Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Mali, Mrs. Pierre (Frances Johnston) '18

1919 Address: 843 East Front Street, Plainfield

1922 Address: 843 East Front Street, Plainfield

1928 Treasurer Book April 15th $5.00

1932 Directory*: Not Listed
* = This directory is not dated but presumed to be from the year 1932.

Sister-in-law Mrs. Henry Lockwood (Amy Brighthurst Brown) deForest '33

May 24, 1901 New York Times society article

Mr. and Mrs. Pierre Mali have opened their counry home at Plainfield, NJ

September 28, 1902 New York Times society article

Mr. and Mrs. Pierre Mali have left Southhampton and have returned to Plainfield, NJ for a few weeks. They will come to New York in mid-November to open their Fifth Avenue home.

1909 Who's Who in New York City and State

reference

Mr. Pierre Mali, commission merchant and importer. Born in Belgium 1856. Married Frances Johnson 1892. In 1880 became vice consul for Belgium and consul in 1898, given to the senior member of the Henry Mali firm since 1830 when the kingdom of Belgium was created.

Addresses are 8 Fifth Avenue and 73 Fifth Avenue.

Mrs. Frances Johnston Mali

From John A. Grady's book: Plainfield

The president of Central Railroad New Jersey and first president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, John Taylor Johnston maintained his summer home from 1863 to 1895. After Johnston's death, the 100-plu-acre-estate, was passed to his daughter, Frances Mali, wife of the Belgium consul, general Pierre Mali. The estate remained intact until 1936, when the property was subdivided into building lots and the house was demolished.

photo of the original home in the book.

The port of entry into the Johnston estate was a Richardson Romanesque style gatehouse.

J. Wesley Johnston

First National Bank, chartered April 25, 1864, shortly after the establishment of the National Bank Act, numbered hatters among the businessmen on its Board of Directors. Front row, left to right, William McDowell Coriell (hatter), Phineas M. French (mill owner), Charles Potter, President; second row, Frank Runyon, Cashier, Daniel R. Randolph (merchant), William M. Stillman, Mulford Estil, J. Wesley Johnston. These names echo throughout Plainfield's history, Courtesy of PNC Bank

from Plainfield, New Jersey's History & Architectureby John Grady and Dorothe Pollard

John Taylor Johnston and Netherwood

Note map in top right corner of the page. Adjacent to the John Taylor Johnston estate is a large parcel of land labeled "Frances J. Mali"

from Plainfield, New Jersey's History & Architectureby John Grady and Dorothe Pollard

1. The P.M. French residence, its adjoining mill, and the Corneliuvs Boice's property appear on a 1878 F. A. Dunham map of the city. The pond is familiar, by whatever name it might be called, as the millpond of colonial days. Sucessively christened with the name of whomever owned the land on which it lay, in the latter 1800s, John Tier claimed the honor by virtue of his popular ice cream pavilion. So it shall be remembered.

2. The railroad's 1852 annual report descrives a rapid increase in passengers to Plainfield "to which number now remove in the summer with their families," and John Taylor Johnston did just that, purchasing more than one hundred acres on both sides of the brook for his rural retreat. His estate, spreading east along Front Street, was detailed in F. A. Dunham's 1894 "Atlas of the City of Plainfield." Called "Netherwood" after Johnston's ancestral home in Scotland, the name resurfaces today in a commercial neighborhood, a train station, a vanished resort hotel, and a historic district. Courtesy of Gail Hunton.

3. John Taylor Johnston, president of the Central Railroad of New Jersey until 1877, was ahead of his time in every sense of the word. Born in 1820, he graduated from the University of the City of New York at the age of nineteen, obtained a law degree from Yale at twenty-three, and assumed the presidencey of the railroad when he was only twenty-eight.

Frances Johnston Mali

John Taylor Johnston's summer compound included a home for his daughter, Frances, wife of the Belgian Consul General Pierre Mali. The Mali home is reproduced here, circa 1926, from the Courier-News publication Plainfield and Vicinity in Pictures. After Johnston's death in 1893, the estate remained intact until 1936 when it was subdivided into building lots. The fairyland through which the Green Brook flowed yielded to reality. All that marks the pot is an enchanting gateghouse. Courtesy of the Courier News – Bridgwater, New Jersey

From Plainfield, New Jersey's History & Architectureby John Grady and Dorothe Pollard

From Plainfield, New Jersey's History & Architecture by John Grady and Dorothe Pollard

Yes, this is Plainfield, and there really were fox hunts here. This photo shows the back of Dr. Edward L. Finch's Park Avenue mansion where there is a lot of activity in preparation for the hunt. The hunts frequently took place on John Taylor Johnston's estate, which extended into the Watchung mountains and comprised over one hundred acres. The house viewed through the porte-cochere still stands, but has been unsympatherically altered. Courtesy of Anne W. Finch

Cars replaced horses, chauffeurs replaced groomsmen, and carriage barns became garages. Henry Talmadge's chauffeur in his new conveyance, proudly poses in front of the old carriage house. The Talmadge mansion, which contained over thirty rooms, was a Belvidere Avenue landmark for many years. Both the house and the carriage house were destroyed by fire in the late 1960's

Johnston Drive, Watchung Mountains

Title: Baby steps for ailing infants and their moms, ca. 1904-1911.
Publication Date: January 03, 2010
Photographer: John Hoffman
Description: A photo of the King's Daughters Baby Camp in Plainfield, taken sometime between 1904-1911. The camp was a fresh-air refuge for sick infants and their mothers. It was opened in the summer of 1896 and operated at least until 1912, when it was listed in the Plainfield City Directories. The camp was located near Vail's Spring on Johnston's Drive along the Watchung Mountains. The matron in charge of the camp was Olive Delaney. [Source information: United Family & Children Services Scrapbook of Newspaper Articles, 1893 to 190

Plainfield Library Archives

Emily Johnston DeForest

Emily JohnstonFatherJohn Taylor Johnston
Spouses
1Robert Weeks DeForestBirth25 Apr 1848Death6 May 1931FatherHenry Grant DeForest (1820-1889)MotherJulia Mary Weeks
Marriage12 Nov 1872
ChildrenEthel (1876-1959) Frances Emily (1878-) Henry Lockwood (1875-) Johnston (1873-)
Notes for Emily Johnston
Author of "A Walloon Family in America"

Plainfield by John A. Grady and Dorothe M. Pollard

The president of the Central Railroad of New Jersey and first president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, John Taylor Johnston maintained his summer home here from 1863 to 1895. After Johnston's death, the 100-plus-acre estate was passed to his daughter, Frances Mali, wife of the Belgian consul general Pierre Mali. The estate remained intact until 1936, when the property was subdivided into building lots and the house demolished.

The port of entry to the Johnston estate was this still extant gatehouse built in the Richardsonian Romanesque style. Many a finely appointed equipage must have passed by its door on the way to one of Mrs. Mali's many soirees.

Fleetwood Museum, North Plainfield

At the Fleetwood Museum, located 614 Greenbrook Road, (Vermuele Mansion, also known as VanDeventer-Brunson house) there are two large maps framed and hanging, circa 1900 and 1894. On each map, the large tracts of land owned by Johnston are clearly marked as well as the parceled estate of Frances Mali. The estate is along the Greenbrook and one of the maps clearly show the footprint of Mrs. Mali's house and outbuildings, plus the large expanse of water that was in front of the house where the Greenbrook widens.

Fleetwood Museum

Fleetwood Museum

Fleetwood Museum

Fleetwood Museum

Fleetwood Museum

1908 Plainfield Library postcard of Johnston Lodge

C-1206 Y Union News Company, New York Johnston Lodge, Plainfield, N.J. Johnston Lodge, view facing tower end

Postcard ID C-1206
Donor Chase
Resource illustration
Condition used
City Plainfield
Historic District
Publisher Union News Company, New York
Artist

1908 The lyre of Alpha Chi Omega

Mrs. Lawrence R. Howard conducted a musical service on Sunday evening, May 30th, at Hope Chapel, Plainfield, N.J., and was assisted by Mrs. Violet Truell Johnston, violnist, and Mrs. Harry R. Moyer, contralto, the latter a member of Alpha Phi. Mrs. Howard goes to Medina, Ohio, for July and August.
http://books.google.com/books?id=PxgTAAAAIAAJ&pg=
PA335&lpg=
PA335&dq=harry+r.+moyer+plainfield+nj&source=
bl&ots=jbVWRn2PHW&sig=zhfwHVZW9aF4O5vozyBpCxTR2RE&hl=
en#v=onepage&q=harry%20r.%20moyer%20plainfield%20nj&f=
false

Mrs. Harry R. Moyer was a member of the Plainfield Garden Club. Is this Mrs. Violet Truell Johnston related to Frances Johnston Mali? The Truell Hotel was a famous establishment where at least one Plainfield GC member resided.

New York Times Wedding Announcement May 1, 1892

MALI – JOHNSTON. The marble Johnston mansion, at Fifth Avenue and Eighth Street, was the scene yesterday afternoon of the wedding of the last unmarried daughter of John Taylor Johnston, Miss Frances Johnston, and Pierre Mali. John Taylor Johnston is the ex-President of the Central Railroad of New-Jersey. Pierre Mail is the Vice Consul of Belgium, son of the late Jules Mali, and nephew of Charles Mali of Brooklyn, who is the Consul of Belgium and a member of an old and honorable Belgian family, with large estates at Verrieres. Mr. Mali has been in this country for twelve years and is a member of the Union and Tuxedo Clubs.

The marriage was performed before an alter erected in the northern end of the art gallery, covered with white altar cloth and decorated with a brass cross and bunches of lilies. The Rev. Dr. Rylance of St. Mark's Church officiated.

The bride wore a gown of white corded silk. The long train was completely covered with a veil of old family point d'applique lace held in place by a diamond and turquois cornert, a gift of the groom. Two sprays of diamonds which had been worn by the bride's mother upon her wedding day ornamnted the front of the waist.

