Plainfield Garden Club








Member: McCutchen, Mrs. Charles Walter (Mary Isabella Simpson) '15

1919 Address: 21 Rockview Avenue, North Plainfield

1922 Address: 21 Rockview Avenue, North Plainfield

1928 Treasurer Book May 1st $5.00
1929 Treasuer Book Associate April $10.00
1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936 Treasurer Book Associate

1932 Directory* Address: 21 Rockview Avenue
* = This directory is not dated but presumed to be from the year 1932.
NOTE: Mrs. Charles W. McCutchen, 21 Rockview Avenue is listed as an "Associate Member"

1937 Treasurer Book, under Associate: Mrs. C. W. McCutchen 1/11/37 Pd.

1938 Treasurer Book, Associate: Mrs. C. W. Mc Cutchen 1/12/38 Pd 1/11/39 Pd. 1/12/40 Pd. 1/13/41 Pd. 12/3/41 Pd. 1/21/43 Pd. 11/24/43 Pd. 12/4/44 Pd.

1942 Address: 21 Rockview Avenue
NOTE: Associate Member

1945 - 1946 Treasurer Book: Associate McCutchen, Chas. 1/28/46 $10.00 Pd Resigned 2/11/46

Mrs. McCutchen passed away November 12, 1948

September 18, 2013 Humboldt Redwoods

Katie Heins, GCA Zone IV Club Member and newly installed GCA President, sends us a letter. Click here.

In this latest missive, Katie refers to a letter she penned August 21, 2013 regarding the Redwoods. Here it is:

"I hope all of you have read Marian Hill's article about GCA and its history with the redwoods in the June Bulletin and my subsequent article in the August Bulletin. (It is with great regret that I must tell you my article was edited without my permission and did not clearly convey my intent and included a glaring typo.)

However, in the event you have not read these articles and are not aware of GCA's ongoing relationship with the redwoods, I will give you a very brief synopsis.

The GCA decided in1930 to preserve a grove of redwoods in Humboldt Redwoods State Park in California, and this was GCA's first conservation project. However, the organization's commitment has continued far beyond this initial land purchase. In the years following the initial purchase, GCA supported efforts of the Save the Redwoods League (STRL) to acquire additional land in the Canoe Creek Watershed, the site of the original 2,553 acres. With twelve additional acquisitions, the GCA Grove was completed in 1972, for a total acreage of 5,131, at a cost of $3,535,000. The GCA never had a formal agreement with the STRL, but in the spirit of the original transaction, in which the GCA provided half of the acquisition costs, the GCA has considered its unwritten commitment to be half of the cumulative land costs. Since 1930 GCA clubs, individual members and friends have contributed nearly $1.5 million, leaving a balance of less than $300,000.

In the coming year, the Executive Committee is committed to making a final effort to erase the balance of the acquisition costs. Each of the 2012-13 Executive Committee members led by example by making individual contributions, and Leslie Purple and Laura Gregg, 2013 Centennial Annual Meeting chairmen, following GCA guidelines, donated 35% of the excess funds from the meeting to STRL.

The national committees have been encouraged to direct any excess funds or carbon mitigation payments to the STRL during the coming year. If your club is hosting a zone meeting and has excess funds, this would be a wonderful opportunity to contribute to this effort.

In addition, if your club or a club member is giving or receiving honorariums, STRL might be considered as a recipient. Many clubs through the years have already designated STRL as a recipient of conservation contributions, and if you club does not already do this, you might consider it.

These are merely suggestions, and perhaps you will have some ideas of your own for ways to support this. I continue to be amazed at the resourceful thinking of GCA clubs and their members. I want to emphasize, however, that this is entirely voluntary at every level of GCA. Clubs and individuals are invited and encouraged to join in this coast-to-coast effort.

If your club or you as an individual would like to send a contribution, please send your check to the STRL, 114 Sansome St., Suite 1200, San Francisco, CA 94104 and note 'GCA Grove' on the memo line."

We of the PGC should support the Humboldt Redwood project as one of our founding members, Mrs. Charles Walter (Mary Isabella Simpson) McCutchen '15 was born May 6, 1855 at Fort Humboldt, a mere 45 miles to the north of this grove of Sequoias.

Her November 12, 1948 obituary read in part "Mrs. Mary Isabella Simpson McCutchen, widow of Charles Walter McCutchen, who died in her North Plainfield home today, was born in a frontier Army post, Fort Humboldt, Calif., in quarters which had been built and once occupied by Gen. Ulysses S. Grant.

She was the daughter of Harriet St. John and Brevet Col. Joseph Simpson. Her father was an Army surgeon and a letter written by her mother indicated what life was like at the California fort when she told how Colonel Simpson had doctored a settler mangled by a grizzly bear in the back yard of the settler's home.

Near the fort were a few pioneer homes, and beyond these lay a wilderness. Fort Humboldt could be reached only by ship from San Francisco, 300 miles away.

A picture owned by the McCutchen family shows the pitch-roofed white house in which Mrs. McCutchen was born. It had square white pillars. Only 20 miles away were the famous California big trees, but the 20 miles were through wilderness, and Mrs. Simpson wrote that she had heard boasting about the giant trees, but "seeing it believing," and it was too difficult to reach the redwood forest to see them.
"

EDITOR'S NOTE: The above was sent to Katie Heins and here is her response: from Katharine Heins, September 22, 2013

Thank you, Susan. I am delighted that you have shared this as this is the kind of voluntary support I was hoping for and it once again reinforces Plainfield's forward thinking in all things.

The charming addition about Mrs. McCutcheon adds an interesting personal note. What a small world we live in!

Best,
Katie

August 26, 1894 New York Times article

Plainfield, City of Homes

The Plainfield Quakers

www.plainfieldquakers.org

The McCutchen
The McCutchen was a Friends' Residence and Nursing Home, located in
North Plainfield, New Jersey. It was owned and managed by the
New York Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends. Due to increasing costs the facility was closed some time ago. The following history was compiled during the late years of the McCutchen's operation.


This history of The McCutchen was written by Horace R. Stubbs in 1970.
The original handwritten copy was typed by Charles Varian,
and was edited for the web by Alan Taplow.
Dedicated to the memory of Margaret W. McCutchen
and the generosity of the McCutchen Family

DALNASHEA
THE HOUSE AND HOW IT GREW
by
Margaret W. McCutchen
On the night before Christmas we moved to the House
Although some of the rooms still weren't fit for a mouse.

In the year eighteen hundred and eighty-six. Yes,
We'd been building the house for a twelve month, I guess.

The stockings were hung by the chimney with care
After three score and three years, we still hang them there.

The lighting was gas and the cooking was coal,
And our water we pumped from an awful deep hole;

But we did have two bathrooms (undreamed of expense!)
And we had a dumbwaiter (which seemed to make sense).

The house, like myself, was in those days much smaller
And it slowly grew big as I slowly grew taller.

First a library added, a music room later
Rooms atop of the kitchen for a cook and a waiter.

The two primal bathrooms expanded to eight
As the Saturday night tubbing got out of date.

And last came a breakfast room, sunny and bright,
Till the house was too big as the family grew slight.

Yes, such was this house - just the body, the shell;
But what of the Spirit therein that did dwell?

There was poetry, music, good company, laughter,
There was love there and peace from foundation to rafter.

Dalnashea it was called, dale of peace for our name
Betokens the Gaelic descent whence it came.

So may peace rest upon you in chamber and hall,
From each New Year to Christmas, and
GOD BLESS YOU ALL.

The McCutchen Boarding Home

BEGINNINGS
In February, 1950 some Friends in Philadelphia informed a few Friends in New York, who were already active as a committee of New York Monthly Meeting, searching for property and facilities which could be made available for the use of Elderly Friends in the New York Area, that a property in North Plainfield, New Jersey had been offered to Philadelphia Friends for such a purpose.

On February 22. 1950. a few New York Friends met Richmond P. Miller of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting in North Plainfield, New Jersey and visited with Miss. Margaret W. McCutchen in her home which later became The McCutchen Boarding Home.

A few days later a small group of New York Friends met at the Penington, a Boarding Home on East 15th Street, Manhattan with a few Friends from Philadelphia Yearly Meeting to give further consideration to the possibility of New York Friends accepting what they were at this time informed would be offered by the owner, to New York Yearly Meeting.

The New York Monthly Meeting Committee Friends felt the project now required the inclusion of a larger geographical area and forthwith gave all the information to a regular Meeting of the Representative Committee of New York Yearly Meeting held at the East 15th Street Meeting House on February 26, 1950, when the following Minute was recorded (Pages 9 and 10, 1950 Yearly Meeting Proceedings) :


An offer of a spacious residence and grounds at North Plainfield, New Jersey as a home for elderly Friends was made to Philadelphia Yearly Meeting. Since Philadelphia Yearly Meeting did not need such a home, it offered the use of the property to New York Yearly Meeting, on condition that we carry on the business transaction through their Meeting. Real interest was expressed in such an undertaking if full control of the property could be centered in New York Yearly Meeting. Believing that such an arrangement could be worked out, it was approved that a committee be appointed for further investigation, the membership of the committee to include the membership of a committee previously appointed by the New York Monthly Meeting to find a suitable place for a Friends Home and a representation from the whole Yearly Meeting. The Nominating Committee was asked to suggest names, and the following members were appointed to a Committee on a Friends Home:

Howard E. Kershner, Stephen L. Angell, Carleton H. Vail, Martha Mott Fraser, Charles B. Llewellyn, J. Paul Satterthwaite, Blanche E. Brown.

New York Monthly Meeting Committee
Ruth E. Buckwell, Harold A. Marshall, Elizabeth M. Cooper, Lenore B. Stoughton, Daisy E. Hawkshurst, Philip V. Stoughton, John Judkyn, Horace R. Stubbs, Allen H. Magill, Lydia F. Taylor, Grace W. Magill, Ella H. Williams, Lila Merritt



The following letters were then received:

21 Rockview Avenue
North Plainfield
March 10, 1950

Mr. Howard E. Kershner
Clerk of New York Yearly Meeting
Society of Friends
55 Central Park West
New York 23, New York

My dear Mr. Kershner:

It has become necessary for me to leave my home at 21 Rockview Avenue. North Plainfield, N.J. and move to smaller quarters. As it has been for over sixty years a home where love and faith and peace have been the ideals, I would like it to serve some helpful purpose. Although not a member of the Society of Friends, I have such admiration for their ideals and much confidence in their administrative ability, that I have offered the property to them as a gift, to be used for such purpose as they may deem best.

This offer was made through Dr. Frank Aydelotte of Princeton by whom, and the Princeton Friends, it was passed on to the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting. confirmed by me in a letter to them of January 16th, 1950.

As, after careful consideration, the Philadelphia Meeting seemed not to be able to use the property, and, as I understand the New York Yearly Meeting is in need of a home for old people in this vicinity, it gives me great pleasure to offer it for this purpose to the New York Yearly Meeting hoping, however, that the Princeton Friends may be included in any further plans. To this offer of my home, my brother, Brunson S. McCutchen of Princeton, N.J. has offered to contribute ten thousand dollars ($10,000.) toward the remodeling of the house.

As to the final disposition of the property, my brother and I do not wish to place any restrictions on the Society of Friends. We would much appreciate, however, that they make an honest effort to operate it for the purpose for which it was given and, if in the end this should seem impracticable, they would consult us (should one or both of us still be living) before coming to a final decision.

Trusting this will meet with the approval of the New York Yearly Meeting of the Society of Friends,

Very sincerely,

Margaret W. McCutchen


120 Greenwich Street
New York City
March 10, 1950

Howard E. Kershner
55 Central Park West
New York, New York

Dear Mr. Kershnsr:

From what my sister has told me, and from my telephone conversation with you this morning, I understand that the Society of Friends is interested in the possibility of using my sister's home at 21 Rockview Avenue, North Plainfield, New Jersey as a home for old people; and further that it is preferable from their point of view to have the house deeded to the New York Yearly Meeting, rather than the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting as previously proposed.

This letter is written to confirm the fact that the offer which I made to the Princeton Meeting in my letter of December 5, 1949 still stands, and I am willing to contribute the sum of $10,000. on behalf of my wife and myself, for the purpose of renovating the property and establishing it as a home for the aged. I hope that it will be possible to arrange this contribution so that it may be made over a period of three taxable years; and if it is desired that the money be contributed directly to the New York Yearly Meeting, please have the Princeton Meeting express to me their willingness to have the contribution made in this way.

Sincerely yours,

B. S. McCutchen


(Handwritten letter)

My dear Mr. Kershner:

Together with these letters from my brother and myself, I would like to add a personal word to you to explain one or two details.

The house needs a new roof. We had a contract with Sears-Roebuck to put on a roof of "strip" shingles at the time of my mother's death. But the future disposition of the house seemed so uncertain that we canceled the contract.

If, however, such a roof would be satisfactory, I will have the new roof put on before turning the house over to the Friends, or, if they would prefer, I would give them the money that such a roof would cost.

Also, the trim on the house needs repainting. This I will have done.

I do not plan to leave any furniture in the house except a few odd pieces.

All of this could not be included in a formal letter, but it should be known to the committee in charge.

Very sincerely,

Margaret W. McCutchen



From the 1950 Proceedings of New York Yearly Meeting . . . held in the Meeting House at East 15th Street, Manhattan on March 22nd, 1950, the following Minute is quoted which gives the report of the committee named above and the action of the Yearly Meeting:

The Committee on a Friends Home recommends that the New York Yearly Meeting accept with gratitude the generous offer of Margaret W. and Brunson S. McCutchen of the property in North Plainfield, New Jersey of a home for elderly Friends, as stated in their letters of March 10, 1950 and an undated hand-written letter received at the same time, provided that satisfactory arrangements can be made with the Borough authorities for tax exemption, zoning and building requirements, and the New Jersey laws concerning the care of the aged:

The Committee further recommends the following Minute:

The New York Yearly Meeting authorizes the appointment of a Board of Managers consisting of twelve (12) members of this Meeting for one, two and three years, with one-third of the membership being appointed each year for three years, thereafter.

This Board is instructed to invite the Princeton Monthly Meeting to appoint three Friends to serve as additional members thereof.

The Trustees of the New York Yearly Meeting are authorized to accept the property upon the recommendation of the Board of Managers.

The Treasurer of the Yearly Meeting is authorized to allow the Board of Managers to draw upon the principal and interest of the Margaret B. Dietrich Fund in accordance with the terms governing the funds, as determined by the Yearly Meeting Law Committee.

The New York Yearly Meeting appropriates the sum of $5,000. and further authorizes the appointment of a committee to raise additional funds for the operation and endowment of this home.

The Board of Managers shall be in full charge of operation, admissions and maintenance, and is instructed to report to each meeting of the Representative Committee and the Yearly Meeting

On behalf of the Committee
Stephen Leroy Angell, Lydia Foulke Taylor, Horace R. Stubbs, Ella H. Williams

The report was approved and the proposed minute adopted.

