Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Tracy, Mrs. Jeremiah Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

? address: 440 West 8th Street, Plainfield

Mother is Mrs. Alfred (Frederica Michelle Dwyer Hooper) Streuli '15

Mother-in-law is Mrs. Howard C. Tracy '15

Charter member of Shakespeare Society

Plainfield Library Archives

February 21, 1916 New York Times obituary for William Evarts Tracy

William Evarts Tracy

William Evarts Tracy, youngest son of J. Evarts Tracy, a lawyer of this city, formerly of Plainfield, N.J., died suddenly yesterday in Helena, Mont., in his 29th year. He was born in Plainfield and was graduated from Yale University in 1909. He attended the Columbia School of Mines. Mr. Tracy was engineer for ten years of the Liberty Bell Mining Company at Telluride, Col. and then joined the engineering staff of the Anaconda Copper Company in Helena. He is survived by his father, five sisters and two brothers, one of whom is Evarts Tracy, the architect of this city.

Historical People Buried in Hillside Cemetary

https://www.hillsidecemetery.com/historical.html

J. Evarts Tracey (1868-1922) Civil War Union Lt. Colonel, Distinguished Service Medal recipient; Architect

Muhlenberg Hospital

Front view of Tracy and Swartwout's 1903 complex.
(Postcard, collection of Nancy Piwowar.)

Wednesday, May 18, 2011
Historic Muhlenberg buildings named among NJ's most endangered

Supporters of Plainfield's Muhlenberg Hospital were overjoyed this morning when Preservation New Jersey announced that the original 1903 complex on the Randolph Road campus has been put on the organization's list of 'Ten Most Endangered Historic Places in New Jersey' for 2011.

Fourteen local supporters, active in the 'Restore Muhlenberg' group attended the ceremonies in Trenton, according to Nancy Piwowar and Deborah Dowe, two who have worked hard on the nomination.

The case for Muhlenberg's listing was outlined in a Plainfield Today guest post this past December by Nancy Piwowar (see here). Preservation New Jersey already has its list up (here) along with the complete Muhlenberg citation (see here).

Though the designation does not guarantee the buildings are preserved from future harm, it brings considerable public pressure on any consideration of demolition.

A happy day for Plainfield, but I'll bet there is no joy on James Street today.

Another postcard view. (Collection of Nancy Piwowar.)

The original 1903 Tracy & Swartwout buildings are outlined in red.

Plainfield’s Drake House Museum to host historical gallery talk this weekend

STAFF REPORT

PLAINFIELD - The Historical Society of Plainfield is inviting the public to a gallery talk titled "The Tracy Family - Forgotten Plainfield Historical Figures," which is scheduled to start 3 p.m. Sunday, June 12 at the Drake House Museum, 602 W. Front St. in the city.

The Tracy Family settled in Plainfield during the late 1800's, and the family home still exists within the Van Wyck Brooks Historic District. J. Evarts Tracy, the family patriarch, was a New York attorney and served on many Plainfield civic organizations.

His son, Evarts Tracy, a Yale graduate, was the architect who designed the 1903 Muhlenberg Regional Medical Center buildings that recently were listed on Preservation New Jersey's 10 Most Endangered Historic Sites list. Evarts Tracy also designed the old Plainfield Police Station and many notable homes in Plainfield, including his own, located in the Hillside Avenue Historic District.

J. Evarts Tracy's daughter, Martha Tracy, was a pioneering female physician who graduated from the Woman's Medical College (now Drexel) in 1904. Some of Dr. Tracy's medical research was noteworthy and is currently being re-examined.

The Tracy Family is buried in Hillside Cemetery overlooking Muhlenberg Hospital.

"2011 marks the 90th anniversary of the rescue of the Drake House from demolition and the creation of The Historical Society of Plainfield. When the society deeded the house to the City of Plainfield, it was to provide a museum for the citizens," said Eloise Tinley, president of the Historical Society of Plainfield. "It is the society's intent to bring to Plainfield citizens exhibits that celebrate the people and places of our city. Please join us as we salute the Tracy family and hear some of Historical Society Trustee Nancy Piwowar's recently discovered stories of the family and their impact on Plainfield and the nation."

The Drake House Museum is open on Sundays from 2-4 p.m. and by special appointment. The society is requesting $5 donations for admission to the gallery talk.

For more information contact the Historical Societry of Plainfield at (908) 755-5831 or at thedrakehousemuseum@verizon.net.

Mark Spivey; 908-243-6607; mspivey@njpressmedia.com

The Tracy Family of Plainfield

Saturday, June 11, 2011
Gallery talk at Drake House Sunday

Gallery talk at Drake House will highlight contributions of Tracy family,
whose son Evarts designed the 1903 Muhlenberg buildings.
The Historical Society of Plainfield will host a gallery talk Sunday afternoon, featuring highlights of the contributions of the Tracy family to Plainfield's history and achievements. The talk will cast more light on some of the materials in the current exhibit on Muhlenberg Hospital and the campaign to have the 1903 Muhlenberg buildings included in Preservation New Jersey's 2011 'Most Endangered' list.

Board member Nancy Piwowar will deliver the talk, which will include information about the family, which had New England Puritan roots.

A son, Evarts Tracy, became an architect and designed the 1903 buildings on Randolph Road that were part of the 'new' Muhlenberg campus, as well as the old Plainfield police station at the foot of Cleveland Avenue and East Fourth Street (now being used as a day care center).

A daughter, Martha, was a pioneering female physician, medical school administrator and tenacious advocate for women's medical education (see more here).

Historical Society president Eloise Tinley notes that 2011 marks the 90th anniversary of the society's rescue of the Nathan Drake farmstead from demolition. After purchasing the property, it was deeded to the City of Plainfield to provide a museum for its citizens, with the Society as the operating agency.

The society is requesting a $5 donation for the gallery

GALLERY TALK:
The Tracy Family, Forgotten Plainfield Historical Figures

Presented by Nancy Piwowar

Sunday
June 12
3:00 PM

The Drake House is at the foot of Plainfield Avenue at West Front Street
Parking in the museum's lot and on the street

Martha Tracy, MD, ca. 1921

from 'Certain Samaritans'.

Colonel Mason Whiting Tyler obituary

http://www.plainfieldlibrary.info/images/Departments/LocalHistory/Obit_Tyler.png

Mr. and Mrs. J. Evarts Tracy

http://www.plainfieldlibrary.info/Departments/LH/FindingAids/ShakespeareSoc.html

Charter Members of the Shakespeare Society 1896 - 1998

First Presbyterian Church of Plainfield 1888

http://www.archive.org/stream/historyoffirstpr00beal/historyoffirstpr00beal_djvu.txt

Contributors: J. Evarts Tracy

November 14, 1895 New York Times

New York Times November 14, 1895
http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=FB0911FE355911738DDDAD0994D9415B8585F0D3

PLAINFIELD KIRMESS OPENED

In Aid of Muhlenberg Hospital – Good Attendance and Reason for Expecting Financial Success – The Booths.

PLAINFIELD, N. J., Nov. 13 – There was a grand opening of the kirmess at the Columbia Cycle Academy Monday night, and the building was decorated very elaborately.

Not since the charity ball have the society fold here been interested in a like event for such a worthy cause. The kirmess is given for the benefit of Muhlenberg Hospital, and, judging from the attendance at the opening night, the hospital will be greatly bettered financially.

Booths have been very prettily arranged about the academy, making an exceedingly tasty show. The equipment of the booths is as follows:

French Booth – Mrs. Albert Hoffman Atterbury, Mrs. Irving H. Brown, Mrs. Charles B. Corwin, Miss Bessie Ginna, Mrs. George C. Evans, Mrs. Charles J. Fisk, Mrs. Ellis W. Hedges, Miss E. E. Kenyon and Miss Whiton.

Florentine Booth – Mrs. I. N. Van Sickle, Mrs. David E. Titsworth, Mrs. W. M. Stillman, Mrs. John D. Titsworth, Mrs. F. A. Dunham, Miss Louise Clawson, Miss Bessie TItsworth, and Mrs. Lulu Lewis.

Gypsy Booth – Mrs. Joseph W. Reinhart, and Mrs. Howard Fleming.

Venetian Booth – Mrs. Hugh Hastings, Miss Emelie Schipper, Mrs. George A. Chapman, Miss Havbiland, Mrs. Samuel Huntingont, Mrs. Emil Woltman, Mrs. Samuel St. J. McCutchen, Mrs. Conklin, Mrs. C. S. West, Mrs. W. E. Lower, Miss E. R. Cock, Mrs. Frank O. Herring, Miss Huntington, Miss Maud Van Bosckerck, Miss MacCready, Miss Clara D. Finley, Miss Ahrens, Miss Aynne MacCready, Miss Mondanari, Miss Graff, Miss Yerkes, Miss Gertrude Walz, and Miss Pierson.

Japanese Booth – Mrs. Charles Seward Foote, Mrs. George Clay, Mrs. S.P. Simpson, Mrs. L. Finch, Mrs. Constantine P. Ralli, Mrs. William Lewis Brown, Mrs. L. Dennis, Mrs. WIlliam Pelletier, Miss Ellis, Miss Anthony, Miss Dryden, Miss Morgan, Miss Bowen, Miss Lawrence, and Miss Rodman.

Spanish Booth – Mrs. S. A. Cruikshank, Mrs. A. T. Slauson, Mrs. J. F. Wichers, Mrs. T. H. Curtis, Mrs. Marion S. Ackerman, Mrs. T. A. Hazell, Mrs. H. L. Moore, Mrs. D. T. Van Buren, Mrs. E. H. Mosher, Miss Harriott, Miss Louise Patton, Miss Maud Lord, Miss May Kirkner, Miss Louise Van Zandt, Miss Annie Horton, Miss Titsworth, and Miss Meredith.

German Booth – Mrs. Mason W. Tyler, Mrs. Logan Murphy, Mrs. John H. Oarman, Mrs. Charles J. Taggart, Mrs. Benjamin R. Western, Mrs. J. E. Turill, Mrs. Arthur T. Gallup, Mrs. Horsley Barker, Mrs. John Haviland, Mrs. George Wright, Mrs. Amra Hamragan, Mrs. William L. Saunders, Mrs. William Wright, Miss Annie Murphy, Miss Wright, Miss Western, Miss Bartling, Miss Helen Warman, Miss Emma Adams and Miss Ann Thorne.

Stationery Booth – Mrs. John Gray Foster, Mrs. Elliott Barrows, Mrs. A. W. Haviland, Mrs. John D. Miller, Mrs. James R. Joy, and Miss Emily R. Tracy.

Parisian Flower Stall – Mrs. Harry M. Stockton, Mrs. Evarts Tracy, Mrs. Daniel F. Ginna, Mrs. W. H. Ladd, Mrs. Frederick Yates, Miss Marlon Dumont, Miss Ginna, Miss Baker, Miss Huntington, and Miss Van Bosckerck.

Refreshments were dispensed by Mrs. Orville T. Waring, Mrs. George W. Van Bosckerck, Mrs. John Bushnell, Mrs. Gifford Mayer, Mrs. George H. Goddard, Mrs. Moore, Mrs. H. P. Reynolds, Mrs. C. C. Guion, Mrs. N. P. T. Finch, Mrs. Henry McGee, Mrs. De Revere, Mrs. Ruth C. Leonard, Mrs. George W. Rockfellow, Miss Annie Opdyke, Mrs. Van Alstyne, Mrs. Utzinger, Mrs. Nelson Runyon, Mrs. Henry Tapsley, Miss Martine, Miss Edith Allen, Mrs. J. Parker Mason, Mrs. J. K. Myers, Mrs. Walton, and Mrs. H. C. Adams

August 26, 1894 New York Times Article: Plainfield, City of Homes

Some of the others that do business in New York and have handsome homes here are . . .; H. Alfred Streuli, the silk manufacturer; . racy, the lawyer;

1982 May Designer Showhouse: 1127 Watchung Avenue

Cover to Page 25

Page 26 to Page 51

Page 52 to Page 75

Page 76 to Back Cover

**PATRON: Mr. David Tracy

William Maxwell Evarts Perkins

related?

William Maxwell Evarts ("Max") Perkins (September 20, 1884 – June 17, 1947), was the editor for Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Thomas Wolfe. He has been described as the most famous literary editor

Perkins was born on September 20, 1884, in New York City, grew up in Plainfield, New Jersey, attended St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire and then graduated from Harvard College in 1907. Although an economics major in college, Perkins also studied under Charles Townsend Copeland, a famous teacher of literature who helped prepare Perkins for his career.

After working as a reporter for The New York Times, Perkins joined the venerable publishing house of Charles Scribner's Sons in 1910. That same year he married Louise Saunders, also of Plainfield, who would bear him five daughters. At the time he joined it, Scribner's was known for publishing eminently respectable authors such as John Galsworthy, Henry James, and Edith Wharton. However, much as he admired these older giants, Perkins wished to publish younger writers. Unlike most editors, he actively sought out promising new artists and made his first big find in 1919 when he signed F. Scott Fitzgerald. This was no easy task, for no one at Scribner's except Perkins had liked The Romantic Egotist, the working title of Fitzgerald's first novel, and it was rejected. Even so, Perkins worked with Fitzgerald to drastically revise the manuscript and then lobbied it through the house until he wore down his colleagues' resistance.

Its publication as This Side of Paradise (1920) marked the arrival of a new literary generation that would always be associated with Perkins. Fitzgerald's profligacy and alcoholism put great strain on his relationship with Perkins. Nonetheless, Perkins remained his friend as well as his editor to the end of Fitzgerald's short life, advancing him money, making personal loans, and encouraging the unstable writer in every way. Perkins rendered yeoman service as an editor too, particularly in helping Fitzgerald with The Great Gatsby (1925), his masterpiece, which benefited substantially from Perkins' criticism.

It was through Fitzgerald that Perkins met Ernest Hemingway, publishing his first major novel, The Sun Also Rises, in 1926. A daring book for the times, Perkins fought for it over objections to Hemingway's profanity raised by traditionalists in the firm. The commercial success of Hemingway's next novel, A Farewell to Arms (1929), which rose to number one on the best-seller list, put an end to questions about Perkins' editorial judgment.

The greatest professional challenge Perkins ever faced was posed by Thomas Wolfe, whose talent was matched only by his lack of artistic self-discipline. Unlike most writers, who are often blocked, words poured out of Wolfe. A blessing in some ways, this was a curse too, as Wolfe was greatly attached to each sentence he wrote. After a tremendous struggle, Perkins induced Wolfe to cut 90,000 words from his first novel, Look Homeward, Angel (1929). His next, Of Time and the River (1935), was the result of a two-year battle during which Wolfe kept writing more and more pages in the face of an ultimately victorious effort by Perkins to hold the line on size.[1] Grateful to Perkins at first for discovering him and helping him realize his potential, Wolfe later came to resent the popular perception that he owed his success to his editor. Wolfe left Scribner's after numerous fights with Perkins. Despite this, Perkins served as Wolfe's literary executor after his early death in 1938 and was considered by Wolfe to be his closest friend.

Although his reputation as an editor is most closely linked to these three, Perkins worked with many other writers. He was the first to publish J. P. Marquand and Erskine Caldwell. His advice was responsible for the enormous success of Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, whose The Yearling (1938) grew out of suggestions made by Perkins. It became a runaway best-seller and won the Pulitzer Prize. Alan Paton's Cry, the Beloved Country (1946) was another highly successful Perkins find. His last discovery was James Jones, who approached Perkins in 1945. Perkins persuaded Jones to abandon the novel he was working on at that time and launched him on what would become From Here to Eternity (1951). By this time, Perkins' health was failing and he did not live to see its success, nor that of Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea (1952), which was dedicated to his memory.[2] Perkins died on June 17, 1947 in Stamford, Connecticut.

Perkins was noted for his courtesy and thoughtfulness. He also recognized skilled writing wherever he found it and nursed along writers as few editors did. That Ring Lardner has a reputation today, for example, is because Perkins saw him as more than a syndicated humorist. Perkins believed in Lardner more than the writer did in himself, and despite the failure of several earlier collections he coaxed Lardner into letting him assemble another under the title How To Write Short Stories (1924). The book sold well and, thanks to excellent reviews, established Lardner as a literary figure.

Apart from his roles as coach, friend, and promoter, Perkins was unusual among editors for the close and detailed attention he gave to books, and for what the novelist Vance Bourjaily, another of his discoveries, called his "infallible sense of structure." Although he never pretended to be an artist himself, Perkins could often see where an author ought to go more clearly than the writer did.

Maxwell Perkins was the grandson of U.S. Secretary of State, U.S. Attorney General & U.S. Senator William M. Evarts, the great-great-grandson of Declaration of Independence signer Roger Sherman, and the uncle of Watergate special prosecutor Archibald Cox. He was also descended from the Puritans John Davenport and Theophilus Eaton.

Perkins' home in Windsor, Vermont, located on 26 Main Street, was purchased from John Skinner in the 1820s for $5,000 by William M. Evarts and passed down to Evarts' daughter, Elizabeth Hoar Evarts Perkins, who in turn left the home to family members, including her son Maxwell. The home stayed in the family until 2005, and was recently restored and reopened as Snapdragon Inn. Snapdragon Inn is open to the public and features the Maxwell Perkins Library, which displays and collects items related to Maxwell Perkins and his extended family. His house in New Canaan, Connecticut, the Maxwell E. Perkins House, is on the National Register of Historic Places. His granddaughter, Ruth King Porter, is a Vermont writer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell_Perkins

December 1910

On New Year's Eve, in the Episcopal Church in Plainfield, NJ, Maxwell Perkins, 26, marries Louise Saunders, 17. It is quite a family affair. His brothers and her sisters are part of the wedding party, and his uncle performs the service.

The young couple had both attended this church while growing up, but had only taken a serious interest in each other about 18 months ago. As a young reporter with the New York Times, Max knew he couldn't support a wife and family. But his new job gave him regular working hours and a steady salary. He had recently joined the venerable publishing house of Charles Scribner's and Sons. In the advertising department.

Elsewhere in the US, Scribner's future star writers, F. Scott Fitzgerald, 14, Ernest Hemingway, 11, and Thomas Wolfe, 10, are dreaming of becoming novelists.

Tracy, Evarts, Perkins, Mead and Cox Connection

American President: A Reference Resource
↑ Rutherford Birchard Hayes Front Page
William M. Evarts (1877–1881): Secretary of State
William Maxwell Evarts was born in 1818 in Boston, Massachusetts. He attended the Boston Latin School and graduated from Yale College in 1833. Evarts studied law privately before attending Harvard Law School for one year. He then joined a law office in New York City in 1839, and in 1841 he was admitted to the bar.

From 1849 to 1852, Evarts served as the assistant U.S. district attorney for the Southern District of New York. He returned to private practice during the remainder of the decade and throughout the Civil War. Politically, Evarts was first a Whig and then a Republican; he disagreed with President Andrew Johnson over the latter's Reconstruction policies but nevertheless joined the President's team of lawyers – a group which also included Henry Stanbery – that prevented Johnson's conviction on impeachment charges.

Following the trial and Johnson's unsuccessful attempt at renominating Stanbery as attorney general, the President tapped Evarts to assume the post. Evarts served for less than a year (July 1868-March 1869). Following this stint, Evarts served as chief counsel for the Republican Party in 1876, defending the legitimacy of Rutherford B. Hayes's election as President over Democratic candidate Samuel Tilden. When Hayes emerged the winner, the new President nominated Evarts to be his secretary of state.

Evarts served in the Hayes cabinet for the entire term, leaving office in 1881. That same year, he served as a delegate to the International Monetary Conference in Paris. Four years later, he served a single term, from 1885 to 1891, in the United States Senate. William Maxwell Evarts died in 1901.

Yale University Library

Repository: Manuscripts and Archives
Sterling Memorial Library
128 Wall Street
P.O. Box 208240
New Haven, CT 06520
Web: http://www.library.yale.edu/mssa/
Email: mssa.assist@yale.edu
Phone: (203) 432-1735
Fax: (203) 432-7441
Call Number: MS 816
Creator: Tracy Family.
Title: Tracy family papers
Dates: 1794-1937
Physical Description: 4 linear feet
Language(s): The materials are in English.
Summary: Papers of ten members of the Tracy family, originating in Litchfield, Connecticut. The most prominent figures are Uriah Tracy, Roger Sherman Tracy, Howard Crosby Tracy, and Evarts Tracy. The papers of Uriah Tracy include letters to his children written while he was in Congress (1794-1806), letters to others on Congressional business, and his journal of a trip to the West in 1800. The papers of Roger Sherman Tracy consist chiefly of letters written to his family from Yale College in 1859 and from Berlin where he had gone to study in 1869. Included also are two letters from Jacob Riis. The correspondence of Howard Crosby Tracy contains twelve of his letters to his parents from Yale College and elsewhere and sixty-four letters to him from members of the Class of 1887. The largest part of his correspondence reflects his activities as a Republican on both the local and national level. Evarts Tracy's papers deal largely with World War I, and consist of letters written to Tracy as well as notebooks kept by Tracy during the war, a sketchbook, poems and other memorabilia. The women in the family are represented by only a scattering of letters. There are also miscellaneous financial papers and materials on Tracy genealogy.
View/Search: To view and/or search the entire finding aid, see the Full HTML(NOTE: for large finding aids, the full HTML view may take up to 30 seconds to render) or the Printable PDF.
Finding Aid Link: To cite or bookmark this finding aid, use the following address:
http://hdl.handle.net/10079/fa/mssa.ms.0816
Catalog Record: A record for this collection, including location information, may be available in Orbis, the Yale University Library catalog.

Administrative Information
Provenance
Gift of Mrs. Howard C. Tracy, 1937, and Emily Baldwin Tracy, 1952.

Cite As
Tracy Family Papers. Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University Library.

Biographical Sketch
Howard Crosby Tracy: lawyer in New York and Brooklyn, 1899-; worked for U.S. Title Guarantee Company, 1925-1926, and for New York Title & Mortgage Company, 1926-1927; member of Republican City Committee of Plainfield, New Jersey, from 1906.

Biographical History
ROGER SHERMAN TRACY (1841-1926), B.A. 1862.

Born December 9, 1841, in Windsor, Vt. Died March 6, 1926, in Ballardvale, Mass.

Father, the Rev. Ebenezer, Carter Tracy (B.A. Dartmouth 1819); studied at Andover Theological Seminary; editor and publisher of Vermont Chronicle for over thirty years; son of Joseph and Ruth (Carter) Tracy; sixth in direct descent from Stephen Tracy, who came from England to Plymouth, Mass., in 1623 and later settled in Duxbury, Mass. Mother, Martha Sherman (Evarts) Tracy; daughter of Jeremiah Evarts (B.A. 1802) and Mehitabel (Sherman) Evarts; sister of John Jay Evarts (B.A. 1832) and William Maxwell Evarts (B.A. 1837); sister-in-law of the Rev. David Greene (B.A. 1821); granddaughter of Roger Sherman (honorary M.A. 1768), a signer of the Declaration of Independence, a member of the Continental Congress and of the Constitutional Convention, and treasurer of Yale College 1765-1776; great-granddaughter of Timothy Todd (B.A. 1747); descendant of John Evarts, who came to this country during the first half of the seventeenth century and settled in New England. Yale relatives include: J. Evarts Tracy, '57 L. (brother); Howard C. Tracy, '87, Evarts Tracy, '90, Robert S. Tracy, '93, and William E. Tracy, '00 (nephews); and Charles B. Evarts, ex -'66, Allen W. Evarts, '69, William Evarts, ex -'71, Sherman Evarts, '81, Maxwell Evarts, '84, Jeremiah M. and Roger S. Evarts, both '17, Effingham C. Evarts, '19, and Prescott Evarts, ex -'23 (cousins).

Windsor High School. High oration appointments Junior and Senior years; member Phi Beta Kappa.

Taught at Peekskill (N.Y.) Military Academy 1862-1864; studied medicine at College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia, 1864-1867, (M.D. 1868); connected with Bellevue Hospital, New York City, as junior and senior assistant and house surgeon 1867-1869; spent the next year abroad, during most of the time studying in Berlin; practiced medicine in New York City 1870-1873, then obliged to give up practice because of increasing deafness; member New York Board of Health 1870-1901 (deputy registrar and registrar of records 1870-1901; also assistant sanitary inspector 1870-1873, sanitary inspector 1873-1887, and chief sanitary inspector 1887); retired from public service in 1901, but for some time kept his room at the Department of Health, where he did much of his writing; in 1904 bought a farm in Winsted, Conn., where he lived two years; had since resided at Ballardvale. Author: Handbook of Sanitary Information for Householders (1884); The Essentials of Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene (1884); Outlines of Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene (1889); The White Man's Burden (under nom de plume of T. Shirby Hodge; 1915); monographs on vital statistics for Wood's Reference Handbook of the Medical Sciences (1893) and on sanitary subjects for the Annual Reports of the New York Health Department; contributed articles to the appendix of the American edition of Parke's Hygiene , to Michael Foster's Primer of Physiology , one of the series of Science Primers edited by Huxley, Roscoe & Balfour Stewart (1883), to Buck's Hygiene and Public Health , and to the Popular Science Monthly and the Century ; affiliated with the Congregational Church.

Unmarried.

Death due to chronic myocarditis. Buried in Old South Cemetery, Windsor. Survived by a sister, Mrs. George P. Byington, of Ballardvale.

( Yale Obituary Record , Number 85, pages 18-20)


* * * * *


HOWARD CROSBY TRACY (1866-1934), B.A. 1887.

Born August 1, 1866, in Westboro, Mass. Died April 19, 1934, in New York City.

Father, J. Evarts Tracy, '57 L. Mother, Martha Sherman (Greene) Tracy. Yale relatives include: Timothy Todd (B.A. 1747) (great-great-great-grandfather); Roger Sherman (honorary M.A. 1768) (great-great-grandfather); Jeremiah Evarts (B.A, 1802) (great-grandfather); Rev. David Greene (B.A. 1821) (grandfather); John J. Evarts (B.A. 1832) and William M. Evarts, (B.A. 1837) (great-uncles); J. Evarts Greene, '53, and Dr. Roger S. Tracy, '62 (uncles); Evarts Tracy, '90, Dr. Robert S. Tracy, '93, and William E. Tracy, '00 (brothers); and William E. Tracy, '34 E. (nephew).

John Leal's School in Plainfield, N.J., and Dr. Pingree's School, Elizabeth, N.J. Dissertation appointment Junior and Senior years; on Class Lacrosse Team Sophomore year; member Pundits, Gamma Nu, and Psi Upsilon.

LL.B. cum laude Columbia 1889; had since practiced law in New York and Brooklyn; clerk in office of his father's firm, Evarts, Choate & Beaman, 1889-1893; in partnership with Wolcott G. Lane, '88, under firm name of Tracy & Lane 1893-1902; practiced alone 1902-1903; connected with Lawyers Title Insurance Company 1903-1905, engaged in examination of titles to real estate; assistant attorney of its successor, Lawyers Title Insurance & Trust Company, 1905-1913; member of law firm of Dean, McBarron & Tracy 1913-1918, Dean, Tracy & Stanfield 1918-1919, and of Dean, King, Tracy & Smith 1919-1921; took three months' course in stock salesmanship with James W. Elliott's Business Builders November 1921 - February 1922; manager of closing department of U.S. Title Guaranty Company of Brooklyn 1925-1926, New York Title & Mortgage Company, Brooklyn 1926-1927, and since then an attorney in the department of general litigation; member of Republican City Committee of Plainfield, N.J., for several years from 1906; member district committee of Organized Aid Association of Plainfield (secretary 1899-1904); one of commissioners of sewer assessments of Plainfield in 1911 and 1912; secretary of reorganization committee of Oregon Railway & Navigation Company 1896; Private, Troop A, Cavalry, New York National Guard, 1889-1892; member Association of the Bar of the City of New York, and Grace Episcopal Church, Plainfield (vestryman 1917-1929).

Married June 24, 1893, in St. Paul, Minn., Minerva Bingham, daughter of Eastburn Ebenezer Lamson, Brown ex -'64, and Martha (Wardner) Lamson. No children.

Death due to a heart attack. Buried in Hillside Cemetery, Plainfield. Survived by wife and five sisters: Miss Emily B. Tracy and Dr. Martha Tracy (B.A. Bryn Mawr 1898; M.D. Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania 1904), both of Germantown, Pa.; Miss Mary Evarts Tracy, of Yokohama, Japan; Miss Edith H. Tracy, of Stockbridge, Mass.; and Mrs. Margaret Tracy Mix, of Muncie, Ind.

( Yale Obituary Record , No. 93, 1934, pp. 63-64)


* * * * *


EVARTS TRACY (1868-1922), B.A. 1890.

Born May 23, 1868, in New York City. Died January 31, 1922, in Paris, France.

Evarts Tracy, who was the second of the four sons of Jeremiah Evarts Tracy (LL.B. 1857) and Martha Sherman (Greene) Tracy, was born May 23, 1868, in New York City, where his father practiced law for fifty years. The latter's parents were the Rev. Ebenezer Carter Tracy (B.A. Dartmouth 1819) and Martha Sherman (Evarts) Tracy. He is a direct descendant in the seventh generation of Stephen Tracy, an Englishman who came to Plymouth, Mass., in 1623, later removing to Duxbury. Martha Evarts Tracy was the daughter of Jeremiah Evarts (B.A. 1802) and Mehetable Sherman, the latter being a daughter of Roger Sherman, treasurer of Yale College from 1765 to 1776, and one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. Evarts Tracy's maternal grandparents were the Rev. David Greene (B.A. 1821) and Mary (Evarts) Greene, the eldest daughter of Jeremiah Evarts, whose mother was the daughter of Timothy Todd (B.A. 1747). The first member of the Greene family to come to America was William Green, who came from Oxford, England, and settled at Charlestown, Mass., between 1640 and 1680. He later returned to England and died there, leaving a posthumous son, William Green, born on his mother's return voyage to America.

Evarts Tracy was prepared for college at the school conducted by John Leal (B.A. 1874) in Plainfield, N.J., where he had lived since he was eight years old. He was a member of the Intercollegiate Athletic Team for three years.

He studied architecture in the office of McKim, Mead & White in New York City until March 1892 and then continued his studies for his profession at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, graduating there in 1894. Upon his return to the United States he was again associated with McKim, Mead & White, continuing in this connection until 1896, when he opened an office of his own. Since 1900 Egerton Swartwout, '91, had been associated with him under the firm name of Tracy & Swartwout. The firm acquired a wide reputation by their work in designing important buildings in various parts of the country, and won a number of competitions, including the Cathedral and the U.S. Post Office and Court House at Denver, Colo., the National Metropolitan Bank and the George Washington and Victory Memorial in Washington, D.C. (the corner stone of the latter of these buildings was laid in November 1921); the Connecticut Savings Bank in New Haven; and the Missouri State Capitol. Other buildings designed by the firm included the National Armory at Washington, D.C., not yet under construction, and the original Yale Club in New York City. Mr. Tracy also made the plans for the remodelling of the sales offices of the Brick Row Print and Book Shop and the Yale University Press in New York City. In 1920 the firm of Tracy & Swartwout was awarded by the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects the Medal of Honor in recognition of their distinguished achievements in architecture, as exemplified in the Missouri State Capitol and the U.S. Post Office and Court House at Denver.

Evarts Tracy was one of the first men to offer his services to the government for the World War. He attended the Plattsburg Camp in 1917, where he commanded Company 15, and also underwent training at the American University in Washington. When plans were made for the organization of the Camouflage Section he was assigned to the staff of the Chief of Engineers for the purpose of recruiting, organizing, and equipping the section. At that time he held the rank of Captain in the Engineer Corps, but before going abroad in September 1917 he had received a commission as Major. After spending a brief period in England, he proceeded to France, where he commanded the 40th Engineers, a camouflage regiment, organized in France, largely from companies sent over from the United States. He was ordered to the British front and was at the first battle of Cambrai, where he received a slight wound. In January 1918 he was put in charge of camouflage training at the Army Engineer school at Langres. He was appointed Army Camouflage Officer in July 1918, having at one time over one hundred and fifty kilometres to look after, and by the following September was in charge of all camouflage sections, covering a large area of the western front. He was cited by General Pershing, and was recommended for the Distinguished Service Medal, which was awarded to him shortly before his death. In October 1918 he returned to America to recruit and train two additional battalions of men for his sections, but the armistice rendered this unnecessary.

He then served on the staff of the Chief of Engineers in Washington for several months, and subsequently went to Panama to make a report on the defenses of the Canal Zone. He was relieved from active duty August 29, 1919, and resumed the practice of his profession. In July 1921 he was at Camp Knox, where he gave instruction to various Field Artillery units. He then went to France, and while there unofficially represented the U.S. Army at French manoeuvres. Upon returning to the United States in September, he was assigned to General Headquarters, with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the Engineer Reserve Corps. He had been in France since December 13, 1921, and for several months before his death he had been engaged in reconstruction work, making his headquarters in Paris. He was a member of the council of the National Sculpture Society and of the committee of experts of the Advisory Council of Real Estate Interests of New York. He also belonged to the Beaux Arts Society of Architects, the American Institute of Architects, and the Architectural League of New York.

Colonel Tracy died at the American Hospital at Neuilly, France, January 31, 1922, after a brief illness from heart trouble. Interment was in Hillside Cemetery, Plainfield, N.J.

He was married June 23, 1894, in Plainfield, to Caroline Fredericka [(Streuli)], daughter of Alfred H. and Fredericka (Hooper) Streuli, who survives him. They had no children. In addition to his wife, Colonel Tracy is survived by his father; a brother, Howard C. Tracy, '87; and five sisters. Two other brothers graduated at Yale, Robert S. Tracy in 1893, and William E. Tracy in 1900. Other relatives who have attended Yale include two great-uncles, John Jay Evarts (B.A. 1832) and William Maxwell Evarts (B.A. 1837); two uncles, Jeremiah Evarts Green (B.A. 1853), and Roger Sherman Tracy (B.A. 1862); and seven cousins, Charles B. Evarts, ex -'66, Allen W. Evarts, '69, Sherman Evarts, '81, Maxwell Evarts, '84, Jeremiah M. Evarts, '17, Roger S. Evarts,'17, and Effingham C. Evarts, '19.

( Yale Obituary Record , No. 81, 1922, pp. 441-444)

Description of the Papers
This collection consists of papers of various members of the Tracy family. The materials are arranged in chronological order by individual, as follows:

Uriah Tracy, of Litchfield, Connecticut. His papers consist of twelve letters to his children, principally his daughter Susan, written while he was in Congress, 1794-1806; and seven letters to James McHenry and others. The letters concern appointments in the army, actions in Congress, and other matters. There is also a copy of Tracy's journal of a trip to the western part of the country in 1800.

Susan (Tracy) Howe, daughter of Uriah Tracy. We have one letter from her to her future husband, Judge Samuel Howe.

Martha Sherman (Evarts) Tracy, wife of Ebenezer C. Tracy. Her papers consist of nine letters to her cousin Sarah [Tracy?], written from Windsor, Connecticut. The letters discuss family matters.

Martha Sherman (Greene) Tracy, wife of Jeremiah Evarts Tracy. There is one letter from her to her husband.

Roger Sherman Tracy. His papers consist of fourteen letters to his parents and brother Jeremiah Evarts Tracy written from Yale College and from Berlin, describing his study in both places, and from other parts of Europe. There are also two letters from Jacob Riis and one from Roger Sherman Tracy about Riis to Jeremiah E. Tracy, enclosing four photographs, and an essay by Roger Sherman Tracy.

Howard Crosby Tracy. Included are twelve letters to his parents from Madison, Wisconsin, where he was visiting relatives, and from Yale College, and one letter from his mother written just before his marriage; sixty-four letters from friends and Yale classmates discussing travel, social events, and activities of the class of 1887; seventeen letters exchanged with service men and others during World War I, largely concerning gifts of knitted goods to the soldiers; and seven folders of political correspondence. The latter, which forms the largest part of Howard C. Tracy's papers, reflects his interests as an active Republican during the first third of this century. He writes opposing the re-election of John Dryden as New Jersey senator in 1907, and urges American entrance into World War I, ratification of the peace treaty, and participation in the League of Nations. Among the letters are two from Herbert Hoover concerning Tracy's views on the peace treaty (1920 Jun 4, 11) and one from Henry Cabot Lodge on the Court of International Justice (1923 Mar 3). Tracy also writes in favor of prohibition and other issues. The political correspondence is supplemented by a series of letters to the editor and other writings and notes by Tracy and others, and newspaper clippings. Also among Tracy's writings is an autobiographical sketch written in 1931.

Minerva Bingham (Lamson) Tracy, wife of Howard Crosby Tracy. Her papers consist of notes on her husband's life and letters of condolence for his death from friends of the family.

Evarts Tracy. His papers deal largely with World War I, except for five letters to his family from Madison, Wisconsin, and one from Paris. There are forty-five letters written to Tracy by friends in the States and from fellow servicemen during the war, concerning both his service in the army and non-military matters. In addition, there are three notebooks kept by Tracy during the war and a sketchbook; poems and other literary fragments written during the war by Tracy and others; military papers such as orders, memoranda, reports, and so forth, dealing for the most part with camouflage; and over sixty photographs of camouflage, army officers, and other military subjects, taken in both Europe and Panama. Other papers include a photograph of a portrait of Tracy in uniform; architectural materials such as photographs; printed matter; and plans for the George Washington Memorial Hall in Washington, D.C. There is also a selection of memorabilia such as Tracy's birth certificate, menus, and so forth.

Caroline Fredericka (Streuli) Tracy, wife of Evarts Tracy. There is one letter to her from Homer Saint-Gaudens concerning her husband and his work with camouflage.

Robert Storer Tracy. His papers consist of one letter to his mother, written from Madison, Wisconsin.

Micellaneous Tracy family papers. Included here are an unidentified letter, several early financial papers, assorted printed material about Tracy family members, and a notebook containing details about the Tracy family genealogy.

These papers were given to Yale University in part by Mrs. Howard C. Tracy in 1937 and by Emily Baldwin Tracy in 1952.

Arrangement
Arranged by name of family member.

digitalgallery.nypl.org

Image ID: 3979568

Roger Sherman. Miniature owned by J. Evarts Tracy, great grandson, Plainfield, N.J.

John Jay Tracy

John Jay Tracy, son of Ebenezer Carter and Martha Sherman (Evarts) Tracy, was born December 23, 1843, at Windsor, Vermont. He received his preparatory training at the schools of his native town, and entered college at the beginning of the Fall term, August 24, 1860.

After graduating, he decided to enter the army, and in September, 1864, he enlisted as a private in Company K, Fourth Regiment, Vermont Volunteers. He spent the Fall of 1864 in the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia, and the following Winter in Petersburg, Virginia. He was mustered out of the Service on July 18, 1865. He went immediately to Green Bay, Wisconsin, where he became Principal of the High School, and continued to occupy that position for two years.

During this time, he also pursued the study of law with John C. Neville, Esq., of Green Bay, and was admitted to the bar of Wisconsin in April, 1868. He commenced the practice of his profession immediately at Green Bay, forming a copartnership with John C. Neville, Esq., under the firm name of Neville & Tracy. After several years, the partnership was dissolved, and he has since been alone, devoting himself to his profession. He has succeeded in building up a very successful and lucrative practice.
He has been twice elected District Attorney of Brown County, of which Green Bay is the county seat. He resigned his position soon after entering upon his second term, preferring to devote his attention to his private practice.

