Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Coriell, Mrs. William Wallace (Emma Buckle) '25

1928 Treasurer Book April 15th $5.00
1929 Treasurer Book Active $5.00
1930 Treasurer Book Active "trans. assoc June '30"
1930 Treasurer Book Associate "Mrs. Corriell" is penciled in.
1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935 Treasurer Book Associate
1936 Treasurer Book Active: Mrs. Wm. W. Coriell (penciled note: See Ass. List)

1930 Address: 963 Central Avenue
Carriage House: 946 Madison Avenue

1932 Directory* Address: 963 Central Avenue
* = This directory is not dated but presumed to be from the year 1932.
NOTE: Mrs. W. W. Coriell, 963 Central Avenue was listed as an "Associate Member"

1932 - 1933 Emma B. Coriell (Mrs. William W. Coriell) Treas.

1936 Treasurer Book: Associate Mrs. Wm. W. Coriell 4/29/36 PAID [named crossed off]

1937 Treasurer Book: Active Mrs. Wm. W. Coriell 1/15/37 1/15/37 PAID

1938 Treasurer Book, Active: Mrs. Wm. W. Coriell 2/10/38 Pd. 1/12/39 Pd.

1940 Treasurer Book, Active: Mrs. Wm. W. Coriell 1/10/40 Pd 1/9/41 Pd. 12/5/41 Pd. 12/14/42 Pd. 11/24/43 Pd. 12/11/44 Pd. 12/4/45

1946 - 1947 Treasurer Book, Active: Coriell, Mrs. William 5/20/46 Her name is then crossed out. Written then under "Associate" is the name "Coriell"

1947 - 1948 Treasurer Book, Associate: Coriell, Mrs. W. W. June 2, 1947

1947 - 1948 Treasurer Book, Active: Coriell, Mrs. W. W. – no notation of date or payment recorded. The under "Associate" Coriell, Mrs. W. W. May 26, 1948. Her name is crossed out and penciled in is a note "transfer to Active"

1949 - 1950 Treasurer Book, Active: Coriell, Mrs. William W. June 8, 1949 June 15, 1950 May 1951

1953 Addresses: 610 Park Ave
Mayfair House, New York City

1958 Address: 909 Park Ave

President 1938 - 1940, 1942 - 1944

Emma Buckle Coriell passed away in 1960.

She may be related to these other PGC Members:

Nash, Mrs. Philip Wallace (Helen Babcock) '57
Wallace, Mrs. Frederick W. (Grace Seccomb) '15

Her gravesite is near the Nash site at Hillside Cemetery, Plainfield.

June 2011: 610 Park Avenue noted "shopping center"

1914 Address: 740 Belvidere

1930 Blue Book List

Address given for:

Coriell, Mr. & Mrs. William W.,963 Central ave.,Plainfield, N.J.

other addresses on file:

909 Park Avenue, Plainfield (1958)
610 Park Ave, Plainfield & New York City, Mayfair House (1953)

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

January 1945 GCA Bulletin Report by Mrs. William W. Coriell, President

January 1945 GCA Bulletin Report by Mrs. William W. Coriell, President
Plainfield Garden Club
MRS. WILLIAM W. CORIELL, President

This past year the Club concentrated on var~ous phases of conservation. Wildlife, illustrated lecture by the State Representative of the Fish and Game Commission. Food, illustrated lecture by a member of the State Agricultural College on "Plants Used by the Indians."

Cooperated with Civil Defense Council on planting of Victory Gardens,
canning' and preservation of garden products.

Loan exhibit by GARDEN CLUB OF AMERICA of "Trees and Plants Used in
War Industry" was shown at Plainfield Public Library and much appreciated by the community. v, '

Mr. E. Russell Bourne gave a talk on "Conservation, the Problem and its
Relation to Water' Resources." The presidents and chairmen of conservation of :the New Jersey member dubs of the GARDEN CLUB OF AMERICA' were invited to attend this meeting. Following this meeting another talk was given by Mr. Gilman, an engineer and a, member of Union County Park Commission, on "Flood Control in this Vicinity," which is a local problem every few years. It was most instructive. '

Two members have been appointed on the Conservation Committee of the Garden Club Of New Jersey for planning and planting of dogwood trees as a memorial to the servicemen and women of the State. This plan will connect with the State Highway Project on the beautification of Route 29. We contributed generously to Red Cross and the war effort.

From www.gcamerica.org

http://www.gcamerica.org/membersonly/docs/gca_bulletins/blt_194501_7-2.pdf

Coriell Mansion

From Dan Damon's Blog:

Sunday, September 21, 2008
Olive Lynch's Open House, or Wall Street meltdown meets Main Street red tape and it ain't good

Olive Lynch's 'Coriell Mansion', at the corner of Central and Stelle Avenues, and the adjoining ranch home at the corner of Stelle and Madison are on realtor's open house today, from 1 to 4 PM.

The public is welcome to come out and look, and the hope is that some – potential – buyers will as well.

The sight is not pretty, but it is not the state of the Coriell Mansion, which is frozen in the midst of a complete restoration of the exterior and renovation of the interior that is shocking.

Rather, it is the unprettiness of a dream crushed by market realities and bureacratic snares.

I will let Olive tell the tale in her own words, via an email she sent and is willing to share –

Let me tell you about what happened.It took me 3 years to get through the city process to get the building rezoned from a 4-family to a single family with a B&B variance. In the historic districts, B&B's are an allowed use. But, because I wanted to do events, weddings (which are not allowed per the Plainfield zoningcode for a B&B), I had to get a variance.I went before the Planning Board, then the Historic [Preservation] Commission, then the Zoning Board of Adjustment, then back to the Historic [Preservation] Commission. The process cost me out of pocket $60,000 for architect's drawings (for the house), engineer's drawing, attorney's fees (I had to go 4 times to the zoning board meeting, because they kept putting me at the back of the agenda and "continuing" me) and a planner. I was required to change my engineer's site plan about 8 times ... Sometimes one change was put back to what it was originally, in the going back and forth between the zoning board, fire department and historic commissions. I was required to get a tree expert to analyze whether the proposed circular drive would harm the large oak tree at the street.After I got through this process, then came the bonding. I was required to put up $60,000 in CASH as a bond for the site work. I had these funds, but I was planning to use this to do the site work. So, I had to put that money in an account and it was held by the city until the work was deemed complete. Unfortunately the engineering firm that the city used way overestimated the costs ... And after the fact, I really should have only had to put up $20,000 or so.I also had a delay related to the fact I wanted to put in pavers at the driveway apron, instead of asphalt. The city engineer at the time (now not there), demanded I create engineering drawings. What made me angry, was in his letter to planning, he stated these drawings then could beused as a standard for any one else who wanted to do pavers in [a] historic district. I objected, provided engineering calculations from the paver manufacturer, that the concrete pavers could meet the load requirements(in fact, better than asphalt).So ... I went through a lot before I could even start work.Next came getting financing. I put together a complete SBA proposal package and went to 2 local banks, and 3 other banks trying to get an SBA loan. I had $100,000 in the bank. I was turned down by all of them, citing that Plainfield was not a viable location for a Bed and Breakfast. It didn't matter that the Pillars had been there for 10 years.I finally got a home construction loan through Wells Fargo (because a B&B is your home). This, with my cash on hand, should have been enoughto complete the project.Then I was informed by the city and state that I required fire sprinklers throughout the building. When I did my research with the B&B association of New Jersey, they said I would not need sprinklers, so this was completely unexpected. The average price I got for this was $100,000.Also, the city inspections department has, to date, rejected every drawing, plan, spec submitted by my architect, plumber, contractor and electrician. I went to the permit office many times, where they could not find my file, and I had to resubmit drawings and diagrams.Also, when we got into the project, we found that the repair done [before I bought the property], right over the porch, was dangerously substandard. It is incredible to me that the city approved the architect's plans and passed it in inspection. When we opened that part of the building up, my engineer and framing contractor said eventually the house would have come down, and that the building was actively moving downward. This surprise cost a substantial amount of money, not in my original budget.So ... Since January I have gone through approximately 18 banks looking for the additional funds to complete the project. I have been turned down by every one. The criteria:1. In the past year, since the building was last appraised, the mansion value has dropped by $200,000. This is based on recent house sales. This was huge, because banks determine what they will loan by the appraised value. This property is especially difficult, because ther are no 15,000 sq ft single family homes ... Even when the appraiser looked up to 30 miles away.2. Banks again did not want to invest in a B&B in Plainfield ... It doesn't have the right population mix to support such a business (that was their opinion).3. With the bank crisis, funding that could have been available for a special project (ie, banks that would have funded a "riskier" loan for a higher interest rate) ... All that funding has dried up.4. I went to brokers that specialize in funding B&Bs ... Much of their funding has dried up, and the few that remain are being very conservative, and did not like my project because I was the sole source of income, the location and it was a start up.So, a post-mortem is:The city of Plainfield's process caused me $60,000 and three years. If I had gotten through the zoning process in a few months, at that time the funding would have been available, and the B&B would be open already. My feeling is at every turn the city put up roadblocks on this project. Given that bank funding will be very tight for the next 2-3 years, I realized I would not get the funding for years, so I'm selling.

Coriell Mansion

Coriell Mansion

Coriell Mansion

Coriell Mansion

Coriell Mansion

new elevator shaft

Coriell Mansion

William McDowell Coriell

First National Bank, chartered April 25, 1864, shortly after the establishment of the National Bank Act, numbered hatters among the businessmen on its Board of Directors. Front row, left to right, William McDowell Coriell (hatter), Phineas M. French (mill owner), Charles Potter, President; second row, Frank Runyon, Cashier, Daniel R. Randolph (merchant), William M. Stillman, Mulford Estil, J. Wesley Johnston. These names echo throughout Plainfield's history, Courtesy of PNC Bank

from Plainfield, New Jersey's History & Architectureby John Grady and Dorothe Pollard

From Plainfield, New Jersey's History & Architecture by John Grady and Dorothe Pollard

This Madison Avenue carriage barn served the Colonial Revival mansion on Central Avenue built for S. L. Schoonmaker, Esq. in 1904 and was purchased soon after by William Coriell. First converted in 1948 to provide living quarters on the second level with an artist's stuido and classrooms below, the ground floor was later redesigned to provide a spcaious family room. Courtesy of William J. Santoriello

The hip-roofed, clapboard, and shingle structure with dentil cornice and wood fan on the south frontage displays appropriate colonial detailing and unusual six-over-one windows. Originally painted colonial gold to match the manor house, the barn acquired a dark brown facade by the 1960s. Courtesy of William J. Santoriello

From Plainfield, New Jersey's History & Architecture by John Grady and Dorothe Pollard

The Madison Avenue facade of the Schoonmaker-Coriell carriage house has been newly revealed by removing the overgrown pines that obscured it (see pictures on previous page) Harking back to an earlier day, the exterior has been lightened by a fresh, cafe au lait paint job announcing the most recent stage in its 104-year history.

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Von Boskerck

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg version 2

[Editor's note: The original document was too faded to scan. This is a different version of a history written by Mrs. Etheldreda Anderegg from 1941 1947]

Plainfield Garden Club History
Continued to 1947

On May 14th, 1941 six years ago to-day in Cedarbrook Park the Anniversary Dogwood Trees were formally presented to the Park Commission. In making the presentation, Mrs. Arthur Nelson, president, said the garden club wished to make a gift of lasting beauty to mark its anniversary. Mr. Tracey responding for the Park Commissioners commended the club for its civic interest and declared the trees would bring a touch of beauty to thousands of lives. The gift was identified by a large boulder bearing a bronze marker. Mrs. Holliday as chairman of the Dogwood Tree Committee and of the Boulder Committee arranged the anniversary celebration.

That year, 1941, an article appeared in Horticulture in praise of our Shakespeare Garden.

A teacher of the Jefferson School staff was sent to the Audubon Nature Camp in Maine.

Handsome new yearbooks containing a revised constitution, membership lists and permanent covers with loose leaves were issued. About this time some of our members looking back upon some of our achievements of the past, and forward for new horizons to explore, agreed that once more we should storm the ramparts of the Garden Club of America. No organization in garden club circles offers to its members such a wide field of opportunities and assured prestige. This reporter has sat in many important national and state conferences were the effect of this prestige could be observed. When important decisions were due there was an intangible inference in the atmosphere which stemmed to imply "All those not members of the Garden State of America may now retire to the Jim Crow car."

Better to have failed in the high aim than to succeed vulgarly in the low one" said Browning.

So a committee to explore the possibilities of our being accepted for membership was named by Mrs. Nelson. With Mrs. Corriel as chairman, the committee consisted of Miss Elsie Harmon, Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler, Miss Elizabeth Browne, Miss William Tyler, Mrs. William A. Holliday, Mrs. James Devlin and your historian. Our search for new worlds to conquer began with a meeting at the home of Mrs. William Tyler, on February 21, 1941, when your historian read a letter she had been asked to write to Mrs. Frederic Kellogg, of Morristown Garden Club, prominent garden club personality. The letter would be interesting at this point, but unfortunately it has been lost. Suffice to say, our prise of ourselves was so completely uninhibited that the committee itself was profoundly impressed by the record of performance of the Plainfield Garden Club set forth therein. Shakespeare said "Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful." After all they could not know our worth unless we told them. This time we forestalled a verdict that we had "accomplished nothing."

It might be interjected here that during Mrs. Goddard's regime an effort was made to join the Garden Club of America. Mrs. Kellogg, approached on that occasion, graciously entertained Mrs. Goddard and Mrs. Holliday at luncheon, and they left with the impression that Plainfield, having rejected an invitation to become a charter member of that organization during Mrs. Herring's tenure, it would be futile ever to hope for membership.

An active campaign was launched by all who had relatives or friends in member clubs. This was accelerated when it was learned that a neighboring club had an identical ambition, and had found a sponsor. Because of geographical allocation, we realized that only one of us would be admitted. When it became apparent that we had aroused interest, and had a semblance of chance for acceptance, a special meeting was called at the home of Mrs. Corriel, and the advantages of membership in the Garden Club of America, as well as the financial obligations thoroughly explored. The club was asked to decide whether they wished the committee to proceed with the negotiations. The vote was unanimously affirmative.

Subsequently Mrs. Kellogg requested that the Morristown Club have the pleasure of proposing us, and Mrs. Lauderdale of Short Hills offered to have that club second us. While we waited for the verdict, our campaign never waned.

On May 11th, 1941, tenth anniversary of Iris Garden, the executive board gave a tea to honor Miss Halloway. Mrs. Holliday arranged a delightful affair in the field house. Members of the garden club and thirty guests were invited. Miss Halloway's friends came from far and near while the Iris Garden glowed in a rainbow of colors for the occasion.

The war which was sweeping over France while Mrs. VanBoskerck's history concluded had now reached our shores. "Come to open purple testament of bleeding war." (King Richard) Our members were working for the U.S.O., the Red Cross and Camp Kilmer, apart and in conjunction with the garden club. Plans were sent to the camp to enhance its barren scenes, and seeds to Brittain. Victory gardens were planted, two new chairmanships were added to the executive board War Activities and Victory Gardens.

In May 1943, we provided vases and began to send flowers regularly to the chapels at Camp Kilmer. This is still being done. Garden books from the Garden Center were placed in the Public Library. Because of gasoline and food rationing it was becoming difficult to hold meetings. Speakers were reluctant to use scarce gasoline and tires for small groups. The war organizations were asking for more things, more effort and more money. The garden club was striving to provide all three.

In June 1943 a delegation from the Garden Club of America came to inspect our members' gardens. Those gardens chosen to head the list were duly explored and approved, but unfortunately the sand of time ran out before they could see them all, and they will never realize all they missed. However, they did see the dogwood planting, the Shakespeare and Iris gardens.

At the annual meeting Mrs. Samuel Carter gave a particularly interesting history of the Shakespeare garden, which was later read by request at the Shakespeare Club. Mrs. Carter said in part: "It has been said that we of the Western World love flowers for what they are, and that the peoples in the East love them for what they suggest. A Shakespeare Garden is full of suggestions, a speaking garden revealing the tradition, folklore and romance of the ancient and timeless plants." Mr. Tracey quoted an authority on the subject as saying that Mrs. Carter's was the finest Shakespeare Garden in the country and that over 15,000 people visited it last year.

Mrs. Coriell announced at the executive board meeting February 2nd, 1944, that Plainfield Garden Club had been elected to membership in the Garden Club of America, and letters of welcome received from sponsoring clubs. It had required three years to reach the new horizons, but a poet once said, "A horizon is nothing but the limit of our sight" so each one attained shows another beckoning in the distance.

Because of rationing, meetings were held in semi-public places of central location. Speakers stressed every phase of conservation. Garden club members were working hard at Camp Kilmer, for the Red Cross and the U.S.O.

In 1945 we became a Founder of the Blue Star Drive, our members contributing generously to this beautiful tribute to the men who served in the armed forces. It is hoped, and the hope is rapidly being fulfilled, that ultimately it will stretch from New Jersey to California.

A new custom was instituted, that of sending a sum of money to the Red Wood Tribute Grove in memory of deceased members. This year, 1945, a dance recital was given to help defray expenses of war activities. Naturally it was under the chairmanship of Miss Maud vonBoskerck, whose motto might well be "Music is my talent my dearest one." It was very successful artistically and financially.

We helped the New York Botanical Garden celebrate its Fiftieth Anniversary by sending hostesses every day for a week, and by a substantial sum of money for plant research.

In 1945 Lyons Hospital was included on our flower and plant list, and we have continued to supply it weekly for two months of each year. Flowering trees were planted along Blue Star Drive in memory of members' sons lost in the war.

Mrs. Samuel Carter and Miss Harriette Halloway received awards from the Garden Club of New Jersey for their work in Shakespeare and Iris gardens respectively.

Besides bouquets were made twice a week for the wards at Camp Kilmer, beginning in May. Our members volunteered to arrange them.

By this time we were discovering that those "new worlds to conquer" for which we had longed, were providing more opportunities than we could well cope with, and so a junior membership was formed, now numbering six.

The associate membership was enlarged to thirty-five so that active members might be enabled to transfer to it. A questionnaire was sent of work they wished to do. In a Garden Club of America contest for a year's program, Miss Halloway's won honorable mention.

Beginning early in December members of the club met every day in Mrs. Boardman Tyler's studio to make Christmas decorations for the hospital at Camp Kilmer. A big fire blazed in the stove, tons of varied evergreens were provided as well as all other necessary equipment. The studio hummed like Santa Claus' workshop, and great quantities of wreaths with large red bows, small bouquets and other favors emerged to cheer the soldiers at Camp Kilmer and Lyons Hospitals. Joyce Kilmer, for whom the camp was named, wrote of his experience in the other World War: "My shoulders ache beneath my pack, Lie easier cross upon his back" We hoped we eased their burden just a little.

The opportunities offered by the Garden Club of America in the field of conservation are so many and so varied, it was necessary to choose which tangent to pursue. In view of the community and national problems of vandalism and child delinquency, it was thought wise to concentrate the major effort in combating these evils. Working through the public schools seemed the most logical procedure. Mr. Wimer of Jefferson School and Mrs. Rulison of the Park Commission have offered sympathetic cooperation. The first step in the program is the establishment of school gardens, now in process of being planted. The garden club provided the funds. A trial garden, or proving bed was started in Cedarbrook Park in 1946. This year many new perennials were added.

Mrs. Hubble's artistic ability was employed so successfully in redecorating the Garden Center, this observer could scarcely recognize it.

The Garden Club of New Jersey bestowed an award upon us for meritorious work at Camp Kilmer. Miss Halloway has made additions to the peony, Iris and Narcissus gardens. It again became necessary to raise money, and a repeat performance by request, of the dance recital was staged by Miss Van Boskerck.

A suggestion from the Garden Club of New Jersey that we plant a tree to honor garden weekled, after consultation with Mr. Tracey, to the beginning of a dogwood arboretum comprising all the varieties that will grow in this vicinity. Twenty-five varieties have already been planted.

Santa Claus helpers gathered again in Mrs. Tyler's studio to make decorations for Camp Kilmer, and surpassed their effort of the previous year. Our work in this Project was not equaled by that of any club either year.

A thrill of pride must have quivered through our membership from founders to newest recruits, triumphs of our members who exhibited in the New York Flower Show. In the realm of flower arrangement there is no more coveted award than the Fenwick Medal. Our Mrs. deHart was runner up fro that prize last year. This year four exhibits won three blue ribbons and two special awards. It was a magnificent performance which won for us third place in the sweepstakes.

Chapel flowers still are sent to Camp Kilmer. Our members arrange them. We take our turn with the other clubs supplying flowers for the entire hospital regularly from gardens when possible, from florists in cold weather. Two gray Ladies representing Plainfield Garden Club, arrange and distribute the flowers through the wards. The by-laws were again revised and new books issued for the permanent covers.

The executive committee has not overlooked the fact that a War Memorial is of paramount interest to the garden club. Much time as been spent in discussion and deep thought given the matter. Mrs. Boardman Tyler has been named a member of the committee. This year we are sending a teacher to the Audubon Nature Camp in Maine, and another to the Conservation Workshop in Trenton.

Several members have been invited to speak on varied subjects, notably Mrs. Garret Smith on Church Gardens, and Miss Halloway on horticultural subjects. Mrs. Garret has been honored as founder of the Little Garden Club of New York City, of which she is honorary president.

A big of biographical information picked up while perusing the minutes is that our new president, Mrs. Loziuex, became a member of the club in 1940, second vice president in 1942, again in 1945, first vice president in 1946 and president in 1947.

Having been a member of the club only ten years, your historian cannot speak with absolute authority, but thinks it probably that the club reached greater heights of achievement under this administration of Mrs. Tyler than during any comparable period of time. This is partly true because of the new opportunities offered by affiliation with the Garden Club of America, and partly due to Mrs. Tyler's dynamic energy and her determination that the Plainfield Garden Club take advantage of these opportunities and assume its rightful position in the vanguard of progressive garden clubs.

Junius described Mrs. Tyler perfectly when he wrote: "the heart to conceive, the understanding to direct and the hand to execute."

We notice as we go over the chronicles of the garden club, the absence of names once listed so frequently:

Those whom we loved so long, and see no more
Loved and still love,
Not dead, but gone before.

If we ever adopt a coat of arms, it might well show crossed trowels over a field of flower arrangements, the other expounding the futility of vandalism to a young cub. And the motto? It must be from Shakespeare, and it is from The Tempest: Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground.

Or if we choose to abandon the classics: Never a dull moment!

Etheldreda Anderegg
Historian, 1947

May 17, 1957 Club Commemorates Founding of Iris Garden

Caption: GARDEN MARKER VIEWED – Standing before the marker commemorating the 25th anniversary of the Iris Garden in Cedar Brook Park are (left to right) Mrs. Frederick Lockwood, Victor B. King, Jr., John C. Wister, Mr. Richard Tracy and Miss Harriette R. Halloway, founder of this garden. (Courier photo by E. T. Wiggins)

The Plainfield Garden Club and guests yersterday dedicated the the entranceway of the of the Iris Garden in Cedar Brook Park.

Miss Harriette R. Halloway, found of the garden and chairman of the garden of the Iris Garden [not legible] the project was started in 1932, was presented a medal by Mrs. Frederick M. Lockwood, president of the Garden Club.

The medal is [not legible] "from the grateful members of the Plainfield Garden Club Harriette R. Halloway founder and director of the Iris gardens of Cedar Brook Park, Plainfield, 1932 - 1957."

[Not legible] viewed a recently installed [not legible] tablet marking the anniversary of the garden.

"Excercise in Perfection"
Victor R. King, president of the Union County Park Commission, led the gathering [not legible] the garden display was "an excercise in perfection is [not legible]," he said.

The park commission provides the setting for the garden and have [not legible] in the project [not legible]

W. [not legible] Tracy, executive had of the Park Commission when the Iris Garden was started paid tribute to Miss Halloway for her "tireless work and painstaking effort."

Another speaker was Dr. John C. Wister of Swarthmore, Pa., president of the American Iris Society when the garden was started and author of [not legible] article about the garden in the current issue of the Journal of the New York Botanical Gardens.