The Nominating Committee was requested to suggest at a subsequent session Friends to serve as a Board of Managers and Friends to serve as a Committee to raise funds.

J. Kennedy Sinclaire, Lydia F. Taylor and the Clerk were appointed a committee to prepare a letter expressing gratitude to Margaret and Brunson McCutchen for their generous gifts.



Here follows the first Board of Managers of the McCutchen Boarding Home:
(Term, one year - Term expires in 1951)
Ella H. Williams, Wally B. Scott, Elmer H. Thorpe, Horace R. Stubbs

(Term, two years - Term expires in 1952)
Stephen L. Angell, Howard E. Kershner, J. Paul Satterthwaite, Lenore B. Stoughton

(Term, three years - Term expires in 1953)
Charles B. Llewellyn, J. Kennedy Sinclaire, Grace W. Magill, Katherine H. Vail

Ways & Means (Endowment)
Howard E. Kershner, Lydia F. Taylor, Edward P. Palmer, Ella H. Williams

Rockview, North Plainfield

INFORMATION ABOUT PROPERTY
COMPRISING McCUTCHEN HOMES
The property bounded by Rockview. Washington, Linden and Sycamore Avenues in the Borough of North Plainfield, Somerset County, New Jersey, prior to 1880 comprised 8 lots. Charles W. McCutchen acquired the first 3 lots April 26, 1880, and 4 more lots in 1882 and 1885. He acquired lot No. 3 facing Washington Avenue and extending along Linden Avenue November 2, 1903. The main part of the "Big House" was constructed during 1886, and the family moved in Christmas Eve. Charles W. McCutchen lived until July 27, 1930 and his Will of January 8. 1930 bequeathed all of his property to his wife, Mary I. McCutchen. At her death November 12, 1948, the property was bequeathed to her daughter, Margaret Wilson McCutchen, who deeded the premises to Yearly Meeting Friends Home, a New Jersey Corporation, September 28. 1950.

Dalnashea or Vale of Peace

PREPARATION FOR HOME OPENING
With property title secured and permits obtained for operation from local and State regulatory bodies, the Board of Managers embarked on the work necessary to obtain the funds and arrange for the building alterations, the addition of an elevator, construction of fire escape and other facilities required to make the 64-year-old house suitable for a home for from 25 to 30 elderly people, depending on the room occupancy.
Members of the McCutchen family had called their home "Dalnashea" (Vale of Peace). Soon the Board of Managers decided the Friends Home should be named "The McCutchen" to commemorate the name of the donors. From the Minutes of the Representative Committee of New York Yearly Meeting are quoted the following :

June 4, 1950

Various matters pertaining to the conditioning of The McCutchen for a Friends Home were considered: Size of alterations with estimated costs; letters appealing for funds; necessary equipment and probable charges; possibilities of using the Margaret Dietrich Fund; study of property assets and liabilities. Friends approved of a letter being sent to all adult members of the New York Yearly Meeting.

A minute regarding the incorporation as read by Lenore Stoughton was approved as follows:


It appearing that the McCutchen property at 21 Rockview Avenue, North Plainfield, New Jersey, must be held by a charitable corporation organized under the law of the State of New Jersey in order to obtain tax exemption for its use and operation as a home for elderly Friends,

Now the several Friends who were appointed at the New York Yearly Meeting held in Third Month, 1950, at 221 East 15th Street, New York City, to serve as a Board of Managers for the proposed home, are designated to act as members of such a corporation for the same terms for which they were appointed to serve on the Board of Managers, and until their respective successors are appointed; and are authorized and directed to form the necessary corporation in New Jersey for the purpose indicated but subject to the following conditions and limitations:

Membership in the corporation is to be limited to Friends designated by the New York Yearly Meeting of 221 East 15th Street, New York City, or by the Princeton United Meeting at the invitation of this Yearly Meeting;

The Corporation may at the discretion of the members accept, and may thereafter hold, title to the aforesaid McCutchen property, and may receive, hold and use the funds appropriated by this Yearly Meeting in Third Month, 1950, and such other funds as may be received by it in future for the operation and endowment of the home, but the by-laws shall provide that the corporation shall not be dissolved, the property mortgaged or sold, or the operation of the home discontinued, except after the approval by this Yearly Meeting, and that in the event of dissolution of the corporation all its assets remaining after payment of its debts and obligations shall be paid over to this Yearly Meeting;

The members of the corporation shall require the appropriate officers thereof to render a report on the management and financial condition of the home to each annual session of this Yearly Meeting, and to the Representative Committee from time to time at its request.
Approval was given to the Board of Managers of the New York Yearly Meeting Friends Home, "The McCutchen", to mortgage the property if necessary to do so in order to raise sufficient funds to complete building operations, at its discretion for a sum not to exceed $25,000.

On Ninth Month 11, 1950, New York Monthly Meeting directed its Treasurer to give to Carleton H. Vail, Treasurer of New York Yearly Meeting, the Blachley Fund in its entirety as New York Monthly Meeting's contribution to the Yearly Meeting Home for Elderly Friends. At that time the principal of the Blachley Fund was carried on the books at $30,760.57. In accordance with the Monthly Meeting's direction, its Treasurer paid to Carleton H. Vail on Twelfth Month 31, 1950, $20,000, leaving a balance of $10,760.57. Further report will be made at the time of transfer of the fund is completed. Appreciation was expressed for this gift to the Yearly Meeting Friends Home, "The McCutchen" .

The Committee appointed to check on the equipment formerly used during Yearly Meeting sessions when held in New York reported that much of it could be used in The McCutchen, and that disposition of the remainder would be determined after the selection for use there had been made. The Committee appointed were Mary V. Mayer, Katherine H. Vail and Grace W. Magill.

The Board of Managers reported at the Meeting in Fourth Month 14, 1951, that satisfactory progress was being made in the alterations at The McCutchen which would be ready for an inspection in June. Applications were being invited. seven having already been received. Appreciation was expressed for the work done by the Board of Managers and Friends were named to the Committee to serve for a period of three years.

Lydia F. Taylor gave an interesting and comprehensive report of the origin, purpose and usages of the Cap Fund, believed to have originally been the Cap and Kerchief Fund of the Women's Yearly Meeting. She read the following letter


"To the Representative Committee of New York Yearly Meeting:

'The Committee of Women Friends of New York Yearly Meeting gives to the New York Yearly Meeting the funds known as the Cap fund of which it is custodian, consisting of $2,000 invested on June 3, 1920 in Max Kessler Mortgage on 32 Grand Street New York by Wilson M. Powell and reduced at this date to $1,415.42 and in addition, cash to the amount of $128.21.

"It is the desire of this Committee that this gift may be assigned to the New York Yearly Meeting Friends' Home in North Plainfield, N.J.

For the Committee, Edith S. Chinsley, Alice M. Sutton, Lydia F. Taylor, Phebe P. Willis.
After interested and concerned discussion, Friends approved the acceptance of the Cap Fund for this purpose.

Gifts of money from 307 individuals and 16 Friends Meetings added to an appropriation from New York Yearly Meeting, a gift of the Blachley Fund by New York Monthly Meeting and Brunson McCutchen's generous gift provided approximately $68,000, sufficient to pay the entire cost of building alterations and the new elevator costing about $15,000.

As provided by the conditions of incorporation and upon invitation of New York Yearly Meeting, Princeton United Meeting named the following to serve as members of the Corporation:

Julia Meredith, Bruce French, Frank Aydelotte

These Friends participated in the deliberations of the Board of Managers for the early period, but soon relinquished their membership.

Margaret W. McCutchen was appointed an honorary member of the Board of Managers and attended meetings regularly until her terminal illness prevented it.

The McCutchen, North Plainfield

OPENING
The building was now suitable for occupancy and the first Guest arrived September 15, 1951. Fittingly, it was Carrie C. Cunmin, a member of New York Monthly Meeting.
The first Manager was Caroline Borton Smith, a member of Montclair Meeting. She and her husband, Clarence W. Smith, came to live at The McCutchen, the Yearly Meeting Friends Home. Clarence Smith assisted as bookkeeper during the early period.

The McCutchen Boarding Home opened free and clear with no mortgage or other indebtedness, and a start toward an endowment fund of $1,500.

The Board of Managers report to Yearly Meeting July 29, 1952 states there were 16 guests residing at The McCutchen.

In September, 1952, all friends of The McCutchen were saddened by the tragic death in an automobile accident of the first Manager, Caroline Barton Smith. Both she and her husband, Clarence Smith, had worked unstintingly and effectively toward establishing a friendly and hospitable atmosphere at The McCutchen. Helen Durgin of Montclair Meeting came to tide over and then Cornelia Lounsbury served as temporary Manager until Pauline Young Merrill was obtained in March, 1953 as Manager. Mrs. Merrill brought experience and understanding to this assignment.

The Board of Managers report to Yearly Meeting, summer of 1953 states that the family numbered 22. The Treasurer's Report shows an operating fund of $9,950, and an endowment fund of $2,257.

Practical capacity occupancy was attained in the summer of 1954, and for the following several years the Boarding Home operated at full occupancy with a small financial surplus of income over expenses each year, while a substantial endowment fund was accumulated.

Over the years members of the Board of Managers and Friends recognized the need of an infirmary or nursing home to provide extended care for residents of the Boarding Home, but the necessary money to provide such a facility did not seem to be available.

Margaret W. McCutchen continually voiced her concern for this need and at the Board Meeting which proved to be the last one she attended in 1961, at her insistence, the Board appointed a Committee to study the possibility of a nursing home annex. In due course, after considerable time and much study, plans were completed under the guidance of architect Gardiner Angell, permits obtained, financing arranged and the construction of the present 25-bed Nursing Home completed.

The Yearly Meeting gave permission to mortgage the premises up to $150,000, if necessary.

The total cost of the building and equipment, including architect's fees, was slightly over $400,000.

The required money for this was provided by a grant from the Hill-Burton funds, gifts from individuals, including generous ones from Ella H. Williams and Margaret W. McCutchen, a draft on the accumulated endowment funds of the Boarding Home, and a mortgage held by the United National Bank. This mortgage has now been reduced to $89,000.

Nursing Home was completed and the first patient admitted June 3,1965.

Mrs. Merrill had continued as Manager at the Boarding Home all through these years since 1953 except for a limited period when she had resigned to live with her widowed daughter and family. After a few months, Mrs. Merrill returned to the Boarding Home as Manager.

Upon opening of the Nursing Home, Mrs. Merrill was appointed Administrator of both Homes, which position she held until the Spring of 1966. At that time Mrs. Merrill, at her request, was granted permission to give up her work because of advancing years and increased responsibilities.

Mrs. Grace B. Richie served as Administrator from this time until October 31, 1969.

Marianne A. Longstreet, a member of Manasquan Monthly Meeting, was named Administrator January 1, 1970, moved to live at The McCutchen, and has brought to the Homes a very friendly and highly qualified management.

There is full occupancy now in both Homes.

December 14, 1970.

The McCutchen 2007

The McCutchen

Washington Rock, photograph dated 1900

www.heritagetrail.org

Charles W. and Mary I. S. McCutchen, of North Plainfield purchased the 10 acres containing the two rocks to "prevent it from becoming a crushed stone quarry," acquiring about 20 acres from Arlene F. Carpenter by deed on 5/10/1909 (Bk V-11, p. 463) and 7 acres from Henry and Barbara Pedeflous on 5/19/1909 (Bk W-11, p. 61) On Nov. 29, l913, they offered the state a total of 27 acres for $1 and conveyed it on Dec. 1, l913 (Bk Z-13, p. 322). The McCutchens' gift followed the creation of the Washington Rock Park Commission by the State Legislature in on March 27, 1913. The bill, introduced by Senator Smalley, empowered the governor to appoint a Commission and $5,000 to acquire adjoining lands up to 100 acres "to take over, care for, keep, improve, maintain and develop the said lands as a public park in commemoration and appreciation of the importance of the events transacted in said locality during the Revolutionary War."

The gift from the McCutchens plus land purchased by the Commission brought the tract to 97 acres. The latest New Jersey park literature lists the present park as containing 45 acres, something of a mystery since additional lands were acquired as late as 1966 from Henry and Marie Grapenthin and from Sherwin Drobner in 1976. For $4,600 the State erected a building known as "The Lodge" in 1914 for the use of the caretaker which also doubled as a public "tea room". The building is a picture book Dutch colonial country farm house and is supposed to have been built on the old Mountain House hotel site. The architect, Henry Keith White, donated the plans. The DAR's Continental Chapter donated antique furnishings for the tea room, which was open daily from 3 to 6pm. "As a matter of fact, if visitors give sufficient notice, by telephone or otherwise, to the care-taker or his wife, a more substantial luncheon will be prepared at any time," wrote the Historical Quarterly. How much the tea room was put to use is open to some question, but we do know that in more recent years the building had served only as the caretaker's residence. With the cut back in State funding, even that function has ceased and the park has fallen on hard times. Its supervision has now been assigned to the distant Liberty State Park Office, which sends an employee to the site irregularly. Most recently, Green Brook Township Committeeman John Koch has been trying to save the park by getting the Somerset County Park Commission to take over its maintenance. Its status and fate is yet to be decided. In the interim the Green Brook Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts and students in the Social Service Club of the Green Brook Middle School have volunteered to clean up the litter.

1920 Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR)

"The problem as to the ownership of the rock and the ground upon which it stands was kindly solved by Mrs. Charles W. McCutchen, of North Plainfield, who purchased it and ten acres of adjoining woodland, thereby saving our precious rock from the greedy stone-crusher that awaited it."

American Red Cross 1924, Chairman Mr. Charles W. McCutchen

reference

archives refere to McCutchen home as Washington Park, North Plainfield

The Borough of North Plainfield was settled by dutch families before the American Revolution. Among them were the Vermeule and Cadmus families. You will find many members of these families buried both in the cemetery behind Vermeule Mansion and in the cemetery on Brook Avenue. These families were just two of the handful that received 1,200 acres apiece from the ridge of "first mountain" downward from King George of England. Some of these homes still exist–among them the Vermeule Mansion, which serves as the current-day community center.

Long before it was called "North Plainfield", our town was referred to as "Blue Hills" and was a part of Warren Township. In 1872, North Plainfield Township was incorporated and included current-day North Plainfield, Watchung and Green Brook.

North Plainfield, a 2.9 square mile area at the base of New Jersey's Watchung Mountains, was originally a cluster of farms. Steady growth as a commuter center began with the extension of the Central Jersey Railroad and continued with the advent of motorized transportation. Just twenty-three miles from Manhattan, the borough retains many small-town qualities yet is convenient to Routes 22, 78, and 287, contemporary roads to diversified employment opportunities.

Tree-lined streets, the Washington Park Historic District, Green Acres parklands, sports and playground facilities, a 4H center, Vermeule Arts Center, and a Senior Citizens Center are among the attributes which lend to North Plainfield's self-description as "A Proud Community." The central businesses continue to utilize a Main Street New Jersey grant to foster economic growth, and the numerous enterprises along Route 22 form the primary commercial sectors.