His religious preferences are Congregational. In politics, he is a Liberal Republican.


He was married September 18, 1869, to Miss Sarah J. Moore, of Plattsburg, New York. They have had five children: Caroline Weed, born June 20, 1870; Mary Harris, born August 11, 1872; Margaret Standish, born October 11, 1875; Catherine Jay, born October 11, 1878, and John Evarts, born September 2, 1880. Caroline Weed died September 3, 1876

Source: "Memorialia of the Class of '64 in Dartmouth College" compiled by John C. Webster, Shepard & Johnston, Printers, 1884, Chicago

October 10, 1907 New York Times

J. E. Tracy Sued On Note

Former Partner of Choate Says He Refused Payment on Legal Ground

An action to recover $1,230 on a promissory note, made by J. Evarts Tracy, senior member of the law firm of Evarts, Tracy & Sherman of 60 Wall Street, has been begun by ex-State Senator Samuel S. Slate, of the law firm of Slater & Press, 76 William Street, the present holder of the note. The case will be argued in a few days. Mr. Tracy was formerly in partnership with Joseph H. Choate.

At Mr. Slater's office yesterday it was said that some months ago a promissory note for $1,250 was made by Mr. Tracy, at four months, and indorsed to the order of Samuel J. Sampson. In return, Mr. Sampson indorsed the note to the order of C. T. Collins, who made it over to the Yellow Pine Shipping Corporation, and then it passed to Van S. Wilkins.

The note was payable on the Merchants' National Bank, and according to Mr. Slater, Mr. Wilkins, whom he had never seen before, called on him one day at his office and asked to have th enote discounted. At the same time he produced a letter signed by Mr. Tracey guaranteeing the authenticity of the note and saying that it would be paid on maturity. In the letter also, said Mr. Slater, Mr. Tracey said he was worth over $100,000 and that the letter was given for the purposed of facilitating its negotiation.

Mr. Slater was considerably surprised at the letter, and said he sent a clerk over to Mr. Tracy to find out whether everything was all right. The reply the clerk brought back from Mr. Tracy was to the effect that the note and letter were genuine and that the former would be paid at maturity.

Later Mr. Slater said he presented the note at the bank and was greatly surprised when it was refused. Mr. Slater communicated with Mr. Tracy, and after waiting five weeks the present action was started.

The answer interposed by Mr. Tracy, according to Mr. Slater, was through Cleveland & Cleveland, lawyers of 27 William Street. It admitted that Mr. Tracy made the note and received value for it, but it stated that Mr. Tracey was relieved from liability because Collins sold the note to some one alleged to be the representative of the Yellow Pine Shipping Corporation and that as no such corporation existed, therefore, the indorsement of the Yellow Pine Shipping Corporation was a forgery.

Mr. Tracy said last night that payment on the note had been refused on purely a legal question, and that if the case is decided against him he will pay over the money. He said there was a good deal behind the case which would place the matter in an altogether different light.

March 4, 1901 New York Times

William M. Evarts Buried

WINDSOR, VT., March 3 – The body of William M. Evarts, who died in New York last Thursday, was brought to Windsor in a special car last evening, accompanied by members of the family, save Mrs. Evarts and Mrs. Beaman, who were taken to the Evarts mansion for the night. A brief service was held at the house this morning for the family, and the public services were held at St. Paul's Church at noon, the Rev. E. N. Goddard, the rector, officiating. This is the church in which Mr. Evarts was married in August 1843.

The church was filled with a large, sympathizing crowd of people. The pall beareres were all former farm employees of Mr. Evarts. Besides the immediate family, there were present from out of town Mr. and Mrs. J. Evarts Tracy of Plainfield, N.J.; Mrs. Henry Wardner and Miss Steele of Springfield, Mass.; J. Evarts Greene of Worcester, Mass.; the Misses Tiffey of Washington, Reginald Foster and Charles P. Searle of Boston, Henry S. Wardner and Allen W. Johnson of New York, and Miss Martha Lamson of Boston.

The interment was in the family plot in Ascutney Cemetery.

Juniper Hill Farm, Windsor CT

http://www.crjc.org/heritage/V09-63.htm

Home of Maxwell Evarts

It was built in 1902 by Maxwell Evarts, a prominent New York city attorney and General Counsel to the E.H. Harriman Railroad. The Colonial Revival articulation of the Ionic portico and former colonnaded trellis were inspired by the c. 1889 addition by George F. Babb to the house at St. Gaudens Historic Site in nearby Cornish, N.H. The preservation of the original grand setting of the estate on Paradise Heights as well as the carriage barn and remains of other agricultural outbuildings is fortuitous in the light of nearby development.

The Evarts family became well known in local, state and world affairs and maintained social ties with the various personages in Cornish, N.H. William Evarts, father of the builder of Juniper Hill, began his illustrious law career at the law offices of Horace Everett at Windsor in 1837. He later became Attorney General under President Johnson and was Secretary of State under President Hayes. He also had his own New York City law practice of Evarts, Southmoyd and Choate, commuting weekends to Windsor, where he raised his 12 children. William Evarts purchased a large amount of village and nearby outlying real estate, owning several houses near the former location of the Baptist Church near the center of the village and a large farm northwest of the village. He converted a portion of his property into Paradise Park and the nearby Pulk Hole Brook and marsh into Runnemede Lake.

When William Evarts died in 1901, a portion of his property on Paradise Heights near the Park was acquired by his son, Maxwell Evarts. Maxwell built the house at Juniper Hill Farm during the summer of 1902 on the 300 acres of land, utilizing the services of Harvey Ayers, locally known as a barn builder.(1) The Colonial Revival style mansion is said to have been designed by Evarts himself, although the Ionic colonnaded trellis was clearly inspired by the c. 1889 work of George F. Babb on an almost identical addition to the home of Augustus St. Gaudens in Cornish, N.H.(2) St. Gaudens had executed a bust of William Evarts and the social ties between the families were well established.

Juniper Hill Farm, Windsor CT

http://www.crjc.org/heritage/V09-63.htm

Home of Maxwell Evarts

It was built in 1902 by Maxwell Evarts, a prominent New York city attorney and General Counsel to the E.H. Harriman Railroad. The Colonial Revival articulation of the Ionic portico and former colonnaded trellis were inspired by the c. 1889 addition by George F. Babb to the house at St. Gaudens Historic Site in nearby Cornish, N.H. The preservation of the original grand setting of the estate on Paradise Heights as well as the carriage barn and remains of other agricultural outbuildings is fortuitous in the light of nearby development.

The Evarts family became well known in local, state and world affairs and maintained social ties with the various personages in Cornish, N.H. William Evarts, father of the builder of Juniper Hill, began his illustrious law career at the law offices of Horace Everett at Windsor in 1837. He later became Attorney General under President Johnson and was Secretary of State under President Hayes. He also had his own New York City law practice of Evarts, Southmoyd and Choate, commuting weekends to Windsor, where he raised his 12 children. William Evarts purchased a large amount of village and nearby outlying real estate, owning several houses near the former location of the Baptist Church near the center of the village and a large farm northwest of the village. He converted a portion of his property into Paradise Park and the nearby Pulk Hole Brook and marsh into Runnemede Lake.

When William Evarts died in 1901, a portion of his property on Paradise Heights near the Park was acquired by his son, Maxwell Evarts. Maxwell built the house at Juniper Hill Farm during the summer of 1902 on the 300 acres of land, utilizing the services of Harvey Ayers, locally known as a barn builder.(1) The Colonial Revival style mansion is said to have been designed by Evarts himself, although the Ionic colonnaded trellis was clearly inspired by the c. 1889 work of George F. Babb on an almost identical addition to the home of Augustus St. Gaudens in Cornish, N.H.(2) St. Gaudens had executed a bust of William Evarts and the social ties between the families were well established.

Juniper Hill Farm was the personal home of Maxwell Evarts and his family until Evarts' death in 1913. During this period of time, a number of important persons, including Presidents Roosevelt and Wilson, were entertained on the estate due to Evarts involvements as a New York City attorney with E.H. Harriman and with what later became the Union Pacific Railroad. Maxwell Evarts considered Vermont as his home and made many contributions, both on the local and state level. He purchased nearby real estate which included a sawmill and a lime kiln complex, as well as building 3 large double tenements in 1907 on North Main Street in Windsor.(5) He served as the president of 2 Windsor banks and was the chief backer of the Gridley Automatic Lathe manufactured by the Windsor Machine Co.(6) He raised Morgan horses on his farm and was instrumental in renewing interest in their breeding.(7) He served as a representative to the Vermont state legislature and was involved in the Vermont State Fair Commission.(8)

After Maxwell's death, the farm was run by and the mansion used as the primary residence for his son, Jeremiah Evarts, and his family. Jeremiah was a candidate for the U.S. Congress in 1936. Juniper Hill Farm was sold in 1944 by Evarts' ex-wife, Catherine, after an unfortunate divorce. It was purchased by Catherine Cushman, an original investor of the Ascutney Slopes Co., which developed the ski area at nearby Mt. Ascutney in 1946. Cushman ran Juniper Hill as an inn and restaurant. The area now used as the parking lot behind the mansion was developed as a tennis court during her ownership. The estate became a residential hotel nursing home for a brief period in the 1950's when it was owned by Curtis Beaton. In 1961 it was purchased by the Catholic Xaverian Brothers of Boston, operated as the Ryken Center and used for retreats and religious encounters. The Brothers owned the property for 20 years, during which period over 10,000 people utilized the services provided at the Center.(9) A second floor bedroom in the northwest corner maintains a collection of books on theology and Catholic teachings established during this period of occupancy. Unfortunately, it was also during this period that various Evarts records relative to the estate were burned during a clean-up of the attic.(10) In 1980, the property was sold to the MAG Corp., but it continued being used as a retreat center known as the "Holy Family Retreat House" The present owners purchased the property in 1984 and currently operate the facility as Juniper Hill Inn.

William Maxwell Evarts

William Maxwell Evarts (February 6, 1818 – February 28, 1901) was an American lawyer and statesman who served as U.S. Secretary of State, U.S. Attorney General and U.S. Senator from New York. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of author, editor, and Indian removal opponent Jeremiah Evarts, and the grandson of Declaration of Independence signer Roger Sherman.

School, family, and early careerWilliam attended Boston Latin School, graduated from Yale College in 1837 and then attended Harvard Law School. While at Yale he became a member of the secret society Skull and Bones[1] , but later in life spoke out against such societies at the 1873 Yale commencement alumni meeting, claiming they bred snobbishness.[2][3]

He was admitted to the bar in New York in 1841, and soon took high rank in his profession. He married Helen Minerva Bingham Wardner in 1843. They had 12 children between 1845 and 1862, all born in New York City.

[edit] Early political careerA Whig Party supporter before joining the fledgling Republican Party, Evarts was appointed an assistant United States district attorney and served from 1849-1853. In 1860 he was chairman of the New York delegation to the Republican National Convention where he placed Senator William H. Seward's name in nomination for President. He served on New York's Union Defense Committee during the Civil War. In 1861 he was an unsuccessful candidate for the United States Senate from New York. He was a member of the State constitutional convention in 1867-1868.

[edit] Service in the Andrew Johnson administrationHe was chief counsel for President Andrew Johnson during the impeachment trial, and from July 1868 until March 1869 he was Johnson's Attorney General.[4]

[edit] Service in the Grant administrationIn 1872 he was counsel for the United States before the tribunal of arbitration on the Alabama claims at Geneva, Switzerland. Evarts was also a founding member of the New York City Bar Association, and served as its first president from 1870 to 1879, by far the longest tenure of any president since.

Service in the Hayes Administration
Evarts served as counsel for President-elect Rutherford B. Hayes, on behalf of the Republican Party, before the Electoral Commission in the disputed presidential election of 1876. During President Hayes's administration he was Secretary of State. He was a delegate to the International Monetary Conference at Paris 1881.

[edit] U.S. SenatorFrom 1885 to 1891 he was a U.S. Senator from New York. While in Congress (49th, 50th and 51st Congresses), he served as chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on the Library from 1887 to 1891. He was also a sponsor of the Judiciary Act of 1891 also known as the Evarts Act, which created the United States courts of appeals.[5] As an orator Senator Evarts stood in the foremost rank, and some of his best speeches were published.

[edit] Chair of the American Committee for the Statue of LibertyHe led the American fund-raising effort for the pedestal for the Statue of Liberty, serving as the chairman of the American Committee. He spoke at its unveiling on October 28, 1886. His speech was entitled "The United Work of the Two Republics." "Taking a breath in the middle of his address, he was understood to have completed his speech. The signal was given, and Bartholdi, together with Richard Butler and David H. King Jr., whose firm built the pedestal and erected the statue, let the veil fall from her face. A 'huge shock of sound' erupted as a thunderous cacophony of salutes from steamer whistles, brass bands, and booming guns, together with clouds of smoke from the cannonade, engulfed the statue for the next half hour."[6]

[edit] RetirementSenator Evarts retired from public life due to ill health in 1891. He was also part of a law practice in New York City called Evarts, Southmoyd and Choate.

He owned a large number of properties in Windsor, Vermont including Evarts Pond and a group of historic homes often referred to as Evarts Estate. The homes included 26 Main St. in Windsor, Vermont. The home was purchased from John Skinner in the 1820s for $5,000 by William M. Evarts and was passed down to his daughter, Elizabeth Hoar Evarts Perkins, who left the home to family members, including her son Maxwell Perkins. The home stayed in the family until 2005. 26 Main Street in Windsor, Vermont was recently restored and reopened as Snapdragon Inn. Snapdragon Inn is open to the public and features a library that displays and collects items related to the history of William M. Evarts and his extended family.

He died in New York City and was buried at Ascutney Cemetery in Windsor, Vermont.

Extended family

William was a descendant of the English emigrant John Evarts, who settled in Northwestern Connecticut in the 17th century.

William was a member of the extended Baldwin, Hoar & Sherman family, which had many members in American politics.

Ebenezer R. Hoar, a first cousin of Evarts, was a U.S. Attorney General, Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts and representative in Congress. The two were best friends, and shared similar professional pursuits and political beliefs. Each served, in succession, as United States Attorney General. Some of Evarts's other first cousins include U.S. Senator & Governor of the State of Connecticut, Roger Sherman Baldwin; U.S. Senator for Massachusetts (brother of Ebenezer R.) George F. Hoar; and California state senator and founding trustee of the University of California, Sherman Day.

Son Maxwell Evarts graduated from Yale College in 1884, where he was also a member of Skull and Bones[7] . He served as a New York City District attorney, and then later as General Counsel for E. H. Harriman, which later became the Union Pacific Railroad, president of two (2) Windsor, VT banks, and the chief financial backer of the Gridley Automatic Lathe (manufactured by the Windsor Machine Co.). In politics, Maxwell served as a representative in the Vermont state legislature and was a Vermont State Fair Commissioner.

Allen Wardner Evarts, another son, graduated from Yale College in 1869. He supported the founding of Wolf's Head Society, and was first president of its alumni association and held the position for 20 years over two separate terms. He was a law partner, corporate president, and trustee of Vassar College.

Grandson Maxwell E. Perkins was the famed Charles Scribner's Sons editor of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Thomas Wolfe, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings and James Jones.

Great nephew Evarts Boutell Greene was the famed American historian appointed Columbia University's first De Witt Clinton Professor of History 1923 and department chairman from 1926 to 1939. He was then hairman of the Columbia Institute of Japanese Studies from 1936–39. He was a noted authority on the American Colonial and Revolutionary War periods. Another relative, Henry Sherman Boutell, was a member of the Illinois State House of Representatives, 1884, a member of the U.S. Representative from Illinois from 1897 to 1911 (6th District 1897-1903, 9th District 1903-11), a delegate to the Republican National Convention from Illinois in 1908 and U.S. Minister, Switzerland, 1911-13.

Great great nephew Roger Sherman Greene II, the son of Daniel Crosby Greene and Mary Jane (Forbes) Greene; was the U.S. Vice Consul in Rio de Janeiro, 1903–04; Nagasaki, 1904–05; Kobe, 1905; U.S. Consul in Vladivostok, 1907; Harbin, 1909–11; U.S. Consul General in Hankow, 1911-14.

Great great nephew Jerome Davis Greene (1874–1959): President, Lee, Higginson & Company from 1917 to 1932; Secretary, Harvard University Corporation from 1905 to 1910 & 1934-1943; General Manager of the Rockefeller Institute 1910-1012, assistant and secretary to John D. Rockefeller Jr. as Trustee, Rockefeller Institute; Trustee, Rockefeller Foundation; Trustee, Rockefeller General Education Board from 1910 to 1939. executive secretary, American Section - Allied Maritime Transport Council, 1918 Joint Secretary of the Reparations, Paris Peace Conference, 1919; Chairman, American Council Institute of Pacific Relations, 1929–32; Trustee, Brookings Institution of Washington from 1928 to 1945; and a founding member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Great-grandson Archibald Cox served as a U.S. Solicitor General and special prosecutor during President Richard Nixon's Watergate Scandal, whereas Evarts defended a U.S. President Andrew Johnson in his impeachment trial. In a sense, they both successfully argued their cases, which represent two of the three U.S. Presidential impeachment efforts. An impeachment trial was never held in Nixon's case, due to the president's resignation.

Snapdragon Inn, Windsor VT

http://snapdragoninn.com/history/

Bert's house. The Skinner home. 26 Main Street. Evarts Estate. These are just some of the names that represent the place we now call the Snapdragon Inn. Over the past 190-plus years, this building has held a special place in the heart of those connected to it; we hope you'll feel the same way.

The Snapdragon Inn was first known as The Skinner house, built by John P. Skinner circa 1815. Skinner, born in Connecticut in 1788, was the owner of a busy stage line along the Connecticut River from Haverhill, N.H., to Hartford, CT that was headquartered in Windsor.

William Maxwell Evarts purchased the John P. Skinner home (as it was then known) for $5,000 in the 1820s. It became part of a three-home residential compound of the Evarts family that grew over the years to include a number of homes and over a thousand acres–sometimes referred to as Evarts Estate. It also began almost two hundred years of ownership of the property by the Evarts family line.

Evarts and his family (he and wife Helen Minerva Bingham Wardner had 11 children) split their time between the high society circles of New York City and Windsor, Vermont. Evarts was the first (and longest serving) president of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, chief counsel for President Andrew Johnson during Johnson's impeachment trial, and from July 1868 until March 1869 he was the 27th Attorney General of the United States. During President Rutherford B. Hayes's administration (1877-81) he served as the 29th Secretary of State; and from 1885 to 1891 he was U.S. Senator from New York. Evarts was a well known and accomplished orator; some of his best speeches have been published, including volumes available in our Inn library.

Evarts died in 1901; his funeral was covered in the New York Times and included pallbearer J.P. Morgan. In his honor, the Supreme Court listened to memorial speeches instead of normal arguments and then the justices made memorial statements before taking a special adjournment. Evarts is buried in Windsor.

Upon Evarts death, the home 26 Main Street passed to his 8th child, daughter Elizabeth Hoar Evarts Perkins.

Elizabeth was born in New York City in 1858 and married Edward Clifford Perkins in Windsor, Vermont in 1882. Elizabeth and Edward had six children, three of whom (William Maxwell Evarts Perkins, Charles Callahan Perkins, and Molly Thomas) collectively became the fourth owners of the home when their mother died in 1940.

William Maxwell Evarts Perkins, better known as Max Perkins, was a well-known editor at Scribner's. Perkins famously guided the literary careers of Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Thomas Wolfe, and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings among many others. Perkins was known for his skill in nurturing young writers, bringing out their talent and helping it to blossom. He did the same for his daughters – he and wife Louise Sanders had five (Bert, Zippy, Peggy, Jane, and Nancy). He was an exceptionally loving and encouraging father; letters exchanged between him and his daughters, written during the long summers when the girls and Louise were in Windsor and Max was at work in the city, were saved by Louise and have been collected in a volume, available in our Inn library.

After Max and Molly passed, Charles became sole owner of the home. When he passed, it was left to his four children, none of whom were interested or able to take possession of the home. Wanting it to stay in the family, they offered it to their cousins.

Bert and Zippy (two of Max's daughters) were delighted and became owners of 26 Main. They shared the home for many years, and eventually Bert made the home her own. Bertha Perkins Frothingham was a well-known and well-loved member of the Windsor community, noted for her support of the local library and other literary institutions. Shortly before her death (in 2005) she sold the home to the Seale family. Perry and Jill Seale and their five children lived in the home for 2 years before selling it to us in 2007, when it began the journey to become the Snapdragon Inn.

This is just a small taste of the rich history of the Snapdragon Inn. For more information, we encourage you to dive into the books in our library when you come to visit – we have a wide selection of biographies, collected writings, and personal histories relating to the family. In addition, the following resources may be of interest:

•Biography of John P. Skinner, see Genealogy – Skinner, Edward Payson, Jr.
•Some of the many NY Times articles on William Maxwell Evarts and family:
"A St. Louis Picture of Mr. Evarts," December 26, 1886
"Mr. Evarts's Golden Wedding," August 27, 1893
"Sketches of the Cabinet," March 8, 1887
"Birthday of William M. Evarts," February 7, 1901
"Obituary for William Maxwell Evarts," March 1 1901
"Funeral of Mr. Evarts," March 3, 1901
•Wikipedia articles
William Maxwell Evarts
Maxwell Perkins
•A little bit about the family behind Snapdragon Inn and our blog, which covers the process from Day One.

1909 Plainfield City Directory

Tracy Evarts, architect, h 1009 Hillside av
Tracy Howard C, architect, h 1331 Prospect av

Streuli Alfred F H, silk mfr, h 1300 Prospect av

1997 Mansions of May

Tracy-Streuli

PLAINFIELD, N. J., June 28. Miss Caroline Frederica Streuli, daughter of H. Alfred Streuli of Hillside Avenue, a New-York silk manufacturer, was married at high noon to-day to Evarts Tracy, son of J. Evarts Tracy, a New-York lawyer, who lives in West Eighth Street here. The ceremony was witnessed by a large and fashionable gathering, which entirely filled the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church. The Rev. Dr. William R. Richards officiated.

The bride wore a beautiful gown of white satin with old lace trimmings. Miss Kathryn Yates was the maid of honor. The bridesmaids were Miss Bessie Ginna, Miss Marion Dumont, Miss May Tracy, Miss Margaret Tracy of Plainfield, Miss Lillian Brooks of New-York, and Miss Sidney Wharton of Pittsburg. Percy A. Stewart was best man. The ushers were Lewis S. Haslan of New-York, Yale Kneeland of Brooklyn, Wallace D. Simmons of St. Louis, Henry M. Sage of Albany, and Alfred Streuli and Robert S. Tracy of Plainfield.

June 5, 2013

Since these seem to be the wallpaper for the PGC website ,I thought you would like these photos. Although our home was "nicely" landscaped with poison ivy and dying Hemlocks 20 years ago we have created a variety of gardens . The Foxglove ,however , seems to have been here all along and shows up where it likes .I wonder if Mrs. Streuli or Mrs. Tracy planted the originals. Virginia

Click here to see the beautifulFoxgloves.

Founding member, Mrs. Alfred F. H. (Virginia Michelle Dwyer Hooper) Streuli '15, built 1300 Prospect Avenue and her daughter, PGC member Mrs. Jeremiah Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) Tracy '22, who grew up there.

Monday, September 29, 2009 Greg Palermo's Tree Blog

The handsome red oak at the corner of 1300 Prospect Avenue at the corner of Hillside has a vase-like shape reminiscent of that of an American elm.

The Plainfield Musical Club

The Plainfield Musical Club, the oldest musical club in New Jersey was founded in April 1892 by Miss Caroline Struelli and 21 other women vocalists, pianists and "elocutionists". The charter members had been meeting informally for several years before officially establishing the Club, which was "dedicated to the stimulation of a greater interest in musical culture." Important early members included Miss Maud Van Boskerck, who came to the PMC as a pianist and contributed to programs as an accompanist and offered her studio as a meeting place. She also supported the annual concert of famous artists. Mrs. Albert H. Atterbury built Club membership up to 60, but when members wavered in meeting attendance, her suggestion of disbanding spurred renewed interest.

1925 brought the addition of males to the Club, as well as organists, harpists, orchestral instrument players and the elocutionists became "poet-readers." The PMC season ran from October through July inclusive and it held nine monthly meetings annually.

The Club was also active with the community. They contributed money to the Red Cross during both World Wars, bought and donated boxes or seats at the Metropolitan Opera House for the Jersey Junior performances as well as tickets to performances by the Plainfield Symphony Society, Plainfield Choral Club and Mendelssohn Glee Club. The PMC also made many contributions to the Edward MacDowell Association for its artist's colony in Peterborough, NH. In 1950, the Club established an Scholarship Fund which awarded high school graduates from Plainfield and North Plainfield who were interested in furthering their musical education. The fund was generously supported in 1988 with a donation from the estate of former member Adele de Leeuw, noted Plainfield author and native. The bequest was set up in honor of her sister Cateau de Leeuw, also a noted author, illustrator and club member. Other nationally known members included Harriet Ware, who composed music for solo voice, piano, choral and organ, and Charlotte Garden, once the leading female organist in the United States and Europe.

There were fifteen types of musicianship represented: piano, accompanists, organ, violin, soprano, contralto, tenor, bass and baritone, ensemble, choral director, and poet-reader. There were also five classes of membership: Senior-active, Junior-active, Joint (for husbands and wives), Associate and Honorary. Mrs. Leighton Calkins, wife of a Plainfield mayor, was made the first honorary member in 1919. The Club is still in existence today and remains active, still gathering at members homes.

1973 Images from Barbara Tracy Sandford

January 26, 2014

1973 was an historic year for our nation. The Watergate scandal occupied most headlines and the stand-off between Nixon and his nemesis, Plainfield's own son, Archibald Cox, riveted not only Plainfield and the U.S., but the world.

Archibald Cox grew up at 1010 Rahway Road. "Archie's" mother was Plainfield Garden Club member Frances Perkins Cox '25.

In May 1973, Professor Cox (Harvard Law) was named special prosecutor to the Watergate scandal. It was he that demanded Nixon release the tapes and he refused Nixon's attempts at compromise. It was this tough stand that eventually led to Nixon's resignation.

Also in May 1973, the Washington Post, upon learning of Cox's appointment, was quick to announce that Archibald Cox was in no way related to Nixon's new son-in-law, Ed Cox. (Remember he and Tricia Nixon were married in the White House rose garden in 1971.) Hmm.

Well, the PGC suspects that there is some DNA that floats between the two men. At the very least, the Washington Post missed the familial relationships between the two "Cox" factions – and probably because they were known to one another through the female sides of the family, which is frequently ignored when tracing genealogy.

Nixon's son-in-law, Edward Ridley Crane Cox, was named for his great-grandmother, PGC member Annie Ridley Crane Finch '21 who lived in "Graystone" on Park Avenue and was a fellow PGC club member with Archibald's mother, Frances. Archibald had many relatives in the PGC (most notably the Perkins and Tracy families) so other than the PGC (and most likely Archibald) no man made the press at the time any wiser to their "circle of acquaintance" back in Plainfield.

Meanwhile Barbara Tracy Sandford began a new endeavor: Childrens Gardens. She solicited large corporations (Bell Labs, Sears) and received monies to start the gardens. Most notably, she started the Elmwood Garden Club, near the now famous Elmwood apartments in the West End. Local award-winning filmmaker Alrick Brown is working on a new film titled My Manz which is about growing up in the Elmwood Garden Projects of Plainfield.

To see what Elmwood looked like in '73 and other parts of the Queen City:

1973 Plainfield, New Jersey

August 28, 2014 Evarts Tracy

Email today from the Drake House:

There is a Netherwood House Tour on September 14, 2014, from 1-5PM. Details are on the attached flyer. [See Below]

One of the homes was designed by Evarts Tracy, architect. He also built the old Muhlenberg Hospital and the old Plainfield Police Station, and was the pioneering camouflage officer for the US government during WWI. It is spectacular on the outside.

Thank you for your support of Plainfield.

Nancy Piwowar
President
Historical Society of Plainfield


The Tracy Family had many many family members in the Plainfield Garden Club. They included:

Tracy, Mrs. Evarts '22
Tracy, Mrs. Howard Crosby (Minerva Bingham Lamson) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

These three women open the doors for many more familial Plainfield relations which include the Cox, Streuli and Perkins clans. The Tracy family also boasts a special architectural & artist relationship to Mrs. Mead. In fact, there should be a home tour just using these families' abodes!

The Tracy family lived at 1009 Hillside Avenue – which sits directly behind 1330 Prospect Avenue which is currently owned by Shakespeare Garden helper Virginia Carroll.

Interestingly enough, 1330 Prospect Avenue was said to have been built by Mrs. Streuli, who lived on the next block of Hillside at #1035. Mrs. Streuli also lived at 1331 Prospect Avenue. Yes, that's correct – the next house over! Mrs. Streuli's daughter, PGC member Caroline, married the Tracy boy at 1009 Hillside and well, lets just say, Caroline didn't get too far from both her PGC mother and mother-in-law. Did she have any choice about joining the PGC!?!

Eight homes in Netherwood are photographed on the flyer – does anyone know the addresses? It would be interesting for all of us to see if they once belonged to one of our members!

Netherwood Heights Tour of Homes September 14, 2014

To help you figure out WHO lived WHERE consult our "Home & Garden" page.

September 15, 2014 Netherwood Home Tour

By all accounts the Netherwood Home Tour was a big success. Check out the "thank you note" here and the photos here. Again, we had four members (that we know so far) affiliated with three of the homes on the tour:

1. Evie's house at 601 Belvidere Avenue
Madsen, Mrs. John (Evelyn or "Evie" Wilson) '70

2. Mrs. Hamilton's house (as well as that of her daughter, former PGC President Meechy) at 1210 Denmark Avenue
Hamilton, Mrs. Christie Paterson (Louise May) '27
Loosli, Mrs. Alden R. (Demetria or "Meechy" Hamilton) '64, President 1974 - 1977

3. Mrs. Hall's husband's relations' home at 734 Berkeley Avenue
Hall, Mrs. Frederick Learned (Anne Garrigues Wigton) '68

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

October 2014 WWI Centennial

Evarts Tracy, pioneer of American military camouflage, was renowned architect
By Nancy Piwowar
Plainfield, NJ – Evarts Tracy was one of the foremost architects in America in 1915, but as World War One came closer to America, he was one of the first men to offer his services to the government. Such patriotism was a family tradition: Tracy was the great-great grandson of Roger Sherman, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence and the only one to sign three other historic documents: The Association of 1774, The Articles of Confederation, and the Constitution of the United States.
Tracy was born in New York on May 23, 1868, and moved with his family at the age of six to Plainfield, New Jersey. His parents' house is located on West Eighth Street in the Van Wyck Brooks Historic District, Plainfield, New Jersey. He graduated from Yale in 1890.
Tracy married Caroline Streuli on June 23, 1894. In 1900, Evarts Tracy built his own house in Plainfield, New Jersey and occupied it in 1901. Tracy's residence was built perpendicular to the road, and one could surmise that he watched the construction of Muhlenberg Hospital from his residence on Hillside Avenue, which is on a hill overlooking Muhlenberg. His residence was also built to the points of the compass just like his Muhlenberg buildings. Tracy's residence is now part of the Hillside Avenue Historic District, Plainfield, New Jersey.

October 2014 WWI Centennial

Earlier in 1896, Tracy designed a Nurses' Home for the "old" Muhlenberg in the west end of Plainfield, and it was completed in 1897 (now demolished).
Tracy was into the latest inventions of his time. He purchased a locomobile, "Best Built Car in America," and it was expensive and elegant. He thought so much of his locomobile that the architectural plans of his Hillside Avenue residence shows that he designed a large locomobile opening and door so that he could drive his locomobile right into the basement of his house. This no longer exists at the residence. He enjoyed giving rides to people around the city in his locomobile.
References are made that Tracy retired from the Tracy and Swartwout architectural firm in 1915, but in actuality he offered his services to the country in the Great World War.
Tracy attended the Plattsburg Camp in 1917, where he commanded Company 15, and also underwent training at the American University in Washington. When plans were made for the organization of the Camouflage Section he was assigned to the staff of the Chief of Engineers for the purpose of recruiting, organizing, and equipping the section. At that time he held the rank of Captain in the Engineer Corps, but before going abroad in September 1917 he had received a commission as Major. After spending a brief period in England, he proceeded to France, where he commanded the 40th Engineers, a camouflage regiment, organized in France, largely from companies sent over from the United States. He was ordered to the British front and was at the first battle of Cambrai, where he received a slight wound. In January 1918 he was put in charge of camouflage training at the Army Engineer school at Langres. He was appointed Army Camouflage Officer in July 1918, having at one time over one hundred and fifty kilometers to look after, and by the following September was in charge of all camouflage sections, covering a large area of the western front. He was cited by General Pershing, and was recommended for the Distinguished Service Medal, which was awarded to him shortly before his death. In October 1918 he returned to America to recruit and train two additional battalions of men for his sections, but the armistice rendered this unnecessary. (1)

October 2014 WWI Centennial

Tracy had become well known to the French government during his war service, and he was selected to work on the reconstruction of France. Tracy was in Paris for two months in 1922, when he developed heart disease and died in the American Hospital on January 31, 1922. He was survived by his wife Caroline and five sisters and one brother. (He was one of nine children of Jeremiah and Martha Sherman Evarts Tracy, and two of his brothers pre-deceased him.) His military service during World War One was memorialized on the Plainfield City Hall bronze memorial tablet.
One of his other early buildings extant in Plainfield is the Old Plainfield Police Headquarters located at West Fourth Street and Cleveland Avenue. Another one of his buildings in Plainfield, Muhlenberg Hospital, is in danger of demolition, and is on Preservation New Jersey's "10 Most Endangered" list.
Tracy is buried in Hillside Cemetery, Scotch Plains, New Jersey, on a hill overlooking Muhlenberg Hospital.
(1) Yale University Library

October 13, 2014

Nancy Piwowar, custodian of all things Drake House-related, penned an article on Mrs. Tracy's husband which made the front page of the World War I Centennial!

Read all about the Tracy family and their many contributions to Plainfield and the WORLD:
Tracy, Mrs. Evarts (Martha Sherman) '22
Tracy, Mrs. Howard Crosby (Minerva Bingham Lamson) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

Hillside Historic District

August 29, 2015

Hillside Historic District has announced a new website: http://hillsideavenuedistrict.com

They have neatly listed the homes in the district in a similar fashion to our Homes & Gardens page.

It is no exaggeration to say that the PGC helped build Hillside. In fact our first club meeting took place at Mrs. Connor's home at 999 Hillside. Take a look at our PGC Hillside Historic District resident members:

807 Hillside Avenue
Browne, Miss Elizabeth B. '37

810 Hillside Avenue
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15

816 Hillside Avenue
Zerega, Miss Bertha Virginia '23

817 Hillside Avenue
Lawton, Mrs. Richard M. (Edith Clarke) '21

832 Hillside Avenue
Yates, Mrs. Frederick Washburn (Bertha Kedzie Cornwell) '15

921 Hillside Avenue
Detwiller, Miss Laura Cecelia '29
Detwiller, Mrs. Charles H. (Catherine or "Cath" Campbell), Jr. '57

922 Hillside Avenue
Atterbury, Mrs. Albert Hoffman (Emma H. Baker) '15

930 Hillside Avenue
Corey, Mrs. Ella J. '15

937 Hillside Avenue
Hunn, Mrs. John T. Sharpless (Hope Ivins) '37
Ivins, Mrs. DeWitt Clinton (Louise Morton Fox) '15
Ivins, Mrs. Clinton Fox (Marguerite Carpenter) '33

945 Hillside Avenue
Stevens, Mrs. Horace N. (Helen Coburn) '15

950 Hillside Avenue
Harlow, Mrs. Edward Dexter (Elise Cochran Martin) '15
Martin, Mrs. Francis A. (Mary Keech Turner) '22

955 Hillside Avenue
Wallace, Mrs. Frederick W. (Grace Seccomb) '15
deForest, Mrs. Henry Lockwood (Amy Brighthurst Brown) '33

966 Hillside Avenue
Warren, Mrs. Frank D. '15

970 Hillside Avenue
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15
Kroll, Mrs. Alexander (Nancy Dwinnell or Mrs. Prince H. Gordon) '60

975 Hillside Avenue
Runkle, Mrs. Harry Godley (Jennie Fitz Randolph) '15
Albin, Mrs. Leland D. (Jennie Hoag) '36
King, Mrs. Victor E. D. (Yasmina S.) '78
Whitehead, Mrs. James Harold (Jean Fitz-Randolph Heiberg) '43

980 Hillside Avenue
Hall, Mrs. Frederic L. (Anne Garrigues Wigton) '68
Stuart, Mrs. Linden (Jeanette W.), Jr. '52
Wigton, Mrs. Charles Benson (Garrigues) '45

982 Hillside Avenue
Baker, Mrs. Clifford Myron (Margaret Drayton) '32
Valiant, Mrs. John (Katharine Drayton) '40

985 Hillside Avenue
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P.") '15
Stevens, Mrs. Horace Nathaniel (Helen Coburn) '15
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P."), Jr. (Edith S.) '37
Stevens, Mrs. Robert Ten Broeck (Dorothy Goodwin Whitney) '37

996 Hillside Avenue
Wallace, Mrs. Frederick W. (Grace Seccomb) '15
Murray Townsend
Mooney, Mrs. Wandell McMaster (Alice Joy McGee) '47

999 Hillside Avenue
Conner, Mrs. William A. (Florence Tupper) '15
Wigton, Mrs. William Garrigues (Ann Hayes) '55

1000 Hillside Avenue
Lawrence, Mrs. Chester B. (Florence B.), Jr. '22

1005 Hillside Avenue
McWilliams, Mrs. Howard (Anna Louise Waldbridge/Mrs. Paul Taylor Brown) '22

1007 Hillside Avenue
Lockwood, Mrs. Frederick M. (Hazel Marshall) '52
Marshall, Mrs. Henry P. (Dorothy Burke) '30

1009 Hillside Avenue
Tracy, Mrs. Evarts '22
Tracy, Mrs. Howard Crosby (Minerva Bingham Lamson) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

1019 Hillside Avenue
Baker, Mrs. Clifford Myron (Margaret Drayton) '28

1030 Hillside Avenue
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Ethel Lucile Titsworth) '42

1035 Hillside Avenue
Streuli, Mrs. Alfred F. H. (Frederica Michelle Dwyer Hooper) '15

1045 Hillside Avenue
Timpson, Mrs. Lewis Gouverneur (Helen Frances Waring) '15
Waring, Mrs. Orville G. (Dorothy Fleming) '35

1046 Hillside Avenue
Genung, Mrs. Alfred Gawthrop (Dorothy or "Dot" Madsen) '69
Madsen, Mrs. John (Evelyn or "Evie" Wilson) '70

1300 Prospect Avenue
Streuli, Mrs. Alfred F. H. (Frederica Michelle Dwyer Hooper) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

1234 Watchung Avenue
Stevenson, Mrs. E. Vickers '41

1239 Watchung Avenue
Brown, Miss Edna M. '34