The maid of honor, Miss Harriet Colles, cousin of the bride, and the bridesmaids, Miss Edith Bell, daughter of Edward Bell, and Miss Charlotte Baker, niece of Mrs. John S. Kennedy, were all dressed in cream white silk demi-train gowns, with small veils overtopped by wreaths of white lilacs and primroses. They carried bouquets of Spring flowers.

Among the members of the families who witnessed the ceremony were John Taylor Johnston, Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. DeForest, Miss Edith De Forest, Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Coe, Mr. and Mrs. Loyall Farragut, Capt. and Mrs. Henry Metcalf, Dr. John T. Metcalf, Mr. and Mrs. James Colles, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mali of Brooklyn, Henry W. T. Mal, Miss Amy Hicks, Miss Isabel Cammann and Henry Lorillard ent with Miss Teenie Noel is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Auguste Noel of 109 Averly Place.

A large reception followed the wedding. Among the guests were the Belgian Minister, Alfred LeGhait, Count and Countess Gastou d'Arschot of the Belgian Lenation, Consults General Shen Woon of China, Henri M. Braem of Denmark, Paul d'Abzac of France, August Feigel of the German Empire, Demetrius N. Botassi of Greece, Saburo Fujii of Japan, A. Olarovsky of Russia, and Zenophon Baltazzi of Turkey, Mrs. William E. Russell, wife of the Governor of Massuchusetts; Col. and Mrs. S. Van Rensselaer Crugar, Mr. and Mrs. Frderick Rhinelander Jones, Miss Beatrix Jones, R. L. Cutting, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Bryce, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Spencer Witherbee, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Dana, Mr. and Mrs. Henry McVickar, and Harry Le Grand Cannon.

After a wedding trip of two weeks, Mr. and Mrs. Mali will be at home at 8 Fifth Avenue.

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F70814F93F5C17738DDDA80894DD405B8285F0D3

Johnston Genealogy

7. JOHN TAYLOR4 JOHNSTON (JOHN3, JOHN2, WILLIAM1 JOHNSTONE) was born
April 08, 1820, and died March 24, 1893. He married (1) FRANCES COLLES
May 15, 1850 in New York, NY.

Children of JOHN JOHNSTON and FRANCES COLLES are:
12. i. EMILY5 JOHNSTON, b. February 15, 1851; d. Unknown.
ii. COLLES JOHNSTON, b. March 14, 1853; d. September 11,
1886.
13. iii. JOHN HERBERT JOHNSTON, b. February 22, 1855.
14. iv. FRANCES JOHNSTON, b. January 09, 1857.
15. v. EVA JOHNSTON, b. September 19, 1866.

Child of JOHN TAYLOR JOHNSTON is:
16. vi. EMILY5 JOHNSTON, b. February 13, 1851, New York NY; d.
1942.

8. JAMES BOORMAN4 JOHNSTON (JOHN3, JOHN2, WILLIAM1 JOHNSTONE) was born
December 30, 1822, and died September 26, 1887. He married MARY HOPPIN
HUMPHREYS October 13, 1853 in St. Andrews Church, Philadelphia, PA,
daughter of MAY HUMPHREYS.

Children of JAMES JOHNSTON and MARY HUMPHREYS are:
i. MARY HUMPHREYS5 JOHNSTON, b. September 04, 1854.
ii. MARGARET TAYLOR JOHNSTON, b. September 24, 1855.
iii. JOHN HUMPHREYS JOHNSTON, b. November 02, 1857; m. ANNIE
LAZARUS,
June 21, 1899.

9. MARGARET TAYLOR4 JOHNSTON (JOHN3, JOHN2, WILLIAM1 JOHNSTONE) was
born November 23, 1825, and died April 10, 1875. She married JOHN BARD
May 17, 1849.

Children of MARGARET JOHNSTON and JOHN BARD are:
17. i. EMILY5 BARD, b. July 12, 1851.
ii. CAROLINE BARD, b. February 15, 1855; d. November 17,
1879.
iii. WILLIAM BARD, b. February 29, 1856; d. February 17,
1868.
18. iv. ROSALIE DE NORMANDIE BARD, b. September 15, 1867.

10. MARGARET H. H.4 JOHNSTON (SAMUEL3, JOHN2, WILLIAM1 JOHNSTONE) was
born in Barksalloch, Scotland. She married SAMUEL MCMATH 1860 in
Balmaghie kirk, Scotland.

Children of MARGARET JOHNSTON and SAMUEL MCMATH are:
i. JOHN ELKINGTON5 MCMATH, b. November 03, 1882, Penn Yan,
Yates
County, New York; d. October 17, 1959, Soldiers and Sailors Memorial
Hosp., Penn Yan, NY; m. MYRTLE TOWNSEND.
19. ii. CHRISTIANA DUNN MCMATH, b. Abt. 1877, Penn Yan, Yates
Co., NY;
d. March 22, 1960, Raleigh, NC at home of her Daughter, Mrs. Thomas
Umphley.
20. iii. SAMUEL ALEXANDER JOHNSTON MCMATH, b. Abt. 1880; d.
December 19,
1949, Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, NY, buried Lake View Cem..
21. iv. AGNES AMELIA MCMATH, b. October 07, 1885, Penn Yan, NY;
d. April
09, 1978, Penn Yan, NY burried at Paxtang Presbyterian Church.

11. DOROTHEA4 JOHNSTON (SAMUEL3, JOHN2, WILLIAM1 JOHNSTONE). She
married HENRY MACLELLAN.

Children of DOROTHEA JOHNSTON and HENRY MACLELLAN are:
i. JOHN5 MACLELLAN.
ii. HANNA MACLELLAN.
iii. ELIZABET MACLELLAN.
iv. DORATHEA MACLELLAN.
v. HARRY MACLELLAN.

Generation No. 5

12. EMILY5 JOHNSTON (JOHN TAYLOR4, JOHN3, JOHN2, WILLIAM1 JOHNSTONE)
was born February 15, 1851, and died Unknown. She married ROBERT WEEKS
DEFOREST November 12, 1872.

Children of EMILY JOHNSTON and ROBERT DEFOREST are:
22. i. JOHNSTON6 DEFOREST, b. September 05, 1873.
23. ii. HENRY LOCKWOOD DEFOREST, b. August 06, 1875.
iii. ETHEL DEFOREST, b. March 15, 1877.
24. iv. FRANCES EMILY DEFOREST, b. December 24, 1878.

13. JOHN HERBERT5 JOHNSTON (JOHN TAYLOR4, JOHN3, JOHN2, WILLIAM1
JOHNSTONE) was born February 22, 1855. He married CELESTINE NOEL.

Child of JOHN JOHNSTON and CELESTINE NOEL is:
i. EMILIE NOEL6 JOHNSTON, b. January 23, 1894.

14. FRANCES5 JOHNSTON (JOHN TAYLOR4, JOHN3, JOHN2, WILLIAM1 JOHNSTONE)
was born January 09, 1857. She married PIERRE MALI April 30, 1892.

Children of FRANCES JOHNSTON and PIERRE MALI are:
i. JOHN TAYLOR JOHNSTON6 MALI, b. March 27, 1893.
ii. GERTRUDE MALI, b. April 22, 1894.
iii. EVA MALI, b. December 05, 1895.
iv. HENRY JULIAN MALI, b. August 11, 1899
.

15. EVA5 JOHNSTON (JOHN TAYLOR4, JOHN3, JOHN2, WILLIAM1 JOHNSTONE) was
born September 19, 1866. She married HENRY EUGENE COE November 27,
1888.

Children of EVA JOHNSTON and HENRY COE are:
i. EMILY6 COE, b. November 21, 1889.
ii. ROSALIE COE, b. September 26, 1891.
iii. COLLES JOHNSTON COE, b. March 28, 1893.
iv. HENRY EUGENE COE, JR., b. October 02, 1894.

16. EMILY5 JOHNSTON (JOHN TAYLOR4, JOHN3, JOHN2, WILLIAM1 JOHNSTONE)
was born February 13, 1851 in New York NY, and died 1942. She married
ROBERT WEEKS DEFOREST November 12, 1872.

Child of EMILY JOHNSTON and ROBERT DEFOREST is:
25. i. ETHEL6 DEFOREST, b. March 15, 1876; d. 1955, New York,
NY.

17. EMILY5 BARD (MARGARET TAYLOR4 JOHNSTON, JOHN3, JOHN2

Pierre Mali

ID: I11079
Name: Pierre Mali
Sex: M
Birth: JAN 1857 in Belgium 1
Death: 4 OCT 1923 in Plainfield, Union, New Jersey 2
Burial: Hillside Cemetery, Plainfield, Union, New Jersey 2
Occupation: Honorary Belgium Consul to U. S. 2
Note: Name: Master Johnston Mali Arrival Date: 18 Jun 1895 Estimated birth year: abt 1893 Age: 2 Gender: Male Port of Departure: Antwerp, Belgium Ship Name: Friesland Search Ship Database: View the Friesland in the 'Passenger Ships and Images' database Port of Arrival: New York, New York Line: 1 Microfilm Serial: M237 Microfilm Roll: M237_643 Others: Pierre Mali, age 39, vice consul for Belgium; Mrs. Frances Mali, age 38; Miss Gertrude, age 1, American citizen.
Note: 1 1900 United States Federal Census > New Jersey > Union > Plainfield Ward 1 > District 123........ Mali, Pierre, head, b. Jan 1857, age 43, m. 9 years, b. BEL, IMM 1880, U. S. Consul; Frances, wife, b. Oct 1859, age 40, four children, all living, b. NY NY NY; John T., son, b. Mar 1893, age 7, b. ALL NY BEL NY; Gertrude, daughter, b. Apr 1894, age 6; Eva, daughter, b. Dec 1895, age 4; Hary, son, Aug 1899, age 10mos.; Andrae, Brother, b. Mar 1872, age 27, b. BEL, IMM 1897, Merchant, dry goods. +6 servants.
Note: New York Times........8 Oct 1923.......... MALI, Suddenly on Oct. 4 1923, at his residence in Plainfield, N. J., in his 67th year, Pierre, beloved husband of Frances Johnston Mali and father of Johnston Mali, Harry Mali, Gertrude M. Moffat and Eva M. Noyes, Consul General for Belgium and senior member of the firm of Henry W. T. Mali & Co...........Interment: Hillside Cemetery, Plainfield.
Change Date: 25 OCT 2007

Frances Johnston Mali

view all
Frances Johnston's Timeline
???? Death of Frances

1857 January 9, 1857 Birth of Frances

1892 April 30, 1892
Age 35 Marriage of Frances Johnston to Pierre Mali

1894 April 22, 1894
Age 37 Birth of Gertrude Mali

1899 August 11, 1899
Age 42 Birth of Henry Mali

1893 March 27, 1893
Age 36 Birth of John Mali

1895 December 5, 1895
Age 38 Birth of Eva Mali

The Henry W. T. Mali & Co., Inc.

Henri Mali, the great-great-grandfather of Frederick Mali, was born in Amsterdam in 1774 and went to Verviers to join forces with Simonis as managing partner of the company where he remained until his death in 1850. It was Henri Mali, who in 1799 found and arranged for John Cockerill, the inventor of the "Spinning Jenny," to come to Hamburg. Henri hired him and brought him to Verviers. This broke the English monopoly on the efficient manufacture of woven cloth.

In 1826, Henri sent his son, Henri Williem Theodore Mali, to look into the business situation in the United States. In that same year, he formed the Henry W. T. Mali & Co., Inc., and a few years later he was joined by his younger brother Charles Mali. In 1831, when Belgium became a Kingdom and began to be represented in the United States, Henri W. T. Mali was appointed the first Counsel General, a position that has been held by a member of the Mali family until 1949, when Henry J. declined.

Fred Mali, founder of Mali Cues, and the fifth generation of the Mali family to carry on the fine tradition of billiards excellence started in 1826.

Since neither Henry W. T. or Charles had sons, their brother Jules Mali, then head of Simonis in Verviers, sent his eldest son, Pierre Mali, to New York in 1878 to carry on the family business. This tradition passed to John Taylor Johnston Mali, Pierre's eldest son, and then to Pierre's second son, Henry Julian Mali. Henry J.'s eldest son, Frederick Johnston Mali was the 5th generation to run Mali and Co., the oldest and largest supplier of billiard fabric in the United States.

The Henry W.T. Mali &. Co. continues in the great tradition of service as exemplified by great-grandfather John Taylor Johnston, who founded The Metropolitan Museum of Art and great-great-grandmother Lucretia Mott, the renowned Quaker Abolitionist and women's rights advocate.

News: Frederick Mali Honored with BCA 2009 President's Award

New York Times Wedding Announcement October 17, 1920

CARAMAI CARROLL WEDS J.T.J. MALI; The Bride of Belgian Consul General's Son in Presbyterian Church at Irvington. RECEPTION AT CARROLLCIFF

The wedding of Miss Caramai Carroll, only daughter of the late General Howard Carroll and Mrs. Carroll, to J.T. Johnston Mali, son of Pierre Mali, Belgian Consul General at New York, and Mrs. Mali, was celebrated at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon in the Presbyterian Church at Irvington-on-Hudson. Guests for the ceremony and reception from New York went in special cars attached to an early afternoon train out of the Grand Central terminal, and were met at Irvington station by automobiles.

The reception following the church ceremony was held at Carrollcliff, the country home of the bride's mother in Tarrytown.

The bride, whose eldest brother, Arthur Carroll, gave her in marriage, wore her mother's wedding gown and veil. The gown was of cream white satin with flounces of point lace, and the veil was also of point lace. She carried a bouquet of lilies of the valley and gardenias.

Miss Gertrude Mali, sister of the bridegroom, was maid of honor. She appeared in a gown of blue taffeta, of medium shade, veiled in brown tulle. Miss Gilbert Darlington, Mrs. Crittenden Adams, Mrs. Joel Ellis Fisher, Jr., and Miss Louisa A. Johnson were the other attendants. They wore gowns of yellow taffeta veiled in brown tulle. All of the attendants wore hats of brown velvet and tulle, and carried yellow chrysanthemums. Rose Mary Carroll, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lauren Carroll, a niece of the bride, was in white organdie and lace, and carried a bouquet of tiny yellow rosebuds.

After the reception Mr. and Mrs. Mali left on their bridal journey, and will reside in New York on their return.

Grant Avenue Station

http://www.plainfieldlibrary.info/OnlineExhibits/LBNF/Rail.html

The Grant Avenue Station opened on September 28, 1885. The Central Railroad of NJ built the station on donated land and $3000 contributed by area residents. The building was destroyed by arson at midnight on December 19, 1967 by two teenage boys who had broken into the station.

The Clinton Avenue Station, built in 1872, was originally named Evona Station after railway proprietor James Taylor Johnston's daughter Eva. In June 7, 1874, The New York Times described the depot as the only one of its type in the country. The depot was a three-story building with the station master living on the second story. Its name was changed to the Clinton Avenue Station in January, 1895. The building was closed in 1957, although the stop continued to operate until 1970-71 when service was discontinued and all structures were demolished.

Courier News articles

de Forest Henry Lockwood 11/25/1939 News
de Forest Henry Lockwood 3/19/1954 Obituary
de Forest Henry Lockwood 4/1/1954 News
De Forest Johnston 11/26/1952 Obituary

John Taylor Johnston

John Taylor Johnston was born on April 8, 1820, the son of John Johnston, a prominent merchant banker in New York City.[1] Johnston was the founding president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1870, as well as the President of the Central Railroad of New Jersey from 1848 to 1877. He was born and grew up in Greenwich Village, and in 1839 graduated from New York University, an institution founded by his father and several other civic-minded New Yorkers. He later studied at Yale Law School, and was admitted to the bar in 1843. In 1856, Johnston constructed the first marble mansion in New York as his residence at 8 Fifth Avenue, just north of Washington Square. He died there on March 24, 1893.

Photo of 4, 6 and 8 Fifth Avenue

New York Times Obituary March 25, 1893

John Taylor Johnston died yesterday morning at his residence, 8 Fifth Avenue, aged seventy-three. The cause of his death was creeping paralysis, which began in 1877. Mr. Johnston had been an invalid for a long time prior to his death, and his ailment caused him to withdraw from active business life at the time of its first symptoms. Mr. Johnston was known to th epublic principally by his founding of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and his connection with the Central Railroad of New Jersey.

Mr. Johnston was born in New York April 8, 1920. His father was John Johnston of Boorman, Johnston & Co., and his mother was Margaret Taylor, the duaghter of John Taylor. Both of his parents were of Scotch birth. John Taylor Johnston was their eldest son. He received his early education in Scotland at the Edinburgh High School. He was graduated from the University of the City of New York in 1829 at the age of nineteen. His fathe was one fo the founders of that institution. He studied las at the Yale Law School at New Haven with Charles Astor Bristed, Daniel D. Lord, and Henry G. De Forest. He went into the office of Daniel Lord and was admitted to the bar in 1849.

Mr. Johnston remained for a short time in the active practice of his profession, and in 1848 he was introduced to take the Presidency of the then insignificant Somerville and Easton Railroad, which he and his associates developed into what is now know as the Central Railroad of New Jersey, with which his business career will always be associated. His Presidency continued uninterrupted from 1848 until 1877, a period of twenty-nine years. In this railroad at one time his fortune was almost entirely occupied. After his resignation of the Presidency in 1877 he retired from business and the railroad passed into the hands of a receiver.

Mr. Johnston was the orginator, in fact, of the whole Central New Jersey Railroad system. It was his forethought that led to the acquistion of the Lehigh and Susquehanna Railraod to Pennsylvania and its appurtenant coal lands. In was his policy to develop the suburbs through which his railroad passed, and a number of the . . . .(not legible) . . . grades and good alignment and to avoid grade crossings were far in advance of the railroad science of his time and were ridiculed by some of his competition.

In art matters Mr. Johnston has been a conscpicuous figure for years. For two years after his graduation from the Law School he traveled abroad, visitng all the great art entres. At his handsome residence in Fifth Avenue, which on account of its architecture is a landmark in that part of the city, he had until 1877 one of the most important art collections in America. He opending his gallery once a week to the public and once ayer he was in the habit of assembling in it all the artists of New York. In 1877 he sold his collection. Among his pictures were Church's 'Niagra' now in the Corcoran Gallery at Washington; Turner's 'Slave Ship' and representative works of Meissonier, Jules Breton, Brion, Fortuny, Madrazo, Daubigny, and the Barbizon School.

In his collection, which was the result of many years' purchasing, were examples of the American, German, and English schools. This sale was one of the first great art sales in this city and it is said that the picutres realized a handsome profit.

Mr. Johnston was the founder of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and its first active President. He continued to occupy this office until 1889, when his helath required his resignation. He was succeeded by Henry C. Marquand. He was elected honorary President for life. His gifts to the musuem were many and its early collection was due to his generosity. His last appearance in public was at the annual meeting of the museum in 1892, and the annual meeting of teh present year was the first one from which he was ever absent.

Mr. Johnston was President of the Governing Board of the University of the City of New York and a member of the boards of the Presbyterian Hospital, the Women's Hospital, and the St. Andrew's Society. He was a member of the Century Club, a Trustee of the American Musuem of Natural History, the National Academy of Design, and the Yale Alumni Association. He was an Elder, like his father, of the old Scotch Presbyterian Chruch, and he took his full part in church councils. He was an influential member of several General Assemblies, in which he representated the New York Presbytery.

Mr. Johnston's wife died in 1888 and his eldest son died two years before that event. His wife, whom he married in 1851, was Frances Colles, daughter of James Colles. His three daughters, all married, are Mrs. Robert W. De Forest, Mrs. Henry E. Coe, and Mrs. Pierre Mali. His only surviving son, J. Herbert Johnston, is a manufacturer at 110 Worth Street. He married last Sprin, Miss Celestine Noel, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Auguste Noel.

The funeral will take place from the Scotch Presbyterian Church in Fourteenth Street, Monday. The burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

John Taylor Johnston Collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Carol Johnston Mali DuBois

Obituary: Carol Johnston Mali DuBois
Friday, 16 March 2012 00:00

Carol Johnston Mali DuBois
Carol Johnston Mali DuBois, 90, died peacefully at home in Oyster Bay Cove on March 3, 2012, and was buried March 6 at a graveside service in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Tarrytown. Born October 6, 1921 in New York City, daughter of John Taylor Johnston Mali, Belgian Consul General, and Caramai Carroll. Educated at Spence School, Vassar and Barnard Colleges. Widow of Eugene DuBois (1911-1975), travel writer and airline executive. A passionate environmentalist, she served for many years as president of Action for Preservation and Conservation of the North Shore of Long Island and on the board of the Cold Spring Harbor Fish Hatchery & Aquarium. She was a 40-year volunteer for the American Red Cross and taught a current events class at the Doubleday Babcock Senior Center in Oyster Bay. Survived by four daughters: Caroline Starin DuBois, Oyster Bay; Abigail DuBois, Arlington, MA; Patricia DuBois, Topsham, ME; Ariane DuBois, Washington, DC; and three granddaughters: Grace DuBois Johnston, Caramai DuBois Johnston and Anna DuBois Bigelow. Donations in her memory may be made to the CSH Fish Hatchery & Aquarium, 1660 Rte 25A, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, or environmental organization of your choice.

The New York Times
Paid Notice: Deaths
DUBOIS, CAROL JOHNSTON MALI
Published: March 11, 2012

. .DUBOIS–Carol Johnston Mali, 90, died peacefully at home in Oyster Bay Cove, NY on March 3, 2012, and was buried March 6 at a graveside service in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Tarrytown, NY. Born October 6, 1921 in New York City, daughter of John Taylor Johnston Mali, Belgian Consul General, and Caramai Carroll. Educated at Spence School, Vassar and Barnard Colleges. Widow of Eugene DuBois (1911-1975), travel writer and airline executive. A passionate environmentalist, she served for many years as President of Action for Preservation and Conservation of the North Shore of Long Island and on the board of the Cold Spring Harbor Fish Hatchery & Aquarium. She was a forty-year volunteer for the American Red Cross and taught a current events class at the Doubleday Babcock Senior Center in Oyster Bay. Survived by four daughters: Caroline Starin DuBois, Oyster Bay; Abigail DuBois, Arlington, MA; Patricia DuBois,Topsham, ME; Ariane DuBois, Washington, DC; and three granddaughters: Grace DuBois Johnston, Caramai DuBois Johnston, and Anna DuBois Bigelow. Donations in her memory may be made to the CSH Fish Hatchery & Aquarium, 1660 Rte 25A, CSH, New York 11724, or environmental organization of your choice

Taylor McDowell Mali

Taylor Mali From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search Taylor Mali

Taylor Mali at the international school in Stockholm
Born (1965-03-28) March 28, 1965 (age 47)
New York City, New York, USA
Occupation Poet, Teacher, Voice Actor
Nationality American
Literary movement Slam Poetry
Notable work(s) What Learning Leaves
Spouse(s) Marie-Elizabeth Mundheim

Influences[show]Billy Collins, Saul Williams, Walt Whitman, Rives, Mary Oliver, and Naomi Shihab Nye

www.taylormali.com

Taylor McDowell Mali (born 28 March 1965) is an American slam poet, humorist, teacher, and voiceover artist.[1][2][3]

Contents [hide]
1 Life
2 Poetry
3 Teaching
4 Published works
4.1 Books
4.2 Audio CDs
4.3 Anthologies
4.4 CD Anthologies
4.5 Narration
5 Awards
6 See also
7 References
8 External links
8.1 YouTube videos


[edit] LifeA 10th-generation native of New York City, Taylor Mali graduated from the Collegiate School, a private school for boys, in 1983. He received a B.A. in English from Bowdoin College in 1987 and an M.A. in English/Creative Writing from Kansas State University in 1993. He also studied drama with the Royal Shakespeare Academy at Oxford. One of four children, his mother was children's book author Jane L. Mali,[4] a recipient of the American Book Award, and his father was H. Allen Mali, vice president of Henry W.T. Mali & Co., manufacturers of pool table coverings. He is the great-great-grandson of John Taylor Johnston, founding president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In 1993, he married Rebecca Ruth Tauber, who died in 2004. On May 13, 2006 he married Marie-Elizabeth Mundheim,[5] a high school friend.

[edit] Poetry
Taylor Mali performing at the international school in StockholmAs a slam poetry performer, Taylor Mali has been on seven National Poetry Slam teams; six appeared on the finals stage and four won the competition (1996 with Team Providence; 1997, 2000 and 2002 with Team NYC-Urbana). Mali is the author of What Learning Leaves and the Last Time as We Are (Write Bloody Publishing), has recorded four CDs, and is included in various anthologies. Poets who have influenced him include Billy Collins, Saul Williams, Walt Whitman, Rives, Mary Oliver, and Naomi Shihab Nye. He is perhaps best known for the poem "What Teachers Make."

He appeared in Taylor Mali & Friends Live at the Bowery Poetry Club and the documentaries "SlamNation" (1997) and "Slam Planet" (2006). He was also in the HBO production, "Russell Simmons Presents Def Poetry," which won a Peabody Award in 2003. Taylor Mali is the former president of Poetry Slam Incorporated, and he has performed with such renowned poets as Billy Collins and Allen Ginsberg. Although he retired from the National Poetry Slam competition in 2005,[6] he still helps curate NYC-Urbana Poetry Series, held weekly at the Bowery Poetry Club.

[edit] TeachingTaylor Mali spent nine years teaching English, history, and math, including stints at Browning School, a boys' school on the Upper East Side of New York City, and Cape Cod Academy, a K-12 private school on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. He now lectures and conducts workshops for teachers and students all over the world. In 2001 Taylor Mali used a grant from the New York Foundation for the Arts to develop the one-man show "Teacher! Teacher!" about poetry, teaching, and math. He is a strong advocate for the nobility of teaching and in 2000 he set out to create 1,000 new teachers through "poetry, persuasion, perseverance, or passion." As of January 13, 2012, he has 891.[7]

[edit] Published works[edit] BooksWhat Learning Leaves, 2002 - ISBN 1887012176
[edit] Audio CDsThe Difference Between Left & Wrong, 1995
Poems from the Like Free Zone, 2000
Conviction, 2003
Icarus Airlines, 2007
[edit] AnthologiesCollections in which Taylor Mali's work is included

Poetry on Stage: At the Red Barn Theatre, Key West, 1995 ISBN 9781888036008
Poetry Nation: The North American Anthology of Fusion Poetry, 1998, ISBN 1550651129
Will Work For Peace: New Political Poems, 1999, ISBN 096664591X
Bearing Witness, 2001, ISBN 9781569761304
Freedom to Speak Anthology, 2002, ISBN 1893972070
The Spoken Word Revolution 2003, ISBN 9781402200373
[edit] CD AnthologiesCollections in which Taylor Mali's work is included

Attack of the Urbanabots (The Wordsmith Press, 2007)
New High Score (The Wordsmith Press, 2004)
Writers Week IX (WWIX, 2004)
Best of Urbana 2003 (The Wordsmith Press, 2003)
The Kerfuffle Incident: Best of the Kalamazoo Poetry Slam (KPS, 2003)
Urbana: Bowery Poetry Club (The Wordsmith Press, 2002)
Freedom to Speak Anthology(CD) (The Wordsmith Press, 2002)
Spoken Word Underground (The Wordsmith Press, 2001)
NYC Slams (Anthology) (PoetCD, 2000)
[edit] NarrationAmerican Fairy Tales, audiobook, 1998
Shipwreck at the Bottom of the World, audiobook, 2000
Hope Along the Wind: The Story of Harry Hay, documentary, 2002
Blizzard!, audiobook, 2003
The Great Fire, audiobook, 2003
Revenge of the Whale, audiobook, 2005
ESCAPE! The Story of the Great Houdini, audiobook, 2006
Close To Shore, audiobook, 2007
[edit] Awards1996, 1997, 2000, 2002 - National Poetry Slam winning team
2001 - U. S. Comedy Arts Festival jury prize for best solo performance, "Teacher! Teacher!"
2003 - AudioFile Earphones Award for The Great Fire.
[edit] See also Poetry portal
Performance poetry
Poetry slam
Spoken word
Voice acting
Bowery Poetry Club
[edit] References1.^ Review of The Great Fire, AudioFile Magazine, Jun/Jul 2003
2.^ Slam Poet's Muse is Teaching, Stacey Hollenbeck, Teacher Magazine, July 18, 2007
3.^ Day Job: Teacher, Night Job: Poet, Instructor, Sep/Oct 2007, Vol. 117 Issue 2, p. 9
4.^ Obituary: Jane L. Mali, New York Times, October 7, 1995.
5.^ Vows: Marie-Elizabeth Mundheim and Taylor Mali, New York Times, May 28, 2006.
6.^ Aptowicz, Cristin O'Keefe. (2008) Words in Your Face: A Guided Tour Through Twenty Years of the New York City Poetry Slam. "Taylor Mali: The Man, The Myth, The Industry" page 266. Soft Skull Press, 288. ISBN 1-933-36882-9.
7.^ The Quest for 1,000 New Teachers
[edit] External linksOfficial website
Taylor Mali at the Internet Movie Database
Taylor Mali's channel on YouTube
Taylor Mali profile, Famecast web site
Podcasts of poems
Watch Taylor Mali recite his poems at Open-Door Poetry
Audio of "What Teachers Make," "Like Lilly Like Wilson," "The Entire Act of Sorrow," "Depression Too Is a Kind of Fire," "Holding Your Position," "For the Life of Me," and "How To Write a Political Poem" (among others) on Indiefeed Performance Poetry Channel
[edit] YouTube videosMali posts videos on his channel at YouTube of his own and other performances:

Like You Know on YouTube
What Teachers Make on YouTube
The Impotence of Proofreading on YouTube
Like Lilly Like Wilson on YouTube

New York Times Obituary March 25, 1893

John Taylor Johnston died yesterday morning at his residence, 8 Fifth Avenue, aged seventy-three. The cause of his death was creeping paralysis, which began in 1877. Mr. Johnston had been an invalid for a long time prior to his death, and his ailment caused him to withdraw from active business life at the time of its first symptoms. Mr. Johnston was known to the public principally by his founding of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and his connection with the Central Railroad of New Jersey.

Mr. Johnston was born in New York April 8, 1820. His father was John Johnston of Boorman, Johnston & Co. and his mother was Margaret Taylor, the daughter of John Taylor. Both is his parents were of Scotch birth. John Taylor Johnston was their eldest son. He received his early education in Scotland, at the Edinburgh High School. He was graduated from the University of the City of New York in 1839 at the age of nineteen. His father was once of the founders of that institution. He studied law at the Yale Law School at New Haven with Charles Astor Bristed, Daniel D. Lord, and Henry G. De Forest. He went into the office of Daniel, Lord and was admitted to the bar in 1843.

Mr. Johnston remained for a short time in the active practice of his profession, and in 1848 he was induced to take the Presidency of the then insignificant Somerville and Easton Railroad, which he and his associates developed into what is now known as the Central Railroad of New Jersey, with which his business career will alwasxy be associated. His Presidency continued uninterruptedly from 1848 until 1877, a period of twenty-nine years. In this railroad at one time his fortune was almost entirely occupied. After his resignation of the Presidencey n 1877 he reitred from business and the railroad passed into the hands of a receiver.

Mr. Johnston was the originator, in fact, of the whole Central New Jersey Railroad system. It was his forethought that led to the acquisition of the Lehigh and Susquehana Railroad in Pennsylvania and its appartenant coal lands. It was his policy to develop the suburbs through which his railroad passed, and a number of the towns in Central New Jersey owe their existence to him. His expenditure to secure low grades and good alignment and to avoid grade crossings were far in advance of the railroad science of his time and were ridculed by some of his competitors.

In art matters Mr. Johnston has been a conscpicuous figure for years. For two years after his graduation from the Law School he traveled aboard, visiting all the great art centres. At this handsome residence in Fifth Avenue, which on account of its architecture is a landmark in that part of the city, he had until 1877 one of the most important art collections in America. He opened his gallery once a week to the public and once a yar he was in the habit of assembling in it all the artists of New York. In 1877 he sold his collection. Among the pictures were Church's "Niagra," now in the Corcoran Gallery at Washington; Turner's "Slave Ship," and representative works of Meissenier, Jules Breton, Brion, Fortuny, Madrazo, Daubigny, and the Barbizon School.

In his collection, which was the result of many years' purchasing, were examples of the American, German, and English schools. This sale was one of the first great art sales in this city and it said that the pictures realized a handsome profit.

Mr. Johnston was the founder of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and its first active President. He continued to occupy this office until 1889, when his health required his resignation. He was succeeded by Henry G. Marquand. He was elected honorary President for life. His gifts to the museum were many and its early collection was due to his generosity. His last appearance in public was at the annual meeting of the museum in 1892, and the annual meeting of the present year was the firstr one from which he was ever absent.

Mr. Johnston was President of the Governoring Board of the University of the City of New York and a member of the boards of the Presbyterian Hospital, the Woman's Hospital, and the St. Andrew's Soceity. He was a member of the Century Club, a Trustee of the American Museum of Natural History, the National Academy of Design, and the Yale Alumni Association. He was an Elder, like his father, of the old Scotch Presbyterian Church, and he took his full part in church councils. He was influential member of several General Assemblies, in which he represented the New York Presbytery.

Mr. Johnston's wife died in 1888 and his edlest son died two years before that event. His wife, whom he married in 1851, was Frances Colles, daughter of James Colles. His three daughters, all married, are Mrs. Robert W. De Forest, Mrs. Henry E. Coe, and Mrs. Pierre Mali. His only surviving son, J. Herbert Johnston, is a manufacturer at 110 Worth Street. He marries, last Spring, Miss Celestine Noel, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Augnate Noel.

The funeral will take place from the Scotch Presybterian Church, in Fourteenth Street, Monday. The burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery.

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F30A13F83C5515738DDDAC0A94DB405B8385F0D3

Frederick J. Mali

An MBA graduate from Harvard Business School, Frederick J. Mali served in the United States Army between World Wars I and II before joining The Henry W. T. Mali & Co., Inc., as President and CEO. A beloved member of the billiard industry and husband to Princess Lucretia Obolensky, he died in 2007. Apart from his professional responsibilities, Frederick J. Mali enjoyed partaking in the arts, particularly the theatre.

Founded in 1826, The Henry W. T. Mali & Co., Inc., serves as the longest-running family business in New York City. The largest and oldest provider of premium billiard products in the United States, the company prides itself on doing business honestly while evolving their products to suit contemporary tastes. Under Mr. Mali's leadership, the company manufactured world-class billiards table cloth, cues, and stick cases, and it continues to do so today in his absence.

Mr. Mali's great-grandfather, John Taylor Johnston, had genetic ties to Benjamin Franklin and was one of the founders of The Metropolitan Museum of Art. His great-great-grandfather, Henri, founded the company in 1826. Frederick J. Mali ran the firm as the fifth generation of his family to do so. His wife, Lucretia, carries on the family name and commitment to charitable causes, such as Justin Tuck's R.U.S.H. for Literacy, which donates books and reading materials to children in New York and Alabama.

By The 100 Year Report on March 8th, 2007
In Memoriam – Frederick J. Mali
Category: Association News, In Memoriam

Fred, the President and CEO of HWT Mali & Co. was a longtime supporter of the Hundred Year Association. He passed away peacefully at home surrounded by his family and friends Thursday, February 1st. He is survived by Lucretia, his wife of 30 years. Lucretia is a member of the Association's Board of Governors and Awards Committee.
Fred was born October 5, 1930, in New York City and educated at Buckley, Groton, Yale and Harvard Business School, where he earned an MBA. He served his country in the US Army between the wars.

He was the fifth generation to run his family's firm which is the oldest continuously family-run company in New York City. The Mali family has been supplying the signature green wool cloth for pool and billiard tables since 1826. The company was one of the original members of the Association.

Fred was the great-grandson of John Taylor Johnston, the principal founder of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the great-great-grandson of abolitionist Lucretia Mott, and the first cousin eight times removed of Benjamin Franklin.

The Association joins Lucretia and the rest of Fred's family in mourning the loss of this great friend. As one said "Fred's kindness and consideration were known to all. Always a sense of humor; nary a word of nastiness towards anyone. We will never forget his charm and wonderful demeanor."

Taylor Mali

Readings, Signings & Exhibits
[See more Arts: Book articles]

Word Up! Taylor Mali on Word X Word Festival 2011 and the Lives of the Poets

What's the word? Find out this week in Pittsfield at the third annual Word X Word Festival from August 13 – 20. This celebration of words written, spoken and sung–created in 2009 by Jim Benson, proprietor of Mission Bar + Tapas–kicks off with its now-legendary rooftop party, one of the hottest events in the region (tickets are nearly sold out). The week-long festival features more than 60 performances of original song, poetry, theater, fiction, and storytelling–most free–at more than 15 venues throughout the city.

Word X Word 2011 has several new elements, such as a block party this Sunday, August 14, from 3 – 8 pm; the first spoken word contest for high school students, the winner of which will perform during the Festival finale at The Colonial Theatre; and the inclusion of narrative fiction with readings by a selection of nationally recognized novelists and short story writers curated by local author Brendan Mathews, whose own work was included in The Best American Short Stories 2010. And in late-breaking news, Benson has announced that Massachusetts governor Deval Patrick has joined the roster to read excerpts from his memoir, A Reason to Believe.

What's not new is the festival's focus on a stunning assortment of emerging singer/songwriters and spoken-word superstars, the latter curated by four-time National Poetry Slam champion Taylor Mali, who divides his time between New York, the Berkshires, and the rest of the world, where he leads writing workshops, curates readings, and judges poetry slams. Mali is a New York City native whose family has lived there since the 1600s; his great-great-grandfather and namesake, John Taylor Johnston (in portrait above, with Mali) was the founding president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He's also is a former school teacher best known for his poem What Teachers Make and his advocacy for teachers. He and his wife, poet Marie-Elizabeth Mali, have had a home in the Berkshires since 2007 and have been involved with Word X Word since its inception.

John Taylor Johnston

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Archives

John Taylor Johnston

Collection Summary
Title: John Taylor Johnston Collection
Creator: Johnston, John Taylor, 1820-1893.
Dates: 1832-1981
Extent: Approximately 2.5 linear feet (2 boxes, 9 custom book boxes)
Abstract: John Taylor Johnston was a founder of The Metropolitan Museum of Art and was elected its first President in 1870. He held this position until he retired in 1889; the institution's Trustees subsequently voted him Honorary President for Life. The collection consists of travel journals, visitor books, correspondence, family histories, and other unpublished and published documents relating to the life, travels and family history of John Taylor Johnston. The bulk of this material relates to Johnston's personal affairs and is not concerned with The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Johnston - Mali - de Forest - Lockwood Connection

1404. Robert Weeks DeForest (Henry Grant DeForest , Lockwood DeForest , Nehemiah DeForest , Samuel DeForeest , David DeForeest , Isaac DeForeest , Jesse , Jean , Melchoir III , Melchior II , Melchoir , Gaspard , Simon , Jean , Thomas , Louis , Jehan , Alard , Giles de L'Estoc , Gerard , Herbert , Waitier , Herbert ) was born on 25 Apr 1848. He died on 6 May 1931.

Robert married Emily Johnston on 12 Nov 1872.

[Notes]

They had the following children.

2195 M i Johnston DeForest was born on 5 Sep 1873.

Johnston married Mary Elizabeth Ogden. Mary was born on 30 Nov 1883.

Johnston also married Natalie Coffin. Natalie was born in 1880. She died in 1906.

+ 2196 M ii Henry Lockwood DeForest was born in 1875.
+ 2197 F iii Ethel DeForest was born in 1876. She died in 1959.
+ 2198 F iv Frances Emily DeForest was born in 1878.

1405. Lockwood DeForest (Henry Grant DeForest , Lockwood DeForest , Nehemiah DeForest , Samuel DeForeest , David DeForeest , Isaac DeForeest , Jesse , Jean , Melchoir III , Melchior II , Melchoir , Gaspard , Simon , Jean , Thomas , Louis , Jehan , Alard , Giles de L'Estoc , Gerard , Herbert , Waitier , Herbert ) was born on 23 Jun 1850.

Lockwood married Meta Kemble on 11 Nov 1880.


They had the following children.

2199 F i Judith Brasher DeForest.
2200 M ii Alfred Victor DeForest.
2201 M iii Lockwood DeForest.

1407. Henry Wheeler DeForest (Henry Grant DeForest , Lockwood DeForest , Nehemiah DeForest , Samuel DeForeest , David DeForeest , Isaac DeForeest , Jesse , Jean , Melchoir III , Melchior II , Melchoir , Gaspard , Simon , Jean , Thomas , Louis , Jehan , Alard , Giles de L'Estoc , Gerard , Herbert , Waitier , Herbert ) was born on 29 Oct 1855.

Henry married Julia Gilman Noyes on 22 Aug 1898.


They had the following children.

2202 F i Julia Mary DeForest.
2203 M ii Henry Wheeler DeForest.
2204 M iii Charles Noyes DeForest.
2205 F iv Alice Delano DeForest.

1408. Louise Woodruff DeForest (James Goodrich DeForest , Lockwood DeForest , Nehemiah DeForest , Samuel DeForeest , David DeForeest , Isaac DeForeest , Jesse , Jean , Melchoir III , Melchior II , Melchoir , Gaspard , Simon , Jean , Thomas , Louis , Jehan , Alard , Giles de L'Estoc , Gerard , Herbert , Waitier , Herbert ) was born on 2 Feb 1853.

Louise married Maynard Hollister in 1886.


They had the following children.

2206 F i Louise Maynard Hollister.

1410. Eliza Hallett DeForest (James Goodrich DeForest , Lockwood DeForest , Nehemiah DeForest , Samuel DeForeest , David DeForeest , Isaac DeForeest , Jesse , Jean , Melchoir III , Melchior II , Melchoir , Gaspard , Simon , Jean , Thomas , Louis , Jehan , Alard , Giles de L'Estoc , Gerard , Herbert , Waitier , Herbert ) was born on 28 Mar 1856.

Eliza married Charles M Russell in 1885.


They had the following children.

2207 M i Louis DeForest Russell.

1416. Moulton DeForest (Isaac Newton DeForest , Joseph DeForest , David DeForest , Samuel DeForeest , David DeForeest , Isaac DeForeest , Jesse , Jean , Melchoir III , Melchior II , Melchoir , Gaspard , Simon , Jean , Thomas , Louis , Jehan , Alard , Giles de L'Estoc , Gerard , Herbert , Waitier , Herbert ) was born in 1839.

Moulton married Mary A Thomas.


They had the following children.

2208 M i Thomas DeForest.
2209 M ii Augusta DeForest.
2210 F iii Gwendolyn DeForest.

April 12, 2012

The Library of Congress will make Frances Benjamin Johnston's photographs of gardens accessible online on Friday. Capturing the Gardens of America

Library of Congress Prints and Photography

Biography of Frances Benjamin Johnston

Although your editor does not have the time to spare to confirm her suspicion, this world renown GCA photographer was most likely related to our own member Frances Johnston Mali.

Excerpt:
Garden photography evolved with professional landscape architecture at the turn of the 20th century. Johnston produced her first landscape and garden images while photographing The White House in the late 1890s. In 1903, she photographed the northern California ranch designed by Albert C. Schweinfurth for education reformer Phoebe Apperson Hearst. Then, in October 1904 Country Life in America published Johnston's photographs of the Mission Revival house and garden. The magazine was a mainstay for the photographer's work before the 1920s when The Garden Magazine, The House Beautiful, House & Garden* and Town & Country became leading clients.

The two photographers formed a professional partnership in 1913, the year twelve garden clubs founded The Garden Club of America. As part of its mission to promote garden design, in 1914, the club began a collection of photographs of member gardens. Already established as photographers through their published images of Daniel W. Langton's Princeton, New Jersey garden for Moses Taylor Pyne; J. Pierpont Morgan's Cragsland estate along the Hudson River; and Long Island North and South Shore houses, Johnston and Hewitt produced a large body of work for the club's photography initiative. They worked in black and white and autochrome, an early color process. The Glen Cove garden of George D. Pratt, designed by James L. Greenleaf, the Southampton garden of Colonel Thomas H. Barber designed by the Olmsted firm and Gray Gardens in Easthampton by author Anna Gilman Hill were among Johnston and Hewitt's work from this period.

*We had two members who had their gardens photographed for Home & Garden magazine:

Mrs. John Brokaw (Annie Wright Mason) Dumont '15

Mrs. George Phelps (Ella Hartley) Mellick '15

At first glance, these gardens do not look as if they were photographed by Frances.

Frances Johnston

William Adolphe Bouguereau (1825-1905) "Portrait of Eva and Frances Johnston" Estimate: $800,000-$1,200,000 The sisters depicted in this tender portrait by Bouguereau are the daughters of John Taylor Johnston, one of the founders and the first president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. With their elegant dresses of red, white, and blue, Bouguereau's masterful portrait subtly suggests the arrival of French art on American soil, an endeavor in which their father was most intimately involved. The upcoming sale marks the painting's first public exhibition, having been maintained within the Johnston family collection since its completion in 1869.

John Taylor Johnston

New York Times April 6, 1893

JOHN TAYLOR JOHNSTON'S WILL

Small Bequests to the Museum of Art and New York University

John Taylor Johnston's will disposing of a million and a half dollars was filed yesterday in the Surrogate's office. Mr. Taylor was the well-known railroad man and financier, who died on March 24 of this year at his residence, 8 Fifth Avenue. The will names John Herbert Johnston, the testator's son, and Henry E. Coe and Robert W. De Forest, sons-in-law, as executors.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, which Mr. Johnston was at one time President, and the University of the City of New York, of which he as a graduate, get $10,000 each. The residue of the estate, after $1,000 is given to each of the grandchildren, is bequeathed in four equal parts to his children, John Herbert Johnston of 20 Washington Square, Emily J. De Forest of 7 Washington Square, Frances Johhnsont Mail of 8 Fifth Avenue, and Eva Johnston Coe of 5 East Tenth Street. If any child dies without issue, his or her share is to be divided equally among the survivors.

There are five grandchildren under age – Johnston De Forest, Ethel De Forest, Frances Emily De Forest, Emily Coe, and Rosalie Coe. Of these, Thomas Nolan of 131 East Twelfth Street is appointed guardian. The only other grandchild is Henry L. De Forest.

The estate is composed of realty and personalty in about equal parts.

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F60917F9345B1A738DDDAF0894DC405B8385F0D3

April 12, 2012

The Library of Congress will make Frances Benjamin Johnston's photographs of gardens accessible online on Friday. Capturing the Gardens of America

Library of Congress Prints and Photography

Biography of Frances Benjamin Johnston

Although your editor does not have the time to spare to confirm her suspicion, this world renown GCA photographer was most likely related to our own member Frances Johnston Mali.

Excerpt:
Garden photography evolved with professional landscape architecture at the turn of the 20th century. Johnston produced her first landscape and garden images while photographing The White House in the late 1890s. In 1903, she photographed the northern California ranch designed by Albert C. Schweinfurth for education reformer Phoebe Apperson Hearst. Then, in October 1904 Country Life in America published Johnston's photographs of the Mission Revival house and garden. The magazine was a mainstay for the photographer's work before the 1920s when The Garden Magazine, The House Beautiful, House & Garden* and Town & Country became leading clients.

The two photographers formed a professional partnership in 1913, the year twelve garden clubs founded The Garden Club of America. As part of its mission to promote garden design, in 1914, the club began a collection of photographs of member gardens. Already established as photographers through their published images of Daniel W. Langton's Princeton, New Jersey garden for Moses Taylor Pyne; J. Pierpont Morgan's Cragsland estate along the Hudson River; and Long Island North and South Shore houses, Johnston and Hewitt produced a large body of work for the club's photography initiative. They worked in black and white and autochrome, an early color process. The Glen Cove garden of George D. Pratt, designed by James L. Greenleaf, the Southampton garden of Colonel Thomas H. Barber designed by the Olmsted firm and Gray Gardens in Easthampton by author Anna Gilman Hill were among Johnston and Hewitt's work from this period.

*We had two members who had their gardens photographed for Home & Garden magazine:

Mrs. John Brokaw (Annie Wright Mason) Dumont '15

Mrs. George Phelps (Ella Hartley) Mellick '15

At first glance, these gardens do not look as if they were photographed by Frances.

Email April 23, 2013

name: Michael Barker
email: barker3320@aol.com
phone:

message:

I noticed that the page on John Taylor Johnston suggests that the photographer Frances Benjamin Johnston might somehow be related to JTJ. She was not.

My wife is great-grand-daughter of Pierre Mali and so the great-great-grand-daughter of JTJ.

If you have any questions about either JTJ or PM, please let me know.

Regards,

Michael Barker

www.amazon.com

Gardens For A Beautiful America 1895 - 1935 by Frances Benjamin Johnston

Plainfield From Johns(t)on Drive

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

Residence of Mrs. Pierre Mali, 843 Front Street

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

1925 Meeting Minutes

May 13, 1925 Meeting Minutes

1915 - 1923 List of Meetings

1918 Meeting Minutes

Additional information on the Johnstons

found in the file for Mrs. David Hall (Alice Story) Rowland '18

From the Netherwood Neighborhood Association

John Taylor Johnston's summer house

Written on the photograph is "Hyde East Front Street" – did the house pass to the Hyde family before being demolished?

Johnston Gate House

1941 Courier-News Plainfield Merits Classification as 'City of Beautiful Trees'

November 30, 2013: Found in Barbara Tracy Sandford's memorabilia. Written by PGC Member Mrs. Garret Smith

"I call Plainfield the City of Beautiful Trees," and out-of-town visitor remarked to me the other day. "My business takes me to many towns about this size clear across the country. Trees, or their lack, always impress me most about a town. Beautiful building can't make up for the lack of them. Many towns seem to have choice trees only in one or two sections. Others have only a few tree-lined avenues. But every part of Plainfield has not only interesting individual trees, but long stretches of streets where treetops meet in green arches above the traffic. That doesn't just happen. This town must have been founded by tree-lovers."

The stranger was right, as many specimen trees on old private properties testify. They are trees that were rare and expensive when planted years ago. A number of well-to-do property owners appreciated trees and collected choice kinds. The street trees of about this age also show that far-sighted men planned to make the town keep growing more beautiful in ways that everyone enjoys.

Trees have always been essential to Plainfielders. In the early days elms stretched down North Ave. from east to the west city boundaries. Many still remain now 70 to 80 years old. That avenue helped to establish Plainfield's policy of "beautiful trees for every street."

Value Appreciated
The city's mayors and councilmen have appreciate the value of trees . . . Ginko . . . now ripening, in the edge of the station grounds, near the corner of the drug store.

Among its immediate neighbors, at this station are a Red Maple, Austrian Pine, English Elm, Horse Chestnut, several Magnolias and a Sycamore Maple, the latter near the middle of the grass oval. Purple Beech, White Pine and two Hemlocks stand at the west exit.

Lindens at Spot
On the North Ave. side of the station is an interesting clump of three Lindens – no two alike. Evergreens are represented by three Scotch Pines, an Austrian and a White Pine, and a tall, slender Spruce. In this little park are also Sugar Swamp and Silver Maples, and a clump of low-growing Beeches. Looking upward to the railroad level, one sees, besides the specimen Ginko mentioned, two Catalpas, a Weeping Mulberry, two Red Maples and an Austrian Pine. A big Pin Oak, two or three Scarlet Oaks, a . . . .

. . . boats glided over Green Brook and when Plainfield and New York social leaders came in big carriages, drawn by spanking teams, to garden musicals, gay dinners, dances and teas as the Johnston's guests.

All of Plainfield's school grounds are constantly growing more attractive. Environment of vines, trees, plants and shrubs awaken appreciation of Nature's beauty that is a lifelong source of pleasure.

Hubbard School, one of the city's architectural gems, has always been regarded as in a class by itself. Its beauty is greatly enhanced by choice plant material on its ample grounds, partly framed by Barberry. Large specimen Japanese Yews arrest attention, along with Sourwoods, or "Lily-of-the-Valley Tree," whose branches bear long one-sided racemes of white flowers in summer and whose leaves are vivid scarlet in autumn.

White Pine, Cedar, Pfitzer Junipers are shadowy evergreen foils for airy bloom of Weeping Japanese . . .

Among them are the old Elms in North Ave., mentioned before; London Planes from Watchung Ave. to Terrill Rd.; Ash in St. Mary's Ave.; Pin Oaks and Planes in Park Ave.; Sycamore Maples in Bellevue Ave.; Norway Maples in both Leland and Monroe Ave. sections. Tulip trees now grow in Central St., along Maxon School grounds, and Ginkos in Landsdowne Terr. In Cleveland Ave., near Grace Church, the lacy foliage of the decorative Mountain Ash, or Rowan Tree, contrasts at this season with bunches of bright hollylike berries. Many years ago the late Simeon Cruikshank planted Buckeyes along his corner property ["Sacmoore" 831 Belvidere] at Belvidere and Watchung Aves. Much smaller than familiar Horse Chestnut and with brighter pink flower-spikes they have always been greatly admired. In autumn the brilliant, scarlet, star-shape leaves of Liquid-ambar, or Sweetgum, glorifies a patch of Ravine Rd. After a shower, or if bruised, the foliage is fragrant. Corky bark and thorny-skinned fruit like little apples, complete this tree's unique characteristics.

Close to 150 trees, of many species, are part of the Muhlenberg Hospital landscape. The long front path beneath the Maples, and on the west the wide Elm-bordered stretch of green lawn leading to a quiet pool, with its amusing little bronze fountain figure, form two vistas of ever-increasing charm. Wide borders of intermingling trees and flowering shrubs frame the property.

The purple leaves of the two Schwedler Maples attract much attention in the spring. So do the Apple trees and Dogwoods that trim the grounds like big bouquets, set off by Hemlocks, Spruce and Pine. Chinese Dogwoods, given by graduate nurses, are especially prized. Devoted interest of the late Marie Louis, nature-lover and for years superintendent of Muhlenberg, helped turn once common-plant "grounds" into a tree-shaded garden spot both restful and diverting.

Dogwood Favorites
Native Dogwoods are favorites among the city's flowering trees. The Plainfield Garden Club, on its own recent 25th birthday, gave small grove of these "Jewels of the Forest" to Cedar Brook Park. On the T. H. Van Bosckerck grounds on Prospect Ave. is the handsome large group of Dogwoods on private property in town. On Dr. Elmer Weigel's lawn on Belvidere Ave [630 Belivdere – see Mrs. Joost]. Chinese Dogwood bears much larger and later blooms. Directly across the street from this, and close to the sidewalk, a low-growing Witch Hazel (Hamanelis) bears yellow Forsythia-like flowers in winter.

Before the Talmadge dwelling [714 Belvidere], in the the same street, are majestic Copper Beeches. In early days Beeches were popular selections for large grounds. Probably the finest Weeping Beech in the city grows in deserted grounds in Central Ave. Nearby on the Witon property is a huge Purple Beech – both almost perfect. Farther down the avenue, on Wardlaw School grounds [1030 Central Avenue - see Below], is a fine old Ginko.

The only Katsura Tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum) in Plainfield is owned by former Mayor Leighton Calkins [929 Madison – see Below]. Its strange trunk and heart-shaped leaves, purplish when young, are unusual. It grows in front of the house in Madison Ave.

Unique among Plainfield trees is a native Orange of the South. it is today laden with velvety, green fruit in Mrs. Howard Tracy's Prospect Ave. garden [1331 Prospect Ave]. Probably nowhere else in this region can one be found, according to Shade Tree Commissioner Lithgow Hunter. Sent north from Maryville College in Tennessee 50 years ago. . . .

. . . residents seeking permanent homes. These officials have always planned with the Shade Tree Commission since its organization, so that every year more trees come marching in. Some fill vacancies in the ranks of old trees along old streets. Others shade tireless blocks in new sections of town.

For the last 17 years, one man, Sidney Durant, the Shade Tree Commission's expert supervisor of trees, has directed its work. it includes feeding, pruning, watering and repairing the city's 25,000 street trees, as well removal of dead or too-badly-injured trees and planting new ones. For nearly 20 years Thomas F. Hylan has served on the commission, of which he is now president.

Of all the city's trees, the strange Ginko, or Maiden-hair tree, grows to a height of 80 feet or so. The delicacy of its little leaves, resembling those of the Maiden-Hair fern, contrast sharply with the arrow-straight upswept branches of what is considered one of the most beautiful and unusual of all hardy exotic trees. The Ginko's origin is a mystery. Nowhere on earth is it been found wild, yet fossils prove it was once scattered all over the world. Nothing else today resembles the Ginko, so paleontologists reason that some series of misfortunes destroyed all missing links. Today's closest relative is the Yew family, thought at a glance they appear as unrelated as a Chines and a New England Yankee.

Planted Near Temples
Early explorers found Ginkos planted around Chinese and Japanese temples. The Chinese called in Yin-Hing – "Silver Apricot" – referring to the greenish-yellow, fleshy fruit having a single stone. This fruit, slightly roasted, was served throughout the formal Chinese dinners which lasted all day. Guests nibble the finlike fruit between courses as an aid to digestion.

The Ginko did not reach England until 1754. The first specimen in this country was planted in Woodlands Cemetery, Philadelphia. In 1889 the Ginko fruited for the first time there on the grounds of Charles Wister. fifty years ago these newcomers to America were not only scarce, but expensive. That Plainfield has so many beautiful old specimens of these trees is possibly due to the fact that John Taylor Johnston, then president of the New Jersey Central Railroad and a resident of this city, was not only a patron of the arts, but a lover of trees. Each of Plainfield's railroad station grounds had not only fine specimens of the Ginko, but also a varied collection of other trees, evidently selected by an expert.

Netherwood, nearest the Johnston home [see Below], was especially favored. Here, beside the north track, stands a regal Ginko, carefully located as an artist would plan his canvas, so that its top is etched against the sky. This emphasizes the beauty of leaf and branch and trunk as viewed from the eastbound station platform. ?? may see a younger . . .

. . . White Oak and Elms are among the trees fringing the western boundary.

"The property as a whole is a remarkable small arboretum," said a well-known visiting tree scientist recently, after inspecting the Netherwood station park. "In my travels I've seen no other railroad station grounds with such a variety of trees. This landscaping, too, I can see was done by an expert."

In employing such an expert to beautify the railroad property in his home town, Mr. Johnston was carrying out the spirit of the statement he made at the time the Metropolitan Museum of New York City was founded at his Fifth Ave. mansion. He was quoted as saying:

"The public ought to have a chance to see, to hear and to know more about whatever feeds the mind and is inspiring, if we are to have the best kind in America."

To even a novice in landscaping, the Netherwood station grounds show that underlying motive. One could not imagine either the south or north oval either diminished of enlarged – so true is their scale. It would be hard to find more beautiful flowering trees than those Magnolias; or more intriguing contrast of leaf, branch and trunk than offered by the Ginko and the Pine. On the north side the clump of Lindens, combined with an apparently outcropping "pudding stone," make a "garden composition" that suggest to the home gardener similar effective arrangements, though not necessarily identical in material.

Beautiful Estate
Some old residents recall that Mr. Johnston's estate in E. Front St. was lavishly beautified with choice trees, as were those of most of his neighbors along that splendid avenue of that day. Some of those estates are still being kept up as homes of their owners today, while others have been divided into beautiful setting for developments of small homes.

The Johnston estate, however, furnished the basis of another public development of beauty spots. A portion of it became the site of the new Barlow School [see Below]. These school grounds are said to be unequaled in the state in the variety and placement of superb trees. What some consider the finest Weeping Beech in town grows here, also two majestic evergreens, one a White Pine, the other a Spruce. Elm, Ginko, Cucumber tree, Ash, "Button Ball," Willow and Sugar Maple are also outstanding.

Two of the most interesting, although not the most conspicuous of the group, are a true English Oak (Quercus Robur) and a Yellow Wood (Cladrastis lute). The first has smallish leaves, thick-set upon the branch. A strange characteristic is that the stem adheres to the side of the acorn. The writer knows of only one other English Oak in town – Central Ave., near Stelle Ave.

The Yellow Wood has wisteria-like racemes of white fragrant flowers in midsummer. Leaves resemble the locust. Another fine specimen grows on the property of Miss Laura Detwiller in Hillside Ave.

All were here in the days . . . .

. . . when Cherry, Dogwood and Crab. In early spring the large leathery-leaved evergreen Japanese Andromeda (Pieris) unfold delicate, coppery leaves and waxy white racemes of tiny flowers. These are classified as shrubs, but on these favorable grounds, are almost small trees of exceptional beauty.

Preservation is Theme
The good judgement of George R. Zimmer, who for many years has supervised Plainfield's school grounds, is shown not only in what has already been accomplished, but in developments being planned. "What can we preserve?" not "What can we cut down?" is his motto. Before clearing the recently purchased grounds adjoining Maxon School was begun this summer, Mr. Zimmer marked every large and small tree that "might some day be of use somewhere." Workmen were warned to cut not one of these.

The City Police Headquarters and also the old Public Library have a setting of trees. The little Library Park is said to have been reserved from farmland whose native trees – mostly, Red, White and Black Oaks – were left standing. Across the facade of Fire Headquarters are a Ginko, a London Plane and Horse Chestnut – each an unusually fine specimen. Among Netherwood firemen are enthusiastic gardeners. Each spring many of Plainfield's 3,000 commuters take great interest in "what the boys are doing to their grounds." Everything planted seems to do well, even the peonies, marking the line between the firemen's parklike grounds and the railroad cinder-bed.

On spacious City Hall grounds is not only a variety of evergreens, but also of deciduous trees, selected for beauty of form, leaf or flower. Two Cryptomeria, "Aristocrats of Evergreens," donated recently by Plainfield's near-centenarian, Miss Isabel Tweedy, and a tall Himalayan Pine in town was brought here by the late Harry K. Tetsuka, to adorn his well-known Japanese garden in Belvidere Ave [556 Belvidere].

The Holly tree on City Hall grounds is another tree found on but few properties. It was donated by Herbert Moody [see Below], when The Courier-news gift of 5,000 bulbs roused a widespread interest in more beautiful grounds, in keeping with the architectural beauty of the building. Evergreens were given immediately by former Mayor Marion F. Ackerman, and a Dogwood by Thomas F. Hylan, whose keen interest in the property extends back to 25 years ago, when, as Councilman, he served on the City Hall Building Committee. This season former Councilman Orville G. Waring, son of the late Mayor Waring, donated several valuable Pfitzer Junipers.

Not Monotonous
Many species of trees planted along our city streets make green lanes that are not monotonous.

. . . . stood for most of that time in this sheltered nook. The fruits, when ripe, are decorative, but not edible. Edible oranges grown only on grafted stock. The thorny branches of this small tree resemble Osage Orange, or "Indian Bow-wood."

Figs are also ripening now in Plainfield. Within a stone's throw of Netherwood station is Watson Ave. It is only three blocks long and from spring to fall it glows with flowers. In one little garden grows a carefully tended Fig tree that bears fruit yearly. Each fall the owner buries his Fig tree in a deep trench well below the frost-line. Each spring it is dug out and reset.

One great wide-spreading Mulberry (Morus Multicaulus) towers far above the roof-top of Leslie R. Fort's home in Cedarbrook Rd. This venerable tree is the historic survivor of a Mulberry plantation, established during the "Multicaulus Mania," by the late Senator Martine [11 Brook Lane, see Below], as a venture to yield gigantic profits on his farm that included the Cedar Brook tract. He believed with others that New Jersey would be one of the world's silk-growing centers. Convinced that silk was to take the place of cotton, New Jersey farmers set out thousands of acres of "silk-worm mulberries" about 100 years ago, only to cut down the trees when the bubble burst.

One of the most varied private collection of trees in the city is that of Miss Jessie D. Munger in Prospect Ave. In recent years instructors at Rutgers University have brought students to these grounds to study the trees and other plant material as well as the garden design. Last spring the general public enjoyed the same privilege.

Love of trees is part of the tradition that has helped mould Plainfield into a city of pleasant homes on quiet streets. The late Jonas Lie, one of our city's most distinguished citizens, sensed this characteristic of our community. In the Common Council Chamber at City Hall hangs his gift – a mountain woodland scene, interpreted by his illustrious brush as an inspiring message to us all.

To learn more about the history of some of the people and places mentioned in this article, visit these links:

[Maxson School]
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Elizabeth B. Atwood) '15

[630 Belvidere]
Joost, Mrs. Sherman Brownell (Marie Murray) '19

[714 Belvidere]
Dunbar, Mrs. William Kuhn '17
Rock, Mrs. Robert B. '43
Runkle, Mrs. Harry Godley (Jennie Fitz Randolph) '15
Whitehead, Mrs. James Harold (Jean Fitz-Randolph Heiberg) '43

[1030 Central Avenue – duCret School]
Huntington, Mrs. Howard (Agnes Fales Strong) '19
McGee, Mrs. Walter Miller (Mary Alice Yerkes) '22
Zerega, Miss Bertha Virginia '23

[929 Madison Avenue]
Ackerman, Mrs. Marion S.(Sarah M. Wills) '35

[Johnston Estate on Front Street & Netherwood]
Mali, Mrs. Pierre (Frances Johnston) '18

[Barlow School East front Street – former estate of "Blojocamavi" owned by Lewis V. Fitz Randolph/Johnston estate]
Barlow, Mrs. Carlton Montague (June Simms) '70
Barlow, Mrs. DeWitt Dukes (Mary Lee Brewer), Jr. '65
Dunbar, Mrs. William K., Jr. (Elizabeth or "Libby" Hail Barlow) '47
Perkins, Mrs. Seymour, Jr. (Esther Moody Barlow) '49
(Also see Mrs. Runkle and Mrs. Whitehead above)

[City Hall]
Moody, Mrs. George T. '22
Perkins, Mrs. Seymour, Jr. (Esther Moody Barlow) '49

[11 Brook Lane, Martine House]
MacLeod, Mrs. Robert F. (Carolyn Waring) '55

1941 Courier-News Plainfield Merits Classification as 'City of Beautiful Trees'

1941 Courier-News Plainfield Merits Classification as 'City of Beautiful Trees'

East Woodbridge, NJ

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Frederick Law Olmsted

Olmsted Associates Records: Job Files, 1863-1971; Files; 7182; Mali estate; Plainfield, N.J., 1923-1935

August 4, 2020 Calling All Photographers!

The GCA Bulletin will be featuring club projects relating to Frederick Law Olmsted in the Fall 2021 issue. Read here:

Dear Zone IV Bulletin Club Chairmen,
I hope you all have received your Summer 2020 issue of the Bulletin and have had a chance to look through it.  There is an article on Frederick Law Olmsted that is of particular interest because the Bulletin Committee is planning to highlight some of his gardens in the Fall 2021 issue.  The gardens we are planning to focus on must have these 2 criteria:  they must be a public park, and there must be a "passionate connection" to your club or to a club member. Do you know of any gardens that fit this criteria?  We want to identify these gardens fairly soon so that photographs may be taken of them in all the seasons.  Please let me know and we can brainstorm together to consider if it could fit the requirements.
Thank you so much for all you do, and I hope all good things for you in these beautiful August days.
Tucker Trimble Zone IV Bulletin Rep


Well, dare we say there is another club in GCA that has a more "passionate connection" to an Olmsted garden in a public park??

Photography Committee Chair Lisa Appel will be assisting us in coordinating some excellent photographs of the garden. We are please asking all members to take out their high resolution cameras (if you have them) and start photographing the garden. Yes, we do have some excellent photos from years past, but current ones would be much appreciated.

The Bulletin does accept iPhone photos, please just make sure you forward them in "Actual Size" so they have the highest resolution. All photos can be sent directly to Tucker @tjtrimble@aol.com but please also CC: plainfieldgc@gmail.com.

This is an excellent socially distanced activity and with not much happening in the garden club world at the moment, please embrace this excellent project!

News: The Garden Club of America to Support "Olmsted 200"

Check out the Olmsted Job Map (here) and see the local Olmsted design projects. They include:
Plainfield
1. Henry C. Irons [Mrs. Henry Clay (Helen B.) Irons '15]
2. Green Brook Park
3. Dr. F. C. Ard [Mrs. Frank C. (Idah Catherine Chappelle) Ard '17]
4. Library Square
5. Kenyon Gardens – extension of Cedar Brook
6. Cedar Brook Park
7. Mali Estate [Mrs. Pierre (Frances Johnston) Mali '18]

Westfield
1. Fairview Cemetery
2. A. R. Rule in Wychwood

Others
1. Rahway River Park
2. Watchung Reservation
3. Baltusrol Golf Club
4. Union County Park Commission
5. Warinanco Park