The 2000 census figures place North Plainfield's diverse population at 21,103. Residents of North Plainfield's single family homes, multi-unit dwellings, and modern apartment complexes benefit from extensive borough-sponsored recreation, youth services, and cultural affairs opportunities. Local churches, community organizations, and service clubs offer many events which celebrate the blend of cultures common to the region.

Proximity to New York City, New Brunswick, Trenton, and Princeton affords easy access to major museums, concerts, theater, and sports events. Area colleges and universities also enrich the options for higher education. Somerset County Park System facilities, Sandy Hook State Park, and the Great Swamp Wildlife Refuge Center cater to a wide range of outdoor interests.

North Plainfield is 2.9 square miles in size and has a population of 21,103 residents (per the 2000 census).

July 17, 2008 Orthodox yeshiva moves into McCutchen home in North Plainfield

Orthodox yeshiva finds new home in N. Plainfield
Tiferes Boruch says enrollment outgrew Springfield homes

Yeshiva Tiferes Boruch, formerly of Springfield, moved into the McCutchen Mansion in North Plainfield in December. The property is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
by Johanna Ginsberg
NJJN Staff Writer

July 17, 2008

After 16 years in Springfield, Yeshiva Tiferes Boruch has moved to North Plainfield.

An expanding registration in the Orthodox boarding school's three-year-old high school division and zoning issues provoked the move.

The high school and "kollel" for post-high school students is now housed at the McCutchen Mansion in North Plainfield, a historic property at 112 Linden Ave.

"We were overoccupied," said administrator Shlomo Yoffe. "The facility itself had no problems," but the number of boys did pose a problem.

The yeshiva had operated as a kollel for students ages 18-21 at 36 Evergreen Ave. for 16 years. Four years ago, it opened a high school division at 810 South Springfield Ave., which was zoned as a private residence, without obtaining a variance. Thirty high-school students were living at that address.

The yeshiva operated a kollel, or religious school for post-high school students, at this location, 36 Evergreen Ave. in Springfield, for 16 years before moving to North Plainfield in December.
The township filed a lawsuit in 2007, and the issue was unresolved last summer when the school began to look for a new location. The Springfield Zoning Board of Adjustment put the case on hold.

In September, the yeshiva found the McCutchen Mansion. Built in 1886 and located in the Washington Park Historic District, the Queen Anne-style home was part of a Quaker retirement village known as the McCutchen Friends Home. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the house comprises 15,000 square feet and sits on more than two acres of property. Margaret McCutchen donated the home to the New York Yearly Meeting Friends' Home in 1951.

"We were looking for a facility that would accommodate us. This is just the right size, with close proximity to Springfield," said Yoffe. The school's total enrollment is about 90 students.

Terms of the sale were not disclosed, but the property had been on the market for $2.25 million.

Both divisions moved into the new facility in December, after gaining the required variances from the local zoning board. The yeshiva, the first in Somerset County, remains loosely affiliated with the Springfield Modern Orthodox synagogue Congregation Israel. It is under the direction of Rabbi Eliyahu Meir Sorotzkin, who has ties to the more fervently religious Orthodox community of Lakewood.

The property at 810 South Springfield Ave. is now for sale; the Evergreen Avenue property was sold to investors in December.

Washington Rock State Park

Washington Rock State Park is a 52-acre (210,000 m2) scenic state park on top the first Watchung Mountain in Green Brook Township, New Jersey. The park is operated and maintained by the New Jersey Division of Parks and Forestry.

It is famous for the scenic overlook which was already taken advantage of by General George Washington in 1777 to monitor British troop movements when the Continental Army was stationed at the Middlebrook encampment. The 30-mile (48 km) panoramic vista covers the eastern plains of New Jersey up to New York City.

The land was bought in 1913 to establish the park. Most of it is woodland but at the outlook there are walking trails and a picnic area.

Washington Rock

Plaque reads:

FROM THIS ROCK
GENERAL GEORGE WASHINGTON
WATCHED THE MOVEMENTS OF
THE BRITISH FORCES
DURING THE ANXIOUS MONTHS
OF MAY AND JUNE 1777
ERECTED BY
THE CONTINENTAL CHAPTER
DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION
AND THE PEOPLE OF
PLAINFIELD AND NORTH PLAINFIELD
1912
"LEST WE FORGET"

View from Washington Rock

View from Washington Rock

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Von Boskerck

Harriette Halloway

November 12, 1948

Mrs. McCutchen Passes Life and Colorful

Mrs. Mary Isabella Simpson McCutchen, widow of Charles Walter McCutchen, who died in her North Plainfield home today, was born in a frontier Army post, Fort Humboldt, Calif., in quarters which had been built and once occupied by Gen. Ulysses S. Grant.

She was the daughter of Harriet St. John and Brevet Col. Joseph Simpson. Her father was an Army surgeon and a letter written by her mother indicated what life was like at the California fort when she told how Colonel Simpson had doctored a settler mangled by a grizzly bear in the back yard of the settler's home.

Near Wilderness

Near the fort were a few pioneer homes, and beyond these lay a wilderness. Fort Humboldt could be reached only by ship from San Francisco, 300 miles away.

A picture owned by the McCutchen family shows the pitch-roofed white house in which Mrs. McCutchen was born. It had square white pillars. Only 20 miles away were the famous California big trees, but the 20 miles were through wilderness, and Mrs. Simpson wrote that she had heard boasting about the giant trees, but "seeing it believing," and it was too difficult to reach the redwood forest to see them.

Colonel Simpson was from an old Princeton and New Brunswick family. He served with distinction in Indian fighting and in the Mexican and Civil Wars. Gen. Zachary Taylor commended him on his role in the Battle of Okeechobee. He was with Generals Scott and Worth in the Mexican War and in the Civil War he directed an Army hospital in Baltimore.

Army Surgeon 40 Years

He was an Army surgeon for almost 40 years and died in 1874.

As the daughter of an Army officer, Mrs. McCutchen had no permanent residence but instead lived at Army posts throughout the country.

In 1880 at Annapolis, Md., she was married to Charles Walter McCutchen, who was born in Williamsburg, N.Y. and came to Plainfield in 1868. He was later prominent in the social and financial life of the city and borough.

From the time of her marriage, Mrs. McCutchen lived at the same address, 21 Rockview Ave. At first it was in what the family calls a cottage, but eventually the McCutchens built the extensive red brick Victorian house which stands there today.

Quite Active

Mrs. McCutchen became active in every phase of benefit work in her community. She belonged to the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church, to the charity organization which preceded the present United Family and Children's Society, the predecessor of the Visiting Nurse Association, the Children's Home group, the King's Daughters, and many others. She was on the committee which furnished the old YMCA. She was a member as well of the DAR and the Monday Afternoon Club. She sponsored bazaars and served on numerous committees.

In her later years, she could not continue all her activities, but she remained an active member of the church and the Monday Afternoon Club.

November 12, 1948

Mrs. McCutchen is Dead at 94, Long Prominent

Mrs. Mary Isabella Simpson McCutchen, long prominent in church and social and charitable activites of Plainfield and North Plainfield, died this morning (Nov. 12, 1948) in her home at 21 Rockview Av., in her 94th year. She was the widow of Charles Walter McCutchen, who died July 27, 1930.

Mrs. McCutchen was born in Fort Humboldt, Calif. May 6, 1855, daughter of an Army family. She had resided in North Plainfield since 1880.

Her late husband was long identified with the business, religious and civic interests of the Plainfields. For many years he was a partner in the firm of Holt and Company, export flour merchants, in New York. He was chairman of the board of the Plainfield Trust Company and second oldest director of the Corn Exchange Bank and Trust Company of New York. Among his benefications was the gift of Memorial Park, Myrtle and Willow Aves., North Plainfield, which he contributed to the borough after World War I.

Mrs. McCutchen is survived by one son, Brunson S. McCutchen of Princeton; one daughter, Miss Margaret W. McCutchen, at home; and one grandson, Charles W. McCutchen, a student at Princeton University.

Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Email exchange March - February 2011 with Plainfield Historical Society

Sorry i did not get back to you sooner i asked George Weiss and Dot pollard about Oakwood; Dot said she will check her information. As far as the McCutchen family, The McCutchen foundation grants us money yearly. Charles McCutchen is our contact there and he has attended events here in the past.

Charles W. McCutchen
The McCutchen foundation
209 West Second Street
Plainfield, New jersey 07060-1215

This is contact info from 2006

The McCutchen Foundation
108 East G Street
Brunswick, MD 21716-1450

Perhaps more recent


––Original Message––
From: Plainfield Garden Club Information <info@plainfieldgardenclub.org>
To: levinetawhid@aim.com
Sent: Thu, Feb 10, 2011 7:07 pm
Subject: Fwd: Archive question


Hi Jesse:

Sarah Hull at the library was able to identify the Oakwood estate. See
below. Now we are wondering if any of our members were related to Robert
McCutcheon. Any clue? Thanks – Susan


–––––––––- Original Message ––––––––
Subject: Fwd: Archive question
From:
Date: Thu, February 10, 2011 4:53 pm
To: info@plainfieldgardenclub.org
––––––––––––––––––––––-

––Original Message––
From: Sarah Hull <sarah.hull@plfdpl.info>
To:
Sent: Thu, Feb 10, 2011 3:29 pm
Subject: re: Archive question


Hi Susan,

The Oakwood Estate was located at 1010 Plainfield Avenue and was owned by the Robert H McCutcheon family. The estate comprised most of the adjacent land between Plainfield Avenue and West Eighth Street.

It was later purchased by and became the home of Miss Emelyn B. Hartridge and the location of the Hartridge School Residence. The actual school was located at other locations throughout the years.

Miss Hartridge was a member and president (from 1924-1927) of the Monday Afternoon Club.

You can see more images here:
http://collections.plainfieldlibrary.info
/embed_browser/results;search
=Oakwood;type=photographs/

More about the school and an image here-
http://www.plainfieldlibrary.info
/OnlineExhibits/Education/LH_education2.html

Later Blueprints:
http://collections.plainfieldlibrary.info/collections_browser/search;
collection=blueprints/search_results;street
=Plainfield;collection=blueprints;_page
=2/blueprint;num=26;id=3868;_page=6/

Please let me know if you any more questions.

Thanks,
Sarah

Sarah Hull
Archivist
Plainfield Public Library
800 Park Avenue
Plainfield, NJ 07060
(908) 757-1111 ext. 136


From:
Sent: Thursday, February 10, 2011 2:06 PM
To: sarah.hull@plfdpl.info
Subject: Archive question



Hi Sarah:

I know this is probably not your department, but I have a question about a home titled "Oakwood" It was featured in Plainfield by John A. Grady and Dorothe M. Pollard.

It seems like a large estate with natural woodland. It is a Queen Anne
mansion and has a companion gatehouse which evidently both still stand today. Just trying to find out the location and possibly, the owner(s)

Please let me know who I should email or if I need to come in and dig
around. Thanks – Susan

The Drake House Museum -- Plainfield Historical Society

http://drakehousemuseum.tripod.com/id3.html


The Historical Society of Plainfield is committed to preserving the history, diversity, and culture of Plainfield and the surrounding areas through its collections, exhibits, lectures, and educational programs.
Please check this page, as we will be posting upcoming exhibits and events.

The Historical Society of Plainfield received an operating support grant from the New Jersey Historical Commission, a division of Cultural Affairs in the Department of State. Funding has been made possible in part by the McCutchen Foundation, the Plainfield Foundation, the Pond Foundation and the New Jersey Historical Commission, a Division of Cultural Affairs in the Department of State, through a grant administered by the Union County Division of Cultural and Heritage Affairs.

Family History

McCutchen Trace Association

The McCutchen Trace Association was established in in Franklin,Tennessee in 1973. We are is a non-profit, non-political, non-sectarian family association. Members include people with the surname McCutchen, McCutcheon, McCutchin, or McCutchan and those who have McCutchen ancestors. Members hail from many different family lines which may or may not be related. We publish two newsletters per year and host a reunion every 2 years.

Mary Isbella Simpson McCutchen, Plainsfield, NJ Obit Thomas McCutchen of NY (Plainfield, NJ) administrator
Charles Walter McCutchen Land Map Plainfield, NJ 1906 Thomas McCutchen of NY (Plainfield, NJ)

Family History

McCutchen Trace Association

The McCutchen Trace Association was established in in Franklin,Tennessee in 1973. We are is a non-profit, non-political, non-sectarian family association. Members include people with the surname McCutchen, McCutcheon, McCutchin, or McCutchan and those who have McCutchen ancestors. Members hail from many different family lines which may or may not be related. We publish two newsletters per year and host a reunion every 2 years.

Mary Isbella Simpson McCutchen, Plainsfield, NJ Obit Thomas McCutchen of NY (Plainfield, NJ) administrator
Charles Walter McCutchen Land Map Plainfield, NJ 1906 Thomas McCutchen of NY (Plainfield, NJ)

Vol. 33 No. 1 2009
2009 Reunion Update. Dalnashea:McCutchen home in N. Plainfield, NJ. McCutcheons from PA to Ohio and Beyond. The Descendants of James and Mary Ann Mossman McCutchan.

From the Green Brook Historical Society

Mr. Henry J. Lund

Born on a small farm in West Dunellen near the Buffalo Tank, Mr. Lund was the custodian of Washington Rock Park for 36 years - from 1926 to 1962. He lived in the "Lodge" on the mountain top which had been built for Pat Hickey, his predecessor. Pat also maintained a refreshment stand selling ice cream, candy, and soda to visitors.

The "Rock" was a favorite picnic spot for local residents and a popular sightseeing destination for out-of-towners. As a boy growing up on his father's farm, Henry worked during school vacations on a nearby 97-acre farm for 50 cents a day. He gave half of his wages to his mother.

During his tenure as custodian for the Park, Henry also served as a police officer on the Green Brook Police Force.

Mr. Lund also remembers when the Lodge originally belonged to the Washington Rock Park Association. It was purchased in 1911 by Charles McCutcheon of North Plainfield and maintained by the Continental Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

The Chapter, which was based in Plainfield and North Plainfield, furnished the Lodge with beautiful antiques and kept it as a museum. People from all over the State would come to visit. In 1913, the land and memorial was deeded to the State. By 1954, the number of visitors to the Rock had declined to the point that the Chapter decided to move the articles to other locations in the area where they would be displayed to a larger audience. Some of the items went to Rockingham, George Washington's headquarters at Rocky Hill, and others went to the Drake House in Plainfield.

McCutchen Genealogy

There is a article in the McCutchen Trace on Charles Walter's home in Plainfield, NJ. Charles Walker was a son of William Morris McCutchen and Eliza St. John.

Vol. 33 No. 1 2009
Dalnashea:McCutchen home in N. Plainfield, NJ.

