Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Heely, Mrs. Laurence Sturdivant (Pauline Mary "Polly" Gates) '52

1953 Address: Rahway Road, Plainfield

1970 - 1986 Address: 1301 Rahway Road, Plainfield

1984: Active
1985 - 1986: Sustaining
1987 - 1988: Deceased

1988 NOTE: Polly Heely passed away

Mother-in-law is Mrs. Augustus V. Heely '15

Her mother is Mrs. LeRoy Gates (Patterson) '20

October 12, 2010 Obituary for Mrs. Heely' son Leroy Patterson Heely

Leroy Patterson Heely

Published:
Tuesday, October 12, 2010 2:17 PM EDT
BRUNSWICK – Leroy Patterson Heely, age 82, passed away October 5, 2010.

He was born August 15, 1928 in Plainfield, NJ, and was the son of Laurence and Pauline Heely.

Mr. Heely attended schools in Plainfield and graduated from Phillips Academy, Andover, MA in 1947, and from Bowdoin College in 1951, where he was a member of Zeta Psi.

He married Nancy Parsons Topping, March 20, 1954 in Plainfield. Mrs. Heely died, July 14, 2003.

Mr. Heely was with Alcan Aluminum Corporation for twenty-five years prior to retiring in 1986. After his marriage Mr. Heely lived in Tenafly, NJ; Hudson, OH; Summit, NJ and then retired to Maine with his wife. An avid jazz fan and amateur cornetist since his early teens, he played with various jazz groups during his life and as a member of Maine Jazz Alliance was a jazz disc jockey on Bowdoin College radio station WBOR. He was active in Bowdoin alumni affairs and served as co-class agent and class secretary. He was a volunteer at Maine Maritime Museum.

He is survived by a daughter, Jane T. Heely, of Concord, NH; a son, Douglas A. Heely, his wife Gretchen, two granddaughters; Lydia and Grace; a brother, Laurence S. Heely, of Greenwich, CT, and two nieces.

A memorial service will be held at 10:30 a.m. Friday, October 29th at First Parish Church, Maine Street, Brunswick followed by a reception at the Alumni House at Bowdoin College.

For those unable to attend, condolences may be expressed at www.brackettfunerlhome.com.

Memorial Contributions may be made to Bowdoin College, Development Office, 4100 College Station, Brunswick, 04011-8342.

September 20, 1921 New York Times engagement announcement

1987 Archives

From the Corresponding Secretary file

Contributors in Marge Ladd's Memory for the Shakespeare Garden

Mrs. Philip Nash
Mrs. Lawrence Heely
Mrs. Richard Eckert
Mrs. Webster Sandford
Mrs. June [not legible]
Standish Ave and Wood Ave
Mrs. Bruce Reid
Mrs. Northrop Pond
Mrs. Alden De Hart
Mrs. E. J. Fitzpatrick
Mrs. William Elliot
Mrs. Charles Eaton Jr.
Mrs. William Shepherd

Total $445.00

1988 Archives

Contributions for the Polly Heely Memorial Fund

Mrs. Murray Rushmore
Mrs. E. J. Fitxpatrick
Mrs. F. Gregg Burger
Mrs. Philip Nash
Mrs. Frederic Pomeroy
Mrs. Alexander Kroll
Mrs. C. Northrop Pond
Mrs. Theodore Budenbach
Mrs. Homer Cochran
Mrs. Dabney Moon
Mrs. Webster Sandford
Mrs. Alden Loosli
Mrs. Robert Loughlin
Mrs. Robert de Graff
Horse Shoe Rad, [not legible] NY 11765
Total $430.00

From the Corresponding Secretary File, Jane Craig

May 25, 1988

45 Valley View Avenue
Summit, NJ 07901
May 25, 1988

Dear Ms. Craig

Thank you so much for your note regarding my mother, Pauline (Polly) Heely. We miss her very much. But, she had a good, long life.

My brother Larry and I were so thrilled over the establishment of the "Polly Heely Memorial." Mom really loved the Garden Club, and she would have loved this kind of gesture. Larry and I divided the list 50 - 50, and have acknowledged all the generous donors.

The Heely family appreciates all you have done.

Sincerely,

Roy Heely

Introduction in Rhyme of Skit for Garden Club Meeting May 1956 by Marge Elliott

Introduction in Rhyme of Skit for Garden Club Meeting May 1956 by Marge Elliott
To see the handwritten pages, see 1956 Archives


Introduction

Imagine that you are our garden club
type here the powers that be
What things go on in a garden club
you'll be surprised to see

The cast are famous actresses
All brought at great expense
So please be kind to others, my friends
Lest they should take offense.

The President's name is Hazel
And its Lockwood thats for sure
She presides as "to-the-manner-born"
But her arrangements they are poor.

Elizabeth King of Programs She's
all fluttering, cooing and coy.
To find the right speaker for just the right day
Is her constant delight and her joy.

Page 2

Ways and Means Chairman is Shirley
Barnhart we're meaning of course
She's breathless, naive and appealing
But hasn't the sense of a horse.

Marion Loizeaux is chairman
of membership looks la-de-da
But don't let that big hat delude you
She's a great one for making faux pas.

Fanny Day has charge of the minutes
Madame Secretary no less
But I must in confidence tell you
All her reports are a mess.

Heely that's Polly the Treasurer
Does weird things to the books
She was never good at her figures
And so for the balance gad - zooks!

Hospitality chairman is Barbara
Sandford's the rest of her name
She's very smart but sarcastic
the "country tweed type" is this dame.

Conservation is Anne Marie Seybold
She is a lady who knows what is what
She has no time for the frivilous
In her ways she's terribly sot.

Alice Mooney our wonderful speaker
Rosa Bunda she has quite a past
And now you know all that you need to
about our illustrious cast.

So please let the music be quiet
I see the house lights are low
Put on the fools and the spotlights
All right curtain ready? Let's go

New York Times September 20, 1921

Gates - Heely Engagement

Leroy H. Gates of 810 Central Avenue, Plainfield, N.J., has announced the engagement of his daughter, Miss Pauline Mary Gates, to Laurence S. Heely, son of Mr. and Mrs. Augustus V. Heely, also of Plainfield.

Miss Gates is a graduate of Mount Vernon Seminary, Washington, D.C. Mr. Heely was graduated from Yale, class of '16.

1982 May Designer Showhouse: 1127 Watchung Avenue

Cover to Page 25

Page 26 to Page 51

Page 52 to Page 75

Page 76 to Back Cover

1953 Check Book

No. 1000
March 31, 1953
Jeanette Stuart
Exhibitor Flower Show
$12.50

No. 1001
March 31, 1953
Harriette Halloway
Shipping charge on arboretum
$1.61

No. 1002
Mar. 31, 1953
G.C.A.
dues for Luce & Heely
1/2 year
$5.00

1953 Check Book

No. 1054
Nov. 18, 1953
Lucie Glover
speaker - Nov. meeting
(Program)
$50.00

No. 1055 (7)
Nov. 20, 1953
American Horticultural Soceity, ??
dues 1954
$5.00

No. 1058 (5),
Dec. 17, 1953
Polly Heely
Program expenses
$5.00
Dec. 17

August 20, 2012 Neltje Doubleday

Email from Mary Kent to Susan Fraser:

I am forwarding you a question from Marian Hill about Neltje Doubleday. I do not recall the name. I was sure if anyone knew it would be you.

Best, Mary


Email from Marian Hill (GCA President) to Mary Kent:
From: "marianwhill@earthlink.net" <marianwhill@earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: Neltje Doubleday
Date: August 18, 2012 8:50:04 PM EDT
To: Mary Kent <kentmary@me.com>
Reply-To: marianwhill@earthlink.net

Dear Mary,

I have a quick question: Was Neltje Blanchan Doubleday a member of your garden club. Thank you for verifying this for me. She is one of my favorite authors.

Hope you are enjoying these last wonderful summer days,
Marian


Susan Fraser's Response to Mary Kent:

Hi Mary,

I do indeed know that name and really wish we had more time to get over to the Plainfield Library and crack open our vault of records. Sadly as of today's date, I don't believe Neltje was a member. However, I am fairly certain she was the niece of founding member:

Mrs. James Wilde (Carrie T. Milliken) deGraff '15

I also think she was related to MANY of our Plainfield Garden Club members. Her son's wife, the famous Robert deGraff, sent in a memorial fund for Polly Heely in 1988. She was a local Plainfield girl and must have known Polly – perhaps grew up with her?

Neltje was part of the elite of Plainfield (and Plainfield Garden Club) both through her family and her husband, Frank Doubleday. Frank worked at first for Scribner publishing and his relative, Maxwell Perkins (related to MANY Plainfield GC ladies) was the very, very famous editor at Scribner's – he helped publish Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Wolfe and many more famous authors. (No coincidence that Scribners was the publishing company for Neltje.)

You can read about Maxwell here at this direct link:

Mrs. Seymour, Jr. (Esther Moody Barlow) Perkins '49

Neltje's daughter married a Babcock, a very prominent Plainfield family, and that puts her in the same family of Tabby Cochran, Somerset Hills GC through Tabby's husband.

Other Plainfield GC members that Neltje was related to are listed below. Most notably Archibald Cox – whose mother was a Plainfield Garden Club member. Jennifer Gregory who lives in the Cox home has promised me that one day we can come for a tour! Susan

Huntington, Miss Florence '15
Huntington, Mrs. Howard (Agnes Fales Strong) '19
Cox, Mrs. Archibald (Frances Perkins) '25
Nash, Mrs. Philip Wallace (Helen Babcock) '57
Nelson, Mrs. Arthur G. '32, President 1936 -1937, 1940 - 1942
Cochran, Mrs. Homer P. (Elisabeth Nash) '52 (Tabby's mother-in-law)
Harlow, Mrs. Edward Dexter (Elsie Cochran Martin) '15
Stewart, Mrs. Percy Hamilton (Elinor DeWitt Cochran) '15

Mrs. de Graff's son, Robert Fair de Graff, was the famous creator of paperback books! It was his wife that sent the memorial for Mrs. Heely in 1988.

Nina (Weil) - for exhibitors page 1

September 24, 2012 NOTE: This document was found in a folder in one of the "President Boxes." Also in the folder were job descriptions. Some were dated 1992 and 1996. Many had no date at all, like this document. In addition, this document had been photo copied and the last lines on each page are missing.

It is very nice to have an assistant to help you if possible & she can take over after 2 years for you.

The exhibitions committee tries to get girls to go into flower shows doing arrangements. You will find this is the hardest part of your job. it is lack of confidence in their ability & also they are scared that they won't do well.

The best help of all is flower arranging workshops, in club fower shows & the Polly Heely memorial fund for 3 girls to do quick flower arrangement at the meetings. To criticize pick Elis Loizeaux, Evie Madsen, Betty Hackman, M.L. Miner, Bernice Swain & myself. Hopefully you will acquire more commentator in time. Always check with the President if she wants you to do the Polly Heely fund arrangements at the next meeting. They may not have the time but it is such a good practice for everyone – the cards are in one of the bags & get Sally Booth, choose 3 girls every time. Then you fill out the year on their card so they will not be called again this year


[faded bottom of the first page]

There are 2 size containers so change each time & by flowers for the small or large ones. (I always love to go there if you forgotten how to go)

You must be at every board meeting or your assistant. Usually the Monday before the 3rd Wednesday meeting. Good flower shows in other towns should be announced at least a month ahead so members can make plans to attend. There are some flower shows we are required to enter – the Zone Meeting. You must enter two classes, start getting 2 girls lined up for this as early as possible so they can pick their class instead of being left with the dregs!

Encourage girls to go with you to the flower show – this helps them to interpret the schedules & range to imagination of the the flower arrangers. Good flower show – all N.J. G.C., & clubs, Philadelphia, Green Fingers in Greenwich & Greenwich G.C.

Also, if any of our members enter a flower show, it is your kindness to them to take them over there. It's a pain to drive & have things go to pieces in the car. And be sure to announce at the club meeting any ribbons won to encourage participation


[Last line faded.]

Nina (Weil) - for exhibitors page 2

1984 Bev Reid's party

Mrs. Heely

1984 Bev Reid's party

The woman on the left in the white dress may be Connie Foster speaking to Mrs. Day. Polly Heely speaks to the man facing away in the red and white plaid jacket.

Crescent Avenue Historic District

Crescent Area Historic District

Post Office: Plainfiled
Zip: 07060

WHAT'S NEAR
Hillside Avenue Historic District
Van Wyck Brooks Historic District

The Crescent Area Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. Portions of the text below were adapted from a copy of the original nomination document. [] Adaptation copyright 2013, The Gombach Group.

Prior to the arrival of the white man, the Lenni-Lenape Indians, part of the Algonquin Tribe, lived in this area of New Jersey. The Ice Age had endowed this area with a protective terrain, productive farmlands and forests and "wonderful pure air and springs." Indian trails became the highways and streets still in use in Plainfield today.Watchung Avenue located in the heart of the Crescent Area Historic District was once one of those trails. Remains of an Indian village and burial grounds have been found in the locality of First, Second and Third Place which are within the boundaries of the Crescent Avenue Historic District.

The first white settlers from Scotland and Holland arrived in the area in the 1680's. The first permanent settler was Thomas Gordon whose home was on Cedarbrook Road adjacent to Crescent Avenue, and whose land holdings covered most of what is present-day Plainfield. The enthusiastic letters back home detailing the healthful climate, plentiful game, fish and fowl, good soil and water brought other settlers to New Jersey, in spite of the "Flee by the salt marshes, most troublesome in the summer." These elements continued through the years to attract new residents.

During the Revolutionary War, patriots from area families served in militia regiments as foot soldiers and officers. An important battle, the Battle of the Short Hills, was fought in the area in June of 1777 and was instrumental in repelling the British in New Jersey. Some of the homes of those who supported the cause of the Revolution still exist today: The Drake House Museum, where Washington rested and briefed his officers, and the Vermule Homestead, where the officers were quartered.
Following the war, industry and transportation began to grow and take on added importance, contributing to the economic prosperity. Plainfield became officially recognized on April 1, 1800 with a population of 215. The Gordon Gazetteer in 1834 gave a glowing account of all the rich resources in Plainfield and noted that "the society is moral and religious."

It was in Plainfield in 1847 that the model for the public school system for the state was devised. Through the efforts of Dr. Charles H. Stillman, Plainfield physician, the New Jersey Legislature empowered the city to raise money by taxation in order to establish a public school system. An account of the day declares, "No one can measure the effect of this enlightened policy in extending the fame of the city and building up its prosperity." Many of the people who were active in education and cultural activities lived within the bounds of the Crescent Area Historic District.

The most influential force to the development of Plainfield was the railroad, which brought about a change in the social and economic character of the town. When a direct connection was made between Plainfield and New York City, c.1850, Plainfield became a commuter town.

During the Civil War, many local residents were involved in the fighting. General Sterling, a general on McCleland's staff, built his home and settled on First Place after the War.

Job Male, a philanthropist, who became known as "Plainfield's Grand Old Man", settled in Plainfield in 1867, following the Civil War. An inventor, he had simplified the loading of ferry slips with a patented leveling device. He purchased with Evan Jones, twenty four acres of land "in the suburbs and laid it out in village lots and streets and erected twenty substantial residences of fine architectural design, drawing the plans for them all himself." He was his own contractor and owned a greater part of the land that includes Crescent Avenue and Watchung Avenue. He designed a particularly distinctive style of architecture "stucco-walled, Mansard roofed, still standing today." He continued to build homes in different parts of the city until his possessions included more than one hundred Plainfield houses. His obituary notice in 1891 noted that "his purse always ready to respond to the calls of deserving charity." He was a public benefactor, making possible the Public Library and the Job Male Art Gallery, and donating the land for the hospital, the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church, and the Unitarian Church.

A Central New Jersey Times account in 1870 of "Our Town Improvements" wrote, "The improvements in building is the expression of a spirit that leads to progressive movements in other directions. The old houses are not recognizable with tints of brown and cream and olive, their plain roofs metamorphosed by pediments, fancy gables and cornices, their primitive simplicity converted into modern beauty by wings, bay windows, recessed projections and every variety of architectural development." The writer further comments on the "new houses, with their aspiring towers, French roofs and cupolas." It was the kind of community that led the Elizabeth Herald in May of 1888 to write, "The bustling activity of the city of Plainfield...is remarkable." And to conclude, "The next move in Plainfield, no doubt, will be the horse cars."
Plainfield had become a fashionable summer resort and eventually attracted many wealthy New York businessmen to settle here year 'round. The Gas Light Age evokes memories of Plainfield with theatricals, minstrel shows, roller rinks and other forms of entertainment. The site of many hotels, the Netherwood was reputed to be one of the "most healthful, comfortable and accessible inland summer resorts in the country."

By 1890, with substantial wealth and improvements, Plainfield continued to advance and prosper, attracting people of substance to live here. As successful businessmen and their families settled in the Crescent Avenue area, they became active in the cultural, religious, and educational affairs of the city. James W. Jackson, William D. Murray both served as presidents of the newly-formed YMCA. Henry C. Squires established the Hope Chapel on January 1, 1888 as a branch of the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church. Augustus Baldwin worked closely with Job Male in establishing the first free public library and the art gallery. In 1883 some of the first subscribers to "the last word in modern efficiency," the telephone, lived in the District: George Goddard, F.O. Herring, Leander Lovell, and the Dumond family. Many served as members of the Common Council.

After Job Male's death, Plainfield continued to be a highly desirable neighborhood and remained that way until the 1930's, when many of the large homes were converted to apartments. This process continues with single family residences almost non-existent today. The alterations for the most part are tastefully done and are not detrimental to the basic style and charm of the original building. This makes for a particularly fine collection of buildings appropriate to an Historic District.
Notes on Recollections of Long-time Residents of the Area
Longtime residents of Plainfield have been interviewed regarding their recollections of famous residents of this area. Those persons interviewed were Mrs. Lawrence Heely, Mrs. Henry Noss, Mrs. Dorothy Wills, Mrs. Helen Mygatt, Mr. John Harmon, Miss Gwen Cochran, Mrs. Dorothy DeHart, Miss Dorothy Leal, Mr. Alfred Genung, Mr. Alex Kroll, Mr. A.L.C. Marsh, Mrs. Hendrick Van Oss and others.

Many people have lived there who were outstanding in cultural fields, education and politics, as well as very successful professional and business men, active both locally and in New York City. Also educators and statesmen lived here.

John Carlson, a renown artist and member of the National Academy lived on 3rd Place as did Alex Seidel who achieved international fame for his designs for Steuben Glass. Another prominent artist who lived here was Thomas Hart Benton whose brother lived for many years on Crescent Avenue. Also William Gilbert, a well known illustrator, lived on Crescent Avenue.

The author of the White Cliffs of Dover, Alice Duer Miller, A. Van Dorn Honeyman, the famous historian, lived on 9th Street, and also Van Wyk Brooks another well-known author. Ernest Ackerman, a representative in U.S. Congress in the 1870's and his brother Marion Ackerman, who lived on Crescent Avenue, founded the Lone Star Cement Company and were deeply involved in many large national important financial and industrial enterprises.

The famous opera singer, Mario Caruso, married a Goddard and was frequently a visitor to Plainfield to the Goddard House at 213 East 9th Street. This family had a profound influence on the musical advancement of the entire area.

The area abounded in lawyers, judges and politicians, including four Mayors of Plainfield, and people in the foreign service for 25 years, such as Hendrick Van Oss, most recently served as ambassador to Madagascar and other countries.

The Crescent Avenue area was truly the heart of the town and boasted the most important and influential people of the period 1860 through 1920. The homes of these people reflect their taste, affluence and are a tangible piece of architectural history reflecting a glorious past.

Summary
The Crescent Area Historic District is a great deal more than a lot of old houses. It is probably one of the finest collections of Victorian architecture in the country. The term Victorian is all inclusive and embraces numerous styles that echo tastes and decorative devices of other periods of architecture from other countries and other times than the one in which the present buildings were constructed. The majority of these have what in architectural terms is referred to as Italianate which stems from the architectural styles popular in Italy going back as far as Byzantine derivative styles, and 15th century Venetian palaces. These variety of design styles result in the sudden surge of interest in European cultures and an attempt by the suddenly successful and new class of wealthy businessmen who were anxious to reflect their success in the work of finance in their homes. These interests were stimulated by their travels abroad and what they had seen, which was considered elegant. Thus we have Tuscan towers, Italian villas, Palazzo's with loggia and arcaded window and arches, Renaissance, Egyptian motifs, classical elements, and finally the exuberant eclectic styles throwing the more American traits of Carpenter Gothic and Stick style in for good measure. English architecture is also reflected with half timber, projecting gables, Eastlake influence, Queen Anne and Edwardian styles. The detail photos of these buildings reflect the painstaking craftsmanship of the builders and imaginative design abilities of the architects. It is truly a tangible record of the past which should be preserved as close to its original state as practical, in their new role of many being converted for multi-family use.

The Crescent Area Historic District is one of the finest collections of suburban Victorian architecture in New Jersey. Developed as a speculative real estate venture in the 1870's by Job Male, the buildings are an impressive presentation of Italianate and Second Empire style architecture of the mid to late 19th century. The houses were primarily designed for wealthy businessmen and, consequently, visages within the district still retain a fine elegance in their total ambiance of buildings and their association with landscaping, rustic streets, sidewalks, and trees.

References
Blumenson, John J.G. Identifying American Architecture
Central New Jersey Times, 1870-1885.
Clayton, W. Woodford. History of Union & Middlesex Counties, 1882.
Cochran, Jean Carter. The History of Crescent Avenue Church
The Courier News, History of Plainfield, 1964.
The Courier News, November 1-4-8, 1954.
Devlin, Harry. To Grandfather's House We Go.
Downey, Andrew Jackson. The Architecture of Country Houses.
The Drake House Museum & The Plainfield Public Library, Scrapbooks and Files.
Dunham, F.A. Atlas City of Plainfield and Boro of North Plainfield, 1894.
Fitzgerald & Co. (Pub.). Springfield, Massachusetts, Plainfield City Directory, 1876-7.
Gowans, Alan. Images of American Living.
Honeyman, A. Van Dorn. History of Union County, Volumes I, II, & III.
Lapsley, Howard G. History of Plainfield, 1942.
League of Women Voters. This is Plainfield, 1954.
McCabe, Wayne. Historic Tour – Plainfield, N.J.
Plainfield Area Chamber of Commerce, Plainfield Area, N.J.
Pub. by Plainfield Courier News. Plainfield & Vicinity in Pictures, 1926.
Plainfield Daily Press, Friday & Saturday, January 30, 31, 1891.
Plainfield Evening News, Saturday, May 23, 1888.
Plainfield & North Plainfield City Directory, 1879-80.
Plainfield & North Plainfield City Directory, 1894-5.
Pratt, Dorothy & Richard, A Guide to Early American Homes.
Smiley, F.T. History of Plainfield, 1891.
Charles H. Detwiller, Jr., A.I.A., Architect and Marilyn Rupp, Architectural Historian, Crescent Area Historic District, Union County, New Jersey, nomination document, 1979, National Park Service, National Register of Historic Places, Washington, D.C.

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

Monday, October 5, 1970 Courier-News

City garden club to host zone meeting

PLAINFIELD – Four national officers of the Garden Club of America, several national committee chairmen and a number of zone chairmen from all over the United States will be guests of the Plainfield Garden Club Wednesday and Thursday at a New Jersey Zone meeting here. They will join some 45 delegates from the 11 garden clubs in the New Jersey area affiliated with the Garden Club of America.

This marks the first time the 55 year-old Plainfield Garden Club, which has been a member of the national organization since 1944, has hosted a zone meeting. An extensive tour of the Garden Club's many beautification and conservation projects in Plainfield will be a major activity on the Wednesday schedule.

There also will be business, horticultural and conservation meetings and special guests speakers, tours of private gardens of two members, a garden walk along Rahway Road, a dinner at the Plainfield Country Club Wednesday evening and a cookout luncheon at the F. Willoughby Frost barn on Rahway Road Thursday.

The emphasis on the two day meetings will be conservation. Dr. E. Alan Bromely, professor of nuclear physics at Yale University, will discuss clean power and its relation to conservation efforts at the dinner Wednesday.

Other speakers will be Dr. Robert E. Loveland, associate professor of Zoology at Rutgers University, who will discuss ecology at a conservation meeting Thursday morning at a 9:30 a.m. in the home of Mrs. Alden R. Loosli, 927 Rahway Road.

Herb horticulture will be the topic Wednesday at a meeting in the Monday Afternoon Club, by Mrs. William Y. Dear Jr., a life member of the Herb Society of America.

The bus tour of Plainfield on Wednesday afternoon will include visits to the Vest Pocket garden in Park Avenue near Depot Place, which the Plainfield Garden Club planned and planted last year and cares for on a continuing basis; the Shakespeare Garden in Cedarbrook Park which was first conceived in 1927; the Iris Garden and the dogwood collection there; a number of plantings of shade trees in the downtown area and other beautification projects the club has undertaken or supported.

The garden walk, planned through gardens on Rahway Road, will take place Thursday morning from Mrs. Loosli's home at 11:30 a.m. following the conservation meeting.

The tour will include the grounds, home and gardens of Mr. and Mrs. Roswell H. Rausch, Mr and Mrs. DeWitt D. Barlow Jr., Mr. and Mrs. F. Willoughby Frost, Mr. and Mrs. David F. Sanders and Mr. and Mrs. David S. Foster and will conclude at the 200-year-old home of Mrs. Laurence S. Heely.

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Stevens will be hosts of a cocktail part for the delegates Wednesday evening, prior to the dinner at the country club at which Mr. and Mrs. Edwin J. Fitzpatrick and Mr. and Mrs. Frederick M. Lockwood will be hosts.

Mr. and Mrs. Rausch have planned a cocktail party prior to Thursday's cookout at the Frost barn and hosts at this luncheon will be Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Holman Jr. and Mr. and Mrs. David F. Sanders. Mrs. Holman is chairman of arrangements for the two-day meetings and Mrs. Sanders is co-chairman. Mrs. Arthur D. Seybold is president of the Plainfield Garden Club.

Monday, October 5, 1970 Courier-News

1973-1974 PGC Directory

Saturday, May 21, 1966 Something to Be proud of . . . Many Worked Together for County Park Display

Caption: DOGWOOD IN FLOWER – Cedar Brook Park's Dogwood Arboretum is a horticultural collection of 61 varieties that is the pride of Plainfield Garden Club and the Union County Park Commission. The display of dogwood blossoms is not the showiest, but it's the most complete in the country. Each year the trees in bloom are a joy to those who visit the planting or follow the drive through Cedar Brook Park. The trees in the Cornus Collections line both sides of the Park Drive.

Something to be Proud of . . .

Many Worked Together for County Park Display

Horticulturalists know it as the "Cornus Collection in Plainfield." The Plainfield Garden Club speaks of it as "our dogwood plantings in Cedar Brook Park." Since last year, the double line of pink and white flowering trees at the Park Ave. entrance to the park as been officially named "The Harriette R. Halloway Cornus Collection."

But to most admirers of the annual evidence that spring is here, it is just "those beautiful trees in the park" whether they refer to them by their botanical or popular name – cornus or dogwood.

Many who come to see the trees are unaware that this collection includes ore than 60 varieties of dogwood, every kind that can grow in this climate. While the trees are beautiful, it is the horticultural collection of so many varieties that counts to the credit of the Plainfield Garden Club even more than the display. It is not the greatest show, but it's the most complete collection.

Dr. Benjamin Blackburn of Drew University in Madison has remarked that this group of trees, growing in a compact reserved area, is a marked achievement on the part of the Union Count Park Commission, the Plainfield Garden Club and Miss Halloway, who served for more than 35 years as a volunteer consultant to the Park Commission and in keeping records of all the plantings.

Miss Halloway, for whom the grove is named, still watches for the flowering season of the dogwood. Now 91, Miss Halloway is a resident at the McCutchen Nursing Home, North Plainfield.

Among the personal possession she treasurers is the Distinguished Service Medal of the Garden Club of America. Also she is a fellow of the Royal Horticultural Society of England and a member of the American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboretums. She is a member of the Plainfield Garden Club and has earned recognition from the New York Botanical Gardens, American Horticultural Society and other organizations for her work and her writings about gardens, flowers, and flowering shrubs and trees.

A great part of the reward to her and the Plainfield Garden Club is that so many people can enjoy the cornus collection in the park. Miss Halloway says: "Each year the trees continue to be beautiful and a joy, if not forever, at least for many years."

THE CEDAR BROOK Park Dogwood Collection is unique, Dr. Blackburn believes. "None other is known to exist in this county," he said, "and a match for it is not be found growing in the Royal Botanic Gardens in London or in Edinburgh or other famous gardens in Great Britain and Europe."

The dogwood collection got its start in 1931 when W. R. Tracy, superintendent of the Union County Park Commission, decided to turn an old city dump into a beauty spot and the Plainfield Garden Club contributed 75 white dogwoods to help the project.

In 1940 the club gave an additional 110 trees to balance the two sides of the drive and complete the groupings. The 61 species now flourishing in the park include nine from Asia, two from Europe and 12 from North America, a number of hybrids and "cultivars," special horticultural selections that have been propagated vegetatively.

The Park Commission has planted a background of evergreens, including hemlocks and pines, to enhance the effect of the dogwoods. Enlarging on its original purpose to beautify the area, the Plainfield Garden Club cooperated throughout the year with the commission in developing the collection and all varieties are now labelled with correct names. A boulder with a tablet also has been installed in the area..

At the 25th anniversary of the Garden Club, held in 1940, Mrs. Thomas R. VanBoskerck, who had written a history of the club's first quarter century, recalled that the members had anticipated the park's work in beautifying the dump area and first had presented 50 dogwood trees to the park through the generosity of Mrs. Charles A. Eaton who took them from her own woods in Watchung. A fund to beautify the park had been started originally in 1924 with Mrs. William Halliday in charge.

Dr. Blackburn points to the Cornus Collection in Plainfield as an admirable example of cooperation among groups interested in the cultural and horticultural riches of a municipality.

25 Years Ago, 1941

Clifford M. Baker, president of the Muhlenberg Hospital board of governors announced that Allen V. Heely, headmaster of the Lawrenceville School, would speak at the graduation exercises for the hospital's school of nursing. Mr. Heely's sister-in-law, Mrs. Lawrence S. Heely, was president of the Women's Auxiliary Hospital. Dr. William B. Fort, senior attending surgeon, was to award the prizes, and William Whitwell Robison and Mrs. Edward Leroy Voorhees were to present diplomas and pins.

The Rev. Harry James Knickle, rector of Grace Episcopal Church, was observing the 10th anniversary of his priesthood.

George A. Ballantyne of 30 Westervelt Ave. was honored by the First Presbyterian Church Session for years of faithful service as head usher.

1974-1975 Directory

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

Cocktail party circa 1984 at Bev Reid's

Fanny Day, in blue and white print dress, facing away and speaking to the woman in the white dress which may be Connie Foster.

Polly Heely in dark blue speaking to Henry Farnum, facing away, in the red and white plaid jacket.

1987-1988 Annual Report

EXHIBITIONS

Exhibitions had two big bonuses added to it's schedule this year. The Heely Challenge Class and our In-Club Show on April 20th.

The Challenge Class was named after Polly Heely who passed away earlier this year. Several donations were given to the Garden Club in her name, and the feeling was that since she always took such an active interest in all workshops and classes that were given, the money should be used to fund this particular project.

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership