Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Fisk, Mrs. Harvey (Elizabeth Richmond) '17

1919 Address: 1440 Prospect Street, Plainfield

1922 Address: 1440 Prospect Street, Plainfield

1929 Treasurer Book Associate April $20.00 "two years"
Mrs. Harvey Fisk was not listed in the 1928 Treasurer Book
1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936 Treasurer Book Associate

1932 Directory* Address: 1440 Prospect Street
* = This directory is not dated but presumed to be from the year 1932.
NOTE: Mrs. Harvey Fisk, 1440 Prospect Street is listed as an "Associate Member"

Sister-in-law to Mrs. Chapman (Mary L.) Fisk '15

September 8, 1910 New York Times Wedding Announcement

MISS RICHMOND A BRIDE

Wedded to Harvey Fisk, Son of Charles J. Fisk, the Banker

WOODSTOCK, VT, Sept. 7 – Harvey Fisk of Plainfield, NJ, son of Charles J. Fisk, member of Harvey Fisk & Sons bankers, New York, and Miss Elizabeth Richmond of Scranton, Penn., daughter of the late William Richmond of Woodstock, were married here today. The ceremony was peformed by the Rev. Dr. Rogers Israel of Scranton, assisted by the Rev. R. Leblanc of Woodstock.

The young bride was gowned in white satin with garniture of lace tulle and orange blossoms, with veil of tulle, held in place by orange blossoms. Her only attendant was her cousin, Katherin Semple of St. Louis, who wore sunset satin veiled with chiffon black lace, and hat with plumes. The bride's uncle, William H. H. Moore, gave her away. The best man was Charles W. Fisk of Plainfield, a brother of the bridegroom, and the ushers , who came up from New York for the ceremony, were Charles D. Stewart, C. Loomis Dana, Jr., Charles W. Howard, J. Donald Kilner, and J. Ford Johnson Jr.

The wedding breakfast was served to about 300 guests in a large tent on the lawn. Mr. and Mrs. Fisk left on a wedding trip through Canada.

Some of the out-of-town guests were Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Fisk, Augustus Fisk, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Waring, Annie Fisk, Helen Tilson, Plainfield, NJ; Robert D. Farlee, George Farlee, Dr. C. L. Dana, New York; Miss ZFisk, Wilburtha, NJ; Henry Belin, Jr., Mrs. N.G. Robertson, Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Welles, Mrs. Paul Belin, Scranton, Penn.; Judge E. B. Adams of the United States Circuit Court and Mrs. Adams, Mrs. J. P. Bryson, Mrs. H. M. Semple, Mrs. Edwin Euston, St. Louis; Mrs. A. B. Greene, Seattle; Miss Marjorie Platt, Miss Louise Smith, Scranton.

Fisk genealogy

refernce to Charles J. Fisk

Harvey Fisk papers to 1944

Harvey E. Fisk (1856-1944) was a New York City banker who also wrote numerous pamphlets and books on public finance for Bankers Trust Company of New York. He specialized in railroad securities and public finance.

Harvey Edward Fisk was born on March 26, 1856 in Jersey City, New Jersey. He was one of eight children, the eldest son, of Harvey and Louisa (Green) Fisk. Fisk earned his A.B. from Princeton University in 1877, where he studied English literature and economics. He married Mary Lee Scudder on October 1, 1879 and they had two sons, Harvey E. Fisk, Jr. and Kenneth Fisk.

Fisk joined his father's banking house of Fisk & Hatch in New York City immediately after his graduation in 1877. The firm specialized in the sale of United States government bonds and railroad securities, which caused Fisk to develop an interest in government and railroad financing. He studied these fields throughout his career and later focused on public finance. Fisk & Hatch was dissolved in 1885. That same year, Harvey Fisk formed the firm of Harvey Fisk & Sons, also in New York City, with his three eldest sons: Harvey E., Charles, and Pliny. The firm also specialized in transactions in United States bonds and other high class investment securities, with Fisk specializing in railroad bonds.

Fisk resigned from Harvey Fisk & Sons in 1898 and spent the next six months traveling through Europe with his family. He then returned to New York City and formed the investment banking firm of Fisk & Robinson with George H. Robinson in 1899. The business was successful in its early years but began experiencing difficulties in 1910. Following the closure of Fisk & Robinson in 1914, Fisk returned to Harvey Fisk & Sons, where he was in charge of publicity.

In April 1917, Fisk changed firms for the last time in his career, becoming a research writer at Bankers Trust Company of New York. During World War I, he was chiefly involved in the preparation of pamphlets to promote the purchasing of Liberty Bonds. After the war, he continued to work in the publicity department of the bank, writing pamphlets and several books on public finance. His books include Our Public Debt (1919), The Dominion of Canada (1920), English Public Finance from the Revolution of 1688 (1920), French Public Finance in the Great War and To-Day (1922), and The Inter-ally Debts (1924). Fisk retired in 1930.

In addition to his banking career, Fisk was also engaged in philanthropic activities. He sponsored a boy's club in New York City and raised funds for Mercer Hospital in Trenton, New Jersey. He was also a longtime supporter of the Princeton University Library, where he was the Honorary Curator of the Benjamin Strong Collection. Fisk's collection of publications on corporate finance was donated to the library by his brother, Pliny Fisk. Harvey E. Fisk died on October 8, 1944.