Also working on the Spring 2011 issue and we have info on some descendants of Samuel St. John McCutchen and Helen Marsh through their son Roy Marsh.

http://genforum.genealogy.com
/mccutcheon/messages/1035.html

McCutchen Genealogy

Re: William Gould McCutchen 1828-1913

There is a article in the McCutchen Trace on Charles Walter's home in Plainfield, NJ. Charles Walker was a son of William Morris McCutchen and Eliza St. John.

Vol. 33 No. 1 2009
Dalnashea:McCutchen home in N. Plainfield, NJ.

Also working on the Spring 2011 issue and we have info on some descendants of Samuel St. John McCutchen and Helen Marsh through their son Roy Marsh.

http://genforum.genealogy.com
/mccutcheon/messages/1035.html

From www.artfact.com

Estimated Price: $_________
Realized Price: $_________

What is this symbol? This symbol indicates that this auction house has verified this price result.
Lot 663: Jasper Francis Cropsey (American 1823-1900) Greenwood Lake in the Autumn Signed J.F. Cropsey and Jasper Francis Cropsey - 1823-1900
Auction House: Weschler's
Auction Location: USA
Auction Title: American and European Fine Art and 2oth Century Decorative Art
Auction Date: 2002
+ Expand
Description: dated 1890 l.r.; also titled and inscribed in pencil on stretcher By J.F. Cropsey, N.A./Hastings-Upon-Hudson, N.Y./1891 u.r. and inscribed Charles McCutchen (?) and located Plainfield, NJ u.l. Oil on canvas 12 x 20 in (30.5 x 50.8 cm) Provenance: Suter Jammer of New York City and Cumberland, MD Mary Jammer Berry of Cumberland, MD (sister) Thomas N. and Dorothea H. Berry of Cumberland, MD (son) Note: This work will appear in the forthcoming catalogue raisonn‚ to be published by the Newington-Cropsey Foundation, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY.

1920's postcard from the Plainfield Library

http://collections.plainfieldlibrary.info/
collections_browser/search;collection
=postcards/search_results;district
=all;collection=postcards;date_range
=146;online_only=on/postcard;id=1284/

Postcard ID P-1284
Donor
Resource photograph
Condition used
City Watchung
Historic District
Publisher New Jersey Post Card Co., Inc., Newark, N.J

New Jersey Post Card Co., Inc., Newark, N.J. Monument and Steps, Washington Rock, Plainfield, N.J. Washington Rock, view of steps leading toward the monument and flagpole base

1920's postcard from Plainfield Library

back

1920's postcard from the Plainfield Library

http://collections.plainfieldlibrary.info
/collections_browser/search;collection
=postcards/search_results;date_range
=146;online_only=on;district=all;collection
=postcards;_page=2/postcard;id=1746/

Postcard ID R-1746
Donor Ricketts
Resource illustration
Condition used
City Watchung
Historic District
Publisher
Artist

Washington Rock near Plainfield, N.J. on which General Washington stood to get a view of the British Army in Revolutionary War Washington Rock, view from lower level of many people on both levels looking out at the view.

1920's postcard from the Plainfield Library

First Presbyterian Church of Plainfield

http://www.archive.org/stream
/historyoffirstpr00beal/historyoffirstpr00beal_djvu.txt

Contributors: Mrs. Charles McCutcheon

Hillside Cemetery

September 14, 2011
Photo by S. Fraser

Hillside Cemetery

September 14, 2011

As you approach the McCutchen marker, you walk up a hill and the marker is placed in such a position that in the background is the Watchung Mountain range and directly behind the Gaelic cross is Washington Rock.

November 14, 1895 New York Times

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive
-free/pdf?res
=FB0911FE355911738DDDAD0994D9415B8585F0D3

PLAINFIELD KIRMESS OPENED

In Aid of Muhlenberg Hospital – Good Attendance and Reason for Expecting Financial Success – The Booths.

PLAINFIELD, N. J., Nov. 13 – There was a grand opening of the kirmess at the Columbia Cycle Academy Monday night, and the building was decorated very elaborately.

Not since the charity ball have the society fold here been interested in a like event for such a worthy cause. The kirmess is given for the benefit of Muhlenberg Hospital, and, judging from the attendance at the opening night, the hospital will be greatly bettered financially.

Booths have been very prettily arranged about the academy, making an exceedingly tasty show. The equipment of the booths is as follows:

French Booth – Mrs. Albert Hoffman Atterbury, Mrs. Irving H. Brown, Mrs. Charles B. Corwin, Miss Bessie Ginna, Mrs. George C. Evans, Mrs. Charles J. Fisk, Mrs. Ellis W. Hedges, Miss E. E. Kenyon and Miss Whiton.

Florentine Booth – Mrs. I. N. Van Sickle, Mrs. David E. Titsworth, Mrs. W. M. Stillman, Mrs. John D. Titsworth, Mrs. F. A. Dunham, Miss Louise Clawson, Miss Bessie TItsworth, and Mrs. Lulu Lewis.

Gypsy Booth – Mrs. Joseph W. Reinhart, and Mrs. Howard Fleming.

Venetian Booth – Mrs. Hugh Hastings, Miss Emelie Schipper, Mrs. George A. Chapman, Miss Haviland, Mrs. Samuel Huntington, Mrs. Emil Woltman, Mrs. Samuel St. J. McCutchen, Mrs. Conklin, Mrs. C. S. West, Mrs. W. E. Lower, Miss E. R. Cock, Mrs. Frank O. Herring, Miss Huntington, Miss Maud Van Bosckerck, Miss MacCready, Miss Clara D. Finley, Miss Ahrens, Miss Aynne MacCready, Miss Mondanari, Miss Graff, Miss Yerkes, Miss Gertrude Walz, and Miss Pierson.

Japanese Booth – Mrs. Charles Seward Foote, Mrs. George Clay, Mrs. S.P. Simpson, Mrs. L. Finch, Mrs. Constantine P. Ralli, Mrs. William Lewis Brown, Mrs. L. Dennis, Mrs. WIlliam Pelletier, Miss Ellis, Miss Anthony, Miss Dryden, Miss Morgan, Miss Bowen, Miss Lawrence, and Miss Rodman.

Spanish Booth – Mrs. S. A. Cruikshank, Mrs. A. T. Slauson, Mrs. J. F. Wichers, Mrs. T. H. Curtis, Mrs. Marion S. Ackerman, Mrs. T. A. Hazell, Mrs. H. L. Moore, Mrs. D. T. Van Buren, Mrs. E. H. Mosher, Miss Harriott, Miss Louise Patton, Miss Maud Lord, Miss May Kirkner, Miss Louise Van Zandt, Miss Annie Horton, Miss Titsworth, and Miss Meredith.

German Booth – Mrs. Mason W. Tyler, Mrs. Logan Murphy, Mrs. John H. Oarman, Mrs. Charles J. Taggart, Mrs. Benjamin R. Western, Mrs. J. E. Turill, Mrs. Arthur T. Gallup, Mrs. Horsley Barker, Mrs. John Haviland, Mrs. George Wright, Mrs. Amra Hamragan, Mrs. William L. Saunders, Mrs. William Wright, Miss Annie Murphy, Miss Wright, Miss Western, Miss Bartling, Miss Helen Warman, Miss Emma Adams and Miss Ann Thorne.

Stationery Booth – Mrs. John Gray Foster, Mrs. Elliott Barrows, Mrs. A. W. Haviland, Mrs. John D. Miller, Mrs. James R. Joy, and Miss Emily R. Tracy.

Parisian Flower Stall – Mrs. Harry M. Stockton, Mrs. Evarts Tracy, Mrs. Daniel F. Ginna, Mrs. W. H. Ladd, Mrs. Frederick Yates, Miss Marlon Dumont, Miss Ginna, Miss Baker, Miss Huntington, and Miss Van Bosckerck.

Refreshments were dispensed by Mrs. Orville T. Waring, Mrs. George W. Van Bosckerck, Mrs. John Bushnell, Mrs. Gifford Mayer, Mrs. George H. Goddard, Mrs. Moore, Mrs. H. P. Reynolds, Mrs. C. C. Guion, Mrs. N. P. T. Finch, Mrs. Henry McGee, Mrs. De Revere, Mrs. Ruth C. Leonard, Mrs. George W. Rockfellow, Miss Annie Opdyke, Mrs. Van Alstyne, Mrs. Utzinger, Mrs. Nelson Runyon, Mrs. Henry Tapsley, Miss Martine, Miss Edith Allen, Mrs. J. Parker Mason, Mrs. J. K. Myers, Mrs. Walton, and Mrs. H. C. Adams

McCutchen Home in North Plainfield

The old McCutchen Home in North Plainfield, New Jersey.
(Matt Rainey/The Star-Ledger)

Photo by Dan Damon

McCutchen Celtic Cross with Washington Rock in the background.

October 20, 2011

Hillside Cemetery

October 20, 2011
Photo by S. Fraser

McCutchen Marker
The McCutchens were very proud of their Irish ancestory so it is no wonder that they placed a Celtic cross at the top of this hill. Their home at 21 Rockview in North Plainfield (once Plainfield) was named "Dalnashea" which in Gaelic translates to "Vale of Peace"

Mary Isabella McCutchen is best known for being the person to save Washington Rock in the Watchung Mountains. It struck us as very significant that the McCutchen marker would have the Washington Rock in the background.

Ted Turner took out his handy binoculars and confirmed that indeed one could spot the rock in the distance.

Hillside Cemetery

October 20, 2011
Photo by S. Fraser

Hillside Cemetery

October 20, 2011
Photo by S. Fraser

McCutchen Marker
Ted Turner shared with us a story that as a school boy in Plainfield, he had always heard that General George Washington stood on the rock and remarked, "I see a plain field."

Frank B. Bennett Company 1912

The Plainfield Trust Co.

On the fourth day of June, ten years ago, the Plainfield Trust Company of Plainfield, N.J., opened for business in an unpretentious store on one of the principal streets on that city. In three years, when by its aggressive methods it had acquired a deposit line of one and a half million dollars, it moved into its handsome building on Park avenue which it now occupies, and which is not only the most imposing edifice in Plainfield but is one of the finest banking houses in the State of New Jersey. In its new home the business of the institution has continued to prosper under the efficient management of its energetic and capable staff of officers until today the company reports deposits of four millions of dollars and a surplus and undivided profit account of two hundred and forty thousand dollars, or nearly two and a half times the amount of its capital.

In addition to the four million of deposits, the company has in its custody a million and a half of trust funds which are kept separate and apart from its assets. This trust business is but another indication of the confidence which the institution has won during the comparatively short period of its existence – a confidence that is based on the character of the service which has been rendered but on the personnel of its directors, all of whom are representative men in the community and who bring to the business the inspiration of some New York City's most important business activities as may be seen from the following:

LIST OF DIRECTORS
and their connections: J. Herbert Case, vice-president Franklen Trust Co., Brooklyn; Frederick Geller, attorny and counseller-at-law, New York; Augustus V. Heely, vice-president The Farmers' Loan and Trust Co., New York; James W. Jackson, executor of the Jesse Hoyt Estate, New York; Edward H. Ladd, Jr. & Wood Bankers, New York; Charles W. McCutchen, Holt & Co., Commision Merchants, New York; Henry A. McGee, Standard Oil Co., New York; Walter M. McGee, Vacuum Oil Co., New York; Charles A. Reed, attorney and counsellor-at-law, New York; Isaac W. Rushmore, dairy products, New York; Frank H. Smith, register Union County, Elizabeth, N.J., Samuel Townsend, president Peoples National Bank, Westfield, N.J., Cornelius B. Tyler, Tyler & Tyler, attorneys, New York; Lewis E. Waring, Edward Sweet & Co., bankers, New York; and Orville T. Waring, Standard Oil Co., New Jersey.

Mr. H. H. Pond, secretary of the company, assumed this position two years ago, and during his uncumbency the deposits have increased from about $2,750,000 to $4,000,000. Mr. Pond has also been president of the New Jersey Bankers Association during the past year and in that capacity has won many friends both for himself and for the institution which he represents.

The Plainfield Trust Company conducts a banking trust, special, safe deposit and "banking by mail" department. Through the latter the institution has extended its operation all over New Jersey, and there are few towns in the state in which some of its deposits may not be found.

http://books.google.com/books?id
=4wkhAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA2-PA44&lpg=RA2-PA44&dq=edward+h.+ladd+new+jersey&source
=bl&ots=dm0GnDDx-W&sig
=YQvKfBNAEj2-SnuL0oqvlP4dhJ8&hl=en#v
=onepage&q=edward%20h.%20ladd%20new%20jersey&f=false

1894 Washington Park, North Plainfield

A unique feature of social life in Washington Park, North Plainfield, is the Park Club. In it has been demonstrated the possibility of a mixed club of ladies and gentlemen. The club was organized in March 1892. It at once purchased and moved the picturesque clubhouse which had erected for it on Washington Avenue, bordering on Green Brook. Its first officers were: President-Samuel Townsend; Vice-President-William J. Roome; Treasurer-George P. Dupee; Secretary-William L. Saunders.

The scheme of the club orginated in the minds of a few gentlemen, neighboring residents of the park, led by Foster Milliken and W. J. Roome, and organization was determined upon. The consummation of the work, in the purchase of the land and the erection of a clubhouse was largely due to the untiring energy of Mr. Milliken, which kept alive a flagging interest and compelled success. By an expenditure of $10,000, the club owns an attractive brick and shingled house, having on the main floor, which opens upon the street level, a Gothic-roofed assembly room, card and committee rooms, besides a ladies' dressing room.

On the floor below are capacious billiard and bowling rooms, and, as the land slopes from the street to the brook, this lower floor opens upon the level of the club grounds, and looks out on the tennis courts. The membeship numbers 100, of whom 4 are ladies, but every gentelmen's membership gives full club rights (except vote) to the lady members of his household and his sons, when they are expected to become members in their own right. It is roughly estimated that the membership of 100 means that 300 are entitled to club priviledges.

The ladies freely avail themselves of these privileges, and their constant prescence and participation in the active life of the club make it unique in club history.

The favorite club night is Saturday and in the season, it is not an unusual event to have present seventy-five ladies enjoying the club sports or engaging in social chats. Bowling and pool are their favorite excercises below, while dancing, singing and whist are enjoyed up stairs. Under the House Committee, invitation dances are given at intervals during the season, and under Junior Entertainment Committee monthly informal invitation dances are given for the younger set. Tuesday morning is devoted to the ladies exclusively, and then they gather in large numbers for club sports, gossip and tea.

Washington park is a quiet community of homes. A man's club could in no way live there; the participation of the ladies in the life of the Park Club has made club life possible, and to them the club acknoledges its debt. The club has become the centre of the social life of the community, and has made household entertainmnet less imperative and less burdensome. It extends the acquaintance and association of all, and promotes prompt interest in and recognition of desirable newcomers into the neighborhood. The entire debt of the club is represented by $9.500 of 5 per cent bonds, running twenty years, but payable at any time, at the option of the club. It has no other debt, and maintains itself from its revenues, without deficit. Because of the constant presence of ladies and children, no wines or liquors of any kind are permitted upon any part of the club property.