Miss Halloway spoke briefly and [not legible] on the work of the [not legible] who care for the Iris Garden. She introduced Kenneth Smith, one of the largest contributors of plants to the garden [not legible]

Mrs. Lockwood presided at the program. Guests included members of [not legible] garden clubs and contributors to the garden.

The Iris Garden Committee includes Mrs. Morris E. Benton, Mrs. Alden de Hart, Mrs. Lockwood, Mrs. Donald E. Luce, Mrs. William K. Dunbar, Jr., Mrs. C. Northrop Pond, Mrs. Webster Sandford, Mrs. Arthur D. Seybold, Mrs. John R. Wells, Mrs. Willian G. Wigton, Mrs. Robert MacLeod, vice chairman, and Miss Halloway, chairman.

Special slides [not legible] for the chairman were Mrs. Charles A. Eaton, Jr., Mrs. F. Willoughby Frost ad Mrs. Edwin M. Treat, Jr.

Mrs. Victor M. King was chairman of the special committee assisted by Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux, Mrs. E. B. Newberry, and Miss Margaret Tyler. Also cooperating were Mrs. N. C. Barnhart, Jr., Mrs. William P. Elliott, Mrs. Homer Cochran and Mrs. H. I. Flanders.

Hostesses (not legible)
Other hostesses were Mrs. William W. Coriell, Mrs. Leslie E. Fort, Mrs. William A. Holliday, Mrs. Richard M. Lawton, Mrs. Robert T. Stevens, Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler, Mrs. William S. Tyler. Mrs. Thomas Van Boskerck and Mrs. Orville G. Waring.

The Iris Garden now has more than 1,800 named varieties properly labeled, representing all types of Iris and totaling more than 75,000 plants.

The main part of the garden is [not legible] caring Iris [not legible] and is expected to be is good blooms thorugh the rest of the month.

1941 - 1942 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg version 2

[Editor's note: The original document was too faded to scan. This is a different version of a history written by Mrs. Etheldreda Anderegg from 1941 1947]

Plainfield Garden Club History
Continued to 1947

On May 14th, 1941 six years ago to-day in Cedarbrook Park the Anniversary Dogwood Trees were formally presented to the Park Commission. In making the presentation, Mrs. Arthur Nelson, president, said the garden club wished to make a gift of lasting beauty to mark its anniversary. Mr. Tracey responding for the Park Commissioners commended the club for its civic interest and declared the trees would bring a touch of beauty to thousands of lives. The gift was identified by a large boulder bearing a bronze marker. Mrs. Holliday as chairman of the Dogwood Tree Committee and of the Boulder Committee arranged the anniversary celebration.

That year, 1941, an article appeared in Horticulture in praise of our Shakespeare Garden.

A teacher of the Jefferson School staff was sent to the Audubon Nature Camp in Maine.

Handsome new yearbooks containing a revised constitution, membership lists and permanent covers with loose leaves were issued. About this time some of our members looking back upon some of our achievements of the past, and forward for new horizons to explore, agreed that once more we should storm the ramparts of the Garden Club of America. No organization in garden club circles offers to its members such a wide field of opportunities and assured prestige. This reporter has sat in many important national and state conferences were the effect of this prestige could be observed. When important decisions were due there was an intangible inference in the atmosphere which stemmed to imply "All those not members of the Garden State of America may now retire to the Jim Crow car."

Better to have failed in the high aim than to succeed vulgarly in the low one" said Browning.

So a committee to explore the possibilities of our being accepted for membership was named by Mrs. Nelson. With Mrs. Corriel as chairman, the committee consisted of Miss Elsie Harmon, Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler, Miss Elizabeth Browne, Miss William Tyler, Mrs. William A. Holliday, Mrs. James Devlin and your historian. Our search for new worlds to conquer began with a meeting at the home of Mrs. William Tyler, on February 21, 1941, when your historian read a letter she had been asked to write to Mrs. Frederic Kellogg, of Morristown Garden Club, prominent garden club personality. The letter would be interesting at this point, but unfortunately it has been lost. Suffice to say, our prise of ourselves was so completely uninhibited that the committee itself was profoundly impressed by the record of performance of the Plainfield Garden Club set forth therein. Shakespeare said "Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful." After all they could not know our worth unless we told them. This time we forestalled a verdict that we had "accomplished nothing."

It might be interjected here that during Mrs. Goddard's regime an effort was made to join the Garden Club of America. Mrs. Kellogg, approached on that occasion, graciously entertained Mrs. Goddard and Mrs. Holliday at luncheon, and they left with the impression that Plainfield, having rejected an invitation to become a charter member of that organization during Mrs. Herring's tenure, it would be futile ever to hope for membership.

An active campaign was launched by all who had relatives or friends in member clubs. This was accelerated when it was learned that a neighboring club had an identical ambition, and had found a sponsor. Because of geographical allocation, we realized that only one of us would be admitted. When it became apparent that we had aroused interest, and had a semblance of chance for acceptance, a special meeting was called at the home of Mrs. Corriel, and the advantages of membership in the Garden Club of America, as well as the financial obligations thoroughly explored. The club was asked to decide whether they wished the committee to proceed with the negotiations. The vote was unanimously affirmative.

Subsequently Mrs. Kellogg requested that the Morristown Club have the pleasure of proposing us, and Mrs. Lauderdale of Short Hills offered to have that club second us. While we waited for the verdict, our campaign never waned.

On May 11th, 1941, tenth anniversary of Iris Garden, the executive board gave a tea to honor Miss Halloway. Mrs. Holliday arranged a delightful affair in the field house. Members of the garden club and thirty guests were invited. Miss Halloway's friends came from far and near while the Iris Garden glowed in a rainbow of colors for the occasion.

The war which was sweeping over France while Mrs. VanBoskerck's history concluded had now reached our shores. "Come to open purple testament of bleeding war." (King Richard) Our members were working for the U.S.O., the Red Cross and Camp Kilmer, apart and in conjunction with the garden club. Plans were sent to the camp to enhance its barren scenes, and seeds to Brittain. Victory gardens were planted, two new chairmanships were added to the executive board War Activities and Victory Gardens.

In May 1943, we provided vases and began to send flowers regularly to the chapels at Camp Kilmer. This is still being done. Garden books from the Garden Center were placed in the Public Library. Because of gasoline and food rationing it was becoming difficult to hold meetings. Speakers were reluctant to use scarce gasoline and tires for small groups. The war organizations were asking for more things, more effort and more money. The garden club was striving to provide all three.

In June 1943 a delegation from the Garden Club of America came to inspect our members' gardens. Those gardens chosen to head the list were duly explored and approved, but unfortunately the sand of time ran out before they could see them all, and they will never realize all they missed. However, they did see the dogwood planting, the Shakespeare and Iris gardens.

At the annual meeting Mrs. Samuel Carter gave a particularly interesting history of the Shakespeare garden, which was later read by request at the Shakespeare Club. Mrs. Carter said in part: "It has been said that we of the Western World love flowers for what they are, and that the peoples in the East love them for what they suggest. A Shakespeare Garden is full of suggestions, a speaking garden revealing the tradition, folklore and romance of the ancient and timeless plants." Mr. Tracey quoted an authority on the subject as saying that Mrs. Carter's was the finest Shakespeare Garden in the country and that over 15,000 people visited it last year.

Mrs. Coriell announced at the executive board meeting February 2nd, 1944, that Plainfield Garden Club had been elected to membership in the Garden Club of America, and letters of welcome received from sponsoring clubs. It had required three years to reach the new horizons, but a poet once said, "A horizon is nothing but the limit of our sight" so each one attained shows another beckoning in the distance.

Because of rationing, meetings were held in semi-public places of central location. Speakers stressed every phase of conservation. Garden club members were working hard at Camp Kilmer, for the Red Cross and the U.S.O.

In 1945 we became a Founder of the Blue Star Drive, our members contributing generously to this beautiful tribute to the men who served in the armed forces. It is hoped, and the hope is rapidly being fulfilled, that ultimately it will stretch from New Jersey to California.

A new custom was instituted, that of sending a sum of money to the Red Wood Tribute Grove in memory of deceased members. This year, 1945, a dance recital was given to help defray expenses of war activities. Naturally it was under the chairmanship of Miss Maud vonBoskerck, whose motto might well be "Music is my talent my dearest one." It was very successful artistically and financially.

We helped the New York Botanical Garden celebrate its Fiftieth Anniversary by sending hostesses every day for a week, and by a substantial sum of money for plant research.

In 1945 Lyons Hospital was included on our flower and plant list, and we have continued to supply it weekly for two months of each year. Flowering trees were planted along Blue Star Drive in memory of members' sons lost in the war.

Mrs. Samuel Carter and Miss Harriette Halloway received awards from the Garden Club of New Jersey for their work in Shakespeare and Iris gardens respectively.

Besides bouquets were made twice a week for the wards at Camp Kilmer, beginning in May. Our members volunteered to arrange them.

By this time we were discovering that those "new worlds to conquer" for which we had longed, were providing more opportunities than we could well cope with, and so a junior membership was formed, now numbering six.

The associate membership was enlarged to thirty-five so that active members might be enabled to transfer to it. A questionnaire was sent of work they wished to do. In a Garden Club of America contest for a year's program, Miss Halloway's won honorable mention.

Beginning early in December members of the club met every day in Mrs. Boardman Tyler's studio to make Christmas decorations for the hospital at Camp Kilmer. A big fire blazed in the stove, tons of varied evergreens were provided as well as all other necessary equipment. The studio hummed like Santa Claus' workshop, and great quantities of wreaths with large red bows, small bouquets and other favors emerged to cheer the soldiers at Camp Kilmer and Lyons Hospitals. Joyce Kilmer, for whom the camp was named, wrote of his experience in the other World War: "My shoulders ache beneath my pack, Lie easier cross upon his back" We hoped we eased their burden just a little.

The opportunities offered by the Garden Club of America in the field of conservation are so many and so varied, it was necessary to choose which tangent to pursue. In view of the community and national problems of vandalism and child delinquency, it was thought wise to concentrate the major effort in combating these evils. Working through the public schools seemed the most logical procedure. Mr. Wimer of Jefferson School and Mrs. Rulison of the Park Commission have offered sympathetic cooperation. The first step in the program is the establishment of school gardens, now in process of being planted. The garden club provided the funds. A trial garden, or proving bed was started in Cedarbrook Park in 1946. This year many new perennials were added.

Mrs. Hubble's artistic ability was employed so successfully in redecorating the Garden Center, this observer could scarcely recognize it.

The Garden Club of New Jersey bestowed an award upon us for meritorious work at Camp Kilmer. Miss Halloway has made additions to the peony, Iris and Narcissus gardens. It again became necessary to raise money, and a repeat performance by request, of the dance recital was staged by Miss Van Boskerck.

A suggestion from the Garden Club of New Jersey that we plant a tree to honor garden weekled, after consultation with Mr. Tracey, to the beginning of a dogwood arboretum comprising all the varieties that will grow in this vicinity. Twenty-five varieties have already been planted.

Santa Claus helpers gathered again in Mrs. Tyler's studio to make decorations for Camp Kilmer, and surpassed their effort of the previous year. Our work in this Project was not equaled by that of any club either year.

A thrill of pride must have quivered through our membership from founders to newest recruits, triumphs of our members who exhibited in the New York Flower Show. In the realm of flower arrangement there is no more coveted award than the Fenwick Medal. Our Mrs. deHart was runner up fro that prize last year. This year four exhibits won three blue ribbons and two special awards. It was a magnificent performance which won for us third place in the sweepstakes.

Chapel flowers still are sent to Camp Kilmer. Our members arrange them. We take our turn with the other clubs supplying flowers for the entire hospital regularly from gardens when possible, from florists in cold weather. Two gray Ladies representing Plainfield Garden Club, arrange and distribute the flowers through the wards. The by-laws were again revised and new books issued for the permanent covers.

The executive committee has not overlooked the fact that a War Memorial is of paramount interest to the garden club. Much time as been spent in discussion and deep thought given the matter. Mrs. Boardman Tyler has been named a member of the committee. This year we are sending a teacher to the Audubon Nature Camp in Maine, and another to the Conservation Workshop in Trenton.

Several members have been invited to speak on varied subjects, notably Mrs. Garret Smith on Church Gardens, and Miss Halloway on horticultural subjects. Mrs. Garret has been honored as founder of the Little Garden Club of New York City, of which she is honorary president.

A big of biographical information picked up while perusing the minutes is that our new president, Mrs. Loziuex, became a member of the club in 1940, second vice president in 1942, again in 1945, first vice president in 1946 and president in 1947.

Having been a member of the club only ten years, your historian cannot speak with absolute authority, but thinks it probably that the club reached greater heights of achievement under this administration of Mrs. Tyler than during any comparable period of time. This is partly true because of the new opportunities offered by affiliation with the Garden Club of America, and partly due to Mrs. Tyler's dynamic energy and her determination that the Plainfield Garden Club take advantage of these opportunities and assume its rightful position in the vanguard of progressive garden clubs.

Junius described Mrs. Tyler perfectly when he wrote: "the heart to conceive, the understanding to direct and the hand to execute."

We notice as we go over the chronicles of the garden club, the absence of names once listed so frequently:

Those whom we loved so long, and see no more
Loved and still love,
Not dead, but gone before.

If we ever adopt a coat of arms, it might well show crossed trowels over a field of flower arrangements, the other expounding the futility of vandalism to a young cub. And the motto? It must be from Shakespeare, and it is from The Tempest: Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground.

Or if we choose to abandon the classics: Never a dull moment!

Etheldreda Anderegg
Historian, 1947

First Presybterian Church of Plainfield 1888

http://www.archive.org/stream/historyoffirstpr00beal/historyoffirstpr00beal_djvu.txt

Contributors: Elisha Coriell

Hillside Cemetery

September 14, 2011
Photo by S. Fraser

It should be noted that Emma's grave marker was found in the plot with Horace Nathaniel Stevens family suggested that she may be related.

Courier News Articles

Coriell William Wallace 7/26/1937 Obituary
Coriell William Wallace 7/29/1937 News
Coriell William Wallace n.d. News

946 Madison Avenue

2011-12-04 Van Wyck Brooks Historical Holiday House Tour

946 Madison Avenue

946 Madison Avenue

946 Madison Avenue

December 4, 2011 946 Madison Avenue

This is the "back door" to the old Coriell mansion on Stelle's converted carriage house.

Our Mrs. Coriell gave her address as "963 Central" although the house now known as the "Coriell Mansion" sits on the corner of Stelle and Central and is now given a Stelle Avenue address. While Mrs. Coriell lived there, she claimed her address as "Central Avenue"

December 4, 2011 946 Madison Avenue

Gail Sloan, Janet Burchett, Sue Swenson, Anne Shepherd

December 4, 2011 946 Madison Avenue

December 4, 2011 946 Madison Avenue

The "big house" aka "Coriell Mansion" up to the left with yellow siding.

December 4, 2011 946 Madison Avenue

Brenda Anderson, Kathy Gaynor, Elaine Welsh and Gail Sloan

December 4, 2011 946 Madison Avenue

Corona, the white pony. The carriage house retains the same horse stall wood paneling and iron hardware. The homeowner, holding the reins, has done most of the renovations. She also cuts hair in her home studio.

December 4, 2011 946 Madison Avenue

December 4, 2011 946 Madison Avenue

December 4, 2011 946 Madison Avenue

December 4, 2011 Coriell Mansion

Corner of Stelle and Central

946 Madison Avenue

Photo by Dan Damon

Photo by Dan Damon

Photo by Dan Damon

Photo by Dan Damon

Photo by Dan Damon

Treasurer Book

On the first page of accounting for 1933 - 1934, Flornce wrote the following:

Florence B, Lawrence, Treasurer

Below are the correct figures and Treasurer's balance according to statements from The Plainfield Trust Co. on November 1933 when I signed as Treasurer of The Plainfield Garden Club. Note that there is only a difference of a few cents in Mrs. Corriell's account.

Balance on hand Nov. 1933
in Savings account 104.98

Balance on hand Nov. 1933
in Regular account 119.88

Balance on hand Nov. 1933
in Special Account 80.83

Florence B. Lawrence, Treasurer

Plainfield Public Library Archives

A planting of dogwood trees presented to the Union County Park Commission by the Plainfield Garden Club are dedicted in Cedar Brook Park where the trees were set out. The gift, which is noted on the bronze tablet members of the club and Park Engineer W. R. Tracy (extreme right) are surveying, marks the 25th anniversary of the club. Left to right are Mrs. Charles A. Eaton, Mrs. William W. Coriell, Mrs. Arthur G. Nelson, president; Mrs. Thomas R. Van Bosckerck, Mrs. Henry C. Wells, Mrs. William A. Holliday and Mr. Tracy (Story on Social Page)

circa 1940

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfield Public Library Archive

1936

Plainfield Garden Club Flower Show. Crescent Ave. Church House
May 15th and May 16th. Mrs. William W. Corriell chairman

Plainfield Public Library Archive

Plainfield Public Library Archive

Plainfield Public Library Archives

1936

Garden Club Plans For Flower Show

Plans were about completed for the flower show of the Plainfield Garden Club at a meeting yesterday in the home of the chairman. Mrs. Wallace Coriel, 963 Central Avenue. The show is to be held May 5 and 6 in the Assembly Room of the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church.

Mrs. Richard Lawton, a prize winner in many horticultural exhibitions, is schedule chairman, and is spected to have schedules printed soon for distribution.

Fully two-thirds of the 50 classes scheduled are listed as "horticultural." The flower arrangment classes are in the minority. The schedule is planned to be of educational value to both experienced gardeners and beginners.

The committee includes Mrs. Corriell, chairman, Mrs. Dudley H. Barrows, secretary; Mrs. Harry Williams, treasurer; Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler and Mrs. William K. Dunbar, decoration and floor plan; Mrs. Henry L. DeForest, properties; Mrs. Henry Marshall, staging; Mrs. Lawton and Mrs. Henry C. Wells, schedule; Mrs. William S. Tyler, exhibits.

Also Miss Harriette R. Halloway, specimens; Miss Josephine Lapslety, entries; Mrs. Garret Smith, publicity; Mrs. Leslie R. Fort and Mrs. Edward H. Ladd Jr., judges, and Mrs. Clifford M. Baker, prizes.

Plainfield Public Library Archives

January 12, 1896 New York Times

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F00914F9395515738DDDAB0994D9405B8685F0D3

A WEEK'S EVENTS IN PLAINFIELD.; Numerous Receptions – Doings of Clubs and Societies.

PLAINFIELD, Jan. 11. – A reception was given by Mrs. I C. Pierson of Watchung Avenue, Tuesday evening. She was assisted in receiving by her daughters, Mrs. Malcolm MacKenzie of New-York and Miss Mabel Pierson; Miss Corbitt of New-York, Miss Cochran of Wilmington, Del., and Miss Hunter of North Adams, Mass.

The members of the North Plainfield Dramatic Club were entertained at the home of Mr. and Mrs. James E. Bailey, Jackson Avenue, Tuesday evening. Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. Andrew E. Keneey, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Neeley, Mr. and Mrs. James Harper, Miss Mary Hughes, Miss Ellen Mullon, and Frank Off.

A Past Master's jewel was presented to Calvin H. Rugg of Jerusalem Lodge, F. and A.M., Tuesday evening. The same evening John J. Lynch, for several years President of the Plainfield Catholic Club, was presented with a gold-headed cane by the members of the club.

A. D. Shepard and family of the Gables have gone to Buckingham, New York, for the Winter.

The class of '96 of the North Plainfield school was entertained by Miss Emma and Miss Bertha Stevens Wednesday evening.

Mrs. John Valiant of Craig Place gave a reception and tea Wednesday. She was assisted in receiving by Mrs. H.K. Carroll, Mrs. A. A. Tafty, Mrs. F. H. Randolph, Miss Grace Carroll, Miss Bessie Valiant, Miss Florence Valiant, and Miss Mary Steiner.

The Park Club gave an entertainment Wednesday night at the clubhouse on Washington Avenue. The patronesses were Mrs. C. A. Reed, Mrs. Samuel St. John McCutcheon, and Mrs. J. H. Howell.

Miss Imogene See of Sing Sing, N.Y., is a guest of Mrs. Elmer E. Runyon of Madison Avenue.

Miss Eda Mills of Summit Avenue gave a party to her friends Wednesday night.

Miss Mollie Lawrence of New York and Miss Mather of Bound Brook are guests of Mr. and Mrs. Marion S. Ackerman of Crescent Avenue.

Miss Emily Coriell of Church Street is visiting in Brooklyn.

Miss Edith Allen of Webster Place is spending the Winter in Flushing.

Mrs. J. H. Ackerman and daughter, Lydia, have returned from a two month's trip to the Pacific coast.

Miss Randolph, daughter of Thompson F. Randolph of New-York, is visiting her sister Mrs. Judson Bonnell of East Front Street.

Mrs. Lewis of Binghampton, N.Y., is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. D. F. Ginna of Watchung Avenue.

Miss Rachel Fay Buckley of Newburg, N.Y., and Harry Ellis Green of Plainfield were married Wednesday night at the bride's home.

Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Moore of Ithaca, N.Y., are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. George Squires of North Plainfield.

Miss Laura J. Runyon of East Fifth Street is visiting friends in Philadelphia.

Miss Harriet Loomis of New York City is a guest of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Morse of Franklin Place.

Miss Josie Burlingham of Albany Normal College is a guest of ex-Councilman Seymore G. Smith of Crescent Avenue.

Miss Jennie Foster of New York and Howard Foster of Princeton Colelge are guests of D. N. Groendyke of Mercer Avenue.

Miss Helen L. Moore of New York is the guest of her sister Mrs. S. A. Cruikshank, of Belvidere Avenue.

Miss Freeman of Rahway is visiting her aunt, Mrs. W. C. Ayres, of West Second Street.

Miss Baldwin of Baltimore has gone home, after a visit with her uncle Councilman J. H. Valiant of Craig Place.

Howell Division, no. 97, Sons of Temperance, celebrated its twenty-seventh anniversary Wednesday evening. AMong those present form the out of tow were A. P. Sutphen of Somerville, Grand Worthy Patriarch Ross Slack of Excelsior Division of Trenton, Past Grand Worthy Patriarch Fred Day of Newark and Worthy Patriarch Evenson of Newark, and Worthy Patriarch Evenson of Philadelphia. James J. Perine of Brooklyn is the only living charter member of the division.

Mrs. Yerkes, wife of the Rev. Dr. D. J. Yerkes of the First Baptist Church, has gone to Greenville, S.C., to visit a daughter.

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest R. Ackerman, who are making a tour around the world, are now at Hongkong.

1952 - 1953 Check Book

No. 981
Jan. 16, 1952 [1953]
Monday Afternoon Club
money to be returned by Mrs. Martin, Miss Harmon and Mrs. Coriel
$23.00

1957 Check Book

Note in margin (February 20, 1957)

Feb. 21 Deposit
Emma B. Coriell
$100.00

1947 Check Book

No. 628
Jan. 20, 1947
Garden Club of America
Mrs. Frost
Mrs. Elliott
Mrs. Foster
Dues
$12.00

No. 629
Feb. 17, 1947
Emma B. Coriell
for conservation
luncheon guests
$7.00

No. 630
Feb. 19, 1947
Mrs. Walter Hine
Feb. lecture
Program $25.00

Residence of Wm. W. Coriell, 963 Central Avenue

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

1909 Plainfield Directory

Buckle James F, (Woolston & Buckle, also Price, Bond, Woolston Co), 145 North av, h. 50 Westervelt av

Coriell Cornelius B., painter, h 60 Manning av, N. P.
Coriell B Frank, real estate, h. 211 W 5th
Coriell Lulu, wid Walter, 17 Harmony, N. P.
Coriell Margaret Miss, h. Fairview av, N. P.
Coriell Wm McD, stenographer, h. 301 Randolph Rd
Coriell Wm W, dry goods, h. 1200 Denmark rd
Coriell Wm Wallace, h 50 Lincoln pl, N. P.

May 13, 1925 Meeting Minutes

1925 Meeting Minutes

1936 - 1937 Meeting Minutes

1938-1939 Meeting Minutes

Mrs. Coriell

May 13, 2013 Coriell Mansion

Local blogger and friend of the Plainfield Garden Club, Dan Damon, writes the following here.

New life for the Coriell Mansion

(photo caption: Two views of the Coriell Mansion in more upbeat days (2002).)

Plainfielders have watched with concern the vicissitudes of the Coriell Mansion at the corner of Stelle and Central Avenues over recent decades. Today, the famed property began the road to recovery (again) as the sale of the property closed to two brothers who have recently taken an interest in restoring it as a single-family dwelling.

Quite a number of years ago, it was taken on by former Councilor Rashid Burney, following whom came Olive Lynch, who was going to make it into a Bed-and-Breakfast, like The Pillars down the street, but on a larger scale.

Unfortunately, the housing crash of 2008 brought an end to her project and the house has sat empty and vulnerable ever since, with its magnificent porch shored up in anticipation of a restoration that failed to materialize.

More recently, the property caught the attention of developer Frank Cretella, who saw its possibilities as an event space. Though parking and a liquor license were said to be problems to be solved, in the end it appears that availability of a reasonably affordable liquor license became a deal-killer.

As one neighbor told me this afternoon, there was much joy and (figurative) dancing in the streets on hearing the news of today's real estate closing.

A hearty welcome to the new owners!

Coriell Mansion in 2002

2007 Gregory Palermo's Tree Blog

2007 Gregory Palermo's Tree Blog

2007 Gregory Palermo's Tree Blog

July 24, 2013 A New Chapter for the Coriell Mansion

A young real estate entrepreneur aims to restore the troubled Coriell Mansion and promised to celebrate with a tea party when the work is done.

Jonathan Steingraber received approval from the Historic Preservation Commission Tuesday to make some exterior repairs and will later seek HPC permission to erect an iron fence, restore a solarium and change one driveway. A former owner planned to convert the mansion to a bed and breakfast, but ran out of funds. Steingraber said he expects to keep it a single-family home, which it was in the late 19th century.

The mansion at 957 Central Avenue is in the Van Wyck Brooks Historic District, one of six residential historic districts in Plainfield. In all, the city has 10 districts (see map here). Steingraber already has a video online about the mansion and the district. To read more about the bed and breakfast project, click here.

Steingraber said he was told the mansion was once the largest single-family home in Plainfield. He knew its history, which included a bank takeover in September 2010. He acquired it for $85,000, he told the commissioners, but said a contractor estimated the cost of repairs at $195,000.

He found porch railings inside the house and set them out to make sure they were all there. But after finding skateboarders had used sections to make a ramp, he put them back inside. His reason for wanting the iron fence, he said, was "so kids stop skateboarding on my porch."

Describing his plans for the driveway, he asked commissioners, "Did you see the movie, 'Gatsby' ?" He wants to replace gray gravel with pure white as in the film.

Steingraber said he had also purchased another house next door, "because Ii don't like having bad neighbors."

He and a girlfriend had listened to several other applications before his turn came up. He asked permission to address the commissioners about the problem of buyers of historic homes being unaware of their status. He suggested having the designation appear right on the listing, so buyers would not make repairs and find out, as some applicants did, that they had to undo the work and fix it over following the city's historic design guidelines.

The commissioners Tuesday included some from the Van Wyck Brooks Historic District who invited Steingraber to a picnic the district is holding Saturday.

Many of the city's mansions were once one-family homes, but only a few have been restored to that status One is the former Monday Afternoon Club on Watchung Avenue, now the home of former Councilman Rashid Burney. Another is the home of WVBHD President John Stewart on West Eighth Street.

Asked after the meeting what she thought of Steingraber's plan to make the Coriell Mansion a single-family home again, HPC Chairman Sandy Gurshman said, "I think it's a miracle. I applaud anyone who undertakes it."

The New York Sun, Wednesday, August 4, 1943

LEAMAN-CORIELL

Mrs. William Wallace Coriell of Plainfield, N.J., has announced the engagement of her daughter, Miss Elizabeth Coriell, to Edward Leaman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter E. Leaman of Stamford, Conn.

The Elite of New York Copyright 1914

The Elite of New York Copyright 1914

Listed:

Coriell, Mr. & Mrs. William Wallace
740 Belvidere Ave., Plainfield, N.J.
Clubs 87

August 30, 1867

Bridget Durgan hanged in New Jersey on 30 August 1867 for murdering her employer's wife. New Jersey physician William Wallace Coriell and his wife had hired Durgan as a servant. She stabbed Mary Ellen Coriell to death and set the house afire. Her execution attracted great newspaper interest, especially from the New Brunswick Weekly Freedonian, in which city she hanged. The New York Times and the Philadelphia Inquirer also closely covered the case, and they were more important because they were close to New Brunswick and had large circulations.

The Time's lead paragraph about the hanging said, "Probably the execution of no person, with the single exception of Mrs. Surratt, has attracted such general attention and interest as hers." (Mary Surratt and three other conspirators were hanged in connection with the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.) Putting aside whether the Time's comparison was hyperbole, there is no doubt that Durgan's hanging attracted much attention. Many people demanded admission tickets to the "private" hanging."

The Yearbook of St. Stephen's Church 1913

Coriell William Wallace Vestry
Coriell Mrs. William Wallace Saint Margaret's Guild

2001 Evergreen Cemetery

CORIELL
Abraham, d. 22 Sept., 1828, age 90 yrs.
Davide, d. 23 Sept., 1803, age 68 yrs. (Husband)
Elizabeth, d. 22 Mar., 1813, age 77 yrs. Wife of Davide Coriell.
Isabella E., d. 6 April 1876, age 42 yrs.2 mo. 3 days. Wife of Morgan Bird.
Israel R., d. 24 Aug., 1869, age 79 yrs. 6 mo. 23 days.
Jane, d. 26 Dec., 1870, age 71 yrs. 6 mo. 22 days. Wife of Jefferson Dunn.
Jennett, d. 31 Oct., 1840, age 81 yr.
Maggie, d.10 Feb., 1872, age 1 yr. 7 mo. 10 days.
Michael, d. 15 April 1832, age 76 yrs. 16 days.
N. Wallace (M. D.), d. 25 May 1881. Husband of Mary E. Stewart.
Richard, b. 8 April 1826, d. 21 April 1898.
Richard E., d.3 Jan., 1842, age 6 yrs. 4(?) mo. 14 days, s. of Richard and Margaret
Coriell.
Richard R., d. 6 Nov., 1892, age 83 yrs.11 mo. 5 days. (Husband)
Theodore W., d. 4 Mar., 1820, d. 6 Sept., 1889.
W. Wallace, b. 1842, d. 1915. (Husband) Co.6 Regt. N. J. Vol.


Evergreen Cemetery is located on Plainfield Avenue between 4th & 5th Streets in Plainfield,
New Jersey. It is quite an old cemetery owned 2 Churches:
First Park Baptist Church
315 W. 7th Street
Plainfield, NJ 07060
and
Convent United Methodist Church
631 E. Front Street
Plainfield, NJ 07060

The cemetery is in bad condition. Even though it has a fence around it,
there is no caretaker on the property. Many of the tombstones have been pushed over and there is much vandalism. The Churches are barely able tokeep the grass cut, much less pay for any repair or replacement of the tombstones. It has a very lonely feel to it. I visited Evergreen in July of 2000, found my relatives and wished there was something I could do. So I decided to post the tombstone inscriptions which were cataloged and typed by The Genealogical Society of Salt Lake City, Utah in 1947. I received permission to post these to the internet by Kathy Warburton, the Copyright Coordinator with the Family and Church History Department of the TheGenealogical Society of Utah, part of the Family and Church History Department of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This transcription of the Evergreen Cemetery records is in the collection of their Family History Library in Salt Lake City.

I had a lot of help and encouragement from the following people who did the actual typing: Jeanne Porter Barton, Barbara Benjamin, Judy Buckney, Barbara David, Carolyn Greene, Marlene Ford, Natasha Joivino, Dave Kane, Marian Ferguson Mallory, Barbara Nocchi, Kevin Olvaney, and Louise Williams.
Without these volunteers, this list would not be available for your use. It
has been our priviledge and honor to help preserve the memories of those who
have gone before us.

Arlene Dunkum

New York Times January 19, 1896

The engagement of Miss Nellie Coriell of New-Market to Clarence White is announced.

New York Times October 1943

ELIZABETH CORIELL MARRIED IN JERSEY,; Has 8 Attendants at Wedding to Walter Edward Leaman Jr. in Plainfield

July 24, 2013

PGC member Anne Shepherd was asked what she remembered of Mrs. Coriell's house, she replied, "It was dark!"

July 24, 2013 Emma Buckle Coriell's house

Everyone should take a moment to read Bernice's latest blog: A New Chapter for the Coriell Mansion.

It is very exciting that our former, two time President, Emma Buckle Coriell's house has a new enthusiastic owner. In particular, members are encouraged to link to the video that the new homeowner has posted.

Mrs. Coriell served as our President from from 1938 to 1940 and then again, 1942 to 1944. It was Mrs. Coriell that saw to it that the PGC was admitted to the Garden Club of America. And that was no small undertaking as you will learn by reading her on-line file.

Mrs. Coriell passed away in 1960 at the age of 83. Do any current PGC members have memories of Mrs. Coriell? Her house? If so, please share them as we all enjoy the stories.

NOTE: What a coincidence that the new homeowner likened his project to Gatsby. Does he know that the Plainfielder responsible for Gatsby most likely stood on his new porch? Max's sister, Frances, was very good friends with Emma as they joined the PGC the same year together (Along with Sally's grandmother!). See here.

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

Thursday, April 9, 2009 Plainfield Trees Blog

THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 2009

New American Chestnuts
Plainfield mayor Sharon Robinson-Briggs will honor the American chestnut at 946 Madison Avenue at the City's Arbor Day celebration Friday April 24.

The tree was planted by Bill Santoriello in 1992 and is now about 10 inches in diameter at breast height. The tree is currently owned by Vicki Blasucci. Lacking a nearby chestnut to pollinate it, the Madison Avenue chestnut has been sterile. But things are looking up for the tree. It will soon have neighbors. The American Chestnut Foundation provided germinated nuts for planting new trees nearby. Bill Santoriello, Vicki Blasucci, and Robin Gates planted four of the nuts this past weekend, two on Vicki's property and two on Bill's, which backs on Vicki's. The nuts are the progeny of a 19" diameter chestnut in Middletown (which was pictured in Plainfield Trees November 21, 2008.) One of the tree's nuts, with newly formed rootlet, is shown below.

The plantings were done with concern for chestnut blight at the forefront. The Madison Avenue chestnut is quite unusual in being absolutely untouched by blight. The last thing anyone wanted was to introduce blight to Madison Avenue with the planting of infected new trees.

Extraordinary measures were taken. First, nuts were planted instead of seedling trees. Why? Unlike seedlings, nuts are extremely unlikely to harbor blight. Second, plant protectors, needed to shelter the tender new trees from predatory deer, were virgin. Sterilizing previously used ones wasn't good enough for us worrywarts. Tony Rosati, a Chestnut Foundation volunteer from Monmouth County, drove out to Hightstown to acquire new ones for use in Plainfield. Third, the nuts were planted only in very close proximity to the Madison Avenue tree. Why? Blight fungi spread on the wind from tree to tree and can also be carried by birds and insects. Spreading chestnut trees around Plainfield could create blight "waystations" that would allow spread of the disease to the Madison Avenue tree.

With luck the new trees might begin flowering in five or six years and cross-pollinate the existing tree so that they can all produce chestnuts. Let's wish them luck.

Monday, September 29, 2008 Greg Palermo's Tree Blog

Another very handsome, mature red oak is at Stelle Avenue near Central. This magnificent street tree was the subject of some concern two or three years ago when the owner of the adjacent Coriell mansion proposed to restore the semicircular driveway that had once opened onto Stelle Avenue. The driveway was to encircle the red oak. Because the house was being converted to a B & B, the fire department wanted the driveway to be wide enough to accommodate fire trucks. The Historic Preservation Commission intervened to have the driveway narrowed so as to limit damage to the tree's roots.

December 11, 2013 Gathering of the Greens at Hillside

The naturalistic boulder for the Coriell marker

Mrs. Coriell, a two-time president of the PGC, almost was overlooked with her marker under another large Andromeda and topped with snow. The Coriell mansion, located on the corner of Central and Stelle Avenues, is currently being renovated.

Mrs. William Wallace (Emma Buckle) Coriell '25

It is not surprising that Mrs. Coriell chose a natural boulder to mark her eternal resting place. Boulders like these were used by the PGC to mark many important Plainfield sites. The Shakespeare Garden, of course, the now defunct Iris Garden and a newly discovered boulder installed by the PGC on City Hall grounds. Recollection has it that there was another installed by the PGC to mark the Cornus Arboretum in Cedar Brook.

The grand estate "Giggleswick" used many of the boulders found on the property in the elaborate naturalistic pools that cascaded down the hillside. Why so many boulders? This part of Union/Middlesex county is part of a glacial moraine. As the glacier melted, it left these large-to-medium sized boulders all over the landscape.

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Detwiller blueprint 740 Belvidere

August 8, 2015

Library offers trove of vintage Plainfield home blueprints for sale

Plainfield homeowners and history buffs are getting a one-of-a-kind opportunity as the Plainfield Public Library prepares to offer upwards of 3,000 blueprint originals from its Detwiller Collection for sale to the public.

The blueprints offered for sale are part of a trove of many thousands recovered from a dumpster at City Hall by the late Plainfield architect and artist Charles Detwiller.

While many of Plainfield's grand homes and mansion are among the blueprints (though fewer than originally, owing to some 'fingering' before strict controls were put in place), the appeal of the collection will be stronger for those who live in or admire the more modest vintage homes from the turn of the 20th century to the World War II era.

These homes include many classic Tudors and other 'cottage' and 'revival' styles, as well as 'foursquares', ranches and Cape Cods and more contemporary stules.

These represent the bulk of Plainfield's building stock from its most expansive period and they were often enough improved or expanded – giving rise to the need for plans showing the original building and the proposed alterations to be filed with the City's inspections department.

It is those blueprints, which have now been cataloged and digitized, that are being offered for sale. In library parlance, they have been de-accessioned, meaning that they no longer need be kept permanently by the Library and are available for dispostion to private parties.

The Library has a portal to the Charles Detwiller Blueprint Collection on its website (see here) and has made a complete list of the blueprints for sale also available online (see here).

The list is alphabetized by street name, and then number. However, I would advise reading the Library's instructions closely so you make the proper notations for your request (see here) – easing the staff's task in finding the item(s) in which you are interested. Paying attention to the suggested time frames needed and numbers of items per request will help you avoid headaches. So, please read and follow the instructions carefully – as carpenters like to say, 'measure twice, cut once'.

The sale will run from September 1 to November 13, 2015 in a two-step process –

You check the offerings to find items that interest you, making careful notations; and

You and the Library work out a pick-up appointment, at which you will be able to view the actual items and make a final decision on your purchase.

Single-page blueprints are priced at $50 each and multiple-page sets at $100. Cash or credit cards are fine, but the Library will not accept personal checks.

Proceeds of the sale will be used to finance the further digitization of the blueprint collection – meaning that we can look forward to another offering of materials at some future point.

The Detwiller Collection is absolutely unique in its size and scope, covering decades of Plainfield history and thousands of buildings throughout the city. Plainfield residents owe Charlie Detwiller a debt of gratitude for his perspicacity that cannot be repaid.

And we owe a debt of gratitude to Library Director Joe Da Rold for the vision that saw in these rescued documents an invaluable resource for the community, and devised means and methods of ensuring these fragile records would be available to Plainfield residents permanently through having them digitized.

EDITOR'S NOTE:
Mr. Detwiller is the late husband of PGC Honorary member Cath Detwiller. Mr. Detwiller's Aunt Laura was a long-time member of the PGC and a very talented botanical artist. Read about the Detwiller family here:

Detwiller, Mrs. Charles H. (Catherine or "Cath" Campbell), Jr. '57

Detwiller, Miss Laura Cecelia '29

And Mr. Detwiller's in-laws:

Campbell, Mrs. William Hall (Mabel C. Raper) '28

Davis, Mrs. F. Edgar (Dorothy or "Dottie" Campbell) '60