Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Stillman, Mrs. Albert Leeds (Virginia Brown) '41

1940 - 1941 Treasurer Book, under "Active" Mrs. Albert L. Stillman 6/26/41 Pd. 1/5/42 Pd. 12/29/42 Pd. 12/14/43 Pd 11/25/44 Pd. 12/30/45 7/46 June 5, 1947 June 4, 1948 June 12, 1949 July 9, 1950 June 1951 June 1952

1942 - 1987 Address: 73 Leland Avenue, Plainfield

1984 - 1985: Active
1985 - 1986: Resigned

Mrs. Albert Leeds Stillman passed away in 1987.

Mrs. Albert Leeds (Virginia Brown) Stillman '41 is the sister-in-law of Plainfield Garden Club member Mrs. Emmet Augustus (Anita Mary Stillman) Quarles '22

May be related through marriage to the following PGC Members:

First wife of William M. Stillman:
Mrs. William M. (Elizabeth B. Atwood) Stilllman '15

Second wife of William M. Stillman
Mrs. William M. (Ethel Lucille Titsworth) Stillman '42


Brown, Miss Edna '34, President 1937 - 1938
Brown, Mrs. Harold S. '34
deForest, Mrs. Henry Lockwood (Amy Brighthurst Brown) '33

Myers, Mrs. J. Kirtland (Mary Ann Stillman) '15
Quarles, Mrs. Ernest Augustus (Anita Mary Stillman) '22
Stillman, Mrs. William M. (Elizabeth B. Atwood) '15
Stillman, Mrs. William M. (Ethel Lucille Titsworth) '42

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

Albert Leeds Stillman family tree

Children of Thomas Bliss Stillman
and Emma Louise Pomplitz
daughter of August Pomplitz and Louise Otto
Thomas Bliss Stillman was listed in Concise Dictionary of American Biography and held many patents for production of synthetic foods
Emma Louise Pomplitz Stillman was listed in Woman's Who's Who of America




Albert Leeds Stillman
Born: 14 Jun 1883
Place: Hoboken, NJ
Died: 6 Feb 1959
Place: Plainfield, NJ
Married: Virginia Brown
Born: circa 1885
Place:
Died:
Place:
Date Married: 18 Sep 1919

Albert Leeds Stillman was listed in the National Cyclopedia of American Biography, Who's Who in New York, and Who's Who in Pennsylvania




Anita Mary Stillman
Born: 13 Dec 1887
Place:
Died:
Place:
Married: Ernest Augustus Quarles
Born: circa 1885
Place:
Died:
Place:
Date Married: 19 Apr 1917





Thomas Bliss Stillman III
Born: 12 Jun 1890
Place:
Died:
Place:
Married: ???
Born: circa 1892
Place:
Died:
Place:
Date Married: 1916

Anita Mary Stillman Quarles '22

Children of Anita Mary Stillman
and Ernest Augustus Quarles




James Addisson Quarles
Born: 1918
Place:
Died:
Place:
Married:
Born:
Place:
Died:
Place:
Date Married:





Francis Fields Quarles
Born: 1919
Place:
Died: 1938
Place:
Married:
Born:
Place:
Died:
Place:
Date Married:





Thomas Bliss Stillman Quarles
Born: 1924
Place:
Died:
Place:
Married: Carolyn Saunders
Born: circa 1926
Place:
Died:
Place:
Date Married: circa 1949





Mary Ann Quarles
Born: 1925
Place:
Died:
Place:
Married:
Born:
Place:
Died:
Place:
Date Married:

Gulestan, Garden of Flowers by Takeo Shiota for the Persian General Consul Saklatvala

From Plainfield, New Jersey's History & Architecture by John Grady and Dorothe Pollard


1. Birches, rhododendrons, mountain laurels, and ferns frame a pagoda in the gardens of Phiroz Sakatvala, Persian Consul General, at East Front Street and Leland Avenue. Saklatvala purchased the Leland family acreage in 1907, turning farmland into an oriental paradise. Under the guidance of architect Takeo Shiota, who later designed the Japanese garden at the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens, the Green Brook was diverted into several branches, flowing around two islands connected by seven bridges, one of which replicated the scared bridge at Nikko. Courtesy of the Historical Society of Plainfield

2. Ancient stone Fu dogs and a stone lantern guard the path to a scared shrine at Saklatvala's "Gulestan" (Garden of flowers) In this setting, Mary Pickford honors her ancestors in a scene from the 1915 film "Madame Butterfly," produced by Famous Players, later known as Paramount Pictures. Was this the first location shoot to take place in the Plainfields? Possibly, but it would not be the last. A precedent had been set. Cinematographers continue to be attracted to the area, most recently fro the movie "Kinsey" in 2003. Courtesy of the Plainfield Public Library – Plainfield, New Jersey

3. The rays of the setting sun trace a path across the Green Brook, highlighting the Saklatvala-Stillman home. The scene is prophetic. The site where Madame Butterfly fulfilled her selfless destiny gave way to the brick and masonry of an apartment complex called Stillman Gardens in 1962. Courtesy of the Plainfield Public Library – Plainfield, New Jersey

Stillman Gardens

From Plainfield, New Jersey's History & Architecture by John Grady & Dorothe Pollard

1. Old sepia-toned photographs cause historians and preservationists to catch their breath. What has been discovered that will recall a moment from the past? The mode of dress suggests the 1930s, the period when Virginia and Albert Stillman purchased the Saklatvala estate. One scene features the Fu dogs near the site of Pickford's performance, and from there, the path to the major portion of the Japanese garden extends over a bridge to the North Plainfield bank of the stream at the rear of the five acre property. Courtesy of the Historical Society of Plainfield

2. The scene changes. A companion photograph surveys a vista of massive entrance gates, lawn, abundant roses, a lily pond, and elegant garden furnishings, part of the Italian gardens at the front of the Saklatvala mansion on the Plainfield side of the Green Brook. The ambiance is now European formality, befitting the approach to a remodeled farmhouse of impressive dimensions. These are the gardens watered by the Green Brook three quarters of a century ago. Courtesy of the Historical Society of Plainfield

July 26, 1987

Handwritten on note:

Copy of memorium for Virginia Stillman send to Mrs. Hawkes

July 26, 1987

Dear Mrs. Craig,

Thank you very much for your note of sympathy from the Plainfield Garden Club and for Helen Eaton's memoriam for my aunt, Virginia Stillman. I have sent copies to my brothers and my aunt's cousins.

I can't lay my hands on Helen's address, so will you please convey my deep appreciation to her.

Cordially,

Mary Q. Hawkes

Mrs. Robert Warren Hawkes

July 26, 1987

From Mac Eaton

June 29

Jane [Craig] –

I talked with Joan [Vivian] about this and she thinks you should send it to Mary Hawkes and enclose a note explaining that it was read at our last meeting. You can put your address on the envelope. It should go to Mrs. Robert Hawkes
50 Washington St.
[not legible] Mass. 02158

Thank you – Mac Eaton

17 Sunbright Road
Watchung, NJ 07060
(201) 756-3333

Smithsonian Archives of American Gardens

Plainfield by John A. Grady and Dorothe M. Pollard

The Stillman estate was a remodeling of an old farmhouse. Apparently, there is nothing new about wanting the latest fashion. As early as the 1860s, a local newspaper noted teh home-remodeling craze and praised it, saying "the plan roofs of the homes had been 'metamorphosed' by pediments, fancy gables and cornices, and their primitive simplicity had been converted to modern beauty by wings, bay windows, recesses, projections and every variety of architectural device." The home is shown below with Australian singer Marjorie Lawrence on the verandah.

Plainfield by John A. Grady and Dorothe M. Pollard

In 1907, Persian consul general Phiroz D. Saklatvala purchased his Leland Avenue estate remodeling an old farmhouse and transforming the grounds. The spectacular result was Gulestan (Garden of Flowers), designed by renowned architect Takeo Shioto, who designed the New York Botanical Gardens. This bridge over the brook duplicates the Japanese imperial family's sacred bridge at Nikko, Japan. Today, a contemporary co-op complex is enhanced by the vision of the former owner.

New York Times November 14, 1895

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=FB0911FE355911738DDDAD0994D9415B8585F0D3

PLAINFIELD KIRMESS OPENED

In Aid of Muhlenberg Hospital – Good Attendance and Reason for Expecting Financial Success – The Booths.

PLAINFIELD, N. J., Nov. 13 – There was a grand opening of the kirmess at the Columbia Cycle Academy Monday night, and the building was decorated very elaborately.

Not since the charity ball have the society fold here been interested in a like event for such a worthy cause. The kirmess is given for the benefit of Muhlenberg Hospital, and, judging from the attendance at the opening night, the hospital will be greatly bettered financially.

Booths have been very prettily arranged about the academy, making an exceedingly tasty show. The equipment of the booths is as follows:

French Booth – Mrs. Albert Hoffman Atterbury, Mrs. Irving H. Brown, Mrs. Charles B. Corwin, Miss Bessie Ginna, Mrs. George C. Evans, Mrs. Charles J. Fisk, Mrs. Ellis W. Hedges, Miss E. E. Kenyon and Miss Whiton.

Florentine Booth – Mrs. I. N. Van Sickle, Mrs. David E. Titsworth, Mrs. W. M. Stillman, Mrs. John D. Titsworth, Mrs. F. A. Dunham, Miss Louise Clawson, Miss Bessie TItsworth, and Mrs. Lulu Lewis.

Gypsy Booth – Mrs. Joseph W. Reinhart, and Mrs. Howard Fleming.

Venetian Booth – Mrs. Hugh Hastings, Miss Emelie Schipper, Mrs. George A. Chapman, Miss Havbiland, Mrs. Samuel Huntingont, Mrs. Emil Woltman, Mrs. Samuel St. J. McCutchen, Mrs. Conklin, Mrs. C. S. West, Mrs. W. E. Lower, Miss E. R. Cock, Mrs. Frank O. Herring, Miss Huntington, Miss Maud Van Bosckerck, Miss MacCready, Miss Clara D. Finley, Miss Ahrens, Miss Aynne MacCready, Miss Mondanari, Miss Graff, Miss Yerkes, Miss Gertrude Walz, and Miss Pierson.

Japanese Booth – Mrs. Charles Seward Foote, Mrs. George Clay, Mrs. S.P. Simpson, Mrs. L. Finch, Mrs. Constantine P. Ralli, Mrs. William Lewis Brown, Mrs. L. Dennis, Mrs. WIlliam Pelletier, Miss Ellis, Miss Anthony, Miss Dryden, Miss Morgan, Miss Bowen, Miss Lawrence, and Miss Rodman.

Spanish Booth – Mrs. S. A. Cruikshank, Mrs. A. T. Slauson, Mrs. J. F. Wichers, Mrs. T. H. Curtis, Mrs. Marion S. Ackerman, Mrs. T. A. Hazell, Mrs. H. L. Moore, Mrs. D. T. Van Buren, Mrs. E. H. Mosher, Miss Harriott, Miss Louise Patton, Miss Maud Lord, Miss May Kirkner, Miss Louise Van Zandt, Miss Annie Horton, Miss Titsworth, and Miss Meredith.

German Booth – Mrs. Mason W. Tyler, Mrs. Logan Murphy, Mrs. John H. Oarman, Mrs. Charles J. Taggart, Mrs. Benjamin R. Western, Mrs. J. E. Turill, Mrs. Arthur T. Gallup, Mrs. Horsley Barker, Mrs. John Haviland, Mrs. George Wright, Mrs. Amra Hamragan, Mrs. William L. Saunders, Mrs. William Wright, Miss Annie Murphy, Miss Wright, Miss Western, Miss Bartling, Miss Helen Warman, Miss Emma Adams and Miss Ann Thorne.

Stationery Booth – Mrs. John Gray Foster, Mrs. Elliott Barrows, Mrs. A. W. Haviland, Mrs. John D. Miller, Mrs. James R. Joy, and Miss Emily R. Tracy.

Parisian Flower Stall – Mrs. Harry M. Stockton, Mrs. Evarts Tracy, Mrs. Daniel F. Ginna, Mrs. W. H. Ladd, Mrs. Frederick Yates, Miss Marlon Dumont, Miss Ginna, Miss Baker, Miss Huntington, and Miss Van Bosckerck.

Refreshments were dispensed by Mrs. Orville T. Waring, Mrs. George W. Van Bosckerck, Mrs. John Bushnell, Mrs. Gifford Mayer, Mrs. George H. Goddard, Mrs. Moore, Mrs. H. P. Reynolds, Mrs. C. C. Guion, Mrs. N. P. T. Finch, Mrs. Henry McGee, Mrs. De Revere, Mrs. Ruth C. Leonard, Mrs. George W. Rockfellow, Miss Annie Opdyke, Mrs. Van Alstyne, Mrs. Utzinger, Mrs. Nelson Runyon, Mrs. Henry Tapsley, Miss Martine, Miss Edith Allen, Mrs. J. Parker Mason, Mrs. J. K. Myers, Mrs. Walton, and Mrs. H. C. Adams

undated Photograph from the Plainfield Library Archives for PGC

back of photo

2004 January thru March Newsletters

Garden History & Design

Diane Clarke was absolutely fabulous at our last meeting. I really enjoyed her presentation and was inspired to get started with this committee. I would like to recommend that Stillman Gardens be submitted to the Archives of American Gardens. I have already received a verbal release to recommend the gardens and will be pursuing a written release in April. This is some of the background materical that I found in the file:

"The property originally belonged to the Leland family. It was purchased by Phiroz D. Sakatvala, Persian consul-general, in 1907. Skaklatvala came from Bombay, India, to learn American business methods, expecting to return to head a company there. He married an American girl and did not return.

He remodeled the farmhouse and created an Italian garden in front of the house, but his main effort was the creation of a Japanese garden. The Japanese garden was created by the Japanese architect, Takea Shiota, who also designed the Japanese garden for the Brookyln Botanical Gardens. The garden was named "Gulestan," "garden of flowers."

The garden includes a shrine to Saklatvala's mother and a memorial statue or a Japanese girl carved in 1691. The bridge over a brook duplicates the sacred bridge at Nikko, property of the Japanese Imperial family. There is a natural swimming pool dug out by hand by Japanese workmen.

One of the movies made on this site was "Madame Butterfly" with Mary Pickford, released in 1915.

The property was purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Albert Stillman in 1930. Stillman was director of research for a coal company and author of technical books and juvenile fiction.

The site is currently the property of Stillman Gardens, a co-operative, whose members actively maintain the garden. Thank you to Bernice for bringing this garden to my attention.

Darlene

Sacred Bridge at Nikko Japan

1951 Check Book

No. 919
Dec. 7, 1951
Virginia Stillman
Shakespeare Garden
tulips in memory of Mrs. Eaton
from Reserve Account
bought from John Scheepers
$7.60

1952 Check Book

No. 964
June 27, 2952
Margaret Cone Ladd
registration for regional meeting
$10.00

No. 965
June 27, 1952
Helen Eaton
registration for regional meeting
$10.00

No. 966
June 27, 1952
Virginia Stillman
registration for annual meeting
$1.50

1952 Check Book

No. 963
June 27, 1952
Virginia Stillman
N.Y. Exhibit
$20.00

1953 Check Book

No. 997
Mar. 31, 1953
Margaret C. Ladd
Exhibitor at Flower show
$12.50

No. 998
Mar. 31, 1953
Marion Loizeaux
Exhibitor at flower show
$12.50

No. 999
Mar. 31, 1953
Virginia Stillman
Exhibitor Flower Show
$12.50

1953 Check Book

No. 1009
April 20, 1953
The New York Botanical Garden
Sustaining dues: 1953 - 1954
$25.00

No. 1010
May 1, 1953
The Garden Club of America
2 garden locaters
(1 for club 1 for Mrs. C. B. Tyler)
$4.00

No. 1011
May 1, 1953
Virginia Stillman
Horticulture tree for Shakespeare Garden
$15.30

1954 Check Book

No. 1066
Mar 17
Mrs. Albert Stillman
registration for annual meeting
$50.00

No. 1067
Eliz. B. Dunbar
registration for zone meeting
$20.00

No. 1068
Mrs. Victor King
Zone meeting $20.00
regis. ann mtg $50.00
railroad ticket - etc
$174.69

1954 Check Book

No. 1069
March 17, 1954
Garden Club of America
memorial to Miss Laura Detwiller
$5.00

No. 1070
Mar. 8, 1954
Fanny K. Day
Program expenses
rental of projector etc
$6.15

No. 1071
Mar 17, 1954
Mrs. Albert L. Stillman
exhibition in N.Y. Show
$12.50

1954 Check Book

No. 1099
May 24, 1954
William Saville
Flowers and plants
$57.30

No. 1100
May 24, 1954
Virginia Stillman
expenses for horticultural exhibit
$8.51

No. 1101
May 24, 1954
Virginia Stillman
Shakespeare Garden
seeds & markers
$2.45

1954 Check Book

No. 1132
Nov. 17, 1954
Von Graff Greenhouses
planting around Salvation Army Hds (?)
$120.00

No. 1133
Nov. 30, 1954
Eliz. N. Cochran
rental of projector for program
$2.75

No. 1134
Dec. 13, 1954
Virginia Stillman
3 lilies for Shakespeare Garden
$2.90

1955 Check Book

No. 1165
July 2, 1955
Snyder Bros.
flowers for Lyons Hospital June 3 & 10
$10.00

No. 1166
July 2, 1955
The Garden Club of America
dues for 78 members at $8 each (Junior member not included)
$624.00

No. 1167
July 14, 1955
Virginia B. Stillman
Shakespeare Garden plants & seeds
$5.20

1956 Check Book

No. 1206
May 11, 1956
Virginia B. Stillman
exhibition expenses
N. Y. Flower Show
$8.45

1956 Check Book

No. 1207
May 11, 1956
Virginia B. Stillman
for Shakespeare Garden
Lily bulbs $16.00
Prints of Shakespeare Garden for G.C. A. $2.00
$18.60

1956 Check Book

No. 1236
October 25, 1956
Virginia B. Stillman
registration fee - Central Zone
meeting – Garden Club
of New Jersey
$4.00

1956 Check Book

No. 1238
November 17, 1956
Virginia B. Stillman
$6.94

1957 Check Book

No. 1261
May 13, 1957
Virginia Stillman
N. Y. Flower Show
expenses
$12.00

1958 Check Book

No. 1302
April 17, 1958
Virginia B. Stillman
for Shakespeare Garden
$11.00

1949 Check Book

No. 781
June 21, 1949
James Smith
Flats for Shakespeare Garden
$16.00

No. 782
June 21, 1949
Dorothy de Hart
N. Y. Flower Show Exhibitor
$7.00

No. 783
June 21, 1949
Virginia Stillman
N. Y. Flower Show Exhibitor
$7.00

1950 Check Book

No. 847
Oct. 13, 1950
Mrs. Burnham Glaser
for Boxes of note paper to sell
$33.00

No. 848
Oct. 13, 1950
Garden Club of America
Contributiors Fund
$25.00

No. 849
Oct. 13, 1950
Garden Club of America
Dues 48 active 240
22 Assoc. 110
3 Honorary 15.00
$365.00

In left margin:

Oct. 25 Sales Calendar & paper
Mrs. Stillman
$63.00

1951 Check Book

No. 883
Mar. 15, 1951
Margaret C. Ladd
N. Y. Flower Show
$10.00

No. 884
Mar. 15, 1951
Marjorie Elliott
N. Y. Flower Show
$10.00

No. 885
Mar. 15, 1951
Virginia Stillman
N. Y. Flower Show
$10.00

1955 TO Mrs. Stillman FROM Arthur McKay

February 27, 2013

Hi Susan,

I am looking for the DVD's and just ran across a perfectly lovely quote concerning Winter in a 1955 letter to Mrs Stillman from Arthur Mc Kay.

" Winter certainly seems reluctant to relax her grip and let us get to work on our gardens. I live in anticipation, and I'm sure you must be fairly ready to welcome Spring yourself."

Back to my task at hand...These archives are intriguing!

Jeanne

February 13, 1955 Letter to Mrs. Stillman from Mr. Arthur B. McKay

Dear Mrs. Stillman,

Winter certainly seems reluctant to relax her grief and let us get to work on our gardens. I live in anticipation, and I'm sure you must be fairly ready to welcome spring yourself.

Here is a list of some plants eligible for admission to the Shakespeare Garden.

From Richards' Gardens Inc.
Plainwell, Mich.
one year old plants (perennial)
Auchusa Italica (Alpanet?)
(like the blue forget-me-nots on tall spikes up to 4 ft #.30 0r 5 for .70

Aubrieta (Royal Purple)
small mounds from red to pink violet and purple
.35 - 3 for .80

February 13, 1955 Letter to Mrs. Stillman from Mr. Arthur B. McKay page 2

Catamanche (Cupid's Dart)
(Deep blue or violet on long stems can be dried for winter
.30 - 3 for .70

Centaurea montana – hardy Batchelor's Button
Blue – larger than the cornflower
.30 - 3 for .70
Helianthemum (sun rose)
mounds of fine shiny evergreen foliage with flowers of bright red, rose, white & yellow
.30 - 3 for .70

From gardens of the Blue Ridge
strong plants (2 yrs or more old)

Aquilegia canadensis
Columbine (scarlet & yellow) ea. 35

Lobelia cardinalis
Cardinal Flower ea. .32

Monarda (Bergamont) Bright Red ea. 34

From R?? Moorestown

Epimedium Alpinus rubrum
this one is dark red ea. .75

February 13, 1955 Letter to Mrs. Stillman from Mr. Arthur B. McKay page 3

There are others, of course, but there is always time and many can be raised from seed.

I'll be sending an order to each of these places, but if you would prefer I can led you the catalog and you can order - particularly as you might see things you wish for yourself.

I hope you can read this. I'm writing on a board across a chair as I have my table filled with catalogs and various papers of seed (that I collected) and am trying to make out my own writing identificaiton.

With best wishes to you and Mrs. Stillman

Arthur B. McKay

Japanese Bird Bath

July 26, 2013

This bird bath now resides at another Plainfield residence. The owner purports that it was an original element in the garden at Gulestan.

If one were to study some of the original/older photographs of the garden, you can see this birdbath.

Golestan Bird Bath

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

May 1955 Mrs. Albert L. Stillman

May 1955 Dogwood Planted

1958

Caption: GARDEN CLUB GIFT – Mrs. Albert L. Stillman, chairman of the Shakespeare committee of the Plainfield Garden Club, places identification card on English hawthorne in Cedar Brook Park. Watching, left to right, are: Mrs. Morris S. Benton, Mrs. Edward H. Ladd 3rd and Mrs. C. Sidney Trewin, club members. (Coronet, Photo by E. T. Wiggins)

100 Attend Open House at Shakespeare Garden

About 100 persons attended an informal tour of the Shakespeare Garden in Cedar Brook Park yesterday afternoon. The outdoors open house marked the 30th anniversary of the garden, one of about a dozen in the United States.

Mrs. Robert F. MacLeod of 11 Brook Lane, president of the Plainfield Garden Club, and members of the club's Shakespeare committee, headed by Mrs. Albert L. Stillman of 73 Leland Ave., described to visitors the 100-odd varieties of plants and shrubs in the garden.

The Garden Club, the Shakespeare Club and the Union County Park Commission established the garden 30 years ago. It now consists of 17 beds and two long borders in a park area of about 150 by 40 feet, located off Randolph Rd.

The ideas was to include all the plants and shrubs – there are 44 of them, Mrs. Stillman said – mentioned by Shakespeare in his plays and sonnets.

Other Plants Included

But the garden was so large, Mrs. Stillman said, that it was agreed upon to include other plant varieties in the 16th and 17th Centuries.

All of the 44 varieties mentioned in the bard's works are labeled by markers, which include the particular Shakespearean quotations referring to them.

The garden was laid out 30 years ago by a landscape architect from Olmsted Brothers of Boston. The Garden Club and the Park Commission split the cost. The garden is cared for by a Park Commission gardener, and supplemental work is done by the Garden Club's Shakespeare committee.

Mrs. Samuel T. Carter Jr. of 940 Woodland Ave., the club's first Shakespeare committee chairman was unable to attend the outdoors open house yesterday.

Termed "Second Finest"

Mrs. Carter, author of the book, "Shakespeare Gardens," has termed the Plainfield garden the second finest in the nation. She has said top honors belong to a Shakespeare garden in Rockefeller Park in Cleveland, Ohio. Established in 1915, the Cleveland garden was one of the first to be planted in the United States.

Mrs. Stillman said Shakespeare gardens bring together flowers grown in England in one period of garden history from being lost to U.S. gardens. The projects also add beauty to public parks and provide a place where Shakespeare poetry is illustrated with living plants and shrubs.

Mrs. Stillman's Shakespeare committee includes Mrs. Morris F. Benton, Mrs. C. Sidney Trewin, Mrs. Victor R. King, Mrs. William P. Elliott and Mrs. George J. His.

Mrs. Edward H. Ladd 3rd, horticultural chairman of the club, was also among those who pointed out features of the garden to guests.

The hospitality committee included Mrs. Henry DeForest, Mrs. Benton, Mrs. Ladd, Mrs. His and Mrs. King.

Punch was served by Mrs. William P. Elliott, Mrs. Trewin and Mrs. His.

1958 Mrs. Stillman

May 21, 1959

circa 1961

Left to right: Mrs. Maurice B. Cooke of the Spade and Trowel Garden club, who was elected director; Mrs. Douglas Valentine of Martinsville, a member of the Washington Valley Garden Club there, first vice president; Mrs. Albert L. Stillman of the Plainfield Garden Club, state president; and Mrs. John Moment of the Monday Afternoon Club Garden Department, corresponding secretary (Photo by Fred Kessing)

circa 1961 Mrs. Stillman

November 16, 2013

Celebration of the Life of Barbara Tracy Sandford

Dr. Charles L. Mead married Evie Madsen's daughter, Nancy Hance, December 2, 1968.

Perhaps Rev. Mead was a relation to "our" Mrs. Mead?

Mead, Mrs. Frederick Goodhue (Marie Louise Myers) '15

Mrs. Mead donated one of the stained glass windows in the church:

1910 New York Observer

Plainfield Church Renovated

The Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church at Plainfield, N. J., of which the Rev. John S. Zelie, D. D., is the pastor, has recently been enriched by the gifts of two handsome stained glass windows. The subject of the first window is "The Presentation in the Temple," and the second, "The Resurrection." The windows are rich and brilliant in color, and are done in painted and stained glass in the style of the renaissance which harmonizes with and carries out the general scheme of decoration of the church.

The first window is a memorial to Frederick G. Mead and Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Myers by Mrs. Frederick G. Mead and the second window is in memory of Mr. Samuel Fisher Kimball, a deacon of the church, by his wife Mrs. Emma C. Kimball. The gifts of these windows follows the entire renovation of the church, which has been one of the the most successful renovations ever carried out. It was finished two years abo under the direction of Mr. Arthur Ware, of New York, and has resulted in making the Crescent Avenue Church one of the most beautiful and churchly edifices in the country.

Frederick, being of course her husband, and Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Myers were Mrs. Mead's parents. Mr. and Mrs. Myers were also founding member Mrs. Jared Kirtland (Mary Ann Stillman) Myers '15 in-laws.

There were many Stillmans in the Club:

Quarles, Mrs. Ernest Augustus (Anita Mary Stillman) '22
Stillman, Mrs. Albert Leeds (Virginia Brown) '41
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Elizabeth B. Atwood) '15
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Ethel Lucille Titsworth) '42

1973-1974 PGC Directory

1973-1974 Garden Club of New Jersey Chairman

1974-1975 Directory

1965 Year Book The Garden Club of New Jersey

Past Presidents
1961-1963
Mrs. Albert L. Stillman
73 Leland Avenue, Plainfield

1965 Year Book The Garden Club of New Jersey

1965 Year Book The Garden Club of New Jersey

When Mrs. Albert L. Stillman became President in 1961, she adopted as her major project the beginning of a Garden Club of New Jersey Headquarters. She believe the time had come to put down permanent roots. She felt if we were able to realize our full potentialities we must have efficient office space, archives to preserve our records, a home for the horticulture library we were collecting. We needed a suitable place to display the Awards we had so richly earned. A place for the various Chairmen to hold meetings, and where Junior activities could be carried on. A central location to stage statewide Garden Centers and hold Flower Shows. But more than that, the time had come for us to establish a worthy symbol of our Horticultural Stewardship. A tangible evidence of our dedication to the preservation of the Beauty Nature has given us as a priceless heritage.

As Mrs. Stillman voiced these hopes in her acceptance speech, it was a clarion call that awakened latent dreams in the hearts of all who heard her. The overwhelming approval given her by member clubs prompted her to outline a schedule:

Executive Board Meeting, May 23, 1961: Mrs. Stillman appointed Mesdames Walters, Schomp, Slocum, Sayre to serve as a committee to look into the feasibility of having a centrally located headquarters building.

1965 Year Book The Garden Club of New Jersey

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 Plainfield Trees Blog

I missed the thousandth anniversary of the world's first novel in 2008. Better late than never, I am making amends by observing the thousand and first. The Tale of Genji, which depicts the cloistered world of the imperial Japanese aristocracy of a millennium ago, is thought to have been written in about 1008. An abiding presence in the novel is the empress tree, Paulownia tomentosa. The delicate lavender hue of the Paulownia flower is the color of romantic attachment throughout the tale. That color is murasaki, the first name of Genji's author, Murasaki Shikibu. Genji's adoptive daughter (and concubine!) is also called Murasaki. Genji's mother, who dies shortly after Genji's birth, is the Lady of the Paulownia Court. Genji carries on a romantic affair with his stepmother, who bears an uncanny resemblance to the Lady of the Paulownia Court.

A tree with the aristocratic associations(1) and exquisitely beautiful blooms of Paulownia might be expected to keep only the best company. Sadly, the tree's star has fallen. In Plainfield Paulownias are most likely to be found in the neglected precincts of the railroad tracks, keeping company with disreputable black locusts (http://plainfieldtrees.blogspot.com/2007/05/black-locust-robinia-pseudoacacia.html). You can see the two species commingling in the wooded strip of land that borders the tracks along South Second Street. America doesn't share Japan's enthusiasm for Paulownia. Despite the beauty of its blooms, Paulownia is regarded as a weed in this country.

I'm glad to report that Plainfield has at least a few beautiful and well cared-for Paulownias. One is in the front yard of 1038 Central Avenue, pictured below. I despaired of finding a photogenic Paulownia in town until Hugh Goodspeed directed me to the Central Avenue tree. (If you visit to have a look, don't miss the white oak only yards away, one of the grandest white oaks in the area. It is pictured at the end of this posting.)

Pictured here is another large Paulownia on Leland Avenue in front of Stillman Gardens.

Jo-Ann Bandomer pointed out this tree to me last spring. She sent an email describing it as looking like a tree-form wisteria. A Paulownia in bloom could easily be mistaken for a wisteria. The huge flowers, which appear before the leaves, are of the same general shape and color as wisteria blooms. Once the leaves appear, the resemblance to wisteria is lost. The large, heart-shaped leaves of Paulownias closely resemble the leaves of catalpas (http://plainfieldtrees.blogspot.com/2007/06/catalpa.html).

Paulownia is not often planted in the United States except on tree farms. It's considered messy, prone to splitting, and invasive.(2) We grow the tree on farms to export its wood to Japan. The wood is highly prized in Japan for its light weight, easy workability, and resistance to rot. It is also said to be fire-resistant. Paulownia wood is a traditional material for the fabrication of chests in which to store kimonos. Several sources relate that it was once customary in Japan and China to plant a Paulownia on the birth of a daughter. The tree would grow fast enough to provide wood for a dowry chest at her marriage. The wood is also used for traditional musical instruments and clogs.

The Japanese still value Paulownias for their beauty, not just as sources of wood. The Paulownia tree is honored by depiction of its flower on the seal of the Japanese prime minister. It would be hard to imagine a flower as the symbol of any American government office. What might Dick Cheney's flower have been?

Schooled by samurai movies, Americans think of the Japanese masculine ideal as silent, loyal, duty-bound, fearless, and skilled at swordplay. The Tale of Genji reflects a different pole of Japanese culture. Genji's era preceded the one depicted in samurai films, and the milieu is the court, not the battlefield. The masculine ideal in Genji's world bears little resemblance to the hero of the samurai film. Not hesitant to shed a tear in contemplation of a beautiful view, he seeks to impress the ladies by the skill with which he mixes the colors of his robes and by the cleverness of his poetry. He prides himself on his ability to blend scents for his own personal perfume. He knows nothing of the world outside the hothouse environment of Kyoto and is afraid to leave central Kyoto at night for fear of highwaymen.(3)

I'm on the lookout for another tree to celebrate an anniversary. This year is the 250th anniversary of the birth of Robert Burns. Does anyone know of a photogenic Scotch pine?

Leland Gardens

Golestan in the Smithsonian Archives of American Gardens

Golestan in the Smithsonian Archives

NJ489000

73 Leland Avenue, Plainfield, NJ

Named after a poem by Saadi entitled "Gulistan," the name means "garden of flowers." The property was purchased in 1907 by Phiroz D. Saklatvala when he served as the Persian consul-general. He remodeled the existing farmhouse and created an Italian garden in front of the house, but his main effort was the creation of a Japanese garden. Saklatvala commissioned Takeo Shiota to design a garden out of flat farmland and brook using Japanese craftsmen. The Green Brook was diverted by a low dam and led into several waterways, flowing around two small islands connected by seven bridges, each copying a different arch. Little hills represented mountains with hundreds of planted flowering shrubs and flowers. The garden included a memorial statue for Saklatvala's mother of a Japanese girl carved in 1691. The workers dug out a a natural cascading swimming pool in 1924 and built a two story pagoda to serve as a bathhouse. The gardens were part of a fledgling movie industry in the early 1900s. Portions of "Madame Butterfly," starring Mary Pickford, as well as "Greater Love Hath No Man", "Broken Fetters," and "A Lesson From the Far East" were photographed in the gardens. The only architectural elements that remain today are a Shinto gate at the entrance to the garden, and the ruins of a teahouse across the brook and no longer part of the property.
Persons associated with the property include: Phiroz D. Saklatvala (former owner, ca. 1907-1930); Stillman family (former owners, ca. 1930-1970); Stillman Gardens, Inc. (present owners); and Takeo Shiota (landscape architect, ca. 1910-1920).

Mary Pickford at Golestan, Plainfield, NJ

Smithsonian File # NJ489001

[Golestan] [slide]: Mary Pickford, as Madam Butterfly, with memorial statue of Japanese girl.

Golestan in the Smithsonian Archives of American Gardens

Smithsonian

NJ489003
Kasten, Darlene, photographer.

[Golestan] [slide]: red Japanese entrance gate flanked by two shrubs.

Japanese stone ornaments

Smithsonian NJ489004
Co-Creator: Kasten, Darlene, photographer.
[Golestan] [slide]: rock steps at Japanese stone ornaments.

To see separate album on Golestan(Gulestan) Click here: 73 Leland Avenue, Plainfield, New Jersey

See the 2013 photograph of a birdbath that now resides in an different Plainfield garden – it is the same one from this photo!

Plainfield Historical Society Memorabilia From the Archives of Barbara Tracy Sandford

This is a sampling of materials saved by Barbara Sandford in her "Plainfield Historical Society" file.

Plainfield Historical Society Memorabilia

Index (73 pages)

*Notation of a photograph stored at the Drake House of the Japanese Gardens on Leland Avenue

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1949-1950 Program

This small brochure was found in the bottom of a box belonging to Barbara Tracy Sandford '50. 12/22/13

1949-1950 Program

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Japanese Bird Bath

July 26, 2013

This bird bath now resides at another Plainfield residence. The owner purports that it was an original element in the garden at Gulestan.

Birdbath from Golestan/Gulestan

July 26, 2013

This bird bath now resides at another Plainfield residence. The owner purports that it was an original element in the garden at Gulestan.

See the undated, older photograph which shows the birdbath in its original environment.

House & Garden 1918

Nippon in New Jersey
The Japanese Garden on the Estate of
P.D. Saklatvala, Esq., at Plainfield, N.J.

Shoba-na-to, the Iris Teahouse, is at one end of
a little pond where goldfish drift indolently about
under the watchful eye of a bronze crane.
Through a wisteria covered pergola the path
from the teahouse crosses a stone bridge to
Matsu Yuma, the Pine Tree Hill.

From the teahouse one
looks out in one direc-
tion to the dense shade
of trees, and in the
other to a sunny open
where water, rock and
stump lend contrast to
the iris and little pine-
trees at the right.

No less a personage
than Mary Pickford
herself has posed in
worship before the
statue of Buddha, a
tribute at once in the
graciousness of the
220-year-old figure
and to the perfect re-
production of the Jap-
enese atomsphere.

House & Garden 1918

House & Garden 1918

The effects obtained
would include a gen-
??? old garden, al-
though the whole devel-
opment is relatively
recent. A bit of the
carved bridge may be
seen in the left back-
ground.

Two antique stone Fu
dogs guard a shrine
hidden among dwarf
rhododendrons, moun-
tain laurel and ferns.
A stone lantern and
moss monkeys in the
trees help give a char-
acter typical of old
Nippon.

House & Garden 1918

House & Garden 1918

House & Garden 1918

House & Garden 1918

The stone lantern on the right of this photograph was photographed again on the land of the original estate on January 4, 2015.

Japanese Landscape Architect Takeo Shiota

Japanese Gardens, New York) SHIOTA, T(akeo). JAPANESE GARDENS AND HOUSES (translation). (New York: (1916).
A very scarce promotional brochure for the professional services of Takeo Shiota, a Japanese landscape architect and architect with offices at 254 Fifth Ave. in New York City. The appearance of a Japanese garden at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition began a small American vogue for Japanese gardens, later aided by the popularizing influences of such periodicals as HOUSE AND GARDEN and HOUSE BEAUTIFUL. Shiota was possibly the most prominent native Japanese practitioner of Japanese landscape gardening on the East Coast and is best known for his design of the Japanese garden at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden which opened in 1915. (see Lancaster. THE JAPANESE INFLUENCE IN AMERICA. pp. 190-205) In this twenty-eight page promotional piece Shiota outlines his philosophy of the Japanese garden, defines its four basic types, and points to examples of his work as evidence of his ability to create harmony between American scenery and the Japanese garden. Small halftone illustrations show his executed work at the residences of George Gould of Lakewood, New Jersey (Georgian Court), Miss G. Scofield at Tuxedo Park, New York and Mr. P. Saklatvala, Plainfield, New Jersey. Also shown are some of Shiota's own sketches for landscape treatments and the sketch of the artificial miniature garden he designed for the Newark Library and Museum. Scarce, There are only 7 copies listed in OCLC, all in the U.S. Stapled pamphlet (25 x 17.5 cm); 28 unnumbered pages with black and white illustrations from photographs and sketches.
Original stapled cream colored wraps with title in black in Japanese on upper cover; a bit of foxing to covers and some upper and lower separation along spine, else fine.

Takeo Shiota

Takeo Shiota (1881 - December 3, 1943) was a Japanese-American landscape architect, best known for his design of the Japanese Hill-and-Pond Garden at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

Shiota was born about 40 miles (60 km) outside of Tokyo, and came to the United States at the age of 26. The design of the Japanese Hill-and-Pond Garden at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, dates from 1914. It stands as the prototype for a popular genre, the first Japanese garden to be created in an American public garden. Shiota's design blended the ancient hill-and-pond style and the stroll-garden style of the Azuchi–Momoyama period,[1] in which various landscape features are gradually revealed along winding paths. Its 3 acres (1.2 ha) contain hills, a waterfall, a pond, and an island, all artificially constructed, with wooden bridges, stone lanterns, a viewing pavilion, a torii, and a Shinto shrine (razed by an arsonist in 1937[2] and rebuilt in 1960[3]).

Shiota's work also includes:

one of the four gardens at the Sister Mary Grace Burns Arboretum in Lakewood Township, New Jersey (originally commissioned by George Jay Gould I, and now part of Georgian Court University)
a Japanese garden at the Walter Kroll house, "Sho-Chiku-Bai", in Tuxedo Park, New York, for architects Walker & Gillette, c. 1912[4]
the rooftop North Garden at the Astor Hotel[5]

He was also the author of The miniature Japanese landscape: a short description in 1915. In the 1920s he formed a partnership with Thomas S. Rockrise (born Iwahiko Tsumanuma, ? - 1936) and conducted business from 366 Fifth Avenue.[6]

***Note the year of Shiota's death, 1943. I learned recently, from a review of the book Defiant Gardens in the Fall 2006/Winter 2007 issue of BBG's Plants & Gardens News (PDF, requires membership login), that Shiota died in a United States internment camp for Japanese-Americans during World War II.

January 2, 2014 Inquiry to the Saklavtala-Stillman Estate

I am curious about the "Golestan" garden designed by Takeo Shiota for Phiroz Saklatvala, now owned by Stillman Garden Inc. I am investigating an inscription on the tomb of Mr Saklatvala in Woodlawn Cemetery, in the Bronx, modern composition in the Old Persian language carved in Old Persian cuneiform characters (I am an emeritus professor of ancient Near Eastern languages, and I have a German colleague whose research on Old Persian extends to modern compositions). I note that the garden includes a Japanese statue dedicated as a memorial to Saklatvala's mother. She, from another prominent Zoroastrian family, died in New York but her remains were interred in London. I wonder if there is an inscription identifying the statue as a memorial to her–and I also wonder if it is possible to visit the garden and see the statue.
With many thanks for your assistance,

Matthew W. Stolper
John A. Wilson Professor Emeritus
Oriental Institute, University of Chicago


January 2, 2015

Dear Members,

We have been invited to solve a mystery!

A very prestigious professor from the University of Chicago, has written to us as he is researching Stillman Gardens in Plainfield.

The Stillman Garden apartment complex sits on the former Persian consulate estate called "Golestan" along Front Street and Leland Avenue. About ten years ago, the PGC documented this garden and submitted it to the Smithsonian Archives (see link).

In particular, the professor, Matthew W. Stolper, is interested in a statue which we described at the time of submission as a Japanese girl, carved in 1691. (It is not clear in the documentation if the statue was actually seen.)

Within the grounds of the apartment complex, there are several noticeable remnants of the Golestan garden. In addition, members are aware of Plainfield residents that have in their possession different items from the estate. So it stands to reason that we, as a group, may know where this statue is – if not on the grounds of the Stillman apartment complex . . .

Would anyone be willing to take a stroll through the complex and search for the statue? Bring your cameras and lets photograph the garden! The Smithsonian likes to have updated photographs.

If you would like to visit the garden or have any information on the garden or the Stillmans, please write back to plainfieldgc@gmail.com


January 4, 2015

Several members and the Plainfield Historical Society have now jumped into the ring in the quest to find the Very Old Statue. Nothing yet to report, but many of you have asked for more information about the estate and the Stillman family. To learn more, click on the individual member files:

Stillman, Mrs. Albert Leeds (Virginia Brown) '41
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Elizabeth B. Atwood) '15
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Ethel Lucille Titsworth) '42
Quarles, Mrs. Ernest Augustus (Anita Mary Stillman) '22
Myers, Mrs. J. Kirtland (Mary Ann Stillman) '15


January 6, 2015

January 4, 2015 Elaine Merritt's Photographs of the Saklatvala-Stillman Estate

Is the second photograph the statue which the University of Chicago professor is searching? We think maybe it is!

Another of Elaine's photos is of a Japanese lantern on a stone stand – this looks identical to a lantern that was photographed by House & Garden in 1918! Great work Elaine!

January 4, 2015 The Saklavtala-Stillman Estate

Photo by E. Merritt

"This one is plastic. Definitely not old." – EM

January 4, 2015 The Saklavtala-Stillman Estate

Photo by E. Merritt

January 4, 2015 The Saklavtala-Stillman Estate

Photo by E. Merritt

January 4, 2015 The Saklavtala-Stillman Estate

Photo by E. Merritt

This stone lantern is featured in a photograph of the garden taken by House & Garden magazine in 1918.

January 4, 2015 The Saklavtala-Stillman Estate

Photo by E. Merritt

January 4, 2015 The Saklavtala-Stillman Estate

Photo by E. Merritt

January 4, 2015 The Saklavtala-Stillman Estate

Photo by E. Merritt

January 4, 2015 The Saklavtala-Stillman Estate

Photo by E. Merritt

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

See the Saklavtala bridge over the Green Brook. All the estates stretched on both sides of the Green Brook and each had a unique bridge to cross. A favorite pastime in Plainfield would be to boat down the Green Brook and pass under each original bridge.

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

Note the stone lantern in the background. It was photographed on January 4, 2015 on the grounds of the former Saklavtala estate.

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

Is this the same statue photographed January 4, 2015?

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

Tea house over the Green Brook?

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

Lantern photographed on January 4, 2015

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

Lantern photographed January 4, 2015

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

Note the Japanese gate in the background. Photographed January 4, 2015

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

Gate photographed January 4, 1915

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

Mary Pickford paused on the Sakvaltala or Golestan bridge spanning the Green Brook.

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

Lantern in the background

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

The top of another large lantern featured throughout the film.

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

Lantern in the background photographed January 4, 2015

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

Garden path

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

Tea house next to pond or the Green Brook

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

January 4, 2015 Lantern photographed – final scene of Madame Butterfly

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

The end

1915 Film Madame Butterfly starring Mary Pickford

January 31, 2015 Correspondence

Dear Ms. Nichols,

My sincerest apologies for getting back to you so late. Our website had an "issue" with emails and I am just figuring it out.

Unfortunately, the only thing I would know about your family are the things posted on www.plainfieldgardenclub.org for Mrs. Mead:

Mead, Mrs. Frederick Goodhue (Marie Louise Myers) '15

Mrs. Mead was relating to other members of the Plainfield Garden Club:

Myers, Mrs. J. Kirtland (Mary Ann Stillman) '15
Quarles, Mrs. Ernest Augustus (Anita Mary Stillman) '22
Stillman, Mrs. Albert Leeds (Virginia Brown) '41
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Elizabeth B. Atwood) '15
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Ethel Lucille Titsworth) '42
Joy, Mrs. James R. (Emma Prentice McGee) '33
McGee, Mrs. Harry Livingston (Susan M. Howell) '18
McGee, Mrs. Walter Miller (Mary Alice Yerkes) '22
Mooney, Mrs. Wandell McMaster (Alice Joy McGee) '47

I do recommend you contacting the genealogy department of the Plainfield Library 908-857-1111 as they would be more likely to help you further. Also, there may be information to be found at the Fanwood Library www.fanwoodlibrary.org

Best of luck to you –

Susan Fraser
Communications Chair
Plainfield Garden Club
Founded 1915
www.plainfieldgardenclub.org


December 27, 2014

My mother, Sandra Shepard Wright, was an only child and the great grand-daughter of Agustus D Shepard and Johanna Elizabeth Mead. I am looking for any information regarding great aunt Winifred Prentice Kay, and also Marie Riis [aka Rees] who was married to Agustus D. Shepard Jr. -Thanks!

Winifred Ohrstrom Nichols

February 24, 2016 Email exchange with Stillman Family Descendent

Received this today:

You've received a new submission from your "contact us" through your "Plainfield Garden Club" Andy's Web Tools web site.

name: Mrs. Thomas B. Stillman Quarles (Carolyn)
email: xxxxxx
phone: xxxxxxx

message:

In researching the Stillman family I saw a photo titled "A Group of Friends at the Home of Thomas B. Stillman 1860. " This was on your website while searching "Member: Stillman, Mrs. William Maxon (Elizabeth B. Atwood) "15. page 5. I would like to know the photo's provenance and whether a copy is available. Your website is very impressive. I appreciate your help.

Our response:

Dear Carol,

Thank you for writing in to us. The photo you reference was taken from a Google search years ago that had a site listed as www.stillman.org. The link to this site no longer works. We recommend contacting the Plainfield Library has they have extensive genealogical records for the founding families of Plainfield.

Please make sure you take a look at all our Stillman and Quarles members:

Myers, Mrs. J. Kirtland (Mary Ann Stillman) '15
Quarles, Mrs. Ernest Augustus (Anita Mary Stillman) '22
Stillman, Mrs. Albert Leeds (Virginia Brown) '41
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Elizabeth B. Atwood) '15
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Ethel Lucille Titsworth) '42

Does anyone remember any of these members?!

UPDATE: February 27th:

Many thanks for your prompt reply. I am receiving help from Jane Thoner at the Public Library. My husband Thomas Bliss Stillman Quarles and I lived in Plainfield from 1954-57 after he graduated from Harvard Business School and worked in Union, NJ. We lived at 520 W. 7th Street and I was introduced to all the living Stillmans then–especially Aunt Dinny (Mrs. Albert Leeds Stillman and their estate Gulestan. I was busy with our first son, Kenneth, who was born at Muhlenberg Hospital in 1955. Aunt Ethel, the second Mrs. William Maxon Stillman, was our neighbor. Tom's mother, Anita Mary Stillman, taught me much family history, but Tom (90) and his sister Mary ( 88) both died in 2013 and I have no more contacts in Plainfield. I really enjoyed reading your membership lists and recognizing familiar names of the influential citizens who made Plainfield such an exceptional place. I remember once helping Aunt Dinny weed the Shakespeare Garden!

There is one disturbing error in your excellent club records: Anita Mary Stillman's husband was EMMET Augustus Quarles–not Ernest. Our third son is named after EAQ and was born on his birthday May 22. Our Rob is very proud of his heritage and especially the spelling of Emmet (one "t"). I hope it may be possible to correct this name. The Quarles family also has a distinguished southern history. Emmet's father was a professor of Moral Philosophy at Washington and Lee University in 1905.

You can see that I have a busy job trying to collect this genealogy for posterity and hope that at my age (86) I will have enough time! Fortunately I am reasonably "digitally savy" but
my fingers are not as facile as they once were in my secretarial days. I most appreciate a phone call–xxxxxxxxxx. Our home has been in xxxxxx since 1970. The address is xxxxxxxxxx.

November 26, 2017 Stillman Gardens

SEE: Stillman Garden Photos and the published Saklatvala article on tomb in Woodland Cemetery