The present officers are: President - St. St. J. McCutchenl Vice-President - B. A. Hegeman, Jr.; Treasurer - George P. Dupee; Secretary - George D. Hallock. Other Governors are Charles A. Reed, George C. Evans, George C. Worth, B.M. Day, and M. S. Taylor.

August 26, 1894 New York Times Article: Plainfield, City of Homes

Washington Park Historic District North Plainfield

SATURDAY: NORTH PLAINFIELD: WASHINGTON PARK HD HOUSE TOUR

Saturday, December 10, 4:00 - 9:00 PM. Tour starts at Church of the Holy Cross, corner of Washington and Mercer Avenues.

Founded in 1988, North Plainfield's only historic district will be featured in a Holiday house tour titled 'Architectural Treasures of North Plainfield'. Nine of the District's homes – mostly Victorians – will be featured, all dressed up for the Christmas holidays.

Tickets are $25 the day of the tour and may be purchased the Holy Cross Church, the tour's starting point, where maps will also be available.

http://washingtonpark.homestead.com/

Dear Washington Park Association:

Please link our website www.plainfieldgardenclub.org to your website. We
will do the same.

Plainfield Garden Club was established in 1915 and many of our early
members were residents of North Plainfield. You can read about the 250+
ladies on the website under "History"

Probably most notable was founding member Mrs. Charles Walter (Mary
Isabella Simpson)McCutchen '15

Other North Plainfield-Plainfield Garden Club Residents include:

Campbell Mabel C. Raper Mrs. William Hall 1928
Eaton Mary Winifred Parlin Mrs. Charles Aubrey 1915
Fleming Helen Hyde Mrs. Austin Lloyd 1919
Foster Fannie C. Groendyke Mrs. John Gray 1915
Hackman Elizabeth or "Betty" Reppert Mrs. Robert K. 1970
Howell Romaine Ray Mrs. Josephus H. 1922
Hyde Helen Miss 1917
Hyde Elilzabeth Kepler Mrs. Charles L. 1917
Hyde Carolyn Knowland Mrs. Frank de Lacey 1919
McGee Emma Louise Whiting Mrs. Henry Augustus 1922
McGee Sarah M. Howell Mrs. Henry Livingston "Harry" 1918
McGee Mary Alice Yerkes Mrs. Walter Miller 1922
Middledith Sarah Augusta Flanders Mrs. James F. 1920
Morison Fanny C. Lemmon Mrs. Nathaniel H. 1916
Murray Mrs. J. Everett 1920
Tingley Miss Dorothea 1932
Trewin Annette Mrs. C. Sidney 1945
Wells Mrs. Henry C. 1920
Wells Nancy G. Mrs. John R., Jr. 1957

We have just begun to post our archival information on line. If
interested, we could send you the addresses of these members. We are
always interested in learning more about them and welcome photographs of
their homes and gardens.

Enjoy the season -

The Ladies of the Plainfield Garden Club

December 14, 2011

Hillside Cemetery

December 14, 2011

Hillside Cemetery

December 14, 2011

Hillside Cemetery

Plainfield Public Library Archives

HONORED AT ANNIVERSARY LUNCHEON – Miss Margaret McCutchen, third from left, first president of the Plainfield College Club, receives announcement of the college scholarship named in her honor from president, Mrs. Louis Reinken, fourth from the left. Listening to the announcement are: left to right, Mrs. Patrick J. White, Mrs. Charles W. Buckelew, another original club members, Miss McCutchen, Mrs. Reinken, Mrs. Redman Cornell and Mrs. Harold W. Scherer, luncheon chairman. Mrs. White and Mrs. Cornell are wearing costumes that were in fashion 50 years ago.

March 14 1957

College Club, 50 Years Old, To Give New Scholarship

The Plainfield College Club celebrated its golden anniversary yesterday with the announcement of the Margaret W. McCutchen scholarship, in honor of the club's first president, a guest at the anniversary luncheon a the Plainfield Country Club.

The Margaret McCutchen scholarship, made possible by the growth of an endowment fund began in 1928, will be awarded to a senior high school girl in May.

College club president, Mrs. Louis W. Reinken, introduced Miss McCutchen, Mrs. Charles W. Buckelew, another funding leader and Mrs. Roy F. Macintyre, the club's only life member. Messages from other founding members wre read, including congratulations from Miss Harriet Goddard, first vice president, Miss Elsie Goddard and Mrs. William M. Stillman.

Past Presidents Introduced

Golden anniversary chairman and past president, Mrs. Harold W. Scherer, introduced past presidents of the college club who attended the luncheon: Mrs. Ellis Enander, Mrs. J. Harold Reppert, Mrs. Charles H. Hutchinson, Mrs. William Land, Mrs. Joseph Katrausky, Mrs. Frazier Graff, Mrs. Dwight Herrick and Mrs. James W. Smith.

Reminiscing through 50 years of history was done through a fashion parade by members, to the accompaniment of the college club Choral Group and the narration of Mrs. Robert Coates.

The choral group began a chorus of "School Days" and "Sweet Adeline" while Mrs. Coates said, "Looking across the gulf of two world wars, the America of 1906 seems young and far away . . . at this time a small group of enthusiastic and determined young women felt the need to encourage girls to enter college." This, she said, led to the founding of the Plainfield College Club with its first meetings "of a social nature, consisting of 'business,' a short play, skits or stunts, sometimes music, then tea."

Growth of Club Traced
This was the time too, when as


the parading models indicated members wore picture hats and dresses with leg of mutton sleeves.

Music, fashions and narrative traced the growth of the College Club through the First World War, when members did . . . work at home or overseas, . . . 20s, when it seemd for a . . .that interest in the club . . . But an end to war . . . a large membership drive . . .remedied the situation.

During the 20s, education . . grams gained in popularity in 1928, the College Club, had once shunned world . . .voted to endorse the reso . . urging Congress to endorse . . Kellogg Peace Treaty. In . . . the club affiliated with the . . . ican Association of Uni . . . Women, and during this . . . it grew rapidly and took . . . creasing part in state and . . . AAUW activities, including raising money for AAUW . . . lowship fund.

Throughout World War . . . club not only . . . scholarship aid and . . .lowship fund cont. . . raised money for . . . refugee children.

$500 Study Grant
In honor of its . . sary, the College Club . . . sented an annivesary . . .gift of $500 study . . . advanced scholar . . . Plainfield Branch . . . of "And we are proud, . . . Coates, "Of the five . . . now attending college . . . our aid." Since the . . . ship gift of $30 in . . . has loaned $3,850 and . . . right gifts of $25, 330 . . . girls needing collge.

She suggested that . . . duty in the future . . . "hold the doors wide

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfield Public Libraray Archives

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfielder Hurt When Hit by Car

Mrs. (scrached out and written "Miss") Margaret McCutchen of 1333 Watchung Ave., a pedestrian, suffered a cut forehead and shock yesterday when she was hit by a car operated by Malcolm Vonsaltza of 241 Amboy Ave., Metuchen.

Plainfield police said the accident occurred at Crescent and Park Aves. Vonsaltza was given a summons charging failure to permit a pedestrian to complete a crossing.

Mrs. McCutchen was taken to Muhlenberg Hospital by the Plainfield Rescue Squad for treatment.

Jan 12 1959

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfield Foun
First Woman to

J. Herbert Case, chairman of the Distribution Committee of the Plainfield Foundation announced the appointment yesterday of Miss Margaret W. McCutchen, as a member of that commitee. Miss McCutchen was appointed by Ralph J. Smalley, judge of the Common Pleas and Orphans Court of Somerset County. This is the first time a woman has been appointed to serve on this committee and Miss McCutchen's active participation in the civic and philanthropic work in the community well qualifies her to fill this post, said Mr. Case.

Miss McCutchen is a trustee of the Visiting Nurse Association, a nurse's aid at Muhlenberg Hosptial and has worked there in the Social Service Department. She is a former president of teh Women's Auxiliary Board of Muhlenberg Hospital and has served as trustee of the Community Chest and the Catherine Webster Home. She succeeds Judge Williams A. Coddington, who served as a member of the Distribution Committee for 15 years.

The Plainfield Foundation, a non-profit organization for public giving, was founded in 1920 by a group of public spirited citizens.

"The close of World War 2," said Mr. Case, "has brought a growing awareness of the human needs of the world and it is important that the people of Plainfield know just how the Plainfield Foundation can benefit . . . run in The Courier-News to acquant the public with the many advantages of leaving money through the Plainfield Foundation.

The need for which money is left by gift or will has in the past sometimes become obsolete or in some cases, even ceased to exist. Benjamin Franklin once left a fund for printers' apprentices. This fund lies idle today. The Plainfield Foundation was organized to meet changing conditions of the times and if money is left through the combined judgement of the distribution committee, which is composed of citizens who are fully aware of community needs, the funds left are used for a purpose that most closely conforms to the expressed wishes of the donor.

Many persons who would like to leave funds for welfare work in memory of loved ones, often feel that their gift is too small, but gifts from $100 up are welcomed by the Plainfield Foundation and a number of modest gifts often become a sizeable sum and can do a great deal of good.

"One of teh most urgent needs in our community today," said Mr. Case, "is a Home for old people where they can live the latter years of their lives, in comfort at a price they can afford. Another equally pressing need is a convalescent home were persons who can no longer remain in the hospital can . . .

Dec 8 1945

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfield Public Library Archive

Foundation 10.4.61

Will Establish Fund

A $40,000 gift under the will of the late Margaret Wilson McCutchen to establish the Margaret Wilson McCutchen Fund. One half of the income in this fund is to go annually to the Ladies Home of Plainfield, and the other half to the General Fund of the Plainfield Foundation for charitable purposed as determined by the foundation's distribution committee.

Plainfield Public Library Archives

May 3 1956

Old Area Names Recalled by . . .

Old names of area towns and streets in Plainfield, published in a Courier-News story Monday began ringing bells today in the memories of other longtime residents besides Walter I. (Fuzzy) Firstbrook, veteran newsman, who furnished inspiration for the first account.

Miss Margaret McCutcehn of 1333 Watchung Ave., daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. McCutchen . . .a member . . prominent . . .her father . . . figure in . . Plainfield and North Plainfield, either annexation or consolidation.

Added also to the account of former place and street names is the intelligence that Elm Pl., now Roosevelt Ave., once was "Water St." from E. Front St. to Green Brook.

The "Evona" section of Plainfield, general area of the Clinton Ave., railroad station, even . . .gave its name to Evona Ave., . . . existing.

The Courier-News will be . . . to hear from other residents . . .can add to the many name . . .nearby towns, streets, roads . . .locations which have passed folkore and have been repl . . . by more modern appellations.

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfield Public Library Archives

May 5 1961

Rites for Miss McCutchen Attended by Many Leaders

Fellow church members and associates from all phases of community activity attended funeral services for the late Miss Margaret W. McCutchen yesterday in the First Park Baptist Church. Miss McCutchen, who died Monday at the age of 79 in her home at 1333 Watchung Ave., had long been active in the religious, civic and charibable work.

The Rev. Glenn E. Hannemann, who conducted the rites, according to Miss McCutchen's own wishes, was assisted by the Rev. Harold R. Husted, D.D., former minister of the church.

Using as his theme, "Open Doors in Life," the Rev. Mr. Hannenman said one of the doors open to Miss McCutchen was that of understanding, and described her understanding of the meaning of life as a whole.

The second door was that of service. Th pastor spoke of Miss McCutchen's YWCA service in France during World War I, her contact with charitable organizations and her Church School teaching in the First Park Church. He said that wherever there was a need she could meet, Miss McCutchen was ready to help.

The third door was that which opens at the time of death. The pastor said there is assurance that through such faith as Miss McCutchen demonstrated, there is continuing and fruitful service yet to come. In accordance with Miss McCutchen's request, the Rev. Mr. Hannemann quoted the following passage fomr John Greenleaf Whittier's poem "Snowbound": "Live is ever lord of death, and love can never lose its own."

Arthur Schroff, minister of music of the church, sang a bass solo, Anton Dvorak's "Going Home," and Mrs. Schroff was the organist. The entire congregation sang one of Miss McCutchen's favorite hymns, "O God, Our Help in Ages Past."

Dr. Husted read selected Scriptures from the Old and New Testaments.

Interment was private, in Hillside Cemetery.

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Margaret McCutchen, 79, Dies; Did Civic Work

Miss Margaret W. McCutchen, 79, who long had been active in civic and charitable work here, died yesterday (May 1, 1961) in her home at 1333 Watchung Ave.

Miss McCutchen was born in her family's North Plainfield homestead, 21 Rockview Ave., Sept. 8, 1881, daughter of the late Charles W. and Mary I. S. McCutchen. Her father was in the export flour business, with Holt and Company, in New York. He was one of the organizers of the Plainfield Community Chest and the Plainfield Trust Company (now the Plainfield Trust State National Bank).

Miss McCutchen was graduated from Smith College in 1903. During World War I, she went to France for the YWCA to operate clubs for nurses in Army hospitals.

A long-time member of the First-Park Baptist Church of Plainfield, she also was a trustee of the Adirondack Community Church of Lake Placid, N.Y., where she had been a Summer resident since 1894.

Miss McCutchen was a member and first president of the Plainfield College Club. At the club's golden anniversary celebration in 1957 establishment of the Margaret W. McCutchen Scholarship in her honor, was announced.

Miss McCutchen also was a member of the Shakespeare Society for many years.

At various times she served on the governing bodies of Plainfield charitable organizations including Muhlenberg Hospital, the Visiting Nurses Association, the YWCA and the Catherine Webster Home. In 1945, she became the first woman to be appointed to the Distribution Committee of the Plainfield Foundation.

After the death of her mothe rin 1948, Miss McCutchen gave the old family residence in Rockview Ave. to the Religious Society of Friends to be used as a shome for elderly people.

Surviving are a brother, Brunson S. McCutchen, and a nephew, Charles W. McCutchen, both of Princeton.

Funeral services will be held at 2:30 p.m. Thursday in the First-Park Baptist Church. The Rev. Glenn E. Hannemann, pastor, will officiate, assited by the Rev. Harold R. Husted, D.D., former minister of the church. Intermnet will be private, in the family plot in Hillside Cemetery.

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfield Public Library Archives

New York Times June 3, 1911

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res
=FB0D17F73F5D16738DDDAA0894DE405B818DF1D3

THREE CEREMONIES FOR MISS HEGEMAN

Bride of Baron Podmaniczky First Married by Plainfield Mayor and Then in Church

ANOTHER CIVIL CEREMONY

Hungarian Vice Consul to Officiate Before Couple Sail for Europe Today – Reception at Dalnashea

The wedding of Miss Virginia Hegeman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Arrowsmith Hegeman of New York and Plainfield, and Baron Tibor Podmaniczky of Budapest, Hungary, took place yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock in the Church of the Holy Cross, North Plainfield, N. J. Prior to the religious ceremony a civil marriage was performed by Mayor Newton B. Smalley of North Plainfield, at Dalnashea, the residence of C. W. McCutcheon, where the wedding reception and supper were also held.

The Rev. Dr. E. Vicars Stevenson, rector of the Grace Church, Plainfield, performed the service at the church, which was thronged with society folk, among the guests being Alexander von Nuber, the Hungarian Vice Consul at New York, Mrs. Albert S. Church of New York was matron of honor and Miss Alice B. McCutcheon of Greenwich, Conn., maid of honor. The bridesmaids were Miss Margaret McCutcheon of Plainfield and Miss Jessica S. Marshall of Duluth, Minn. Harold A. Hegeman, brother of the bride, was best man, and the ushers were Peter B. Matthews, Rougier Thorne, Howard L. C. Roome, and Clarence S. Roome. The wedding marches were played by Will S. O'Brien, organist and choirmaster of Holy Cross. The bride's father gave her in marriage.

The bride's gown was of moire antique silk, which was worn by her grandmother, Mrs. Charles Matthews, at her marriage, and the bocice was or point duchess lace worn by her mother at her wedding. The court train of satin matched the gown. The veil was of rare old honiton lace. The bride carried a shower bouquet of lilies of the valley and white orchids. The others in the bridal party were gowned in apple green chiffon over pale green satin, and they wore poke bonnets and carried bouquets of Tausendonchon roses.

Following the reception the couple left for New York, and will sail for Europe today after the Hungarian Vice Consul has performed another civil ceremony. They will reside at Freiberg, Germany, the Baron being a medical student in the university at that city. The bride's father is President of the United States Metal and Manufacturing Company of 165 Broadway, and is a former Mayor of North Plainfield.

Mary Isbella McCutchen

And her family, husband Charles

NOTE: This may not be the Mary Isabella McCutchen from North Plainfield, NJ

New York Times June 7, 1915

McCutchen – One June 4, at his home, Belmar, New Jersey, Samuel St. John McCutchen aged 66 years. The funeral service will be held at the residence of his brother, Charles W. McCutchen, 29 Rockview Avenue, Plainfield, New Jersey, on Monday, June 7 at 3 P.M. Interment private.

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res
=F30912FE3B5C13738DDDAE0894DE405B858DF1D3

May 30, 1910 New York Times

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F50E16FE355D16738DDDA90B94DD405B808DF1D3

PLAINFIELD SHOW DRAWS GOOD HORSES

First Big Eastern Open Air Exhibition Opens Thursday with Many Entries

The Plainfield Horse Show, which opens Thursday at Plainfield, N.J., marks the opening of the Summer circuit. From a one=day exhibition it has grown into one of th emost important open-air affairs held in the East, as many of the most prominent horseowners in the East will be represented. It is a probable that Paul A. Sorg will drive his coach with a party of friends daily from the Holland House to the show grounds.

The entry list totals more than 400 and all the popular classes are included. The roadsters enterered are W.J. Butterfield's Dreamwold Devil, Charles W. McCutcheon's Willie Direct, Louis Schmieder's Ceceilia Bellini, Henry C. Price's Marjorie Wilkes, and Emil Seely's Carl Wilkes.

The heavy harness horses are well represented by Joseph J. Ryan's Whitby Jet, Recall; W. G. Forster's Sporting Duchess, Lord Forest; Paul A. Sorg's Tease, Tormen, Dignity, Manhattan King, Pilgrim, Pioneer, Puritan Maid, Precise, Vanity Fair; Ivanbrook Farm's Peter Pan, Edward Griffith's Thunderere, Kuhn-Rohlig's Beauty, Mrs. F. G. Hall's Comet and Fluerette, Emil Seelig's Peter Pan, Sunshine, and Midget; George Watson's Florham Surprise, Florham Romance, Florham Phenomenal, Florham Rotentate, Florham Regent, and Florham Royal; Robert A. Fairbairn's Golden Rod, De Witt C. Flanagan's Rataplan, Prince Charming, Lord Russell; S.K, Farrington's Humboldt, Tonzo Sauvage's Littel Prince, Grand Duke; Miss Annie L. Seward's Chunky, Charles W. McCutchen's Piccadilly Sweetheart, Jeane d'Arc, All Ablaze; Belton Farm's Irvington Tom Trot, Irvington Leading Girl, Albin Trojan's Peter Paul; Sandy Point Farm's Phoebe Watton, Lord Brooke, Silfield Lillie and Aquidneck.

The ponies in the harness entries are Miss Gladys Constance Herbert's Bo-Beep, Belton Farm's Irvington Peggy, T. Douglas Robinson's Doncaster Model, Peter Hauck, Jr.'s, Jack Sprat, Miss Mabel B. Holly'es Little Corporal, and Paul A. Sorg's Vanity Fair.

The saddle horses and ponies under saddle are Kuhn-Rohlig's Wotan, Senta, Beauty, Tommy; Mrs. A. Browning Prentice's Ginita, Charles W. McCutchen's All Ablaze, Mrs. W. A. McGibgon's Rosalind, W. A. McGibbon's Belle Terre, Nettletown, and Portchester; A. C. Vail's Inkling, Miss Grace F. Antony's St. Valentine, Ivanbrook Farm's Peter Pan, Aeroplane; Andrew Morison's Sonia, Black Diamond; Tichenor-Grand Company's Wood Pigeon, Philip; T. G. Plant's Lady Lightfoot, Somerset Farm's Royalist, Roslyn, Lady Idol; Joseph M. Byrnes's Bourbon Bay, Torne Brook Farm's Jester, Mrs. James B. McKay's Lady Debonair, Jack Frost; Hugh Gormley's Pretty Polly, Maid of Erin; Mrs. Thoas J. Regan's Sarno, Godfrey Preese's Watchful, Howard W. Beebe's Snip, Castlewall Stables' Fairy Queen . . . .

June 6, 1915 New York Times

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F10A15F9345A12738FDDAF0894DE405B858DF1D3

Samuel St. John McCutcheon

Samuel St. John McCutcheon, a lawyer, and a member of the firm of Fletcher, McCutcheon & Brown of 128 Broadway, died on Thursday at his Summer home at Belmar, N.J., in his sixty-seventh year. He graduated from Yale University with the class of 1877, and for fifteen years was a member of the State Board of Education. His widow, and two sons survive him. Mr. McCutcheon had lived in Plainfield, N.J., for many years.

January 12, 1896 New York Times

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F00914F9395515738DDDAB0994D9405B8685F0D3

A WEEK'S EVENTS IN PLAINFIELD.; Numerous Receptions – Doings of Clubs and Societies.

PLAINFIELD, Jan. 11. – A reception was given by Mrs. I C. Pierson of Watchung Avenue, Tuesday evening. She was assisted in receiving by her daughters, Mrs. Malcolm MacKenzie of New-York and Miss Mabel Pierson; Miss Corbitt of New-York, Miss Cochran of Wilmington, Del., and Miss Hunter of North Adams, Mass.

The members of the North Plainfield Dramatic Club were entertained at the home of Mr. and Mrs. James E. Bailey, Jackson Avenue, Tuesday evening. Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. Andrew E. Keneey, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Neeley, Mr. and Mrs. James Harper, Miss Mary Hughes, Miss Ellen Mullon, and Frank Off.

A Past Master's jewel was presented to Calvin H. Rugg of Jerusalem Lodge, F. and A.M., Tuesday evening. The same evening John J. Lynch, for several years President of the Plainfield Catholic Club, was presented with a gold-headed cane by the members of the club.

A. D. Shepard and family of the Gables have gone to Buckingham, New York, for the Winter.

The class of '96 of the North Plainfield school was entertained by Miss Emma and Miss Bertha Stevens Wednesday evening.

Mrs. John Valiant of Craig Place gave a reception and tea Wednesday. She was assisted in receiving by Mrs. H.K. Carroll, Mrs. A. A. Tafty, Mrs. F. H. Randolph, Miss Grace Carroll, Miss Bessie Valiant, Miss Florence Valiant, and Miss Mary Steiner.

The Park Club gave an entertainment Wednesday night at the clubhouse on Washington Avenue. The patronesses were Mrs. C. A. Reed, Mrs. Samuel St. John McCutcheon, and Mrs. J. H. Howell.

Miss Imogene See of Sing Sing, N.Y., is a guest of Mrs. Elmer E. Runyon of Madison Avenue.

Miss Eda Mills of Summit Avenue gave a party to her friends Wednesday night.

Miss Mollie Lawrence of New York and Miss Mather of Bound Brook are guests of Mr. and Mrs. Marion S. Ackerman of Crescent Avenue.

Miss Emily Coriell of Church Street is visiting in Brooklyn.

Miss Edith Allen of Webster Place is spending the Winter in Flushing.

Mrs. J. H. Ackerman and daughter, Lydia, have returned from a two month's trip to the Pacific coast.

Miss Randolph, daughter of Thompson F. Randolph of New-York, is visiting her sister Mrs. Judson Bonnell of East Front Street.

Mrs. Lewis of Binghampton, N.Y., is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. D. F. Ginna of Watchung Avenue.

Miss Rachel Fay Buckley of Newburg, N.Y., and Harry Ellis Green of Plainfield were married Wednesday night at the bride's home.

Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Moore of Ithaca, N.Y., are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. George Squires of North Plainfield.

Miss Laura J. Runyon of East Fifth Street is visiting friends in Philadelphia.

Miss Harriet Loomis of New York City is a guest of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Morse of Franklin Place.

Miss Josie Burlingham of Albany Normal College is a guest of ex-Councilman Seymore G. Smith of Crescent Avenue.

Miss Jennie Foster of New York and Howard Foster of Princeton Colelge are guests of D. N. Groendyke of Mercer Avenue.

Miss Helen L. Moore of New York is the guest of her sister Mrs. S. A. Cruikshank, of Belvidere Avenue.

Miss Freeman of Rahway is visiting her aunt, Mrs. W. C. Ayres, of West Second Street.

Miss Baldwin of Baltimore has gone home, after a visit with her uncle Councilman J. H. Valiant of Craig Place.

Howell Division, no. 97, Sons of Temperance, celebrated its twenty-seventh anniversary Wednesday evening. AMong those present form the out of tow were A. P. Sutphen of Somerville, Grand Worthy Patriarch Ross Slack of Excelsior Division of Trenton, Past Grand Worthy Patriarch Fred Day of Newark and Worthy Patriarch Evenson of Newark, and Worthy Patriarch Evenson of Philadelphia. James J. Perine of Brooklyn is the only living charter member of the division.

Mrs. Yerkes, wife of the Rev. Dr. D. J. Yerkes of the First Baptist Church, has gone to Greenville, S.C., to visit a daughter.

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest R. Ackerman, who are making a tour around the world, are now at Hongkong.

1948 Check Book

No. 742
Dec. 1, 1948
Garden Club of America
Redwood Grove
in memory of Mrs. McCutcheon
Mrs. Eaton and Mrs. Huntington
$15.00
stopped payment

No. 743
Dec. 1, 1948
Mrs. Yones Arai
to pay for flowers used
in arrangements for lecture
$22.60

No. 744
Dec. 1, 1948
Interstate Printing Corp.
stamped envelopes for mailing
horticultural letter
$26.45

In left margin:

Dec. 3 Dues (Mrs. Walter McGee) 15.00

1950 Check Book

No. 829
Mar. 31, 1950
S. S. Pennock Co.
for vases for Lyons
from Hosp. Services Acct.
$17.00

No. 830
Mar. 31, 1950
Garden Club of America
in memory of Mrs. McCutcheon (Redwood Grove)
Mrs. Eaton and Mrs Huntington
this check is to replace
chk # 742 drawn 12/1/48
$15.00

Not to be counted in this years expense already account for 1948

No. 831
May 10, 1950
Garden Club of America
1949 Founders Fund
contribution
from Reserve
$22.00

DAR

1901 Directory of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution

1. Continental Chapter - Plainfield
Organized January 23, 1896; Members, 36 (New York, 2; Kentucky, 1)

Regent, Mrs. C. W. McCutchen
1st Vice-Regt., Mrs. Rowland Cox
2nd Vice-Regt., Miss Eliza E. Kenyon
Secretary, Mrs. J. Kirtland Myers
Treasurer, Mrs. J. G. Foster
Registrar, Mrs. D. H. Rowland

Residence of C. W. McCutchen, 21 Rockview Avenue

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

"Oakwood," The Resident Department of the Hartridge School -- Main House

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

The Entrance "Oakwood"

The Oakwood Estate was located at 1010 Plainfield Avenue and was owned by the Robert H McCutcheon family. The estate comprised most of the adjacent land between Plainfield Avenue and West Eighth Street.

It was later purchased by and became the home of Miss Emelyn B. Hartridge and the location of the Hartridge School Residence. The actual school was located at other locations throughout the years.

Miss Hartridge was a member and president (from 1924-1927) of the Monday Afternoon Club.

You can see more images here:
http://collections.plainfieldlibrary.info
/embed_browser/results;search=Oakwood;type
=photographs/

More about the school and an image here-
http://www.plainfieldlibrary.info/
OnlineExhibits/Education/LH_education2.html

Later Blueprints:
http://collections.plainfieldlibrary.info
/collections_browser/search;collection
=blueprints/search_results;street
=Plainfield;collection=blueprints;_page
=2/blueprint;num=26;id=3868;_page=6/

Please let me know if you any more questions.

Thanks,
Sarah

Sarah Hull
Archivist
Plainfield Public Library
800 Park Avenue
Plainfield, NJ 07060
(908) 757-1111 ext. 136

Oakwood
I spent 4 wonderful years at Oakwood. It was the Hartridge School. When my mother was at Hartridge, in the 30's classes were held on Park Ave which ultimately became the Park Hotel Annex (the Park Hotel was quite a spiffy place in its day, before it became a home for the homeless). The school was across the street They went to Oakwood for sports and I don't know what else. The whole school finally moved there. It was a victorian mansion with the most incredible plaster work on the ceilings. When you were board you could just look up and gaze at cupids and flowers. The upstairs French classroom was especially interesting. I haven't been there in a long time. It was sold o a religious group I think in the 70's or 80's


.If you like we could go visit someday when we are at the garden because it isn't too far. It is on Plainfield Ave. It probably doesn't look like much now. It was never beautiful but the school was a happy inspiring place I loved it.
xoxo S.
circa 2011

Caretakers Lodge, Washington Park and View From Washington Rock

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

October 14, 2012

Washington Rock State Park turning 100 this weekend

An excerpt from the article in the Courier News . . .

"The people of Plainfield and North Plainfield saved the Rock," explained Nancy Piwowar, local historian and a trustee of the Historical Society of Plainfield.

It says so right there on the plaque, a replacement forged in 1966 to replace the 1912 plaque that was presumed stolen by vandals. The replacement reads that the dedication of the park was made by the Continental Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and "the people of Plainfield and North Plainfield," which appears alongside the words "lest we forget."


"The People" can be translated into founding Plainfield Garden Club Member Mrs. Mary McCutchen. Mrs. McCutchen may have shared the praise with her neighbors, but it was her pocketbook that saved Washington Rock.

A History of the McCutchen

http://www.plainfieldquakers.org/history/mcutchen.asp

Rahway & Plainfield Friends (Quaker) Meeting
(Rahway & Plainfield Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends)
225 Watchung Avenue
Corner of Watchung Avenue & East 3rd Street
Plainfield, NJ 07060
(908) 757-5736


BEGINNINGS
In February, 1950 some Friends in Philadelphia informed a few Friends in New York, who were already active as a committee of New York Monthly Meeting, searching for property and facilities which could be made available for the use of Elderly Friends in the New York Area, that a property in North Plainfield, New Jersey had been offered to Philadelphia Friends for such a purpose.
On February 22. 1950. a few New York Friends met Richmond P. Miller of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting in North Plainfield, New Jersey and visited with Miss. Margaret W. McCutchen in her home which later became The McCutchen Boarding Home.

A few days later a small group of New York Friends met at the Penington, a Boarding Home on East 15th Street, Manhattan with a few Friends from Philadelphia Yearly Meeting to give further consideration to the possibility of New York Friends accepting what they were at this time informed would be offered by the owner, to New York Yearly Meeting.

The New York Monthly Meeting Committee Friends felt the project now required the inclusion of a larger geographical area and forthwith gave all the information to a regular Meeting of the Representative Committee of New York Yearly Meeting held at the East 15th Street Meeting House on February 26, 1950, when the following Minute was recorded (Pages 9 and 10, 1950 Yearly Meeting Proceedings) :


An offer of a spacious residence and grounds at North Plainfield, New Jersey as a home for elderly Friends was made to Philadelphia Yearly Meeting. Since Philadelphia Yearly Meeting did not need such a home, it offered the use of the property to New York Yearly Meeting, on condition that we carry on the business transaction through their Meeting. Real interest was expressed in such an undertaking if full control of the property could be centered in New York Yearly Meeting. Believing that such an arrangement could be worked out, it was approved that a committee be appointed for further investigation, the membership of the committee to include the membership of a committee previously appointed by the New York Monthly Meeting to find a suitable place for a Friends Home and a representation from the whole Yearly Meeting. The Nominating Committee was asked to suggest names, and the following members were appointed to a Committee on a Friends Home:

Howard E. Kershner, Stephen L. Angell, Carleton H. Vail, Martha Mott Fraser, Charles B. Llewellyn, J. Paul Satterthwaite, Blanche E. Brown.

New York Monthly Meeting Committee
Ruth E. Buckwell, Harold A. Marshall, Elizabeth M. Cooper, Lenore B. Stoughton, Daisy E. Hawkshurst, Philip V. Stoughton, John Judkyn, Horace R. Stubbs, Allen H. Magill, Lydia F. Taylor, Grace W. Magill, Ella H. Williams, Lila Merritt

Genealogy of the Wilson-Thompson Families

MARY ISABELLA SIMPSON, eldest daughter
of Josiah and Harriet (St. John) Simpson, born May 6,
1855, married April 28, 1880, Charles Walter McCutchen,
son of William M. and Eliza (St. John) McCutchen, born
January 5, 1845. They reside at Plainfield, New Jersey.

Issue of Charles Walter and Mary I. (Simpson) Mc-
Cutchen.

960. Margaret Wilson McCutchen, b. Sept. 8, 1881.

961. Charles St. John McCutchen, b. Mch. 24, 1888;

d. Sept. 1, 1891.

962. Branson Simpson McCutchen, b. Nov. 20, 1892.

1909 New York Tribune

Article on Somerset horse show with Miss Margaret McCutchen and her horse, All Ablaze.

www.grayeagles.org

From the New York Times: Lawrence Mead Jr., Aerospace Engineer, Dies at 94

By DENNIS HEVESI
Published: August 30, 2012
Lawrence Mead Jr., the aerospace engineer who led the design team for the A-6 Intruder, the bulky twin-engine jet that served as the Navy's primary attack bomber for more than three decades, died on Aug. 23 in New Haven. He was 94. His son Lawrence Mead III confirmed his death.
photo credit: Olin Mills
Lawrence Mead Jr., a senior vice president of the Grumman Aerospace Corporation (now Northrop Grumman).
Lawrence Mead Jr., a senior vice president of the Grumman Aerospace Corporation (now Northrop Grumman) and design chief for the A-6 Intruder in the late 1950s. His son Lawrence Mead III confirmed his death.
Mr. Mead, a senior vice president of the Grumman Aerospace Corporation (now Northrop Grumman), was named design chief for the A-6 Intruder in the late 1950s. Five years after its introduction in 1960, the A-6 was flying bombing missions off aircraft carriers in the Gulf of Tonkin during the Vietnam War.
"Not sleek, never beautiful, the A-6 would soon prove itself to be a masterpiece of aeronautical engineering," Grumman World, a company publication, wrote in 1992 when the last A-6 was delivered to the Navy. Equipped with a pioneering digital navigation system, it "became the Navy's workhorse bomber and the Marines' primary ground support aircraft in Vietnam."
Weighing approximately 25,000 pounds, with a wingspan of about 50 feet, the A-6 was capable of cruising at about 500 miles an hour while carrying up to 18,000 pounds of bombs. "That was a tremendous amount," said Joshua Stoff, curator of the Cradle of Aviation Museum in Garden City, N.Y. "That's why it was very successful in the Vietnam War."
In part because of a wing-to-wing aluminum alloy beam, the bulky jet could bear that weight and its rugged fuselage while still being able to take considerable enemy fire. And with the attack-navigation system incorporated by Mr. Mead and his team, ground troops could be covered through cloudy skies and even at night. The midwing jet detected and attacked enemy vehicles traveling at night along the Ho Chi Minh Trail, North Vietnam's supply line to the south.
Over the A-6's 32-year history, Grumman built more than 700 of the planes. They flew combat sorties over Grenada and Lebanon in 1983 and during the first Persian Gulf war – "a remarkably long and successful service life," Mr. Stoff said.
"When we won the contract," Mr. Mead told Plane News in 1980, "we thought that it would be successful if we could sell 100 Intruders."
The A-6 was just one of Mr. Mead's accomplishments. He was a member of the Grumman team that designed the Apollo lunar module that carried Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to the surface of the moon on July 20, 1969. He was also one of the chief designers of the F-14 Tomcat, the fighter featured in the hit movie "Top Gun." Lawrence Myers Mead Jr. was born in Plainfield, N.J., on May 11, 1918, to Lawrence and Eleanor Machado Mead, but spent much of his childhood in China, where his parents were missionaries. After returning to the United States, Mr. Mead graduated from Princeton in 1940 with a degree in engineering. He earned a master's degree there in 1941. Soon after, he was hired by Grumman, which at the height of World War II had more than 25,000 workers at its complex in Bethpage, on Long Island. Mr. Mead worked on the design teams for Navy fighters like the Hellcat and the Bearcat.
Besides his son Lawrence, he is survived by two other sons, Kirtland and Bradford; two sisters, Elizabeth Bolton and Margaret McCutchen; nine grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. His wife of 59 years, the former Janet Chase, died in 2001.
Mr. Mead never piloted a plane, though he sometimes sat in the navigator's seat. In recent years he conducted tours at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum, aboard the World War II aircraft carrier Intrepid on the Hudson River in Manhattan – making sure, of course, to highlight the features of the A-6 Intruder.

See: Mead, Mrs. Frederick Goodhue (Marie Louise Myers) '15

October 12, 2012 Green Brook to Celebrate Washington Rock Centennial

http://greenbrooknj.com/main6_03.htm

Excerpt from the great history of Washington Rock:

Charles W. and Mary I. S. McCutchen, of North Plainfield purchased the 10 acres containing the two rocks to "prevent it from becoming a crushed stone quarry," acquiring about 20 acres from Arlene F. Carpenter by deed on 5/10/1909 (Bk V-11, p. 463) and 7 acres from Henry and Barbara Pedeflous on 5/19/1909 (Bk W-11, p. 61) On Nov. 29, l913, they offered the state a total of 27 acres for $1 and conveyed it on Dec. 1, l913 (Bk Z-13, p. 322). The McCutchens' gift followed the creation of the Washington Rock Park Commission by the State Legislature in on March 27, 1913. The bill, introduced by Senator Smalley, empowered the governor to appoint a Commission and $5,000 to acquire adjoining lands up to 100 acres "to take over, care for, keep, improve, maintain and develop the said lands as a public park in commemoration and appreciation of the importance of the events transacted in said locality during the Revolutionary War."

The gift from the McCutchens plus land purchased by the Commission brought the tract to 97 acres. The latest New Jersey park literature lists the present park as containing 45 acres, something of a mystery since additional lands were acquired as late as 1966 from Henry and Marie Grapenthin and from Sherwin Drobner in 1976. For $4,600 the State erected a building known as "The Lodge" in 1914 for the use of the caretaker which also doubled as a public "tea room". The building is a picture book Dutch colonial country farm house and is supposed to have been built on the old Mountain House hotel site. The architect, Henry Keith White, donated the plans. The DAR's Continental Chapter donated antique furnishings for the tea room, which was open daily from 3 to 6pm. "As a matter of fact, if visitors give sufficient notice, by telephone or otherwise, to the care-taker or his wife, a more substantial luncheon will be prepared at any time," wrote the Historical Quarterly. How much the tea room was put to use is open to some question, but we do know that in more recent years the building had served only as the caretaker's residence. With the cut back in State funding, even that function has ceased and the park has fallen on hard times. Its supervision has now been assigned to the distant Liberty State Park Office, which sends an employee to the site irregularly. Most recently, Green Brook Township Committeeman John Koch has been trying to save the park by getting the Somerset County Park Commission to take over its maintenance. Its status and fate is yet to be decided. In the interim the Green Brook Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts and students in the Social Service Club of the Green Brook Middle School have volunteered to clean up the litter.

The Trudeau Institute

03.21.12 - Trudeau Institute awarded $40,000 in unrestricted funds from The McCutchen Foundation
Saranac Lake, N.Y. – Dr. Charles W. McCutchen of Bethesda, Md., and Lake Placid recently contributed $40,000 in unrestricted funds to the Trudeau Institute through The McCutchen Foundation. A retired physicist with deep ties to the Adirondacks, McCutchen is a longtime supporter of the Institute.

McCutchen has been summering at Lake Placid since he was a child. His grandfather, Charles Walter McCutchen (1845-1930), a partner in the export flour merchant Holt & Co., bought Camp Pinafore from prominent Brooklyn businessman Edward B. Bartlett in 1894, changing the camp's name to Asulykit, a cheerful, if obscure, rendering of Shakespeare's "As You Like It." (McCutchen's grandmother was a member of the Shakespeare Society of Plainfield, N.J., where the McCutchens were well-known citizens.)

The younger Charles McCutchen grew up in Princeton, N.J., and attended The Lawrenceville School, followed by Princeton, Brown and Cambridge Universities. McCutchen contributes to several North Country organizations. He explained that, in 2009, when Trudeau was seeking funding for a confocal microscope, it found him a ready-made target. In 1959, while trying without success to "spin-flip free electrons" at Cambridge, a chain of lucky breaks had led him to realize why the structure of joint cartilage made it slippery. Trying to see holes McCutchen was certain had to be present in cartilage, he built the one and only refractometer microscope. To understand how it operated, he looked into optical theory and, pursuing a distraction, realized that a confocal, scanning, fluorescence microscope, which did not then exist, would provide sharper pictures than ordinary microscopes. His findings were published in 1967. A little more than 40 years later, he chipped in $30,000 toward the Institute's purchase of just such an instrument. (The holes in cartilage turned out to be too small to be seen with an optical microscope.)

The Trudeau Institute is an independent, not-for-profit, biomedical research organization, whose scientific mission is to make breakthrough discoveries leading to improved human health. Trudeau immunologists are committed to making breakthrough research discoveries that will prevent and treat cancer, asthma, allergy, arthritis, colitis, multiple sclerosis, and infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis, influenza and sepsis.

The Institute is supported by federal and state grants, and contributions from individuals, corporations and private foundations like The McCutchen Foundation.

####

Nelson's Biographical Cyclopedia of New Jersey Volume 2

The house of Holt & Company was founded in 1802, and has continued for over a century in the manufacture and sale of its well known brands of flour for the markets of the West Indies, Central America and South America, handling flour especially adopted to those tropical climates. The founder was Stephen Holt, who came here from New London, Connecticut, and engaged in this line of commerce. He was successful from the beginning, and in a short period of time the business assumed proportions of some importance. The firm name became Stephen Holt & Company, and was known by that title for several years. When the elder Mr. Holt died the name was changed to Philetus H. Holt, who was the sone of the founder. In 1852 it was altered to Holt & Company, its present style, and now (1913) Philetus H. Holt, a great-grandson of the founder of the firm, is an active member of the same. From the beginning their products were in great demand, the extent of their business showing a steady increase with the advancing years, and they are now firmly established throughout the breadth of this continent, West India Islands, and South America.

Mr. McCutchen's connection with the house of Holt & Company has brought him into some prominence in relation to the American export trade, and he is also active in various other enterprises. The Corn Exchange Bank of New Jersey, and the People's National Bank of Westfield, New Jersey, include him as a director in their several boards, while he is director, secretary and treasurer of the Adirondack Company. He is also a member of the New York Produce Exchange, the Maritime Exchange of New York and the Chambe of Commberce of the State of New York. He is a trustee of the University of Rochester, New York, and the Peddie Institute of Hightstown, New Jersey. He holds membership in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the New England Society of New York, the Union League Club, Atlantic Yacht Club, National Arts, Plainfield Country, Park Golf and Lake Placid Yacht Clubs. He is Republican in politics, but has never sought or held public office, preferring to devote his time to other interests. He derives his chief pleasure from travel and his trips have included several excursions to Europe, going out the beaten paths as far as possible, to the Pacific Coast, to the West Indies, South America, Egypt, etc, from which he has gained considerable experience and knowledge.

Mr. McCutchen married, April 28, 1880, Mary Isabella Simpson, at Annapolis, Maryland. Children: Margaret Wilson and Brunson Simpson. The family home is at Plainfield, New Jersey, where he has resided since his removal there in 1867, and they have a summer residence at Camp Asulykit, Lake Placid, New York.

October 20 - 21, 2012 Centennial Celebration of Washington Rock

Dan Damon's Blog

Plainfield's Drake House Museum will join 24 other Union County museums and historic sites this weekend in the annual 'Four Centuries in a Weekend' celebration.

A special exhibit and gallery talk offered at the Drake House highlight how Plainfield and North Plainfield residents came together to save Washington Rock as a historic site when it was in danger of succumbing to development. Now a State Park, Washington Rock is celebrating its 100th birthday this year.

The 'Four Centuries' events take place throughout the County on Saturday from 10 AM to 5 PM and Sunday from Noon to 5 PM.

The events is conveniently organized into clusters of related themes for those who wish to focus more closely. The Drake House is listed under two themes: the Revolutionary War experience, and Victorian life and times.

You can view or download the complete brochure from Union County's website.

Photo caption: Plaque commemorating donation of flagpole at Drake House, 1924.

October 24, 2012

Dan Damon corrected the record and included a little blurb sent to him by the Communications Chair: North Plainfield Couple Donated Washington Rock

View from Washington Rock, dated 1907. (Courtesy Plainfield Public Library)

Satellite view of Washington Rock today (Google Maps) October 24, 2012

An email from Susan Fraser of the Plainfield Garden Club is worth sharing –


We also loved all the recent coverage of the Centennial celebrations on the saving of Washington Rock. However, we were sad that Mrs. McCutchen's name was not associated with what we call "our first conservation project." She was one the NJ DAR chapter directors and it was she and her husband, Charles, that purchased the rock to save it. They deeded it back to the state of NJ a year later. Remember discovering the McCutchen Celtic Cross on top of the hill at Hillside Cemetery last year? It was so exciting to see that it was placed in the site line of Washington Rock – one of the McCutchens' great legacies to Plainfield and New Jersey. Here is the direct link to her album:

http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=4508

Feel free to share this info with your readers....
The Plainfield Garden Club has a long history of involvement in the community and has been responsible for the maintenance of the Shakespeare Garden in Cedar Brook Park since its inception.

The McCutchen family were members of the Plainfield Friends Meeting, lived in North Plainfield, and were responsible for the founding of what was the McCutchen Home in North Plainfield.

1920 Muhlenberg Hospital Womens Auxiliary

Mrs. Charles W. McCutchen
21 Rockview Avenue

Fort Humboldt State Park, California

Editor's Note: In the garden club, there has been a long standing tradition of making a donation to the Redwoods when a members passes away. Such a donation was made for Mrs. McCutchen. The Garden Club of America, was essential in the preservation of the Redwoods in the early part of the 20th century. Did Mrs. McCutchen influence both the PGC and the GCA preservations of this national resource? Mrs. McCutchen's mother, Mrs. Simpson, is quoted commenting on the Redwoods.

Fort Humboldt is situated on a bluff overlooking Humboldt Bay. This remote military post was established in 1853 to assist in conflict resolution between Native Americans and gold-seekers and settlers who had begun flooding into the area after the discovery of gold in the northern mines.

Later, Fort Humboldt would become the headquarters for the Humboldt Military District, which included Forts Bragg and Wright in northern Mendocino County, extending north through Humboldt County to Fort Ter-Waw in Klamath and Camp Lincoln near present-day Crescent City.

It was during its first few years that Fort Humboldt was home to one of its most famous residents, the young Captain Ulysses S. Grant. After being decorated for bravery in the Mexican-American war, he was posted to several locations including Fort Vancouver in the Pacific Northwest. The isolation of Fort Humboldt did not appeal to Grant, and after serving as commanding officer of Company F for six months, resigned his commission.

Fort Humboldt was formally abandoned in 1870 and rapidly fell into decay. Today, only the hospital building remains of the original fourteen structures. It is now an historical museum dedicated to telling the story of the Fort and the Native American groups, including the Wiyot, Hoopa and Yurok of this region. In the 1980's the Surgeon's Quarters was reconstructed and there are plans for its establishment as a period house museum. In 2001 an historic herb and vegetable garden was recreated adjacent to the Hospital.

The park also includes a Logging Museum and open air displays of historic 19th-mid 20th century logging equipment including the Dolbeer Steam Donkey; "Lucy," the Bear Harbor Lumber Company's Gypsy Locomotive #1; and the Elk River Mill and Lumber Company's #1 "Falk" locomotive.

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=665

Josiah and Harriett Simpson

Established on January 30, 1853, by Captain Robert C. Buchanan, 4th Infantry, this post was situated on a 35 foot high bluff overlooking Humholdt Bay at what was then Bucksport, presently a part of the city of Eureka. Intended to provide protection for the area's inhabitants from Indian hostiles, it served also as a supply depot for other posts in northern California. Ulysses S. Grant served here in 1854 as a 4th Infantry captain. In 1866 the garrison, except for one company of artillery was withdrawn and the post then became a subdepot, maintained primarily to provide supplies to Fort Gaston. Department commander Brigadier General Irvin McDowell reported on September 14, 1867, that the company of Artillery had been withdrawn and the post completely abandoned. One historical chronologist reports abandonment took place in 1866, in accordance \with Special Order Number. 243. Department off Californiania. On April 6, 1870, the military reservation, now a state historic monument was transferred to the Department of the Interior. The post hospital, completely renovated, was moved a short distance from its original site. It is now a Museum with Native American and military artifacts, text and photographs. The second building that has been restored is the Surgeons Quarters. This building Is open only for special occasions. Visitors can look in the windows and see photographs of Josiah Simpson, Army Doctor, and his wife Harriett, who lived in the residence from 1854-75. In 2001 the Park added the History in Bloom garden designed to represent a typical personal garden at the Fort in 1853-63. The Fort Museum is open daily from 8:00 am until 4:00 pm most of the year. It is closed on weekends only from November through February. For more info on Fort Humboldt, people can call the State Park at (707) 445-6567.

U.S. Grant's home in 1854 was said to be the L-shaped one in top row of officers' quarters

Fronteir Life at Fort Humboldt Surgeon's Quarters

http://www.parks.ca.gov/pages/665/files/surgeons%20quarters%20sign.pdf

This replica of the original one-and-a-half story building housed many of the surgeon's families. Harriett St. John Simpson was the wife of Assistant Surgeon Josiah Simpson. From 1854 - 1857, Mrs. Simpson lived in this house with her husband and two children. Much of what we know of the daily life on this frontier Fort comes from the lively letters Mrs. Simpson wrote to her family back East. She was fond of entertaining and would often throw parties for the officers and their families. The cold and damp climate led Mrs. Simpson to move into the front parlor where she cooked, slept and played her melodeon near the warmth of the fireplace.

Click link to see Mrs. McCutchen's mother

1915 - 1923 List of Meetings

Washington Rock Park Commission 1921

Scannell's New Jersey's First Citizens: Biographies and Portraits ..., Volume 2

Irivng Stewart

Birth: unknown
Death: Jun. 16, 1937
Ware Neck
Gloucester County
Virginia, USA

Died at his home at Piney Point on the North River.
A veteran of the World War I and served on the Mexican border.
Married Isabelle MacMaster,brother of Percy H.Stewart,Mrs.Louis Clausel both of Plainfield,NJ and Mrs.William Fleet Taliaferro of Gloucester county.

Family links:
Spouse:
Isabelle MacMaster Stewart (1883 - 1961)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Ware Episcopal Church Cemetery
Gloucester
Gloucester County
Virginia, USA

Oakwood

Oakwood

Oakwood

The Plainfield Trust Company

Charles W. McCutchen Holt & Co., Commission Merchants, New York

History of Union County, New Jersey

CHARLES WALTER MCCUTCHEN
was born in Williamsburg, (now a part of Brooklyn), New Yrok, January 5, 1845. He is of Scotch-Irish ancestry on his father's side, his grandfather, Thomas McCutchen, having been born at Newton Ards, near Belfast. William Moore McCutchen, his father, was a native of New York city, where he was born January 5, 1803. His mother, Eliza St. John, was a native of Connecticut.

Mr. McCutchen received his education at the Polytechnic Institute, Brooklyn. At the age of seventeen he entered upon a business life, becoming a clerk with Sawyer, Wallace & Company, at that time one of the foremost commission houses of New York city. Here he received a thorough business training, which proved invaluable to him in after years. In 1867 his family moved to Plainfield, New Jersey, where they have always resided and where his father died August 1, 1889.

Since 1879 Mr. McCutchen has been a member of the firm of Holt & Company, commission and flour merchants of New York city; a house which established in the early part of the century, has always maintained a leading position in its particular branch of commerce, having been an important factor in the development of the export trade in flour and breadstuffs with the West Indies and South America.

Saturday, May 21, 1966 Something to Be proud of . . . Many Worked Together for County Park Displayt

Caption: DOGWOOD IN FLOWER – Cedar Brook Park's Dogwood Arboretum is a horticultural collection of 61 varieties that is the pride of Plainfield Garden Club and the Union County Park Commission. The display of dogwood blossoms is not the showiest, but it's the most complete in the country. Each year the trees in bloom are a joy to those who visit the planting or follow the drive through Cedar Brook Park. The trees in the Cornus Collections line both sides of the Park Drive.

Something to be Proud of . . .

Many Worked Together for County Park Display

Horticulturalists know it as the "Cornus Collection in Plainfield." The Plainfield Garden Club speaks of it as "our dogwood plantings in Cedar Brook Park." Since last year, the double line of pink and white flowering trees at the Park Ave. entrance to the park as been officially named "The Harriette R. Halloway Cornus Collection."

But to most admirers of the annual evidence that spring is here, it is just "those beautiful trees in the park" whether they refer to them by their botanical or popular name – cornus or dogwood.

Many who come to see the trees are unaware that this collection includes ore than 60 varieties of dogwood, every kind that can grow in this climate. While the trees are beautiful, it is the horticultural collection of so many varieties that counts to the credit of the Plainfield Garden Club even more than the display. It is not the greatest show, but it's the most complete collection.

Dr. Benjamin Blackburn of Drew University in Madison has remarked that this group of trees, growing in a compact reserved area, is a marked achievement on the part of the Union Count Park Commission, the Plainfield Garden Club and Miss Halloway, who served for more than 35 years as a volunteer consultant to the Park Commission and in keeping records of all the plantings.

Miss Halloway, for whom the grove is named, still watches for the flowering season of the dogwood. Now 91, Miss Halloway is a resident at the McCutchen Nursing Home, North Plainfield.

Among the personal possession she treasurers is the Distinguished Service Medal of the Garden Club of America. Also she is a fellow of the Royal Horticultural Society of England and a member of the American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboretums. She is a member of the Plainfield Garden Club and has earned recognition from the New York Botanical Gardens, American Horticultural Society and other organizations for her work and her writings about gardens, flowers, and flowering shrubs and trees.

A great part of the reward to her and the Plainfield Garden Club is that so many people can enjoy the cornus collection in the park. Miss Halloway says: "Each year the trees continue to be beautiful and a joy, if not forever, at least for many years."

THE CEDAR BROOK Park Dogwood Collection is unique, Dr. Blackburn believes. "None other is known to exist in this county," he said, "and a match for it is not be found growing in the Royal Botanic Gardens in London or in Edinburgh or other famous gardens in Great Britain and Europe."

The dogwood collection got its start in 1931 when W. R. Tracy, superintendent of the Union County Park Commission, decided to turn an old city dump into a beauty spot and the Plainfield Garden Club contributed 75 white dogwoods to help the project.

In 1940 the club gave an additional 110 trees to balance the two sides of the drive and complete the groupings. The 61 species now flourishing in the park include nine from Asia, two from Europe and 12 from North America, a number of hybrids and "cultivars," special horticultural selections that have been propagated vegetatively.

The Park Commission has planted a background of evergreens, including hemlocks and pines, to enhance the effect of the dogwoods. Enlarging on its original purpose to beautify the area, the Plainfield Garden Club cooperated throughout the year with the commission in developing the collection and all varieties are now labelled with correct names. A boulder with a tablet also has been installed in the area..

At the 25th anniversary of the Garden Club, held in 1940, Mrs. Thomas R. VanBoskerck, who had written a history of the club's first quarter century, recalled that the members had anticipated the park's work in beautifying the dump area and first had presented 50 dogwood trees to the park through the generosity of Mrs. Charles A. Eaton who took them from her own woods in Watchung. A fund to beautify the park had been started originally in 1924 with Mrs. William Halliday in charge.

Dr. Blackburn points to the Cornus Collection in Plainfield as an admirable example of cooperation among groups interested in the cultural and horticultural riches of a municipality.

25 Years Ago, 1941

Clifford M. Baker, president of the Muhlenberg Hospital board of governors announced that Allen V. Heely, headmaster of the Lawrenceville School, would speak at the graduation exercises for the hospital's school of nursing. Mr. Heely's sister-in-law, Mrs. Lawrence S. Heely, was president of the Women's Auxiliary Hospital. Dr. William B. Fort, senior attending surgeon, was to award the prizes, and William Whitwell Robison and Mrs. Edward Leroy Voorhees were to present diplomas and pins.

The Rev. Harry James Knickle, rector of Grace Episcopal Church, was observing the 10th anniversary of his priesthood.

George A. Ballantyne of 30 Westervelt Ave. was honored by the First Presbyterian Church Session for years of faithful service as head usher.

1998-1999 PGC Annual Report

Wednesday, December 4, 2013

Historic sign on the Titsworth-Sutphen building

Wednesday, December 4, 2013

Landmark Eyes Lot 9 For New Project

Titsworth-Sutphen House
Landmark's concept also includes relocation of the Titsworth-Sutphen House to the other block, adjacent to the brew pub. The pre-Civil War structure is now on the PNC Bank lot on West Second Street and is being used by Angels in Action Foundation as an education center. As part of the approvals for Landmark's West Second Street Commons project in September 2010, Cretella pledged to relocate the historic building.

Plainfield Historical Society Memorabilia From the Archives of Barbara Tracy Sandford

This is a sampling of materials saved by Barbara Sandford in her "Plainfield Historical Society" file.

Plainfield Historical Society Memorabilia

Index (73 pages)

circa 1983

circa 1983

American Gardening 1904

American Gardening 1904

American Gardening 1904

P. J. Berckman

Women's Camera Work: Self/body/other in American Visual Culture 1998

As Radway speculates about the purpose of reading the romance, for a family-centered woman, picking up the camera also served as a means of temporary escape – from a situation that left her no time for herself or for a fantasy world. Mrs. Charles McCutchen of Plainfield, New Jersey began with a camera lent her by her brother-in-law. When he gave it up for billiards and whist, she wrote, 'I, no longer fettered by masculine interference, had some tolerable luck." Some fourteen years later, she advised beginners not to "waste all your time on 'press the button' photography, and let some one else 'do the rest,' but get a good camera and easy, safe plates and as you have time and opportunity, study it out for yourself." Recounting both her great satisfaction in experimenting with plate and developer and the frustrations of being interrupted at her printing, she justified her pleasure by describing it as "worth while" work that allows a mother to see and to preserve "a thousand interesting moments of childhood" as "little every-day pictures." "I call my photography my fancy work, and have never regretted that it took that form rather than crocheted mats and embroidered pillows," she wrote. "They would have been work out and faded long ago, whereas I have now in my series of negatives a sort of family history running through the years (a seventeen-year-old daughter now, whose first negatives dates back to four) from which I can print at any time."