15
Ivins, Mrs. Clinton Fox (Marguerite Carpenter) '33

945 Hillside Avenue
Stevens, Mrs. Horace N. (Helen Coburn) '15

950 Hillside Avenue
Harlow, Mrs. Edward Dexter (Elise Cochran Martin) '15
Martin, Mrs. Francis A. (Mary Keech Turner) '22

955 Hillside Avenue
Wallace, Mrs. Frederick W. (Grace Seccomb) '15
deForest, Mrs. Henry Lockwood (Amy Brighthurst Brown) '33

966 Hillside Avenue
Warren, Mrs. Frank D. '15

970 Hillside Avenue
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15
Kroll, Mrs. Alexander (Nancy Dwinnell or Mrs. Prince H. Gordon) '60

975 Hillside Avenue
Runkle, Mrs. Harry Godley (Jennie Fitz Randolph) '15
Albin, Mrs. Leland D. (Jennie Hoag) '36
King, Mrs. Victor E. D. (Yasmina S.) '78
Whitehead, Mrs. James Harold (Jean Fitz-Randolph Heiberg) '43

980 Hillside Avenue
Hall, Mrs. Frederic L. (Anne Garrigues Wigton) '68
Stuart, Mrs. Linden (Jeanette W.), Jr. '52
Wigton, Mrs. Charles Benson (Garrigues) '45

982 Hillside Avenue
Baker, Mrs. Clifford Myron (Margaret Drayton) '32
Valiant, Mrs. John (Katharine Drayton) '40

985 Hillside Avenue
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P.") '15
Stevens, Mrs. Horace Nathaniel (Helen Coburn) '15
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P."), Jr. (Edith S.) '37
Stevens, Mrs. Robert Ten Broeck (Dorothy Goodwin Whitney) '37

996 Hillside Avenue
Wallace, Mrs. Frederick W. (Grace Seccomb) '15
Murray Townsend
Mooney, Mrs. Wandell McMaster (Alice Joy McGee) '47

999 Hillside Avenue
Conner, Mrs. William A. (Florence Tupper) '15
Wigton, Mrs. William Garrigues (Ann Hayes) '55

1000 Hillside Avenue
Lawrence, Mrs. Chester B. (Florence B.), Jr. '22

1005 Hillside Avenue
McWilliams, Mrs. Howard (Anna Louise Waldbridge/Mrs. Paul Taylor Brown) '22

1007 Hillside Avenue
Lockwood, Mrs. Frederick M. (Hazel Marshall) '52
Marshall, Mrs. Henry P. (Dorothy Burke) '30

1009 Hillside Avenue
Tracy, Mrs. Evarts '22
Tracy, Mrs. Howard Crosby (Minerva Bingham Lamson) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

1019 Hillside Avenue
Baker, Mrs. Clifford Myron (Margaret Drayton) '28

1030 Hillside Avenue
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Ethel Lucile Titsworth) '42

1035 Hillside Avenue
Streuli, Mrs. Alfred F. H. (Frederica Michelle Dwyer Hooper) '15

1045 Hillside Avenue
Timpson, Mrs. Lewis Gouverneur (Helen Frances Waring) '15
Waring, Mrs. Orville G. (Dorothy Fleming) '35

1046 Hillside Avenue
Genung, Mrs. Alfred Gawthrop (Dorothy or "Dot" Madsen) '69
Madsen, Mrs. John (Evelyn or "Evie" Wilson) '70

1300 Prospect Avenue
Streuli, Mrs. Alfred F. H. (Frederica Michelle Dwyer Hooper) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

1234 Watchung Avenue
Stevenson, Mrs. E. Vickers '41

1239 Watchung Avenue
Brown, Miss Edna M. '34