Description
Fisk's papers document his work as an author and include his research files, notes, and drafts of articles and books. The majority of the papers are composed of clippings and other research materials he collected about the economies and finances of many countries, especially France, the United Kingdom, Germany, and the United States. The papers also include Fisk's notes and drafts for articles and books, most notably for an unpublished work on American public finance and for his book English Public Finance from the Revolution of 1688 (1920).

Plainfield by John A. Grady and Dorothe M. Pollard

Built in 1850, Charles Fisk purchased and remodeled the house in 1890. For many years the house served as a social center for the Fisks' elaborate entertainments. As mayor, Fisk frequently had the police and fire departments do their annual drills and inspections on the front lawn of his Seventh Street mansion, which straddled the block between Arlington and Madison Avenues.

November 14, 1895 New York Times

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=FB0911FE355911738DDDAD0994D9415B8585F0D3

PLAINFIELD KIRMESS OPENED

In Aid of Muhlenberg Hospital – Good Attendance and Reason for Expecting Financial Success – The Booths.

PLAINFIELD, N. J., Nov. 13 – There was a grand opening of the kirmess at the Columbia Cycle Academy Monday night, and the building was decorated very elaborately.

Not since the charity ball have the society fold here been interested in a like event for such a worthy cause. The kirmess is given for the benefit of Muhlenberg Hospital, and, judging from the attendance at the opening night, the hospital will be greatly bettered financially.

Booths have been very prettily arranged about the academy, making an exceedingly tasty show. The equipment of the booths is as follows:

French Booth – Mrs. Albert Hoffman Atterbury, Mrs. Irving H. Brown, Mrs. Charles B. Corwin, Miss Bessie Ginna, Mrs. George C. Evans, Mrs. Charles J. Fisk, Mrs. Ellis W. Hedges, Miss E. E. Kenyon and Miss Whiton.

Florentine Booth – Mrs. I. N. Van Sickle, Mrs. David E. Titsworth, Mrs. W. M. Stillman, Mrs. John D. Titsworth, Mrs. F. A. Dunham, Miss Louise Clawson, Miss Bessie TItsworth, and Mrs. Lulu Lewis.

Gypsy Booth – Mrs. Joseph W. Reinhart, and Mrs. Howard Fleming.

Venetian Booth – Mrs. Hugh Hastings, Miss Emelie Schipper, Mrs. George A. Chapman, Miss Havbiland, Mrs. Samuel Huntingont, Mrs. Emil Woltman, Mrs. Samuel St. J. McCutchen, Mrs. Conklin, Mrs. C. S. West, Mrs. W. E. Lower, Miss E. R. Cock, Mrs. Frank O. Herring, Miss Huntington, Miss Maud Van Bosckerck, Miss MacCready, Miss Clara D. Finley, Miss Ahrens, Miss Aynne MacCready, Miss Mondanari, Miss Graff, Miss Yerkes, Miss Gertrude Walz, and Miss Pierson.

Japanese Booth – Mrs. Charles Seward Foote, Mrs. George Clay, Mrs. S.P. Simpson, Mrs. L. Finch, Mrs. Constantine P. Ralli, Mrs. William Lewis Brown, Mrs. L. Dennis, Mrs. WIlliam Pelletier, Miss Ellis, Miss Anthony, Miss Dryden, Miss Morgan, Miss Bowen, Miss Lawrence, and Miss Rodman.

Spanish Booth – Mrs. S. A. Cruikshank, Mrs. A. T. Slauson, Mrs. J. F. Wichers, Mrs. T. H. Curtis, Mrs. Marion S. Ackerman, Mrs. T. A. Hazell, Mrs. H. L. Moore, Mrs. D. T. Van Buren, Mrs. E. H. Mosher, Miss Harriott, Miss Louise Patton, Miss Maud Lord, Miss May Kirkner, Miss Louise Van Zandt, Miss Annie Horton, Miss Titsworth, and Miss Meredith.

German Booth – Mrs. Mason W. Tyler, Mrs. Logan Murphy, Mrs. John H. Oarman, Mrs. Charles J. Taggart, Mrs. Benjamin R. Western, Mrs. J. E. Turill, Mrs. Arthur T. Gallup, Mrs. Horsley Barker, Mrs. John Haviland, Mrs. George Wright, Mrs. Amra Hamragan, Mrs. William L. Saunders, Mrs. William Wright, Miss Annie Murphy, Miss Wright, Miss Western, Miss Bartling, Miss Helen Warman, Miss Emma Adams and Miss Ann Thorne.

Stationery Booth – Mrs. John Gray Foster, Mrs. Elliott Barrows, Mrs. A. W. Haviland, Mrs. John D. Miller, Mrs. James R. Joy, and Miss Emily R. Tracy.

Parisian Flower Stall – Mrs. Harry M. Stockton, Mrs. Evarts Tracy, Mrs. Daniel F. Ginna, Mrs. W. H. Ladd, Mrs. Frederick Yates, Miss Marlon Dumont, Miss Ginna, Miss Baker, Miss Huntington, and Miss Van Bosckerck.

Refreshments were dispensed by Mrs. Orville T. Waring, Mrs. George W. Van Bosckerck, Mrs. John Bushnell, Mrs. Gifford Mayer, Mrs. George H. Goddard, Mrs. Moore, Mrs. H. P. Reynolds, Mrs. C. C. Guion, Mrs. N. P. T. Finch, Mrs. Henry McGee, Mrs. De Revere, Mrs. Ruth C. Leonard, Mrs. George W. Rockfellow, Miss Annie Opdyke, Mrs. Van Alstyne, Mrs. Utzinger, Mrs. Nelson Runyon, Mrs. Henry Tapsley, Miss Martine, Miss Edith Allen, Mrs. J. Parker Mason, Mrs. J. K. Myers, Mrs. Walton, and Mrs. H. C. Adams

August 26, 1894 New York Times Article: Plainfield, City of Homes

Some of the others who do business in New York and have handsome homes here are . . .; Charles Fisk, Pliny Fisk and Alexander Fisk of the banking firm of Harvey Fisk's Sons;

Residence of Harvey Fisk, 1440 Prospect Avenue

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

1909 Plainfield City Directory

Fisk Charles W, clerk, h 211 W 7th
Fisk Harvey E, clerk, h 211 W 7th

1925 Meeting Minutes

May 13, 1925 Meeting Minutes

1919 Meeting Minutes

Charles Fisk Mansion on 7th Street between Madison & Arlington Avenues

SMITH'S ESTATE et al. v. COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

Circuit Court of Appeals, Third Circuit.
Argued December 21, 1943.
Decided February 2, 1944.
Charles H. Welles, Jr., of Scranton, Pa., for petitioners.
Loring W. Post, of Washington, D. C. (Samuel O. Clark, Jr., Asst. Atty. Gen., and Sewall Key and Helen R. Carloss, Sp. Assts. to Atty. Gen., on the brief), for respondent.
Before BIGGS, GOODRICH, and McLAUGHLIN, Circuit Judges.
GOODRICH, Circuit Judge.
The Commissioner seeks in this case to sustain his inclusion in the gross estate of Abby R. Smith, who died in 1937, of the value, less a life estate, of certain property conveyed in trust by the decedent in 1919. The trust was made irrevocable in 1925. Alternate grounds are asserted by the Commissioner in support of his action. (1) It is contended that certain future interests, presently to be described, are in violation of the Pennsylvania rule against perpetuities and therefore the value of those interests is includible in the gross estate under § 302(a) of the Revenue Act of 1926, as amended by the 1934 Act, 26 U. S.C.A. Int.Rev.Acts, page 227.1 (2) In the alternative it is urged that the future interests are includible in the gross estate under § 302(c) of the same Act, ibid,2 as a transfer intended to take effect in possession or enjoyment at or after death. The Tax Court sustained the Commissioner on the first theory and thus did not find occasion to consider the alternative ground urged. The executors petitioned this Court for review.
The pertinent provisions of the trust indenture are:
"Fifth: To pay over the said income mentioned in the Fourth paragraph hereof, to Elizabeth Richmond Fisk for and during the period of her natural life, and on her death to pay over the income arising from said trust fund to such child or children as she may leave to survive her, as hereinafter provided. In the event of the death of any child or children of Elizabeth Richmond Fisk, leaving child or children him or her surviving, then the child or children of such deceased child shall take the portion of said income his or her parent would have taken if living.
"Sixth: After the death of Elizabeth Richmond Fisk, as her children reach the age of twenty-five years to pay over to each of them their proportion of the trust fund if in the sole discretion and judgment of said trustees it will be wise to so distribute the trust fund, and thereafter at any time if said Trustees shall in their judgment and discretion consider it wise to pay over the principal of said trust fund or any part thereof, they may do so. This clause to cover the payment to any child or children of any deceased child of Elizabeth Richmond Fisk as they reach the age of twenty-five years or thereafter, if in the judgment and discretion of said Trustees it is wise to pay the same. In the case of the death of Elizabeth Richmond Fisk without leaving child or children, or children of deceased child or children, before the corpus of the trust estate has been paid over, then and in that case the said trust fund any [sic] any unpaid interest or income shall be returned into my estate for distribution to my heirs."
When Abby R. Smith died, the life tenant, Elizabeth Richmond Fisk, was living; likewise the latter's four daughters: Elizabeth Fisk Tyler, born July 7, 1911, Margaretta Fisk, born February 23, 1915, Ursula Fisk, born September 15, 1917, Ann Louise Fisk, born June 25, 1921. There was also a great grandson, Harvey Tyler, son of Elizabeth Fisk Tyler, born December 18, 1933.
The first question is whether the future interests following the life estate of the decedent's daughter run afoul of the Pennsylvania rule against perpetuities. Since the decision of the Tax Court on this point turns upon an "unmistakable" question of law, this Court upon review may examine the question and reverse the Tax Court, if it finds "a clear-cut mistake of law." Dobson v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 1943, 64 S.Ct. 239, 247. Our basis for testing the Tax Court's decision
is, as agreed upon by everyone, the Pennsylvania law. See Rogers' Estate v. Helvering, 1943, 64 S.Ct. 172.
The rule in Pennsylvania is the one usually stated; an interest which may not vest within a life or lives in being, twenty-one years and the usual period of gestation thereafter is void. Warren's Estate, 1936, 320 Pa. 112, 182 A. 396, 104 A. L.R. 1345. And, where the validity of a gift to a class is involved, the Pennsylvania cases follow the rule of the leading English case of Leake v. Robinson, 1817, 2 Mer. 363,3 that if the interest of any potential member of the class can by any possibility vest too remotely, the entire gift to the class fails. Coggins' Appeal, 1889, 124 Pa. 10, 16 A. 579, 10 Am.St.Rep. 565; In re Kountz' Estate (No. 1), 1906, 213 Pa. 390, 62 A. 1103, 3 L.R.A.,N.S., 639, 5 Ann. Cas. 427. The Tax Court, citing some of the Pennsylvania decisions, construed the trust indenture to provide for gifts to several classes which were to vest neither in interest nor in possession or enjoyment upon the death of the life tenant. Then it held that since, by possibility, some member of the classes specified might become entitled to take under the trust indenture at a time beyond the period specified in the rule, the gifts to the children and grand-children were void as to all, and hence everything following the life estate was includible in the decedent's estate. The Tax Court was in error upon the Pennsylvania law. Our analysis of the Pennsylvania law and its application to the undisputed facts of this case follows.
Following the life estate to the settlor's daughter, the settlor provided for a gift to a class composed of her daughter's children, designated for convenience here as Class One. In the event that any member of Class One died before reaching the age of 25, his children, whom we may call Subclass Two, were to take his share of the income and principal as provided. Under the provisions of the trust there were possible as many Subclasses (Two, Three, Four, etc.) as there were members of Class One. In such a case it is the accepted rule that the possibility of a gift to any member of a subclass violating the rule against perpetuities and thus rendering the gift to that subclass invalid, does not invalidate gifts to other subclasses or a prior class, if they are otherwise valid.4 Under such circumstances the gift to each class must be examined separately to determine its validity. The Tax Court therefore made a "clear-cut mistake of law" when it applied the rule of Leake v. Robinson, applicable in the case of "one class" gifts, to the several separate class gifts, thus in effect treating a number of distinct classes as one class. The next step is to consider the validity of the gift to the separate classes.
THE GIFT TO CLASS ONE
Under the trust indenture it is clear that the settlor did not intend the various classes mentioned to close at the time the indenture took effect. Nor was the gift by its terms only to those children and grandchildren of the daughter living upon the daughter's death. The general rule is that in the case of a gift to a class, the members of that class who are to take are ascertained at the time set for distribution.5 In the case of the Class One here, the time for distribution of the corpus would be when the first member of the class (settlor's grandchildren) attained twenty-five, after the termination of the prior life estate.6 If there were no provisions for income payments before that time, the gift to them would violate the rule against perpetuities. Coggins' Appeal, supra. However, we think it clear under the Pennsylvania decisions that the provision for payment of the income of the trust to the members of Class One saves their gift from invalidation under the rule.
It has long been the law in Pennsylvania that a direction that income be paid to an ascertained beneficiary of a
trust until there is a distribution to him of corpus, indicates an intention that a present gift was intended. In such a case, age is not descriptive of those who are to take but of the date of payment. The particular interests vest with only possession and enjoyment postponed. In re Bilyeu's Estate, 1943, 346 Pa. 134, 29 A.2d 516; Safe Deposit & Trust Co. v. Wood, 1902, 201 Pa. 420, 50 A. 920. Here, the members of Class One will necessarily be definitely ascertained at the time the preceding life estate terminates since they are the children of the life tenant. Consequently, the number who would share the income at that date would be determinable. Since, under the trust they are to receive the income upon the termination of the life estate until the corpus is distributable, their interests vest upon the termination of the life estate. Therefore, the gift to them does not violate the rule against perpetuities, since their interests must vest, if at all, upon the death of their mother, a life in being when the trust was executed. That the interest of any member of Class One would be subject to divestment in the event that member does not reach twenty-five, is immaterial. In re Bilyeu's Estate, supra.
THE GIFTS TO SUBCLASSES
It can easily be seen that the interests sought to be created in children of members of Class One (Subclasses Two, Three and so on), born after the creation of the trust, do violate the rule against perpetuities. For example, the daughter who is the life tenant, might by possibility, give birth, after the trust was created, to a child, who would become a member of Class One. The mother, and all her other children, and all other possible lives in being, might by possibility die when this child was a year old. There would then no longer be any lives in being. By possibility this one surviving child might have a child, a member of a subclass, at twenty-four and then die. Thus, even if it be assumed that this member of the subcla

William Henry Richmond

William Henry Richmond (1821-1922) was an American coal mine operator. He is reckoned as one of the key actors in the expansion of the Lackawanna Coal Mine district of Scranton, Pennsylvania during the second half of the 19th Century. Richmond is best remembered today as the namesake of Richmond Memorial Library in Marlborough, Connecticut.

Early years [edit]
William Henry Richmond was born October 23, 1821 at Marlborough, Hartford County, Connecticut. His father, William Wadsworth Richmond, claimed family roots dating back to 11th Century Brittany and an American forefather who was one of the members of Plymouth Colony that launched Taunton, Massachusetts in 1637.[1] Another of Richmond's ancestors, William Wadsworth, was an immigrant to the Massachusetts Bay Colony from England in 1632 and a founder of the Colony of Connecticut a few years later.[1]
Richmond's father worked as a blacksmith, with his shop working in conjunction with a Marlborough factory that produced wagons, window blinds, and other fabricated goods.[2] His father later expanded his operation with another Marlborough blacksmith, establishing a foundry under the business name Richmond and Kellogg.[3]
One of five children,[4] Richmond attended public school in Connecticut until the age of 13, at which time he left home to take a job.[1] With the coming of the massive economic crisis known as the Panic of 1837 this decision was soon reversed, however, and the 15-year old Richmond returned home to work on the home farm and in his father's shop, also re-enrolling in school to continue his studies.[5]
Career [edit]


William Henry Richmond in 1903.
In 1842 Richmond left home again, this time to take a job in a store in Honesdale, Pennsylvania.[1] He remained there for three years before moving to the nearby Northeastern Pennsylvania town of Carbondale, where he opened a store of his own as part of a partnership called Richmond & Robinson.[1] Originally a general merchandise store, the Richmond & Robinson firm brought in some of the first woodworking machinery into the Lackawanna and Wyoming Valleys and began manufacturing doors, coal cars, and other wooden products in 1851.[1] This new activity proved successful and Richmond bought out his partner to become a sole proprietor in 1853.[1]
A fire in September 1855 destroyed Richmond's store building, but he was able to have it rebuilt by the next year.[1]
Richmond was married in 1847 to Lois Roxanna Morss and together they raised three daughters, all of whom attended and graduated from Vassar College.[1] Two other children died in early childhood.[4]
Richmond began his career as a mine operator in January 1860 when he launched Richmond & Co. in partnership with a former official of the when he opened a coal mine in partnership with a former top official of the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company.[4] A mine was opened near the neighboring town of Blakely.[1] The enterprise proved successful and in 1861 Richmond sold his Carbondale wood manufacturing operation to concentrate full-time on the coal industry.[1] Richmond & Co. subsequently opened the first coal breaking facility in the area, processing and finishing coal for the market.[1]
Richmond & Co. was absorbed into the Elk Hill Coal and Iron Company in 1863, with Richmond eventually emerging as president, chief stockholder, and general manager of the operation.[1] Coal breaking remained a specialty, and in 1889 construction was begun on a new facility at Dickson City, closer to mining operations.[1] By 1891 Richmond's colliery was able to process and ship 1,000 tons of coal per day.[1] The Lackawanna and Wyoming valleys as a whole saw their total production of anthracite coal explode from barely over 200,000 tons per year in the middle 1840s to about 26,000,000 tons per year in 1897.[1] Richmond became very wealthy in the process.
As the 19th Century came to a close, Richmond's Elk Hill Coal and Iron operated two coal mines in Lackawanna County with an annual output of between 400,000 and 500,000 tons per year, a third colliery at Dickson City, and a fourth constructed in 1893 about 5 miles north of Carbondale.[4]
Richmond took pride in the economic role played by he and his peers and felt himself the victim of unfair vilification at the hands of journalists and the public. In a 1903 speech to citizens of the town of his birth, Richmond declared:
"The price of oak and hickory wood used to be $6 to $7 a cord on dock at Middle Haddam, and by the time it was placed before the door of the New Yorker, and sawed and split to proper sizes to use, it cost him $12 or more per cord, and it is counted as taking two cords, or 256 cubic feet, of wood to supply the number of heat units of a ton of anthracite coal. Notwithstanding, now when the people of New York and elsewhere can have a ton of anthracite coal put in their coalbins for $5 or $6, they, through the newspapers, abuse the hardworking coal operators and producers, who expend large amounts of money in opening coal mines, building coal breakers and railroads to produce the coal, and call them by the euphonious name 'Coal Barons.'"[6]
Richmond financed the launch of other business enterprises during his life, including the Crystal Lake Water Company and in 1867 the Carbondale Gas Company.[1] He was also an original stockholder and director of the Third National Bank.[1]
Later years [edit]
In matters of religion, Richmond was an active member of the Presbyterian Church from 1842.[4] He was treasurer of the Lackawanna Bible Society for three decades and was a member of the American Bible Society.[5]
Politically, Richmond supported the Republican Party until the middle of the 1890s, at which time he switched his allegiance to the Prohibition Party.[4] Richmond was a Prohibition Party candidate for United States Congress in 1904.[5] In 1908 he appeared on the ballot as a Presidential elector on behalf of Prohibition Party nominee Eugene W. Chafin.[7]
In 1874 Richmond moved to a 75 acre farm outside of Scranton, Pennsylvania, where as a hobby he began raising Jersey cows.[1] He sold the bulk of his herd in 1886, keeping 10 animals for household use.[1] A son-in-law who was an attorney was made a vice president of Elk Valley Coal and Iron, and he and Richmond's daughter and their five children shared Richmond's home during his later years.[4]
Death and legacy [edit]
Richmond died March 14, 1922, at the age of 101.[5]
Richmond is remembered today as the namesake of Richmond Memorial Library in Marlborough, Connecticut.
Footnotes [edit]

^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t "William Henry Richmond," National Cyclopaedia of American Biography: Volume 9. New York: James T. White and Company, 1899; pp. 103-104.
^ William Henry Richmond, "Address by Hon. William H. Richmond of Scranton, Pa.," in Mary Hall, Report of the Celebration of the Centennial of the Incorporation of the Town of Marlborough: August 23d and 25th, 1903. Hartford: Case, Lockwood & Brainard Company, 1904; pp. 80-81.
^ Richmond, "Address by Hon. William H. Richmond of Scranton, Pa.," pg. 81.
^ a b c d e f g Portrait and Biographical Record of Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania. New York: Chapman Publishing Co., 1897; pp. 245-246.
^ a b c d "William H. Richmond," Mining and Metallurgy, vol. 3, whole no. 186 (June 1922), pp. 44-45.
^ Richmond, "Address by Hon. William H. Richmond of Scranton, Pa.," pg. 82.
^ Lawrence Kestenbaum, "Richmond," Political Graveyard, www.politicalgraveyard.com/
Works [edit]

"Address by Hon. William H. Richmond of Scranton, Pa.," in Mary Hall, Report of the Celebration of the Centennial of the Incorporation of the Town of Marlborough: August 23d and 25th, 1903. Hartford: Case, Lockwood & Brainard Company, 1904; pp. 80-86.
"Recollections of Ninety-Five Years in Connecticut and the Anthracite Region of Pennsylvania," Journal of American History, vol. 11, no. 3 (1917) pp. 424-444.
Further reading [edit]

Frank Allaben, "The Grand Old Man of Scranton," Journal of American History, vol. 11, no. 3 (1917), pp. 421-424.
Frederick L. Hitchcock, Sketch of Life of William Henry Richmond. Scranton, PA: F.H. Gerlock & Co. Printers, 1917.
Thomas F. Murphy, Jubilee History: Commemorative of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Creation of Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania: Story of Interesting Events from Indian Occupancy of Valley, Connecticut Settlement, Organization of Luzerne County, Start of Anthracite Industry, and Forty Years Effort to Establish Lackawanna County... Topeka, KS: Historical Publishing Co., 1928.

William Henry Richmond

Woodstock, Windsor County Vermont

Birth: Dec. 12, 1885
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Death: May 3, 1966
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA

Elizabeth was the daughter of William Richmond and Elizabeth Fairbanks. She was the wife of Harvey Fisk. (Death certificate)

Family links:
Spouse:
Harvey Fisk (1884 - 1928)

Children:
Elizabeth Fisk Tyler (1911 - 1978)*
Margaretta Fisk Paine (1915 - 1952)*
Ursula Richmond Fisk Clough (1917 - 1989)*
Anne Fisk Howe (1921 - 2001)*

*Calculated relationship

Inscription:
Wife of Harvey Fisk.

Burial:
River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA

Created by: David Edsall
Record added: Oct 03, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 59561706

Richmond Family buried at Woodstock, Windsor County, Vermont

Adams, Emma U. Richmond 59567967
b. Sep. 10, 1847 d. Feb. 4, 1926 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Bryson, Jeannie Richmond 88029857
b. Oct. 7, 1858 d. Mar. 24, 1953 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Fisk, Elizabeth Richmond 59561706
b. Dec. 12, 1885 d. May 3, 1966 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Furber, Carrie Eveline Richmond 97609653
b. Aug. 10, 1877 d. Aug. 19, 1965 Riverside Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Moore, Marie Richmond 59561430
b. Mar. 19, 1845 d. Oct. 14, 1929 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Payne, Isabelle A. Richmond 97672014
b. 1850 d. 1953 Riverside Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Pratt, Lucia A. Richmond 60328708
b. 1869 d. 1924 Prosper Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Anna Belle Townsend 109032831
b. 1877 d. 1960 Riverside Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Belle L. 60328790
b. 1863 d. 1925 Prosper Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Charles 88029755
b. unknown d. May 12, 1867 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Charlie 88029882
b. unknown d. Jun. 3, 1852 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Clifton 89372708
b. unknown d. Jan. 21, 1897 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Cynthia M. Howe 89372733
b. unknown d. Sep. 22, 1899 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Elvira E. Thompson 59758315
b. Jan. 21, 1844 d. May 28, 1908 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Emily C. Darling 69405631
b. unknown d. Feb. 21, 1891 Riverside Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Forrest Alfred 109032837
b. May 13, 1883 d. 1954 Riverside Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Frank L. 69405652
b. Sep. 7, 1852 d. Jan. 15, 1907 Riverside Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Frederick C. 89350066
b. May 17, 1860 d. May 10, 1934 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Infant Son 69405647
b. Apr. 18, 1891 d. Apr. 20, 1891 Riverside Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Job 88073588
b. unknown d. Mar. 3, 1878 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Search for "Richmond" at GenealogyBank
Richmond, Laurinda 88029782
b. Apr. 27, 1802 d. Dec. 3, 1877 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Lewis Martin 48917191
b. Aug. 18, 1881 d. Dec. 12, 1959 Riverside Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Lizzie E. Fairbanks 88029934
b. Dec. 17, 1856 d. Jun. 1, 1890 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Lorenzo 88029709
b. Aug. 16, 1806 d. Jan. 22, 1884 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Lorenzo 88029816
b. Mar. 29, 1849 d. Feb. 8, 1879 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Loring 89350049
b. unknown d. Nov. 20, 1881 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Mary H. Marcy 88073606
b. unknown d. Dec. 29, 1875 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Mary L. 89372672
b. unknown d. Feb. 19, 1876 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Mason A. 60328723
b. 1820 d. 1903 Prosper Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Myrtle L. 69405638
b. Sep. 30, 1882 d. Jan. 2, 1973 Riverside Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Orlando L. 69405626
b. Dec. 9, 1820 d. Jan. 6, 1904 Riverside Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Sarah Thacher 48917207
b. Mar. 25, 1887 d. Feb. 7, 1965 Riverside Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Sophia A. Barber 60328765
b. 1832 d. 1896 Prosper Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Susanna Metcalf 89350057
b. unknown d. Jan. 24, 1884 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Thomas Thacher 48917225
b. Nov. 17, 1912 d. Feb. 8, 1999 Riverside Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, Ursula Hazen 88029725
b. Oct. 26, 1814 d. Sep. 2, 1902 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Richmond, William 88029910
b. Dec. 2, 1854 d. Apr. 17, 1889 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Semple, Mary Richmond 59568530
b. Dec. 23, 1852 d. Apr. 14, 1929 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Smith, Abby Hazen Richmond 59561239
b. Oct. 1, 1843 d. Dec. 12, 1937 River Street Cemetery
Woodstock
Windsor County
Vermont, USA

March 12, 2009 Sherm Fisk Howe Vermont Historian

The Gully House, Woodstock Vermont

he Gully House, just after completion in 1935.

The Fisk Trophy, first awarded in 1937.

Petie Fisk Howe, James Johnson and Ursula Fisk during the construction of the Gully House.

Margaretta “Grettie” Fisk, who competed in the 1936 Winter Olympics.

amily and friends gather during the construction of the Gully House

March 12, 2009: In 1937 The Fisk Family Introduces the Fisk Trophy Race

In 1935, the Fisks built the Gully House, the small lodge where Bunny lived during the winters and in which the Fisks enjoyed as their own living space over the summers.

Mrs. Fisk's daughters, Ursula and Margaretta, were talented enough at skiing to earn entry into the 1936 Olympics. According to an account of Joan Merrill, "they were our first women's Olympic ski team." With such a talented brood, Mrs. Fisk thought it would be great to start a ski race for her daughters and thus began the Fisk Trophy Race in 1937, which quickly became one of the premier ski races in the United States due to the talent of the Fisk family. In that same year, Sherm Howe, who was married to Petie Fisk until her death in 2001, rememers that Margaretta was on the second backup team for an FIS sponsored race in Switzerland. He believes that Margaretta and Ursula's travel to Europe and their subsequent mingling with other skiers brought an influx of talented skiers to the Fisk Trophy Race.

1935 - 1945 Gilbert's Hill and the First Ski Tow

Prosper Ski Hill Opens; the Fisk's and Bunny open "The Gully"

"Well, being a south slope and everything, it wasn't the right place to be, anyway . . . I went up [what would later become] Suicide Six, and down the back side, and found what is called the Gully now. And I decided that was the place to be because it had higher elevation, better snow conditions and everything, and two exposures; a northeast one and a south slope. The south slope being the back side of Suicide Six . . ." said Bunny in 1979.

Oscar Harding, the Road Commissioner at the time, owned the Gully property. Bunny would have purchased the property from him, but Elizabeth Richmond "Muddy" Fisk said (per Bunny's account) "If anybody knows that you want the land, they're gonna put the price up, because they'll know what it is for." Muddy therefore purchased the land and allowed Bunny to assemble the tow. Again, he used free hardware provided by the Woodstock Electric Company. Muddy paid for the poles that would bring the power from Route 12 up into the Gully and did not charge Bunny rent for his use of Gully hill.

Harvey Edward Fisk

Harvey Edward Fisk (1856 – October 8, 1944) was an American banker and financial writer. At the time of his death he was the only surviving son of Harvey Fisk, who founded the banking house of Fisk & Hatch in 1862 and helped the Union finance the Civil War. He was associated with his brother Pliny Fisk, who was an outstanding investment banker before the first World War, in the management of their father's firm.[1]
Biography[edit]

Fisk was born in Jersey City in 1856. His mother was the former Louisa Green of Trenton. He graduated from Princeton University in 1877 and immediately joined the firm of Fisk & Hatch. In 1885 the firm was reorganized and became Harvey Fisk & Sons. Mr. Fisk specialized in railroad securities.[1]
He resigned from the family company in 1898 and a year later formed a partnership with George H. Robinson for investment banking purposes. Harvey E. Fisk retired from the firm of Fisk & Robinson, on January 13, 1915. This caused the partnership to expire by limitation. The business continued at the same location, 26 Exchange Place, under the name of Robinson & Co. with members being George H. Robinson, Thomas G. Cook, and J. Stanley Brown. Fisk announced that he would be located hereafter at the office of Harvey Fisk & Sons.[2] Three years later Mr. Fisk joined the Bankers Trust Company as a research writer.[1]
Fisk specialized in the preparation of pamphlets and books on public finance, and, in one book, calculated that the total direct expenditure for World War I amounted to $223,000,000,000. He remained with the Bankers Trust until his retirement in 1930.[1]


Harvey E. Fisk residence at 12 East 53rd Street in New York City.
In 1909, Harvey E. Fisk is reported to have sold his house at 12 East 53rd Street in Manhattan. The house was built for Mr. Fisk by Charles T. Wills from plans by Raleigh C. Gildersleeve. Previously there was an old brownstone on the lot which was owned by Walter G. Oakman. This was torn down except for the side walls, and a new dwelling put into its place. The unusual depth of the lot of 119.5 feet, allowed Fisk to carry out a plan of having three extra deep rooms. The main floor had a large reception room in front, a large music room in the middle, and an imposing dining room at the rear.[3] This house which is still extant is a five-story American basement house, with a frontage of 37.6 feet. The house was sold to William L. Harkness for $400,000. All of the furnishing were including the rugs and tapestries that had been bought abroad, were included in the purchase. Harkness was a cousin of Edward S. Harkness of the Standard Oil Company.[4]
Harvey Edward Fisk was engaged in extensive philanthropic work. In his younger days he sponsored a boys' club on the West Side in New York. He also helped raise funds for Mercer Hospital in Trenton, New Jersey, where he died. Up to his death he was actively involved in the work of the Princeton University Library and was an honorary curator there of the Benjamin Strong collection of books on industry and finance.[1]
Family[edit]

Harvey Edward Fisk married Mary Lee Scudder in 1879. Mrs. Fisk for many years engaged in social service work with the Riverside Association. During World War I she devoted her time to aiding the United States Navy, and later provided clothing for wounded men returning from France. She was former chairman of the executive committee of the Sorosis Club, a life member of the New Jersey Society of the Colonial Dames of America and a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. At the time of her death, Mrs. Fisk was living in her apartment at the Madison Square Hotel, 37 Madison Avenue.[5]
In addition to his brother Pliny, Harvey E. Fisk's other brothers were Charles J. Fisk, banker and former Mayor of Plainfield, New Jersey; Wilbur C. Fisk, former president of the Hudson & Manhattan Railroad Company; and Alexander G. Fisk, also a banker. Harvey Edward Fisk married Mary Lee Scudder of Trenton, New Jersey, in 1879. They remained married until her death in 1941. Fisk had two sons: Harvey E. Fisk, Jr., of Fairfield, Connecticut, and Kenneth Fisk of Roseland, New Jersey, and three sisters, Miss Mary Louis Fisk, Mrs. Samuel Wood Thurber of Princeton, and Mrs. John Warren DuBois Gould of 102 East Twenty-second Street, New York City. Harvey Edward Fisk died at the age of 88 on October 8, 1944.[1]
References[edit]

^ a b c d e f "Harvey E. Fisk Dies; Retired Banker, 88". The New York Times. October 9, 1944. Retrieved 30 December 2011.
^ "Harvey E. Fisk Retires; New Banking and Brokerage Firm Continues". The New York Times. January 4, 1915. Retrieved 30 December 2011.
^ "New Fifty-third St. Home of William L. Harkness Residence". The New York Times. October 24, 1909. Retrieved 30 December 2011.
^ "W.L. Harkness Buyer of $400,000 Residence". The New York Times. October 17, 1909. Retrieved 30 December 2011.
^ "Mrs. Harvey E. Fisk, Wife of Banker, 79". The New York Times. February 5, 1941. Retrieved 30 December 2011.

Fisk House, 12 East 53rd Street, New York

New York Times October 9, 1901

WEDDINGS OF A DAY
Waring - Fisk
Special to The New York Times

PLAINFIELD, N. J., Oct. 8. – The marriage of Miss Louise Green Fisk and Lewis Edmund Waring was celebrated yesterday. The wedding was the most brilliant society event that has taken place in this city this Fall. Invitations had been issued to more than 2,500 persons in this city, New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Newport, Washington, and other various cities in this and adjacent States. Mrs. Waring is the eldest daughter of ex-Mayor and Mrs. Charles J. Fisk. Mr. Waring is a son of Mr. and Mrs. O. T. Waring. He is a member of the Hillside Golf Club of this city and also of the Baltusrol Golf Club.

The ceremony was performed at 8:30 o'clock in the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church by the pastor, the Rev. Dr. William R. Richards. A feature of the ceremony was the presence of a number of choir boys from Grace Protestant Episcopal Church, New York, who preceded the bridal party.

The ushers were Henry Lower, Laurens H. Van Buren, Richard S. Waring, Edward J. Waring, brothers of the bridegroom; Augustus R. Fisk of this city, Raymond Lefferts and Edward Sawyer of New York, Rutherford M. Shepard and J. Cheney Wells of Philadelphia. The flower girls were Miss Annie G. Fisk, sister of the bride, and Miss Eleanor Waring, sister of the bridegroom. The bridesmaids were Miss Margaretta Wood of Pittsburg, Penn.: Miss Esther Waterman of Southport, Conn.; Miss Helen Bushnell, Miss Helen Talmadge, Miss Florence Waring, a sister of the bridegroom; Miss Edith C. Fisk, a cousin of the bride, of this city, and Miss Evelyn Louise Fisk of Willburtha, N. J., aunt of the bride. Miss Fannie Cox of this city was maid of honor. The best man was Orville T. Waring, eldest brother of the bridegroom.

The bride wore a gown of chiffon with rose point lace and tulle veil. She carried a shower bouquet of white roses, orchids, and lilies of the valley.

After the ceremony an elaborate reception was held at the home of the bride's parents on West Seventh Street. Among the large number of presents received by the bride none attracted more attention than did the gift of Mrs. Richie, the bride's grandmother. It was linen worth $1,000, packed in an old German dower chest.

1901 Harper's Official Golf Guide

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership