Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Carter, Mrs. Samuel Thomson, Jr. (Anna Washburn Burnham) '21

1922 Address: 940 Woodland Avenue, Plainfield

1929 Treasurer Book Active April $5.00 (Not listed in the 1928 Treasurer Book)
1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937 Treasurer Book Active

1932 Directory* lists the address as 940 Woodland Avenue, Plainfield
* = This directory is not dated but presumed to be from the year 1932.

1938 Treasurer Book, Active: Mrs. Samuel T. Carter Jr. 1/4/38 Pd. 1/4/39 Pd.

1940 Treasurer Book, Active: Mrs. Samuel T. Carter Jr. 1/4/40 Pd 4/14/41 Pd. 11/24/41 Pd. 11/20/42 Pd.

1943 - 1945 Treasurer Book, Active: Mrs. Samuel T. Carter Jr. 11/22/43 Pd. 11/25/44 Pd. Her name is then crossed out.

1942 Directory: 940 Woodland Avenue

545? Woodland Avenue (1953)

In 1965, the 50th Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club, Mrs. Samuel T. Carter, Jr. was listed as an "Honorary Member" and alive.

Mrs. Carter may be related to PGC Members Mrs. Cochran and Mrs. Gaston.

Long Island Genealogy

Carter, Samuel T., son of Rev. S. T. Carter, and Burnham, Anna Washburn, of Morristown, New Jersey, daughter of Frederick G. Burnham, married 21 October 1897 at Morristown, New Jersey by Rev. S. T. Carter of Huntington and Rev. Albert Erdman of Morristown, N. J.

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Von Boskerck

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg version 2

[Editor's note: The original document was too faded to scan. This is a different version of a history written by Mrs. Etheldreda Anderegg from 1941 1947]

Plainfield Garden Club History
Continued to 1947

On May 14th, 1941 six years ago to-day in Cedarbrook Park the Anniversary Dogwood Trees were formally presented to the Park Commission. In making the presentation, Mrs. Arthur Nelson, president, said the garden club wished to make a gift of lasting beauty to mark its anniversary. Mr. Tracey responding for the Park Commissioners commended the club for its civic interest and declared the trees would bring a touch of beauty to thousands of lives. The gift was identified by a large boulder bearing a bronze marker. Mrs. Holliday as chairman of the Dogwood Tree Committee and of the Boulder Committee arranged the anniversary celebration.

That year, 1941, an article appeared in Horticulture in praise of our Shakespeare Garden.

A teacher of the Jefferson School staff was sent to the Audubon Nature Camp in Maine.

Handsome new yearbooks containing a revised constitution, membership lists and permanent covers with loose leaves were issued. About this time some of our members looking back upon some of our achievements of the past, and forward for new horizons to explore, agreed that once more we should storm the ramparts of the Garden Club of America. No organization in garden club circles offers to its members such a wide field of opportunities and assured prestige. This reporter has sat in many important national and state conferences were the effect of this prestige could be observed. When important decisions were due there was an intangible inference in the atmosphere which stemmed to imply "All those not members of the Garden State of America may now retire to the Jim Crow car."

Better to have failed in the high aim than to succeed vulgarly in the low one" said Browning.

So a committee to explore the possibilities of our being accepted for membership was named by Mrs. Nelson. With Mrs. Corriel as chairman, the committee consisted of Miss Elsie Harmon, Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler, Miss Elizabeth Browne, Miss William Tyler, Mrs. William A. Holliday, Mrs. James Devlin and your historian. Our search for new worlds to conquer began with a meeting at the home of Mrs. William Tyler, on February 21, 1941, when your historian read a letter she had been asked to write to Mrs. Frederic Kellogg, of Morristown Garden Club, prominent garden club personality. The letter would be interesting at this point, but unfortunately it has been lost. Suffice to say, our prise of ourselves was so completely uninhibited that the committee itself was profoundly impressed by the record of performance of the Plainfield Garden Club set forth therein. Shakespeare said "Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful." After all they could not know our worth unless we told them. This time we forestalled a verdict that we had "accomplished nothing."

It might be interjected here that during Mrs. Goddard's regime an effort was made to join the Garden Club of America. Mrs. Kellogg, approached on that occasion, graciously entertained Mrs. Goddard and Mrs. Holliday at luncheon, and they left with the impression that Plainfield, having rejected an invitation to become a charter member of that organization during Mrs. Herring's tenure, it would be futile ever to hope for membership.

An active campaign was launched by all who had relatives or friends in member clubs. This was accelerated when it was learned that a neighboring club had an identical ambition, and had found a sponsor. Because of geographical allocation, we realized that only one of us would be admitted. When it became apparent that we had aroused interest, and had a semblance of chance for acceptance, a special meeting was called at the home of Mrs. Corriel, and the advantages of membership in the Garden Club of America, as well as the financial obligations thoroughly explored. The club was asked to decide whether they wished the committee to proceed with the negotiations. The vote was unanimously affirmative.

Subsequently Mrs. Kellogg requested that the Morristown Club have the pleasure of proposing us, and Mrs. Lauderdale of Short Hills offered to have that club second us. While we waited for the verdict, our campaign never waned.

On May 11th, 1941, tenth anniversary of Iris Garden, the executive board gave a tea to honor Miss Halloway. Mrs. Holliday arranged a delightful affair in the field house. Members of the garden club and thirty guests were invited. Miss Halloway's friends came from far and near while the Iris Garden glowed in a rainbow of colors for the occasion.

The war which was sweeping over France while Mrs. VanBoskerck's history concluded had now reached our shores. "Come to open purple testament of bleeding war." (King Richard) Our members were working for the U.S.O., the Red Cross and Camp Kilmer, apart and in conjunction with the garden club. Plans were sent to the camp to enhance its barren scenes, and seeds to Brittain. Victory gardens were planted, two new chairmanships were added to the executive board War Activities and Victory Gardens.

In May 1943, we provided vases and began to send flowers regularly to the chapels at Camp Kilmer. This is still being done. Garden books from the Garden Center were placed in the Public Library. Because of gasoline and food rationing it was becoming difficult to hold meetings. Speakers were reluctant to use scarce gasoline and tires for small groups. The war organizations were asking for more things, more effort and more money. The garden club was striving to provide all three.

In June 1943 a delegation from the Garden Club of America came to inspect our members' gardens. Those gardens chosen to head the list were duly explored and approved, but unfortunately the sand of time ran out before they could see them all, and they will never realize all they missed. However, they did see the dogwood planting, the Shakespeare and Iris gardens.

At the annual meeting Mrs. Samuel Carter gave a particularly interesting history of the Shakespeare garden, which was later read by request at the Shakespeare Club. Mrs. Carter said in part: "It has been said that we of the Western World love flowers for what they are, and that the peoples in the East love them for what they suggest. A Shakespeare Garden is full of suggestions, a speaking garden revealing the tradition, folklore and romance of the ancient and timeless plants." Mr. Tracey quoted an authority on the subject as saying that Mrs. Carter's was the finest Shakespeare Garden in the country and that over 15,000 people visited it last year.

Mrs. Coriell announced at the executive board meeting February 2nd, 1944, that Plainfield Garden Club had been elected to membership in the Garden Club of America, and letters of welcome received from sponsoring clubs. It had required three years to reach the new horizons, but a poet once said, "A horizon is nothing but the limit of our sight" so each one attained shows another beckoning in the distance.

Because of rationing, meetings were held in semi-public places of central location. Speakers stressed every phase of conservation. Garden club members were working hard at Camp Kilmer, for the Red Cross and the U.S.O.

In 1945 we became a Founder of the Blue Star Drive, our members contributing generously to this beautiful tribute to the men who served in the armed forces. It is hoped, and the hope is rapidly being fulfilled, that ultimately it will stretch from New Jersey to California.

A new custom was instituted, that of sending a sum of money to the Red Wood Tribute Grove in memory of deceased members. This year, 1945, a dance recital was given to help defray expenses of war activities. Naturally it was under the chairmanship of Miss Maud vonBoskerck, whose motto might well be "Music is my talent my dearest one." It was very successful artistically and financially.

We helped the New York Botanical Garden celebrate its Fiftieth Anniversary by sending hostesses every day for a week, and by a substantial sum of money for plant research.

In 1945 Lyons Hospital was included on our flower and plant list, and we have continued to supply it weekly for two months of each year. Flowering trees were planted along Blue Star Drive in memory of members' sons lost in the war.

Mrs. Samuel Carter and Miss Harriette Halloway received awards from the Garden Club of New Jersey for their work in Shakespeare and Iris gardens respectively.

Besides bouquets were made twice a week for the wards at Camp Kilmer, beginning in May. Our members volunteered to arrange them.

By this time we were discovering that those "new worlds to conquer" for which we had longed, were providing more opportunities than we could well cope with, and so a junior membership was formed, now numbering six.

The associate membership was enlarged to thirty-five so that active members might be enabled to transfer to it. A questionnaire was sent of work they wished to do. In a Garden Club of America contest for a year's program, Miss Halloway's won honorable mention.

Beginning early in December members of the club met every day in Mrs. Boardman Tyler's studio to make Christmas decorations for the hospital at Camp Kilmer. A big fire blazed in the stove, tons of varied evergreens were provided as well as all other necessary equipment. The studio hummed like Santa Claus' workshop, and great quantities of wreaths with large red bows, small bouquets and other favors emerged to cheer the soldiers at Camp Kilmer and Lyons Hospitals. Joyce Kilmer, for whom the camp was named, wrote of his experience in the other World War: "My shoulders ache beneath my pack, Lie easier cross upon his back" We hoped we eased their burden just a little.

The opportunities offered by the Garden Club of America in the field of conservation are so many and so varied, it was necessary to choose which tangent to pursue. In view of the community and national problems of vandalism and child delinquency, it was thought wise to concentrate the major effort in combating these evils. Working through the public schools seemed the most logical procedure. Mr. Wimer of Jefferson School and Mrs. Rulison of the Park Commission have offered sympathetic cooperation. The first step in the program is the establishment of school gardens, now in process of being planted. The garden club provided the funds. A trial garden, or proving bed was started in Cedarbrook Park in 1946. This year many new perennials were added.

Mrs. Hubble's artistic ability was employed so successfully in redecorating the Garden Center, this observer could scarcely recognize it.

The Garden Club of New Jersey bestowed an award upon us for meritorious work at Camp Kilmer. Miss Halloway has made additions to the peony, Iris and Narcissus gardens. It again became necessary to raise money, and a repeat performance by request, of the dance recital was staged by Miss Van Boskerck.

A suggestion from the Garden Club of New Jersey that we plant a tree to honor garden weekled, after consultation with Mr. Tracey, to the beginning of a dogwood arboretum comprising all the varieties that will grow in this vicinity. Twenty-five varieties have already been planted.

Santa Claus helpers gathered again in Mrs. Tyler's studio to make decorations for Camp Kilmer, and surpassed their effort of the previous year. Our work in this Project was not equaled by that of any club either year.

A thrill of pride must have quivered through our membership from founders to newest recruits, triumphs of our members who exhibited in the New York Flower Show. In the realm of flower arrangement there is no more coveted award than the Fenwick Medal. Our Mrs. deHart was runner up fro that prize last year. This year four exhibits won three blue ribbons and two special awards. It was a magnificent performance which won for us third place in the sweepstakes.

Chapel flowers still are sent to Camp Kilmer. Our members arrange them. We take our turn with the other clubs supplying flowers for the entire hospital regularly from gardens when possible, from florists in cold weather. Two gray Ladies representing Plainfield Garden Club, arrange and distribute the flowers through the wards. The by-laws were again revised and new books issued for the permanent covers.

The executive committee has not overlooked the fact that a War Memorial is of paramount interest to the garden club. Much time as been spent in discussion and deep thought given the matter. Mrs. Boardman Tyler has been named a member of the committee. This year we are sending a teacher to the Audubon Nature Camp in Maine, and another to the Conservation Workshop in Trenton.

Several members have been invited to speak on varied subjects, notably Mrs. Garret Smith on Church Gardens, and Miss Halloway on horticultural subjects. Mrs. Garret has been honored as founder of the Little Garden Club of New York City, of which she is honorary president.

A big of biographical information picked up while perusing the minutes is that our new president, Mrs. Loziuex, became a member of the club in 1940, second vice president in 1942, again in 1945, first vice president in 1946 and president in 1947.

Having been a member of the club only ten years, your historian cannot speak with absolute authority, but thinks it probably that the club reached greater heights of achievement under this administration of Mrs. Tyler than during any comparable period of time. This is partly true because of the new opportunities offered by affiliation with the Garden Club of America, and partly due to Mrs. Tyler's dynamic energy and her determination that the Plainfield Garden Club take advantage of these opportunities and assume its rightful position in the vanguard of progressive garden clubs.

Junius described Mrs. Tyler perfectly when he wrote: "the heart to conceive, the understanding to direct and the hand to execute."

We notice as we go over the chronicles of the garden club, the absence of names once listed so frequently:

Those whom we loved so long, and see no more
Loved and still love,
Not dead, but gone before.

If we ever adopt a coat of arms, it might well show crossed trowels over a field of flower arrangements, the other expounding the futility of vandalism to a young cub. And the motto? It must be from Shakespeare, and it is from The Tempest: Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground.

Or if we choose to abandon the classics: Never a dull moment!

Etheldreda Anderegg
Historian, 1947

April 24 - May 30, 1988 Cedar Brook Farm Designer Showhouse

Listed in the program is: Mrs. Howard Carter, Jr. – is she related to Mrs. Samuel T. Carter?

Many PGC members were also members of the Muhlenberg Auxiliary that staged amazing designer homes in Plainfield in an effort to raise money for the hospital.

In 1988, the designer showcased home was Cedar Brook Farm which had also been the home of a PGC member, Mrs. Robert F. (Carolyn Waring) MacLeod '55, PGC President 1958 - 1960

To see the progam and learn the history of the house, click these links:

1988 Cedar Brook Farm Designer Showcase Program Cover to Page 25

1988 Cedar Brook Farm Designer Showcase Program Pages 26 to 50

1988 Cedar Brook Farm Designer Showcase Program Pages 51 to 75

1988 Cedar Brook Farm Designer Showcase Program Pages 76 to End

1974 Junior League Designer Showcase: The Martine House

Listed n the program is Mr. and Mrs. Howard Carter, Jr. – relation?

1974 Designer Showcase Martine House Cover to Page 25

1974 Designer Showcase Martine House Page 26 to End

In addition to saving the 1988 Program for the Designers Showhouse of Cedar Brook Farm (aka The Martine House) which was organized by the Muhlenberg Auxiliary, PGC Member Anne Shepherd also kept the 1974 Designers Showcase of the very same home, organized by the Junior League.

Within the program pages, you will find mentioned many PGC members. They include: Clawson, MacLeod, Kroll, Davis, Wyckoff, Stevens, Loizeaux, Swain, Hunziker, Connell, Foster, Dunbar, Elliott, Fitzpatrick, Gaston, Hackman, Holman, Lockwood, Morrison, Royes, Rushmore, Sanders, Williams, Barnhart, Bellows, Burger, Burner, Carter, Clendenin, DeHart, Detwiller, Eaton, Eckert, Fort, Frost, Gonder, Keating, Laidlaw, Loosli, Madsen, Mann, Marshall, Miller, Moody, Moon, Morse, Murray, Mygatt, Barrett, Peek, Perkins, Pfefferkorn, Pomeroy, Pond, Royes, Samek, Sandford, Sheble, Stevens, Shepherd, Stewart, Stout, Trewin, Vivian, Zeller, Cochran, Mooney and Hall.

Sports Illustrated September 5, 1955

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1130154/index.htm

Summer Dudes
"Roughing it" at the huge 6,000-acre Valley Ranch in Wyoming's Yellowstone country, a group of prominent Easterners take time out from riding, hunting and pack trips to pose with their sons at the corral


CAST OF CHARACTERS

1 Alfred Morris.
2 John A. Morris of New York (treasurer, Thoroughbred Racing Associations).
3 John A. Morris Jr.
4 Thomas Cochran.
5 James K. Robinson Jr. of West Chester, Pa. (vice president, American Stores Co.).
6 James K. Robinson III.
7 David Robinson.
8 G. Keith Funston Jr.
9 Harvey Mol� III.
10 Mathew Mol�.
11 Harvey Mol� of New York ( U.S. Steel).
12 Bishop Anson Phelps Stokes Jr. of Boston (former rector, St. Bartholomew's, New York City).
13 Howard Carter of Plainfield, N.J. (partner, Gifford, Woody, Carter & Hays law firm).
14 Fergus Cochran.
15 Homer Cochran of Plainfield (vice president, J. P. Morgan & Co.).
16 James Cochran.
17 G. Keith Funston of Greenwich, Conn. (president, New York Stock Exchange).
18 Henry Jury of Jackson, Mich. (Jury Furniture Co.).
19 William Jury.

SUMMER POLOISTS

The Maharaja of Jaipur led a pickup team of Indians, Pakistanis and Britishers, called The Diplomats, to defeat (10-5) at Olney, Md. against a Washington Polo Club team manned by Don Bradley, Bill Beall, Dr. John Keeler, Colonel Porter King and Halter Cunningham. The royal leader scored a goal, proved an adept player

Reclining between chukkers, maharaja, 43, rests on Oriental rug and satin-covered pillows as he chats with his sari-clad maharani (left), Mrs. Sherali Kha and Pakistani Ambassador Syed Amjad Ali (right).

Sidelined by heat, maharaja enjoys the shade of maharani's parasol as match continues. He played only two chukkers, alternating with his 21-year-old son, Kumar Bhwani Singh, who holds a captaincy in Indian army.

Tight-lipped maharaja tensely awaits the start of match. Currently rated at seven goals, he contributed some fine near-side neck shots.

Google Search Results for Howard Carter

New-York observer - Google Books Result
1910
IS, Howard Carter, son of the Rev. Samuel T. Carter, DD, of East Orange, NJ, and
Ruth Morris Brandegee, daughter of Mrs. William P. Brandegee, of Plainfield ...
books.google.com/books?id=nLZLAAAAYAAJPrinceton University - Bric A Brac Yearbook (Princeton, NJ), Class ...
Philip Thomas Carroll, III 57 Wiggins St., Princeton, N.J. Howard Carter, Jr 955
Kensington Ave., Plainfield, NJ. John Preston Carter, Jr Scenic Dr., ...

www.e-yearbook.com/yearbooks/Princeton...Bric_A.../Page_111.html - Similar

1919 Audubon Societies

Bird-lore - Google Books Result
National Committee of the Audubon Societies of America, National Association of Audubon Societies for the Protection of Wild Birds and Animals, National Audubon Society - 1919
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT Edited by T. GILBERT PEARSON. ... Secretary Theodore S.
Palmer, First Vice-President Jonathan Dwight, T reasurer Samuel T. Carter, Jr., Attorney ...
books.google.com/books?id=xVxMAAAAMAAJ

New York Times October 17, 1987

Wedding to Take Place

Upon Thursday next at 12:30 o'clock in the South Street Presbyterian Church, Morristown, N. J., the marriage will be celebrated of Anna Washburn Burnham, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Gordon Burnham, to Samuel Thomson Carter, Jr., of New York. The ceremony will be performed by the father of the bridegroom, the Rev. Samuel T. Carter, editor of The Church Union, assisted by Dr. Albert Erdman, the pastor of the South Street Church. The bridegroom is a grandson of the late Robert Carter, book publisher, and is the senior member of the New York law firm of Carter & Fallows. The bride is a niece of ex-Senator Washburn of Massachusetts.

The bridesmaids are Miss Eva S. Porter, daughter of Gen. Fitz John Porter; Miss Edith Twining, daughter of Dr. Twining of The Independent; Miss Harriet Talcott Buxton, Miss Christine Sutphen, Miss Jeanetter Carter, a cousin of the bridegroom, all of Morristown, and Miss Emma D. Carter, a sister of the bridegroom, of Mount Holyoke College, Massachusetts. The best man is Edward H. Fallows, the bridegroom's partner. The ushers are the Rev. John Calhoun, assistant pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, Germantown, Penn.; Drs. David Bovaird and Samuel Cochran of New York; Norman McLeod Carter, a brother of the bridegroom, of Princeton, N.J.; Messrs. Frederick S. Pratt and Edward Hilliard, cousins of the bride, of Cambridge, Mass. Mr. and Mrs. Carter will reside in New York City.

Wanted -- A Theology by Samuel Thomson Carter

1982 May Designer Showhouse: 1127 Watchung Avenue

Cover to Page 25

Page 26 to Page 51

Page 52 to Page 75

Page 76 to Back Cover

**PROGRAM: Mrs. Robert B. Thomson
Patrons: Mrs. Howard Carter

Plainfield Public Library Archive

1936

Mrs. Clifford Baker Heads Garden Club; Reports Stress Recent Civic Improvements

Election of officers of the year's work, especailly that of a civic nature recently undertaken, and an address by Mrs. Otto Lane, who gave instructions in making conservation Christmas wreaths, featured the annual meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club yesterday at the home of Mrs. George W. Fraker in Rahway Road.

Mrs. Leslie Runyon Fort, retiring president, was in charge of the business session. These officers were chosen for the coming year: President, Mrs. Clifford M. Baker; vice-presidents, Mrs. Harry P. Marshall and Mrs. Raymond V. V. Miller; recording secretary, Mrs. Anna Stewartl corresponding secretary, Miss Laura Detwiller; treasurer, Mrs. Frederick W. Yates.

Mrs. Samuel T. Carter, Jr., gave a report of the work in the Shakespeare Garden in Cedar Brook Park. During the year there were a number of plantings in the garden which have added to its attractiveness.

Mrs. Thomas R. Van Boskerck requested donations of jellies for the Flower, Plant and Fruit Guild for distribution among the sick and shut-ins. They can be sent to her home, 1232 Prospect Avenue.

The following letter was received from Edward Baker, Jr., president of the Lions club:

"I am writing you in behalf of the Lions Club of Plainfield in regarde to the very wonderful work the Plainfield Garden Club is doing around our city. Some of the members of our club have seen the work in Cottage Place and also, the brook in Watchung Avenue, which is about completed. We just want you to know that we consider this one of the finest pieces of civic service which has been rendered Plainfield. As citizens and members of the Lions Club we certainly appreciate this work."

A report of unusual interest was presented by the conservation committe of the club. It was in part as follows:

"In early October, 1931, at the request of the Chamber of Commerce a survey was made by our president, Mrs. Leslie R. Fort and the chairman of the conservation committee of the Chamber of Commerce. This report embodied suggestions for work at conscpicuous places in the city . . . be of help in unemployment relief the club made an appropriation to be used as far as possible for wages only. Great interest was at once shown not only by club members, but also by people in many walks of life.

"Two projects were undertaken. The one first begun was Cottage Place close to the railroad tracks. Following some publicity for the work being attempted, gifts came freely – top soil, manure, plants, trees and shrubs. City officials, those of the park and street departments and the New Jersey Central, co-operated gernerously.

"Today a beautiful little park awaits the spring. There have been planted 31 trees where none stood before; 26 rose bushes and over 375 other plants and shurbs have been most carefully set out. This work employed 139 hours at 50 cents an hour and 312 hours at 40 cents an hour. The expenditure was $169.50. Cottage park has been evolved.

"It was evident when the work at Cottage Place was well underway that a second piece of work could be begun. The south bank of Green Brook at the Watchung Avenue bridge was chosen as the worst eyesore in the city. Here, as in Cottage Place, advice was generously given that nothing could be done. But the gardeners just kept on working. Gifts kept coming. A tractor was brought in to cope with stones and debris impossible for men to move. Today another pleasnt little park created by the garden club also awaits the spring.

"Because in pioneer days the little stream, now called Green Brook, was called the Sahcunk River, streams, and the tribe dwelling here along its banks were teh Sahcunk Indians, this little park made by our club is now called Sahcunk Park. In those early days from Rock Avenue to Bound Brook there was located Waccaho-vo-howiohy Village, the name meaning "where you can dig into the ground."

"In two projects 28 1/4 hours at 50 cents an hour and 211 3/4 hours at 40 cents an hour made an expenditure of $99.30. The total planting of 51 trees, 89 roses and 750 other plants and shrubs cost $268.60. Every cent went for wages so the garden club has the enviable record of being able to dispense 100 per cent relief. The fine co-operative spirit shown in every direction made every moment a delight.

"Those of us who really dug in the gardens are quite conscious that many defects may be discovered easily by those so minded. But we trust that these plots, slected as behicles for helping those in distress will be filled with flowers and restful shade. And we hope that each succeeding year will find these spots a little lovelier because of our civic interest in them and that this part of co-operative effort will not be forsaken."

Among the women who were actively engaged in these enterprises were Mrs. Leslie R. Fort, president; Mrs. J. L. Devlin, Mrs. Thomas R. VanBoskerck, Mrs. Garret Smith, Mrs. Henry L. DeForest, Mrs. Clinton Ivins, Miss Elsie Harman, Mrs. Charles A. Eaton and Mrs. Henry Wells.

Plainfield Public Library Archive

Plainfield Public Library Archive

Plainfield Public Library Archive

May 9, 1974 Spring Potpourri Guestbook

1949 Checkbook

No. 799
Nov. 4, 1949
Garden Club of America
Contributors Fund
$25.00

No. 800
Nov. 4, 1949
Garden Club of America
Dues for 49 active
22 Associate
1 Honorary (Mrs. Carter)
$360.00

No. 801
Nov. 10, 1949
Garden Club of America
dues Honorary Member
(Miss Halloway)
$5.00

1925 Meeting Minutes

1915 - 1923 List of Meetings

1936 - 1937 Meeting Minutes

Princeton Class Notes 1943

'86

The following data as to the Carter families has been received. Jim had two children. The daughter, Miriam, was a very successful school-teacher when she married. Her husband has since died. The son, Donald, as a young boy showed remarkable interest in bird life and through Sam Carter, secured a fine position in the National History Museum of New York. He was sent on long trips to South America and other countries for the Museum, becoming one of the best ornithologists. In World War I he was sent overseas to have charge of the carrier pigeons in a very large territory. Jim's wife died about three years ago.

Sam had three children. A daughter, Gladys, who was killed in a tragic auto accident nine years ago, whose two children came to live with Same and his wife. One, Ann, married Peter Garwin, now a bombardier; the other, a son, was in Yale, but left to enter war service, being rejected in two attempts because of his eyes. Sam's oldest son, Burnham, is next to the senior member in the firm of Lee & Ross, public accountants in New York and is a member of the N. Y. State Guard. The youngest son, Samuel, is with the advertising firm of J. Walter Thompson, doing civil war air service as well. Mrs. Samuel Carter still resides in Plainfield, N.J.

Thomas Donald Carter (1893-1972)

From the Smithsonian Institute Archives

Title:
Thomas Donald Carter (1893-1972)
Summary:
Thomas Donald Carter (1893-1972) was curator of mammals at the American Museum of Natural History, 1920-1960
Cite As:
Acc. 90-105 - Science Service, Records, 1920s-1970s, Smithsonian Institution Archives
Topics:
Mammalogy, Zoology, Natural history
Subjects:
Carter, T. Donald (Thomas Donald) 1893-, American Museum of Natural History
Form/Genre:
Black-and-white photographs
Local Number:
SIA Acc. 90-105 [SIA2008-0396]

T. Donald Carter

Call Number: PPC .C37
T. Donald Carter photographic print collection 1927-1934
American Museum of Natural History Special Collections-Library Central Park West at 79th Street New York, NY 10024
COLLECTION INFORMATION
Repository: American Museum of Natural History, Special Collections-Library Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024
Collection: T. Donald Carter photographic print collection Creator: Carter, Thomas Donald (1893-1972)
Inclusive Dates: 1927-1934
Extent: 5 boxes (2 linear feet).
Physical Description: The collection consists of black and white loose and mounted photo prints, one scrapbook, and one booklet for storing negatives. Some groups of prints have been wrapped in tissue and labeled.
Condition: Fair. The scrapbook is deteriorating. Images pasted inside are fading. Boxes 4 and 5 contain prints that were flattened and mounted by Conservation, April 2011.
Prepared by/Date: Richard T. Fischer, May, 2011; Ann Herendeen, 2004

T. Donald Carter photographic print collection 1927-1934
Call #: PPC .C37
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH
T. Donald Carter was a zoologist at the American Museum of Natural History: research assistant 1920- and assistant curator 1944-1960, AMNH Dept. of Mammalogy. T. Donald Carter played an important role in the development of the Asian, African, and North American Halls. Carter was assistant at the New York Zoological Society, 1913-1916. He served in the U.S. Army during World War I, and spent a year with the Pigeon Service of the Signal Corps. After his retirement in 1960, Carter raised wild ducks and other birds at his 136-acre home in Kinnelon, N.J., near Boonton.
SCOPE AND CONTENT
The T. Donald Carter Photograph Collection includes prints from his AMNH expeditions to Roraima, Indo-China, West China and Abyssinia. Also included are two boxes of personal and family photographs. Some of the images are captioned on the verso. Personal and family photographs which were mounted may have descriptive captions on the back.
RELATED MATERIAL
AMNH Library Special Collections has Carter's papers and correspondence, field books from various expeditions, one box of Carter's lantern slides in the Lantern Slide collection; also Carter's lantern slide projector and one box of objects dating from his time in the U.S. Army in the Memorabilia collection.
Carter's field books and negatives of field photographs are located as separate archival collections in Special Collections.
Prints from the Legendre Indo-China Expedition 1931-1932 are available in the Sidney Jennings Collection, Call Number: PPC .L64.
ACCESS CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS
Requests to use the collection should be made in advance to the Senior Special Collections Librarian, who may be contacted at 212-769-5420 or at speccol@amnh.org
PREFERRED CITATION
American Museum of Natural History, T. Donald Carter photographic print collection, 1927-1934. PPC .C37.
1996/1997 gift.
SOURCE OF ACQUISITION
T. Donald Carter photographic print collection 1927-1934
Call #: PPC .C37
CONTAINER LIST
Box Title
1 Day Roraima Expedition 1927-1928 Prints
2 Day Roraima Expedition 1927-1928 Prints (Scrapbook)
3 Legendre Indo-China Expedition 1931 Prints
Sage West China Expedition 1934 Prints
Abyssinia 1927-1929 Prints
4 Personal/Family. undated.
5 Personal/Family. undated.

Burnham Carter Jr. Obituary August 29, 2011

Old Lyme - Burnham Carter Jr., 87, of Old Lyme died Monday, Aug. 29, 2011.

Mr. Carter was born on Jan. 21, 1924, in Watertown. His first two years of schooling were at the German School in Havana, Cuba, where his father was with the American embassy. When the family moved to New York City, he attended Friends Seminary, returning to Old Lyme each summer. In 1940, he graduated from the Millbrook School in Millbrook, N.Y., and went on to Princeton. After Pearl Harbor, the college accelerated, and he graduated in 1943. During the war, he served as a Naval aviator with the rank of lieutenant (j.g.).

On May 5, 1945, Mr. Carter married Sue Holmes McLeod of Pittsburgh and Old Lyme, whom he had known since they were ten. Throughout their marriage they vacationed in Old Lyme whenever possible. In 1948, Mr. Carter received his M.A. from Colgate University and in 1955 his doctorate of philosophy from Stanford. He taught for ten years at Purdue University in Indiana, and then became the academic dean at Briarcliff College in Briarcliff Manor, N.Y., and in 1971 at Pine Manor College in Chestnut Hill, Mass. In 1977 he returned to teaching as the abercrombie professor of english. After retirement in 1996, he and his wife continued to live in Dedham, Mass., where he assisted Bride International Media in the production of CD-ROMs of Shakespeare's Macbeth and Romeo and Juliet, as well as one on the Transcendentalists, where he was the voice-over for Ralph Waldo Emerson.

After the death of his wife in 1999, he moved back to Old Lyme. He was active in the Old Lyme beach club, first as a director and then as president. From 1968 to 2007 he was a director of Berkshire Farm and Services for Youth, a school for boys in trouble in Canaan, N.Y., founded by his great-grandparents, Catharine and Frederick Gordon Burnham. In 2001, he published The Story-Teller, a life of his father, and in 2007 Legacies, a set of sonnets about his family. We will miss his love of literature and poetry, the Sunday crossword and UCONN women's basketball, and the beach and woods of Old Lyme.

Mr. Carter is predeceased by his wife of 55 years, Sue; and his brother, David.

He is survived by his sister, Alison Mitchell, of Old Lyme; three children, Jeffery Burnham Carter of Deep Gap, N.C., Elizabeth Edmonstone of Old Lyme, and Jane Cipoletti of Barrington, R.I.; eight grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 1, 2011 in the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme.

In lieu of flowers, please send a gift to the charity of your choice.

Fulton-Theroux Funeral Home, Old Lyme is handling the arrangements.

Please visit www.fultontherouxoldlyme.com for tributes and more service information.

Published in The Day on September 2, 2011

Burnham Carter Jr. Obituary August 29, 2011

Old Lyme - Burnham Carter Jr., 87, of Old Lyme died Monday, Aug. 29, 2011.

Mr. Carter was born on Jan. 21, 1924, in Watertown. His first two years of schooling were at the German School in Havana, Cuba, where his father was with the American embassy. When the family moved to New York City, he attended Friends Seminary, returning to Old Lyme each summer. In 1940, he graduated from the Millbrook School in Millbrook, N.Y., and went on to Princeton. After Pearl Harbor, the college accelerated, and he graduated in 1943. During the war, he served as a Naval aviator with the rank of lieutenant (j.g.).

On May 5, 1945, Mr. Carter married Sue Holmes McLeod of Pittsburgh and Old Lyme, whom he had known since they were ten. Throughout their marriage they vacationed in Old Lyme whenever possible. In 1948, Mr. Carter received his M.A. from Colgate University and in 1955 his doctorate of philosophy from Stanford. He taught for ten years at Purdue University in Indiana, and then became the academic dean at Briarcliff College in Briarcliff Manor, N.Y., and in 1971 at Pine Manor College in Chestnut Hill, Mass. In 1977 he returned to teaching as the abercrombie professor of english. After retirement in 1996, he and his wife continued to live in Dedham, Mass., where he assisted Bride International Media in the production of CD-ROMs of Shakespeare's Macbeth and Romeo and Juliet, as well as one on the Transcendentalists, where he was the voice-over for Ralph Waldo Emerson.

After the death of his wife in 1999, he moved back to Old Lyme. He was active in the Old Lyme beach club, first as a director and then as president. From 1968 to 2007 he was a director of Berkshire Farm and Services for Youth, a school for boys in trouble in Canaan, N.Y., founded by his great-grandparents, Catharine and Frederick Gordon Burnham. In 2001, he published The Story-Teller, a life of his father, and in 2007 Legacies, a set of sonnets about his family. We will miss his love of literature and poetry, the Sunday crossword and UCONN women's basketball, and the beach and woods of Old Lyme.

Mr. Carter is predeceased by his wife of 55 years, Sue; and his brother, David.

He is survived by his sister, Alison Mitchell, of Old Lyme; three children, Jeffery Burnham Carter of Deep Gap, N.C., Elizabeth Edmonstone of Old Lyme, and Jane Cipoletti of Barrington, R.I.; eight grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 1, 2011 in the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme.

In lieu of flowers, please send a gift to the charity of your choice.

Fulton-Theroux Funeral Home, Old Lyme is handling the arrangements.

Please visit www.fultontherouxoldlyme.com for tributes and more service information.

Published in The Day on September 2, 2011

Shakespeare Gardens: Design, Plants and Flower Lore by Anne Burnham Carter

by Anne Burnham Carter

85 pages
Published 1937 by Dorrance and
original titleShakespeare Gardens: Design, Plants and Flower Lore

In an herb garden

by Annie Burnham Carter

Princeton Alumni Weekly 1925: A Princeton Family

Five of Princeton's present undergraduates have the honor of being members of what is probably the largest Princeton family on record. They are the descendants of the Thomas Carter family which for nearly fifty years has been actively represented at the University by the presence in the student body of at least one of its number. This continuing group as produced eleven members of Phi Beta Kappa and has won decorations for distinguished service from five governments.

The students who are carrying on the Princeton traditions of this larger family are William Watts Cochran, James Blair Cochran, and Homer Pierce Cochran of Plainfield, N. J., all first cousins and members of the Freshman Class; Robert Carter Miller of Princeton, N. J., a Sophomore; and Samuel T. Carter, III, of Plainfield, a Junior. Miller and Carter are second cousins, and also bear the same relationship to the Cochran boys.

The founder of the line was one Thomas Carter, who was born in Scotland in 1807 and who, as a young man, came in 1832 to seek his fortune in the United States. Since 1877 no less than thirty-six of his blood descendants have been students at Princeton. The family's connection with the University meanwhile has been further strengthened by the fact that six women of the lineage have married Princeton men. Thus the total of the family's representatives at Princeton is brought to forty-two, with thirty-six of this number now living. Three additional members of the ken were graduates of the Princeton Theological Seminary in the 'Sixties.

The learned profession have claimed most of this Princeton family. While nine of its members have entered business, eight chose the ministry, eight medicine, six law, five education and one farming. The remaining five, are, as previously stated, still engaged in undergraduate activities. An unusual record of family service throughout the world is found in the fact that ten Princeton members of the family have been missionaries to Turkey, Persia, India and the Philippines and China.

The members of the family who have been decorated are William S. Dodd '81, missionary in Turkey, who was decorated by that country with the Order of the Medijidie and also by the English Red Cross; the late Jesse B. Carter '93, a Princeton professor, who was decorated by Italy as Knight Commander of the Order of the Crown; and T. Guthrie Speers '12 who received the Croix de Guere and the Distinguished Service Cross during the late World War.

Members of the present undergraduate generation of the family are prominent in campus affairs. Samuel T. Carter, III, is managing editor of the Daily Princetonian and collaborated in writing this year's Triangle Club show. Robert C. Miller is a member of the University water polo team, and William Cochran is vice-president of the Freshman Class.

That the family holds promise of continuing its unusual record is shown by the fact that already there are said to be twenty-two additional members who are heading for Princeton.

Carter family of Princeton

Letter regarding the Shakespeare Garden by Mrs. Carter

Not dated. Best guess is circa 1926

With the auspices of the two committees the sum of $500 was raised toward the garden of which amount the Garden Club contributed our half. This amount has been placed in the hands of the Park Commissioner and is being used by them ? the Shakespeare Garden under our agreement by which all experience beyond this will be met by the Commissioner. This expense bids fair to be sure than the amount contributed b the two Clubs. The garden plan was made by Olmsted Bros. of Boston, well known landscape architects. it will be a beautiful garden in the old English style, and it is fast nearing completion. There is a permanent sub committee consisting of Mrs. Howard Fleming, the originator of the garden idea, and

Then it ends.

Annual Report circa 1926

Annual report of ? Garden Club Comm. for the Shakespeare G. in Cedarbrook Park.

For the Spring of the year the Garden Club appointed a committee to cooperate with a similar committee of the Shakespeare Club in connection with the plans to make a Shakespeare Garden in Cedarbrook.

Our members from each of the clubs, to cooperate with the commissioners in the planting of the garden.

Respectfully submitted
Annie B. Carter

Nov. 9th [No year]

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

1958

Caption: GARDEN CLUB GIFT – Mrs. Albert L. Stillman, chairman of the Shakespeare committee of the Plainfield Garden Club, places identification card on English hawthorne in Cedar Brook Park. Watching, left to right, are: Mrs. Morris S. Benton, Mrs. Edward H. Ladd 3rd and Mrs. C. Sidney Trewin, club members. (Coronet, Photo by E. T. Wiggins)

100 Attend Open House at Shakespeare Garden

About 100 persons attended an informal tour of the Shakespeare Garden in Cedar Brook Park yesterday afternoon. The outdoors open house marked the 30th anniversary of the garden, one of about a dozen in the United States.

Mrs. Robert F. MacLeod of 11 Brook Lane, president of the Plainfield Garden Club, and members of the club's Shakespeare committee, headed by Mrs. Albert L. Stillman of 73 Leland Ave., described to visitors the 100-odd varieties of plants and shrubs in the garden.

The Garden Club, the Shakespeare Club and the Union County Park Commission established the garden 30 years ago. It now consists of 17 beds and two long borders in a park area of about 150 by 40 feet, located off Randolph Rd.

The ideas was to include all the plants and shrubs – there are 44 of them, Mrs. Stillman said – mentioned by Shakespeare in his plays and sonnets.

Other Plants Included

But the garden was so large, Mrs. Stillman said, that it was agreed upon to include other plant varieties in the 16th and 17th Centuries.

All of the 44 varieties mentioned in the bard's works are labeled by markers, which include the particular Shakespearean quotations referring to them.

The garden was laid out 30 years ago by a landscape architect from Olmsted Brothers of Boston. The Garden Club and the Park Commission split the cost. The garden is cared for by a Park Commission gardener, and supplemental work is done by the Garden Club's Shakespeare committee.

Mrs. Samuel T. Carter Jr. of 940 Woodland Ave., the club's first Shakespeare committee chairman was unable to attend the outdoors open house yesterday.

Termed "Second Finest"

Mrs. Carter, author of the book, "Shakespeare Gardens," has termed the Plainfield garden the second finest in the nation. She has said top honors belong to a Shakespeare garden in Rockefeller Park in Cleveland, Ohio. Established in 1915, the Cleveland garden was one of the first to be planted in the United States.

Mrs. Stillman said Shakespeare gardens bring together flowers grown in England in one period of garden history from being lost to U.S. gardens. The projects also add beauty to public parks and provide a place where Shakespeare poetry is illustrated with living plants and shrubs.

Mrs. Stillman's Shakespeare committee includes Mrs. Morris F. Benton, Mrs. C. Sidney Trewin, Mrs. Victor R. King, Mrs. William P. Elliott and Mrs. George J. His.

Mrs. Edward H. Ladd 3rd, horticultural chairman of the club, was also among those who pointed out features of the garden to guests.

The hospitality committee included Mrs. Henry DeForest, Mrs. Benton, Mrs. Ladd, Mrs. His and Mrs. King.

Punch was served by Mrs. William P. Elliott, Mrs. Trewin and Mrs. His.

Plainfield Library Bio Card

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership