Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Atterbury, Mrs. Albert Hoffman (Emma H. Baker) '15

Founding Member

1919 Address: Cedarcroft, Park Avenue, Plainfield

1922 Address: Hillside Avenue, Plainfield

1929 Treasurer Book Active $5.00 (Not listed in the 1928 Treasurer Book)
1930 Treasurer Book Active with note "922 Hillside"
1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937 Treasurer Book Active

1932 Directory* Address: 922 Hillside Avenue
*This directory was not dated but guessed to be from 1932.

1938 Treasurer Book, Active: Mrs. A. H. Atterbury 1/6/38 pd, 1/5/39 Pd

1940 Treasurer Book Active: Mrs. A. H. Atterbury 1/4/40 Pd 1/3/41 Pd. 11/27/41 Pd. 11/24/42 Pd. 11/25/43 Pd. 11/27/44 Pd. 12/3/45 8/46 May 6, 1947

1942 Address: 922 Hillside Avenue

1947 - 1948 Treasurer Book: Active Atterbury, Mrs. Albert H. resigned

May be related to the following members:

Baker, Mrs. Clifford M. (Margaret D.) '32, President 1932 - 1934
Baker, Mrs. John Whitney (Theodora Faber) '22

Plainfield Musical Club 1914 - 2000

Plainfield Musical Club 1914 - 2000

Plainfield Library Archives

The Plainfield Musical Club, the oldest musical club in New Jersey was founded in April 1892 by Miss Caroline Struelli and 21 other women vocalists, pianists and "elocutionists". The charter members had been meeting informally for several years before officially establishing the Club, which was "dedicated to the stimulation of a greater interest in musical culture." Important early members included Miss Maud Van Boskerck, who came to the PMC as a pianist and contributed to programs as an accompanist and offered her studio as a meeting place. She also supported the annual concert of famous artists. Mrs. Albert H. Atterbury built Club membership up to 60, but when members wavered in meeting attendance, her suggestion of disbanding spurred renewed interest.

1925 brought the addition of males to the Club, as well as organists, harpists, orchestral instrument players and the elocutionists became "poet-readers." The PMC season ran from October through July inclusive and it held nine monthly meetings annually.

The Club was also active with the community. They contributed money to the Red Cross during both World Wars, bought and donated boxes or seats at the Metropolitan Opera House for the Jersey Junior performances as well as tickets to performances by the Plainfield Symphony Society, Plainfield Choral Club and Mendelssohn Glee Club. The PMC also made many contributions to the Edward MacDowell Association for its artist's colony in Peterborough, NH. In 1950, the Club established an Scholarship Fund which awarded high school graduates from Plainfield and North Plainfield who were interested in furthering their musical education. The fund was generously supported in 1988 with a donation from the estate of former member Adele de Leeuw, noted Plainfield author and native. The bequest was set up in honor of her sister Cateau de Leeuw, also a noted author, illustrator and club member. Other nationally known members included Harriet Ware, who composed music for solo voice, piano, choral and organ, and Charlotte Garden, once the leading female organist in the United States and Europe.

There were fifteen types of musicianship represented: piano, accompanists, organ, violin, soprano, contralto, tenor, bass and baritone, ensemble, choral director, and poet-reader. There were also five classes of membership: Senior-active, Junior-active, Joint (for husbands and wives), Associate and Honorary. Mrs. Leighton Calkins, wife of a Plainfield mayor, was made the first honorary member in 1919. The Club is still in existence today and remains active, still gathering at members homes

Past Presidents


Name
Dates

Mrs. Clifton Wharton
1892 - 1898

Mrs. Albert H. Atterbury
1906 - 1914


Mrs. J. Kirtland Meyers
1914 - 1917


Mrs. Albert H. Atterbury
1917 - 1920


Mrs. Ruth Waldo
1920 - 1923

Mrs. Harry R. Moyer
1923 - 1925

Mrs. Duncan W. Taylor
1925 - 1927

Mrs. Leontine Hunstman
1927 - 1929

F. Clyde Doane
1929 - 1931

H.D. Bonnell
1931 - 1933

Fay Barnaby Kent
1933 - 1935

Mary Eaton His
1935 - 1937

Georges J. His
1937 - 1939


H.D. Bonnell
1939 - 1941

Muriel Collins Lambert
1941 - 1943

Howard S. Savage
1943 - 1945

Georges J. His
1945 - 1947


Jean Bender Coulthurst
1947 - 1949

Phyllis Runyon
1949 - 1951

Catherine Talley
1951 - 1953

Rosemary Hinman
1953 - 1955

Stuart LeCompte
1955 - 1957

Claire C. O'Neill
1957 - 1959

Florence S. Hageman
1959 - 1961

Dorothea Durant 1961 - 1963

Louise Markley De Lisle 1963 - 1965

Bernice Swain 1965 - 1967

Marilyn Hannon 1967 - 1968

Patricia McNelis 1968 - 1969

Jeannette M. Rutan
1969 - 1970

Joyce Bayer
1973 - 1974

IBeverly Weber
1976 - 1977

Irina Holt
1977 - 1978

Carol Marder
1980 - 1981

Robert Paoli
1981 - 1983

Rena Fruchter
1983 - 1985

Patty Fischer
1985 - 1987

Fred Fischer
1987 - 1989

Allen Weakland
1989 - 1991

Paul DiDario
1991 - 1997

December 18, 1920 New York Times letter to the editor by Mr. Atterbury

March 3, 1918 New York Times article on NYC Landlords

Atterbury family tree

Name: Albert Hoffmann Atterbury 1
Sex: M
Birth: 29 AUG 1860 in Trenton, Mercer, NJ 1
Death: AFT 1930 in of Plainfield, NJ 1
Occupation: Lawyer in NYC
Reference Number: 26613
Note:
[atterbury descendants6.FTW]

Albert Atterbury was in the Yale class of 1882, and got his law degree, LLB,
f rom Columbia 1884. He practiced law in New York city, and resided in
Plainfie ld. Emma and Albert Atterbury had no children.

Father: Edward Johnson Coale Atterbury b: 15 AUG 1813 in Newark, NJ
Mother: Beulah Murray Livingston b: 14 SEP 1819 in New York, NY

Marriage 1 Emma H. Baker
Married: 17 NOV 1892

Sources:
Title: atterbury descendants6.FTW
Repository:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Aug 28, 2001

New York Social Register

Listing address as 315 West 7th Street, Plainfield

Courier News obituary November 21, 1955 for Emma Baker Atterbury

Cedarcroft apartments

Cedar Croft Apartments
985-1005 Park Avenue, Plainfield, NJ 07060

Description
The subject property is a 3 story brick building containing 10 apartment units. The building has approximately 9,500 sq/ft of rentable space in 45 total rooms. The layout of the property is divided up into (3) four bedroom, 1.5 bath apartments, (2) three bedroom apartments, (3) two bedroom apartments and (2) two room efficiencies. The four bedroom apartments have high ceilings, large great rooms and non- working fireplaces and two of the upper units have private balconies. The building has been upgraded with newer windows, roof and individual gas heating units in 8 out of the 10 apartments. The two smaller units are heated by baseboard electric. Although the building does have an operational gas fired boiler the tenants are responsible for paying for their own heat. The building has two decorated stairwells with carpeting and motion detector lights throughout. The grounds are landscaped and there is onsite parking and (5) semi- covered garages that are currently not being used by the tenants. Price is negotiable.

Desirable section of Plainfield. Quiet, residential area. Close to all

Price:$950,000No. Units:10Building Size:11,875 SFPrice/Unit:$95,000Property Type:MultifamilyProperty Sub-type:Garden/Low-RiseProperty Use Type:InvestmentCommission Split:2%Cap Rate:8.50%Gross Rent Multiplier:6.70Occupancy:95%Lot Size:

1003 Park Avenue, Plainfield

Cedarcroft apartments

Cedarcroft apartments

Cedarcroft apartments

Cedarcroft apartments

Cedarcroft apartments

Cedarcroft apartments

Park Avenue Residence: Atterbury Estate Name: Cedarcroft

922 Hillside Avenue Residence: Atterbury

From Plainfield, New Jersey's History & Architecture by John Grady and Dorothe Pollard

Clockwise from top left: The slopes where American patriots once fought the British were under a new assualt. Residential development surged on into the Short Hills, the last bastion of unspoiled farmland on the outskirts of Plainfield, and a new decorative element entered local garden design. Water had long been a feature of the city's brook side gardens for obvious reasons. Rock now added a fresh dimension for the reasons less obvious. Deposited as a terminal moraine at the end of the last ice age, the boulders forming the underpinnings of the Short Hills had ended their long journey. Eons later, they resurfaced as the bane of eighteenth and nineteenth century farmers and the delight of twentieth century landscapers.

A gentrified farmhouse enters a new phase of its existence. The house appers ancient, the hilly road has not been paved, a well house remains in place, but this is no longer a working farmyard. Land once allotted to husbandry has been transformed into a pleasure garden replacing a formerly utilitarian landscape.

Designed during the 1920's. the Albert Atterbury garden on Hillside Avenue mirrors the garden principles of Giggleswick (seen in the bottom left picture) – water, rock, and luxurant bloom. The house rides the crest of the hill, with lawns and flower beds spilling down the slope toward the rooftops below in graceful waves of texture, punctuated with rare trees and shrubs.

Climbing roses clasp the home's trellised walls in a warm embrace and the basic bones of the garden have been preserved and enhanced by the gentle refinements of today's owners. Continuously cultivated for over three-quarters of a century, this urban Eden is truly one of Plainfield's living legacies – a legacy shared by many during house and garden tours.

"Giggleswick" seems to have started it all. Marjorie Elliott's 1989 treatise on the Giggleswick estated on Woodland Avenue dates the stone cottage of George and Ella Mellick to 1894, with a larger, medieval-style great hall added soon after, and describes the rock gardens developed withthe help of Swiss engineers using huge boulders dug up from the property. "The cavaties created by the relocation of these boulders formed pools that were filled with water . . .(where) one could swin, after a fashion." Spring bulbs, irises, peonies, wildflowers, lilies of the valley, and jack-in-the-pulpits swathed the landscape in naturalized plantings. Though the estate house was razed after a fire, an enclave of luxury condominiums arose on the site, incorporating many of the pre-exisiting garden features. Thus, a legend lives on. Courtesy of Courier News – Bridgewater, New Jersey

Albert H. Atterbury

photo from "Images of America: Plainfield" by John A. Grady and Dorothe M. Pollard
Caption reads, "Seen here is Albert Hoffman Atterbury in his Hillside Avenue garden. Atterbury was a world traveler and collector of first editions, which he presented to his alma mater, Yale. Atterbury lived in his home until his death in 1955 at age 95."

Atterbury House

photo from "Images of America: Plainfield" by John A. Grady and Dorothe M. Pollard
Caption reads, "In the 1920,s Albert Atterbury and his wife, Emma, moved from their West Seventh Street mansion to a more comfortable home on Hillside Avenue. The Atterburys were active for many years in the cultural and civic life of Plainfield."

Atterbury garden in more modern times

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Von Boskerck

The Garden Club of America

Mrs. C. W. Clarke
27 Shrewsbury Dr.
Rumson, NJ 07760

postmark 1 APR 94

The Garden Club of America

598 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 1022

Dear Anne –

Thank you for the film of Atterbury Garden. I am researching just how or if it is possible to make slides from it. You or Nancy Kroll will be hearing from me if I have some success! (over)

I do appreciate your entrusting the film to me.

Sincerely, Diane

The Garden Club of America

February 2011

Mary Kent recalled that member Phyllis Alexander had mentioned she had a film of the Atterbury garden. Susan Fraser recalls Phyllis speaking about having a film and having it made into a DVD.

June 1, 2007

The Atterbury house, now owned by Gregory Palermo, was part of a garden tour in conjunction with Shakespeare-in-Bloom

June 1, 2007

June 1, 2007

June 1, 2007

June 1, 2007

New York Times November 14, 1895

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=FB0911FE355911738DDDAD0994D9415B8585F0D3

PLAINFIELD KIRMESS OPENED

In Aid of Muhlenberg Hospital – Good Attendance and Reason for Expecting Financial Success – The Booths.

PLAINFIELD, N. J., Nov. 13 – There was a grand opening of the kirmess at the Columbia Cycle Academy Monday night, and the building was decorated very elaborately.

Not since the charity ball have the society fold here been interested in a like event for such a worthy cause. The kirmess is given for the benefit of Muhlenberg Hospital, and, judging from the attendance at the opening night, the hospital will be greatly bettered financially.

Booths have been very prettily arranged about the academy, making an exceedingly tasty show. The equipment of the booths is as follows:

French Booth – Mrs. Albert Hoffman Atterbury, Mrs. Irving H. Brown, Mrs. Charles B. Corwin, Miss Bessie Ginna, Mrs. George C. Evans, Mrs. Charles J. Fisk, Mrs. Ellis W. Hedges, Miss E. E. Kenyon and Miss Whiton.

Florentine Booth – Mrs. I. N. Van Sickle, Mrs. David E. Titsworth, Mrs. W. M. Stillman, Mrs. John D. Titsworth, Mrs. F. A. Dunham, Miss Louise Clawson, Miss Bessie TItsworth, and Mrs. Lulu Lewis.

Gypsy Booth – Mrs. Joseph W. Reinhart, and Mrs. Howard Fleming.

Venetian Booth – Mrs. Hugh Hastings, Miss Emelie Schipper, Mrs. George A. Chapman, Miss Havbiland, Mrs. Samuel Huntingont, Mrs. Emil Woltman, Mrs. Samuel St. J. McCutchen, Mrs. Conklin, Mrs. C. S. West, Mrs. W. E. Lower, Miss E. R. Cock, Mrs. Frank O. Herring, Miss Huntington, Miss Maud Van Bosckerck, Miss MacCready, Miss Clara D. Finley, Miss Ahrens, Miss Aynne MacCready, Miss Mondanari, Miss Graff, Miss Yerkes, Miss Gertrude Walz, and Miss Pierson.

Japanese Booth – Mrs. Charles Seward Foote, Mrs. George Clay, Mrs. S.P. Simpson, Mrs. L. Finch, Mrs. Constantine P. Ralli, Mrs. William Lewis Brown, Mrs. L. Dennis, Mrs. WIlliam Pelletier, Miss Ellis, Miss Anthony, Miss Dryden, Miss Morgan, Miss Bowen, Miss Lawrence, and Miss Rodman.

Spanish Booth – Mrs. S. A. Cruikshank, Mrs. A. T. Slauson, Mrs. J. F. Wichers, Mrs. T. H. Curtis, Mrs. Marion S. Ackerman, Mrs. T. A. Hazell, Mrs. H. L. Moore, Mrs. D. T. Van Buren, Mrs. E. H. Mosher, Miss Harriott, Miss Louise Patton, Miss Maud Lord, Miss May Kirkner, Miss Louise Van Zandt, Miss Annie Horton, Miss Titsworth, and Miss Meredith.

German Booth – Mrs. Mason W. Tyler, Mrs. Logan Murphy, Mrs. John H. Oarman, Mrs. Charles J. Taggart, Mrs. Benjamin R. Western, Mrs. J. E. Turill, Mrs. Arthur T. Gallup, Mrs. Horsley Barker, Mrs. John Haviland, Mrs. George Wright, Mrs. Amra Hamragan, Mrs. William L. Saunders, Mrs. William Wright, Miss Annie Murphy, Miss Wright, Miss Western, Miss Bartling, Miss Helen Warman, Miss Emma Adams and Miss Ann Thorne.

Stationery Booth – Mrs. John Gray Foster, Mrs. Elliott Barrows, Mrs. A. W. Haviland, Mrs. John D. Miller, Mrs. James R. Joy, and Miss Emily R. Tracy.

Parisian Flower Stall – Mrs. Harry M. Stockton, Mrs. Evarts Tracy, Mrs. Daniel F. Ginna, Mrs. W. H. Ladd, Mrs. Frederick Yates, Miss Marlon Dumont, Miss Ginna, Miss Baker, Miss Huntington, and Miss Van Bosckerck.

Refreshments were dispensed by Mrs. Orville T. Waring, Mrs. George W. Van Bosckerck, Mrs. John Bushnell, Mrs. Gifford Mayer, Mrs. George H. Goddard, Mrs. Moore, Mrs. H. P. Reynolds, Mrs. C. C. Guion, Mrs. N. P. T. Finch, Mrs. Henry McGee, Mrs. De Revere, Mrs. Ruth C. Leonard, Mrs. George W. Rockfellow, Miss Annie Opdyke, Mrs. Van Alstyne, Mrs. Utzinger, Mrs. Nelson Runyon, Mrs. Henry Tapsley, Miss Martine, Miss Edith Allen, Mrs. J. Parker Mason, Mrs. J. K. Myers, Mrs. Walton, and Mrs. H. C. Adams

Courier News Articles

Atterbury Albert Hoffman wife Emma (Baker) 10/24/1950 News
Atterbury Albert Hoffman wife Emma (Baker) 8/29/1955 News
Atterbury Albert Hoffman wife Emma (Baker) 8/31/1955 Editorial
Atterbury Albert Hoffman wife Emma (Baker) 11/21/1955 Obituary
Atterbury Albert Hoffman wife Emma (Baker) 12/3/1955 News

Courier News articles for "Baker"

Baker Catherine 3/21/1966 News
Baker Catherine 3/25/1966 News
Baker Catherine 3/31/1966 News
Baker Catherine 4/2/1966 News
Baker Catherine 5/17/1966 News death
Baker Catherine 5/18/1966 News
Baker Catherine 8/13/1966 News
Baker Catherine 8/11/1966 Clipping (nonCN)
Baker Clifford M. wife Margaret Drayton 1/11/1938 News
Baker Clifford M. wife Margaret Drayton 1/21/1939 News
Baker Clifford M. wife Margaret Drayton 2/11/1941 News
Baker Clifford M. wife Margaret Drayton 1/11/1944 News
Baker Clifford M. wife Margaret Drayton 10/24/1945 News
Baker Clifford M. wife Margaret Drayton 4/12/1947 News
Baker Clifford M. wife Margaret Drayton 4/8/1949 News
Baker Clifford M. wife Margaret Drayton 1/25/1949 News
Baker Clifford M. wife Margaret Drayton 5/1/1957 News
Baker Clifford M. wife Margaret Drayton 6/2/1959 News
Baker Clifford M. wife Margaret Drayton 11/6/1979 Obituary
Baker Elizabeth T. 6/6/1956 News
Baker Elizabeth T. 12/28/1971 Obituary
Baker Horace Edward 5/20/1939 News
Baker Horace Edward 6/17/1939 News
Baker Horace Edward 3/15/1946 News
Baker Horace Edward 7/17/1947 News
Baker Horace Edward 12/11/1947 News
Baker Horace Edward 5/28/1948 News
Baker Horace Edward 3/24/1949 News
Baker Horace Edward 5/26/1950 News
Baker Horace Edward 6/20/1950 News
Baker Horace Edward 4/18/1952 News
Baker Horace Edward 9/9/1953 News
Baker Horace Edward 9/16/1953 News
Baker Horace Edward 3/12/1954 News
Baker Horace Edward 1/4/1961 News
Baker Horace Edward 6/29/1966 News
Baker Horace Edward 12/26/1974 News
Baker Horace Edward 10/3/1975 Obituary
Baker Horace Edward 10/4/1975 Obituary
Baker Ivan Franklin wife Lucile Atkinson 6/29/1976 Obituary
Baker Lucile Atkinson husband Ivan Franklin 10/27/1976 Obituary
Baker Jane Runyon 1/6/1966 News
Baker Jane Runyon 8/21/1969 Obituary
Baker John Drayton parents Clifford & Margaret 10/24/1945 News
Baker Joseph W. 10/28/1969 Obituary
Baker Margaret Drayton husband Clifford M. 10/24/1945 News
Baker Margaret Drayton husband Clifford M. 5/31/1962 Obituary
Baker Margaret Drayton husband Clifford M. 6/7/1962 News
Baker Serring B. 2/20/1971 Obituary
Baker Serring B. n.d. Film Negative

April 1, 1994

April 1, 1994

View of Garden of Albert H. Atterbury, 922 Hillside Avenue

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

1919 Muhlenberg Hospital

Mrs. A. H. Atterbury
1003 Park Avenue

October 26, 1908 New York Times

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F70D14FB3B5A17738DDDAF0A94D8415B888CF1D3

PLAINFIELD, N. J., Oct. 25 – No arrests were made at the Plainfield Country Club today when the first trial at Sunday golf took place, and in fact there was no suspicion of interference of any sort. The clubhouse was open all afternoon, despite the protests of the local clerby, and about a score of the "liberals" played golf. Among the number were A. H. Atterbury and Hugh F. Fox, Councilman Henry D. Hibbard, S. D. Lounsbury, E. G. Willson, and Frank Reinhart, the crack golfer, all well-known citizens. In and about the clubhouse were a number of the women members as well as about two dozen men who did not care to go over the course.

The police made no arrests for Sunday baseball, and in fact no games were reported, although it had been announced that some would be held today in order to bring about arrests and thus have the legality of Sunday golf tested. Mayor C. J. Fisk, who voted for the amendment of the club allowing it to be open on Sundays, and who later announced that arrests would follow if any indulged in baseball within the city limits, was not a visitor at the clubhouse. In his statement explaining his vote the Mayor declares that he favored Sunday opening, but that the question of golf play was entirely a matter for the governors to decide.

At the fashionable Park Avenue Baptist Church tonight the Rev. Dr. A. E. Finn, the pastor, in denouncing the golf play today at the Plainfield Country Club, remarked concerning those who voted in favor of the innovation:

"Last Tuesday night 168 people by their vote to open the Plainfield Country Club for half a day on Sunday, put a stumbling block in the way of the moral and religious progress of the beautiful City of Plainfield. I wonder if these 168 refined, cultured, educated, influential people knew what God said in His holy Word about putting stumbling blocks in the way of their fellow men? That the influence of these 168 stumbling blocks is far reaching is evident by the fact that a petition in favor of Sunday baseball has now been sent to our Mayor.

"Just as truly as the retribution of God came upon the people in Isaiah's time for the desecration of His holy day, so we have every reason to believe that the people who are endeavoring to break one of the great institutions that God has given us for our moral and spiritual development will be called upon to account for it. But these 168 stumbling blocks have not only violated God's law, but upon this very day when they open their golf links violated a State law. And in proof of this assertion, I quote Corporation Counsel Craig A. Marsh, Vice President of the New Jersey Bar Association:

"We were very proud of our banker-Mayor, C. J. Fisk, President of the State Excise Commission, when he found that Atlantic City was openly violating the law and that he did not try to conceal it, but reported that fact to the Governor. But where is the consistency of Mayor Fisk to report to the Governor the violations of the law in other cities and at the same time to join with 168 people to openly violate the law in our own city?

"We call upon the citizens of Plainfield who have any regard for their homes, their city, their church, and their God to see that God's laws are observed, and that the State laws are enforced, and that this moral germ is destroyed in its incipient state."

Among the other pastors of fashionable churches who denounced the innovation from their pulpits today were the Rev. Dr. A. C. McCrea of the First M. E. Church and the Rev. Dr. Charles E. Herring of the First Presbyterian Church.

Hydes related to the Atterburys

Hyde, Mrs. Charles Livingston (Elizabeth Kepler) '17

1915 - 1923 Book: Meetings of The Plainfield Garden Club

1915 - 1923 List of Meetings

1925 Meeting Minutes

May 13, 1925 Meeting Minutes

May 13, 1925 Meeting Minutes

Film of the Atterbury Garden

Mrs. Emma Atterbury

In her garden's summer house

Movie_Mrs. Conner 999 Hillside Mrs. Atterbury 922 Hillside Mrs. Stevens 985 Hillside Miss Munger 1441 Prospect

Mrs. Atterbury's Garden

Email received May 13, 2013

name: Brian Manning Smith
email: montaukbrian@yahoo.com
phone:

message:

I am the great grandson of Mary G. Manning (Born 1857, lived in Plainfield, died in Brooklyn 1938). In her will was written "bequeath to my nieces, ELIZABETH MANNING, MARGARET BAKER, and KATHARINE VALIANT, ......". I am trying to contact a current descendant of either Mrs. Baker or Mrs. Valiant to gather/confirm some family history. I wonder if one of your members could help me?


Barr, Mrs. Frank Seymour (Helen Letitia Brewster) '32
Barr, Mrs. W. Manning (Marjorie) '39
Valiant, Mrs. John (Katharine Drayton) '40
Baker, Mrs. Clifford Myron (Margaret Drayton) '32
Atterbury, Mrs. Albert Hoffmann (Emma H. Baker) '15
Baker, Mrs. John Whitney (Theodora Faber) '22
Loizeaux, Mrs. Charles E. (Elizabeth or "Betty" Manning Barr), Jr. '69


–––- Forwarded message –––-
From: <donotreply@andyswebtools.com>
Date: Mon, May 13, 2013 at 11:40 AM
Subject: New "Contact Us" submission from Brian Manning Smith
To: plainfieldgc@gmail.com


You've received a new submission from your "contact us" through your "Plainfield Garden Club" Andy's Web Tools web site.

name: Brian Manning Smith
email: montaukbrian@yahoo.com
phone: XXX-XXX-XXXX

message:

I am the great grandson of Mary G. Manning (Born 1857, lived in Plainfield, died in Brooklyn 1938). In her will was written "bequeath to my nieces, ELIZABETH MANNING, MARGARET BAKER, and KATHARINE VALIANT, ......". I am trying to contact a current descendant of either Mrs. Baker or Mrs. Valiant to gather/confirm some family history. I wonder if one of your members could help me?

922 Hillside Avenue

Albert Hoffman Atterbury

The Plainfield Musical Club

The Plainfield Musical Club, the oldest musical club in New Jersey was founded in April 1892 by Miss Caroline Struelli and 21 other women vocalists, pianists and "elocutionists". The charter members had been meeting informally for several years before officially establishing the Club, which was "dedicated to the stimulation of a greater interest in musical culture." Important early members included Miss Maud Van Boskerck, who came to the PMC as a pianist and contributed to programs as an accompanist and offered her studio as a meeting place. She also supported the annual concert of famous artists. Mrs. Albert H. Atterbury built Club membership up to 60, but when members wavered in meeting attendance, her suggestion of disbanding spurred renewed interest.

1925 brought the addition of males to the Club, as well as organists, harpists, orchestral instrument players and the elocutionists became "poet-readers." The PMC season ran from October through July inclusive and it held nine monthly meetings annually.

The Club was also active with the community. They contributed money to the Red Cross during both World Wars, bought and donated boxes or seats at the Metropolitan Opera House for the Jersey Junior performances as well as tickets to performances by the Plainfield Symphony Society, Plainfield Choral Club and Mendelssohn Glee Club. The PMC also made many contributions to the Edward MacDowell Association for its artist's colony in Peterborough, NH. In 1950, the Club established an Scholarship Fund which awarded high school graduates from Plainfield and North Plainfield who were interested in furthering their musical education. The fund was generously supported in 1988 with a donation from the estate of former member Adele de Leeuw, noted Plainfield author and native. The bequest was set up in honor of her sister Cateau de Leeuw, also a noted author, illustrator and club member. Other nationally known members included Harriet Ware, who composed music for solo voice, piano, choral and organ, and Charlotte Garden, once the leading female organist in the United States and Europe.

There were fifteen types of musicianship represented: piano, accompanists, organ, violin, soprano, contralto, tenor, bass and baritone, ensemble, choral director, and poet-reader. There were also five classes of membership: Senior-active, Junior-active, Joint (for husbands and wives), Associate and Honorary. Mrs. Leighton Calkins, wife of a Plainfield mayor, was made the first honorary member in 1919. The Club is still in existence today and remains active, still gathering at members homes.

June 6, 1992 Historical Society of Plainfield Secret Gardens Tour

October 24, 1992 Historical Society of Plainfield Secret Gardens Tour

1. Drake House
2. Shakespeare Garden
3. Victorian Hideaway, 935 Madison Avenue

4. Holly, Box and Ivy, 836 Arlington Avenue
King, Mrs. Victor R. (Elizabeth J.) '48

5. Green-Wreathed Carriage House, 825 Carlton Avenue
Lare, Mrs. William Sloane (Dorothy) '54

This is the Carriage House to 1127 Watchung Avenue
Ginna, Mrs. Daniel F. (Katherine Whiting Lewis) '15

6. England Revisited, 922 Hillside Avenue
Atterbury, Mrs. Albert Hoffman (Emma H. Baker) '15

A silhouette of living green against the fence is prelude to a 1922 English country house enclosed within a dense barrier of broad-leaf evergreens, and warmly embraced by its colorful perennial garden. An open gate beckons us into a flowering courtyard where a young woodland diety plays his pipes, roses and clematis climb latticed walls and magnolia shades the tender growth below. We would linger awhile, but the distant music of falling water lures us along stepping stones to the pond beside a shaded pavilion. Below the weeping hemlock, oriental koi perform an underwater ballet among the waterlilies. And look for the bullfrog. Where? Over there, just behind the stems of arrowhead or sunning on his favorite lily pad.

Further down the hill we go, through the multicolored sprawl of an English country garden to the swimming pool. Anemone, bleeding heart, Canterbury bells – on the flowers romp through phlox, sweet william and verbena to the end of the gardener's lexicon. Evident amid the floral exhuberance is the touch of a firm and controlling hand, encouraging and directing the garden symphony.

Enter the house through the garden room, where the flowering world has been captured, visually and verbally, between the enticing covers of books. Find here all the lore, fact, imagery and poetry to which the garden is heir. Bird houses are here, as well, in fancy dress to add a touch of fantasy to either an outdoor or indoor setting.

The home's interior – gracious, welcoming and serenely comfortable – plays subtle accompaniment to the abundance lying just beyond its walls. Sunny yellow, trellis patterns and pastel florals distribute airy freshness throughout the house. A spacious kitchen has been transformed from a trio of nondescript rooms into the light-filled surroundings we wee today. Each room offers escape to the secret garden, expressing the gardener's wish to be, above all else, outdoors.

7. Hillside in Bloom, 1314 Highland Avenue
Noss, Mrs. Henry (Edith Edwards Tyler) '66

8. Elegant Serenity, 1332 Prospect Avenue
Van Boskerck, Mrs. Thomas Rowe (Lucy Otterson) '15

9. Hidden Harmony, 1401 Chetwynd Avenue

10. Petals on the Paving, 1081 Rahway Road
Barlow, Mrs. DeWitt Dukes (Mary Lee Brewer), Jr. '65

11. Woodland Idyll, 1275 Denmark Road
Sandford, Mrs. Webster (Barbara Tracy) '50

Plainfield Library Bio Cardn

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

1901 Harper's Official Golf Guide

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Hillside Historic District

August 29, 2015

Hillside Historic District has announced a new website: http://hillsideavenuedistrict.com

They have neatly listed the homes in the district in a similar fashion to our Homes & Gardens page.

It is no exaggeration to say that the PGC helped build Hillside. In fact our first club meeting took place at Mrs. Connor's home at 999 Hillside. Take a look at our PGC Hillside Historic District resident members:

807 Hillside Avenue
Browne, Miss Elizabeth B. '37

810 Hillside Avenue
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15

816 Hillside Avenue
Zerega, Miss Bertha Virginia '23

817 Hillside Avenue
Lawton, Mrs. Richard M. (Edith Clarke) '21

832 Hillside Avenue
Yates, Mrs. Frederick Washburn (Bertha Kedzie Cornwell) '15

921 Hillside Avenue
Detwiller, Miss Laura Cecelia '29
Detwiller, Mrs. Charles H. (Catherine or "Cath" Campbell), Jr. '57

922 Hillside Avenue
Atterbury, Mrs. Albert Hoffman (Emma H. Baker) '15

930 Hillside Avenue
Corey, Mrs. Ella J. '15

937 Hillside Avenue
Hunn, Mrs. John T. Sharpless (Hope Ivins) '37
Ivins, Mrs. DeWitt Clinton (Louise Morton Fox) '15
Ivins, Mrs. Clinton Fox (Marguerite Carpenter) '33

945 Hillside Avenue
Stevens, Mrs. Horace N. (Helen Coburn) '15

950 Hillside Avenue
Harlow, Mrs. Edward Dexter (Elise Cochran Martin) '15
Martin, Mrs. Francis A. (Mary Keech Turner) '22

955 Hillside Avenue
Wallace, Mrs. Frederick W. (Grace Seccomb) '15
deForest, Mrs. Henry Lockwood (Amy Brighthurst Brown) '33

966 Hillside Avenue
Warren, Mrs. Frank D. '15

970 Hillside Avenue
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15
Kroll, Mrs. Alexander (Nancy Dwinnell or Mrs. Prince H. Gordon) '60

975 Hillside Avenue
Runkle, Mrs. Harry Godley (Jennie Fitz Randolph) '15
Albin, Mrs. Leland D. (Jennie Hoag) '36
King, Mrs. Victor E. D. (Yasmina S.) '78
Whitehead, Mrs. James Harold (Jean Fitz-Randolph Heiberg) '43

980 Hillside Avenue
Hall, Mrs. Frederic L. (Anne Garrigues Wigton) '68
Stuart, Mrs. Linden (Jeanette W.), Jr. '52
Wigton, Mrs. Charles Benson (Garrigues) '45

982 Hillside Avenue
Baker, Mrs. Clifford Myron (Margaret Drayton) '32
Valiant, Mrs. John (Katharine Drayton) '40

985 Hillside Avenue
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P.") '15
Stevens, Mrs. Horace Nathaniel (Helen Coburn) '15
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P."), Jr. (Edith S.) '37
Stevens, Mrs. Robert Ten Broeck (Dorothy Goodwin Whitney) '37

996 Hillside Avenue
Wallace, Mrs. Frederick W. (Grace Seccomb) '15
Murray Townsend
Mooney, Mrs. Wandell McMaster (Alice Joy McGee) '47

999 Hillside Avenue
Conner, Mrs. William A. (Florence Tupper) '15
Wigton, Mrs. William Garrigues (Ann Hayes) '55

1000 Hillside Avenue
Lawrence, Mrs. Chester B. (Florence B.), Jr. '22

1005 Hillside Avenue
McWilliams, Mrs. Howard (Anna Louise Waldbridge/Mrs. Paul Taylor Brown) '22

1007 Hillside Avenue
Lockwood, Mrs. Frederick M. (Hazel Marshall) '52
Marshall, Mrs. Henry P. (Dorothy Burke) '30

1009 Hillside Avenue
Tracy, Mrs. Evarts '22
Tracy, Mrs. Howard Crosby (Minerva Bingham Lamson) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

1019 Hillside Avenue
Baker, Mrs. Clifford Myron (Margaret Drayton) '28

1030 Hillside Avenue
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Ethel Lucile Titsworth) '42

1035 Hillside Avenue
Streuli, Mrs. Alfred F. H. (Frederica Michelle Dwyer Hooper) '15

1045 Hillside Avenue
Timpson, Mrs. Lewis Gouverneur (Helen Frances Waring) '15
Waring, Mrs. Orville G. (Dorothy Fleming) '35

1046 Hillside Avenue
Genung, Mrs. Alfred Gawthrop (Dorothy or "Dot" Madsen) '69
Madsen, Mrs. John (Evelyn or "Evie" Wilson) '70

1300 Prospect Avenue
Streuli, Mrs. Alfred F. H. (Frederica Michelle Dwyer Hooper) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

1234 Watchung Avenue
Stevenson, Mrs. E. Vickers '41

1239 Watchung Avenue
Brown, Miss Edna M. '34