Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Anderegg, Mrs. John Swift (Etheldreda T.) '37

Treasurer Book Active: 1937
1938 Treasurer Book, Active: Mrs. John S. Anderegg 4/9/38 Pd. Cash 4/4/39 Pd.

1940 Treasurer Book, Active: Mrs. John S. Anderegg 3/20/40 Pd 2/27/41 Pd 11/27/41 Pd. 12/8/42 Pd. 1/9/44/ Pd. 1/18/45 Pd. 2/6/46 5/15/46 May 6, 1947 June 28, 1948 June 29, 1949 July 9, 1950 May 1951 June 1952

Dover Rd, Colonia, Rahway (1953)

1942: Dover Road, Colonia

In 1965, the 50th Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club, Mrs. John S. Anderegg was listed as an "Honorary Member"

1970 - 1975 Address: 10 Union Street, Camden, ME
Listed as "Honorary Member"

1975: Mrs. John Swift Anderegg's name is removed from the roster.

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

page 10

"The school children had drawn lovely silhouettes of the trees, and hanging on the wall beside each one, was a living branch in a container of water. These branches were supplied by the Shade Tree Commission. Beautiful colored slides of the following members' gardens were shown; Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler, Mrs. William S. Tyler and Mrs. A. D. Seybold, with Miss Margaret Tyler commenting. Afterwards one woman said, "I didn't know there was so much beauty in Plainfield."

Two hundred adults and over seven hundred children attended the show, which also included a puppet show, a movie and exquisite water colors of trees by the late Miss Laura Detwiller.

Living Memorials
In 1945 we began honoring our deceased members with gifts of money to the Garden Club of America's Redwood Memorial Grove in California. By 1961 our fund had grown to $200.00 – enough to "buy" a tree. What a trifling sum to pay for one of these magnificent Redwoods which Charles Steinbeck has called, "mute ambassadors from another age which create a vision that stays with you always . . . a stunning memory of what the world was like once long ago."

Also, that same year we were a Founder of the Blue Star Memorial Drive on Highway 22. "Our members contributed generously to this beautiful tribute to the men who served in the armed forces." Mrs. Anderegg records, "Flowering trees were planted of members' sons lost in the war."

Christmas Wreaths
One Christmas during World War II, we made 214 wreaths and 400 boutonnieres of "enduring greens gay with bright accents of color" for Camp Kilmer. We used two tons of evergreens, spent an estimated 400 hours making the wreaths and worked in assembly-line technique at Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler's studio were "a fire crackled merrily in the stove and the smell of Christmas was everywhere". Numb arm muscles, taut backs and blackened hands were disregarded in the joy of working together. For years, Mrs. John S. Anderegg was head of this project.

When Camp Kilmer was no longer functioning, we made wreaths for Lyons Hospital. In 1951, the members were described as engaging in a "colossal project of wreath making, reaching a state of frenzy." The next year the wreath-making was confined to one very long day and described as "fun", but for the last time. From then on, we sent money for the purchase of Christmas greens.

1950 was the year we started the annual custom of creating gift packages of cigarettes for the patients at Lyons. Those imaginative, beautiful packages (which the patients used as decorations), were always displayed at our Christmas meeting, and sometimes judged. Many a member, not so nimble fingered as others, was rumored to have stayed away from that meeting! In 1964, cigarettes went out of favor and hard candies, cleverly wrapped as tree ornaments, were substituted.

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

Dover Rd, Colonia, Rahway Residence: Anderegg

Honorary Member: Mrs. John Swift Anderegg '37

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg version 2

[Editor's note: The original document was too faded to scan. This is a different version of a history written by Mrs. Etheldreda Anderegg from 1941 – 1947]

Plainfield Garden Club History
Continued to 1947

On May 14th, 1941 – six years ago to-day in Cedarbrook Park – the Anniversary Dogwood Trees were formally presented to the Park Commission. In making the presentation, Mrs. Arthur Nelson, president, said the garden club wished to make a gift of lasting beauty to mark its anniversary. Mr. Tracey responding for the Park Commissioners commended the club for its civic interest and declared the trees would bring a touch of beauty to thousands of lives. The gift was identified by a large boulder bearing a bronze marker. Mrs. Holliday as chairman of the Dogwood Tree Committee and of the Boulder Committee arranged the anniversary celebration.

That year, 1941, an article appeared in Horticulture in praise of our Shakespeare Garden.

A teacher of the Jefferson School staff was sent to the Audubon Nature Camp in Maine.

Handsome new yearbooks containing a revised constitution, membership lists and permanent covers with loose leaves were issued. About this time some of our members looking back upon some of our achievements of the past, and forward for new horizons to explore, agreed that once more we should storm the ramparts of the Garden Club of America. No organization in garden club circles offers to its members such a wide field of opportunities and assured prestige. This reporter has sat in many important national and state conferences were the effect of this prestige could be observed. When important decisions were due there was an intangible inference in the atmosphere which stemmed to imply – "All those not members of the Garden State of America may now retire to the Jim Crow car."

Better to have failed in the high aim than to succeed vulgarly in the low one" said Browning.

So a committee to explore the possibilities of our being accepted for membership was named by Mrs. Nelson. With Mrs. Coriell as chairman, the committee consisted of Miss Elsie Harmon, Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler, Miss Elizabeth Browne, Miss William Tyler, Mrs. William A. Holliday, Mrs. James Devlin and your historian. Our search for new worlds to conquer began with a meeting at the home of Mrs. William Tyler, on February 21, 1941, when your historian read a letter she had been asked to write to Mrs. Frederic Kellogg, of Morristown Garden Club, prominent garden club personality. The letter would be interesting at this point, but unfortunately it has been lost. Suffice to say, our prise of ourselves was so completely uninhibited that the committee itself was profoundly impressed by the record of performance of the Plainfield Garden Club set forth therein. Shakespeare said "Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful." After all they could not know our worth unless we told them. This time we forestalled a verdict that we had "accomplished nothing."

It might be interjected here that during Mrs. Goddard's regime an effort was made to join the Garden Club of America. Mrs. Kellogg, approached on that occasion, graciously entertained Mrs. Goddard and Mrs. Holliday at luncheon, and they left with the impression that Plainfield, having rejected an invitation to become a charter member of that organization during Mrs. Herring's tenure, it would be futile ever to hope for membership.

An active campaign was launched by all who had relatives or friends in member clubs. This was accelerated when it was learned that a neighboring club had an identical ambition, and had found a sponsor. Because of geographical allocation, we realized that only one of us would be admitted. When it became apparent that we had aroused interest, and had a semblance of chance for acceptance, a special meeting was called at the home of Mrs. Coriell, and the advantages of membership in the Garden Club of America, as well as the financial obligations thoroughly explored. The club was asked to decide whether they wished the committee to proceed with the negotiations. The vote was unanimously affirmative.

Subsequently Mrs. Kellogg requested that the Morristown Club have the pleasure of proposing us, and Mrs. Lauderdale of Short Hills offered to have that club second us. While we waited for the verdict, our campaign never waned.

On May 11th, 1941, tenth anniversary of Iris Garden, the executive board gave a tea to honor Miss Halloway. Mrs. Holliday arranged a delightful affair in the field house. Members of the garden club and thirty guests were invited. Miss Halloway's friends came from far and near while the Iris Garden glowed in a rainbow of colors for the occasion.

The war which was sweeping over France while Mrs. VanBoskerck's history concluded had now reached our shores. "Come to open purple testament of bleeding war." (King Richard) Our members were working for the U.S.O., the Red Cross and Camp Kilmer, apart and in conjunction with the garden club. Plans were sent to the camp to enhance its barren scenes, and seeds to Brittain. Victory gardens were planted, two new chairmanships were added to the executive board – War Activities and Victory Gardens.

In May 1943, we provided vases and began to send flowers regularly to the chapels at Camp Kilmer. This is still being done. Garden books from the Garden Center were placed in the Public Library. Because of gasoline and food rationing it was becoming difficult to hold meetings. Speakers were reluctant to use scarce gasoline and tires for small groups. The war organizations were asking for more things, more effort and more money. The garden club was striving to provide all three.

In June 1943 a delegation from the Garden Club of America came to inspect our members' gardens. Those gardens chosen to head the list were duly explored and approved, but unfortunately the sand of time ran out before they could see them all, and they will never realize all they missed. However, they did see the dogwood planting, the Shakespeare and Iris gardens.

At the annual meeting Mrs. Samuel Carter gave a particularly interesting history of the Shakespeare garden, which was later read by request at the Shakespeare Club. Mrs. Carter said in part: "It has been said that we of the Western World love flowers for what they are, and that the peoples in the East love them for what they suggest. A Shakespeare Garden is full of suggestions, a speaking garden revealing the tradition, folklore and romance of the ancient and timeless plants." Mr. Tracey quoted an authority on the subject as saying that Mrs. Carter's was the finest Shakespeare Garden in the country and that over 15,000 people visited it last year.

Mrs. Coriell announced at the executive board meeting February 2nd, 1944, that Plainfield Garden Club had been elected to membership in the Garden Club of America, and letters of welcome received from sponsoring clubs. It had required three years to reach the new horizons, but a poet once said, "A horizon is nothing but the limit of our sight" so each one attained shows another beckoning in the distance.

Because of rationing, meetings were held in semi-public places of central location. Speakers stressed every phase of conservation. Garden club members were working hard at Camp Kilmer, for the Red Cross and the U.S.O.

In 1945 we became a Founder of the Blue Star Drive, our members contributing generously to this beautiful tribute to the men who served in the armed forces. It is hoped, and the hope is rapidly being fulfilled, that ultimately it will stretch from New Jersey to California.

A new custom was instituted, that of sending a sum of money to the Red Wood Tribute Grove in memory of deceased members. This year, 1945, a dance recital was given to help defray expenses of war activities. Naturally it was under the chairmanship of Miss Maud vonBoskerck, whose motto might well be "Music is my talent – my dearest one." It was very successful artistically and financially.

We helped the New York Botanical Garden celebrate its Fiftieth Anniversary by sending hostesses every day for a week, and by a substantial sum of money for plant research.

In 1945 Lyons Hospital was included on our flower and plant list, and we have continued to supply it weekly for two months of each year. Flowering trees were planted along Blue Star Drive in memory of members' sons lost in the war.

Mrs. Samuel Carter and Miss Harriette Halloway received awards from the Garden Club of New Jersey for their work in Shakespeare and Iris gardens respectively.

Besides bouquets were made twice a week for the wards at Camp Kilmer, beginning in May. Our members volunteered to arrange them.

By this time we were discovering that those "new worlds to conquer" for which we had longed, were providing more opportunities than we could well cope with, and so a junior membership was formed, now numbering six.

The associate membership was enlarged to thirty-five so that active members might be enabled to transfer to it. A questionnaire was sent of work they wished to do. In a Garden Club of America contest for a year's program, Miss Halloway's won honorable mention.

Beginning early in December members of the club met every day in Mrs. Boardman Tyler's studio to make Christmas decorations for the hospital at Camp Kilmer. A big fire blazed in the stove, tons of varied evergreens were provided as well as all other necessary equipment. The studio hummed like Santa Claus' workshop, and great quantities of wreaths with large red bows, small bouquets and other favors emerged to cheer the soldiers at Camp Kilmer and Lyons Hospitals. Joyce Kilmer, for whom the camp was named, wrote of his experience in the other World War: "My shoulders ache beneath my pack, Lie easier cross upon his back" We hoped we eased their burden just a little.

The opportunities offered by the Garden Club of America in the field of conservation are so many and so varied, it was necessary to choose which tangent to pursue. In view of the community and national problems of vandalism and child delinquency, it was thought wise to concentrate the major effort in combating these evils. Working through the public schools seemed the most logical procedure. Mr. Wimer of Jefferson School and Mrs. Rulison of the Park Commission have offered sympathetic cooperation. The first step in the program is the establishment of school gardens, now in process of being planted. The garden club provided the funds. A trial garden, or proving bed was started in Cedarbrook Park in 1946. This year many new perennials were added.

Mrs. Hubble's artistic ability was employed so successfully in redecorating the Garden Center, this observer could scarcely recognize it.

The Garden Club of New Jersey bestowed an award upon us for meritorious work at Camp Kilmer. Miss Halloway has made additions to the peony, Iris and Narcissus gardens. It again became necessary to raise money, and a repeat performance by request, of the dance recital was staged by Miss Van Boskerck.

A suggestion from the Garden Club of New Jersey that we plant a tree to honor garden weekled, after consultation with Mr. Tracey, to the beginning of a dogwood arboretum comprising all the varieties that will grow in this vicinity. Twenty-five varieties have already been planted.

Santa Claus helpers gathered again in Mrs. Tyler's studio to make decorations for Camp Kilmer, and surpassed their effort of the previous year. Our work in this Project was not equaled by that of any club either year.

A thrill of pride must have quivered through our membership from founders to newest recruits, triumphs of our members who exhibited in the New York Flower Show. In the realm of flower arrangement there is no more coveted award than the Fenwick Medal. Our Mrs. deHart was runner up fro that prize last year. This year four exhibits won three blue ribbons and two special awards. It was a magnificent performance which won for us third place in the sweepstakes.

Chapel flowers still are sent to Camp Kilmer. Our members arrange them. We take our turn with the other clubs supplying flowers for the entire hospital regularly from gardens when possible, from florists in cold weather. Two gray Ladies representing Plainfield Garden Club, arrange and distribute the flowers through the wards. The by-laws were again revised and new books issued for the permanent covers.

The executive committee has not overlooked the fact that a War Memorial is of paramount interest to the garden club. Much time as been spent in discussion and deep thought given the matter. Mrs. Boardman Tyler has been named a member of the committee. This year we are sending a teacher to the Audubon Nature Camp in Maine, and another to the Conservation Workshop in Trenton.

Several members have been invited to speak on varied subjects, notably Mrs. Garret Smith on Church Gardens, and Miss Halloway on horticultural subjects. Mrs. Garret has been honored as founder of the Little Garden Club of New York City, of which she is honorary president.

A big of biographical information picked up while perusing the minutes is that our new president, Mrs. Loziuex, became a member of the club in 1940, second vice president in 1942, again in 1945, first vice president in 1946 and president in 1947.

Having been a member of the club only ten years, your historian cannot speak with absolute authority, but thinks it probably that the club reached greater heights of achievement under this administration of Mrs. Tyler than during any comparable period of time. This is partly true because of the new opportunities offered by affiliation with the Garden Club of America, and partly due to Mrs. Tyler's dynamic energy and her determination that the Plainfield Garden Club take advantage of these opportunities and assume its rightful position in the vanguard of progressive garden clubs.

Junius described Mrs. Tyler perfectly when he wrote: "the heart to conceive, the understanding to direct and the hand to execute."

We notice as we go over the chronicles of the garden club, the absence of names once listed so frequently:

Those whom we loved so long, and see no more
Loved and still love,
Not dead, but gone before.

If we ever adopt a coat of arms, it might well show crossed trowels over a field of flower arrangements, the other expounding the futility of vandalism to a young cub. And the motto? It must be from Shakespeare, and it is from The Tempest: Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground.

Or if we choose to abandon the classics: Never a dull moment!

Etheldreda Anderegg
Historian, 1947

1st Prize New York Flower Show 1948

Smithsonian Archives
http://collections.si.edu/search/results.jsp?view=&date.slider=&q=plainfield+&dsort=&start=60

Catalogued Data:
Title:New York Flower Show [slide]
Creator: Cassebeer, F. W
Physical description: 1 slide: glass lantern, col.; 3 x 5 in
Type: Projected media
Place: United States of America, New York, New York
New York (State)
New York City
Date: 1948
03/08/1948
Topic: Spring
Flower shows
Flower arrangement
Local number: NY208031
Restrictions: Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Notes: No Names for Picture. Class 3 - Niche - Arrangement of living plant material featuring flowers in 2 forms (pyramidal, bunch). Mrs. John S. Anderegg, Plainfield (NJ) Garden Club. 1st prize

1st Prize New York Flower Show 1948

Smithsonian Archives
http://collections.si.edu/search/results.jsp?view=&date.slider=&q=plainfield+&dsort=&start=60


Catalogued Data:
Title:New York Flower Show [slide]
Creator: Cassebeer, F. W
Physical description: 1 slide: glass lantern, col.; 3 x 5 in
Type: Projected media
Place: United States of America, New York, New York
New York (State)
New York City
Date: 1948
03/08/1948
Topic: Spring
Flower shows
Flower arrangement
Local number: NY208032
Restrictions: Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Notes: No Names for Picture. Class 3 - Niche - Arrangement of living plant material featuring flowers in 2 forms (pyramidal, bunch). Mrs. John S. Anderegg, Plainfield (NJ) Garden Club. 1st prize
Data Source: Archives of American Gardens

In Memory of

Etheldreda Anderegg (1896 - 1976)

Date of Birth: ** June 1896

Date of Death: ** July 1976

Social Security Number (SSN): ***-64-7038 ?

Died at Age: 80 years, Lived: 29236 days

Birth Anniversary: in 178 days [+]

Death Anniversary: in 195 days [+]

Carteret Press December 11, 1959

COLONIA – The engagement of Miss Hope Ingersoll, and John Swift Anderegg, Jr. formerly of New Dover Road, has been announced by the bride-to-be's parents, Mrs. Hope Garland Ingersoll, Buzzards Bay, Mass., and W. Fitch Ingersoll, Marion, Mass. Mr. Anderegg's parents moved from Colonia to Camden, Me., about five years ago.

Miss Ingersoll is an alumna of the Putney School, Radcliffe College, and the Nursing School of the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston where she is a member of the faculty.

Mr. Anderegg is a graduate of the Pingry School and Massachussetts Institute of Technology. He is president of the Dynamica Research Coporation of Stoneham, Mass.

From Roots Web

ID: I11700
Name: Frederick ANDEREGG 1
Sex: M
Birth: 1852
Burial: Westwood Cemetery, Oberlin, Lorain county, Ohio, USA
Death: 1922

Marriage 1 Mary Osband SWIFT b: 05 JAN 1858 in Detroit, Wayne county, Michigan, USA
Children
Frederick Osband ANDEREGG b: 1887
John S. ANDEREGG
Ruth S. ANDEREGG b: 1891

Sources:
Author: National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution
Title: DAR Lineage Book Volume 160 (159001-160000)
Publication: Name: DAR, Washington, D. C.;
Repository:
Name: Midwest Genealogy Center, Independence, MO

Note:
Source Medium: Book

Page: pg. 159
Text: MRS. MARY OSBAND SWIFT ANDEREGG. DAR ID NUMBER 159494 Born in Detroit, Mich. Wife of Frederick A. Anderegg. Descendant of John Swift, Sergt. Asa Cowles,...,as follows: 1. Osband Durfee Swift (1813-57) m. 3d 1851 Laura A. Cowles (1827-1900). 2. ...; Russell Cowles (1780-1865) m. 1804 Dorcas Gardner (1786-1849) 3. ...; Asa Cowles m. Mollie Russell. Asa Cowles (1747-1837) served as private, corporal and sergeant in the Massachusetts troops. He was born in Belchertown, Mass.; died in New Lebanon, New York.

History of Colonia, New Jersey

http://www.wthpc.org/Colonia%20Tour.pdf

The origins of what is known as the Anderegg
home date back to an early owner of the Cone
homestead "The Trees," James Hora, who built
this house for one of his five daughters. He went
on to build a house for each of his remaining
daughters, and is said to have done the same
for his two sons in another town.

The home has also been referred to as the
Van Wyck farmhouse, after its early owners,
formerly of New York. William Van Wyck, who
acquired the nickname "Uncle Bill" by the community,
gained the adoration of the local children
during picking times on the farm, at which time
the boys–and sometimes the girls–of the town
volunteered to gather tomatoes and beans, and
after which were treated by William to ice cream
in the market.

After the Van Wycks, the house passed
through various families, including the Holtons,
the Morgans, the Stuarts, the Andereggs, and
the Pecks.

Woodbridge Independent July 9, 1937

http://archive.woodbridgelibrary.org/Archive/WoodbridgeIndependent/1937/1937-07-09/pg_0002.pdf

John Anderegg of Dover Road has returned to his home from a visit at the home of his mother, Mrs. John Anderegg in Oberlin, Ohio.

Woodbridge Independent August 20, 1937

http://archive.woodbridgelibrary.org/Archive/WoodbridgeIndependent/1937/1937-08-20/pg_0005.pdf

Colonia News

Mrs. and Mrs. John Anderegg of Dover Road have as their guests Major and Mrs. Stanley Grimwold and daughter of California and Mrs. Peggy Trump of Philadelphia

Woodbridge Independent Leader July 22, 1954

http://archive.woodbridgelibrary.org/Archive/IndependentLeader/1954/1954-07-22/pg_0001.pdf

For That Parched Tree . . . Water Ordinarily Wasted Can be Used to Moisten Roots Till Nature's Lapse Ends

WOODBRIDGE – Some helpful suggestion both for conserving water and quenching the thirst of parched trees, shrubs and flowers were contained in a message to The Independent-Leader today.

The suggestions came from Mrs. John S. Anderegg, New Dover Road, Colonia. Mrs. Anderegg, well-known for her handsome gardens and the beauty of her flower arrangements, says the lives of new trees and shrubbery can be saved by a simple routine which requires little effort but much consistency. Her suggestions are valuable ones for they do no contemplate any drain whatever on the dwindling water supplies.

In the first place, householders are advised to place a receptacle under the spigot while they are waiting for the water to run either hot or cold. Thus, this water becomes available for helping the dry roots of baby trees or plants which nature seems to have forgotten. Water can be used for the same purpose after it first has been used for the youngsters' baths or for the laundry.

Any remnants of soap, detergents or ammonia remaining after the laundry is finished will have no harmful effects on growth. Mrs. Anderegg also advises that the watering be thorogh because otherwise roots will reach to the surface to get the moisture and will be damaged by the sun. Water one thing at a time until the ground around it is thoroughly soaked, she says, before proceeding to the next.

These little habits will keep life where it fast is dwindling until the rains come – and will not diminish the water supply. Try and practice them.

Genealogy ofr John Swift Anderegg

4758. Mary Osband8 Swift (Laura7 Cowles, Russell6, Asa5, Nathaniel4, Jonathan3, John2, John 'Cole'1) was born January 05, 1858 in Detroit, Michigan, and died in Boston, Massachusetts. She married Frederick Anderegg August 30, 1886 in Lansing, Michigan. He was born June 11, 1852 in Meyringen, Switzerland, and died in Boston, Massachusetts.

More About Mary Osband Swift:
7: Cowles Book at Minn. History Center
Education: 1885, Oberlin Conservatory of Music
Occupation: Music Teacher

More About Frederick Anderegg:
7: Cowles Book at Minn. History Center
Education: Harvard –2 years Post- graduate work
Occupation: 1894, Proffessor of Mathematics at Oberlin College

Children of Mary Swift and Frederick Anderegg are:
7214 i. Frederick Osband9 Anderegg, born September 20, 1887 in Oberlin, Ohio.
More About Frederick Osband Anderegg:
7: Cowles Book at Minn. History Center


7215 ii. Larua M. Anderegg, born October 04, 1888 in Lansing, Michigan.
More About Larua M. Anderegg:
7: Cowles Book at Minn. History Center


7216 iii. John Swift Anderegg, born November 10, 1891 in Oberlin, Ohio.
More About John Swift Anderegg:
7: Cowles Book at Minn. History Center


7217 iv. Ruth Swift Anderegg, born November 10, 1891 in Oberlin, Ohio.
More About Ruth Swift Anderegg:
7: Cowles Book at Minn. History Center


7218 v. Margaretha Anderegg, born May 09, 1893 in Oberlin, Ohio.
More About Margaretha Anderegg:
7: Cowles Book at Minn. History Center


7219 vi. Katharine Anderegg, born May 09, 1893 in Oberlin, Ohio.
More About Katharine Anderegg:
7: Cowles Book at Minn. History Center

Etheldreda Anderegg

In Memory of
Etheldreda Anderegg (1896 - 1976)
Etheldreda Anderegg is on Sysoon. Personal Death record and Detailed information about the deceased person. [430824-en]
Share Your Memories and Sympathies and Join the Bereaved!

Date of Birth: ** June 1896

Date of Death: ** July 1976

Social Security Number (SSN): ***-64-703* ?

Died at Age: 80 years, Lived: 29236 days

Birth Anniversary: in 145 days [+]

Death Anniversary: in 162 days [+]

Last known address was Camden, Knox County, Maine

September 22, 1949

http://archive.woodbridgelibrary.org/Archive/FordsBeacon/1949/1949-09-22/pg_0011.pdf

Executive Board Named by Library in Colonia

COLONIA – At the annual meeting of members of the Colonia Library last week a new executive board was elected. Those who will serve on the board for the ensuing two years are: Mrs. Kenneth McCain, Mrs. James H. Horaban, Mrs. Charles P. Jones, Mr. George Devlin, Mr. Elnar Larsen. Members elected for one year term are: Mrs. John S. Anderegg, Mrs. C. Clark Stover, Mrs. Charles E. Frederickson, Mr. E. H. Gallit, Mr. Raymond W. Thode, Mr. Andrew Wilson.

After adjournment of the annual meeting, the new executive board met to elect officers. Mrs. McCain was re-elected as president; Mr. Rohde will serve as vice-president; Mrs. Stover, secretary and Mr. Larsen, treasurer.

Raritan Township Fords Beacon November 29, 1945

http://archive.woodbridgelibrary.org/Archive/FordsBeacon/1945/1945-11-29/pg_0001.pdf

Decorations for Yuletide Topic at Colonia Meeting

COLONIA – Mrs. John S. Anderegg, Dover Road, who has been prominent in garden club activities in New York and New Jersey, will speak at the Colonia Library next Thursday at 8:30 P.M., on novel Christmas decorations and artistic arrangements for the home.

Mrs. Anderegg, aided by the Plainfield Garden Club, is in charge of Yuletide decorations at Camp Kilmer Hospital. There she will use many of the unique arrangements which she will bring to the library to illustrate her talk.

The evening will be sponsored by the budget and finance committee of teh Colonia Parent-Teacher Association. Tickets may be obtained at Colonia School, Colonia Library, from members of the association or at the door.

Raritan Township and Fords Beacon October 23, 1947

http://archive.woodbridgelibrary.org/Archive/FordsBeacon/1947/1947-10-23/pg_0005.pdf

Library Board Meets

LIBKAKY B'OAKB MEETS
–The Board of Trustees of the
Colonia .Library met" Monday . at
the library, with A. J. Fox presiding.
Ke welcomed ail the board
members to the first fall meeting,
and expressed the desire' to keep
the people of Colonia library-conscious,
and continue the civic interest
through, the use of the
library building, officers for. the
year are president, Mrs. Fox, vice
president, Mrs. Thomas McEniry;
secretary, Lawrenee Suit; treasurer,
Einar Larsen; Trustees are M.
C. Asbur-y, Mrs, John Anderegg,
Mrs. Chester Case, Mrs. Clark
Stover, Mrs. Oscar Wilkerson, Jr.,
Mrs. H. F. Brown, and Edward
Nadler. The following committees
were appointed, House committee:
chairman, Edward Nadler, H. F.
Broom, Raymond Rhode, Charles
ICnauer, and Mrs, Anderegg; Library
and Book Committee, Mrs.
Raymond Rhode, chairman, Mrs.
Case, Mrs. McEniry, Mrs. Anderegg,
and James Sutherlin; activities
and publicity committee: Mrs.
Mary Pattison, Charles Nickerson,
and chairman H. F. Broom; financial,
committee: W. C. Asbury and
Einar Larsen; Board of Education
Committee, Raymond Rhode,
chairman, Edward Nadler, Mrs.
Wilkerson and Mrs. Stover. The
board voted to purchase a display
table, six book stands and new
window shades. Mrs. Fox reported
the library had been reserved for
ten consecutive Wednesday nights,
from 8 to .10 . P. M. for a free
course in Fundamental Economics
given by the Henry George School
of Social Science. He also announced
progress in the painting'
of. the portraits of the late Dr.
Fred Albee and Mrs. Margaret Soule. The next meeting of the board will be held November 11, 8 P.M. at the Library

Raritan Township - Fords Beacon August 18, 1949

http://archive.woodbridgelibrary.org/Archive/FordsBeacon/1949/1949-08-18/pg_0001.pdf

Mrs. Anderegg to Help Plan N.J. Garden Show

WOODBRIDGE – Mrs. John S. Anderegg, Dover Road, Colonia, has been appointed a member of the committee in charge of the sixth annual flower show sponsored by the New Jersey State Garden Clubs. September 22 and 23 at the Upper Montclair Women's Club, 200 Cooper Avenue, Upper Montclair.

The theme of the New Jersey State Garden Clubs' show this year will be "New Jersey Grows." Further information may be obtained from Mrs. Anderegg. Entry blanks may be sent in any time until September 18 to Mrs. Francis M. Archibald, 150 Lincoln Avenue, Elizabeth, Elizabeth 3-0230.

May 25, 1928 Woodbridge Leader

The Woodbridge Leader
May 25, 1928 – Page 8
... , Alexander & wf to 1st Nat'l Bank, Woodbridge. Thru A. Sabo. S. sd Rd to Cutters Dock where W. sd Ids John Nash intersects said Rd, Twp Woodbridge. Anderegg, John S., to M. F. Reddington. Inc. Thru R. D. Cranstown. S. sd Dover Rd,where same is intersected by W. sd Id to .34 Acre Co, Colonia. Allgaier ...

Woodbridge Public Library email March 6, 2012

Subject: re: Reference Question
From: "Wendi Rottweiler" <wrottweiler@woodbridgelibrary.org>
Date: Tue, March 6, 2012 1:38 pm
To: plainfieldgc@plainfieldgardenclub.org
Priority: Normal
Options: View Full Header | View Printable Version | Download this as a file | View as plain text | View Message details


Dear Ms. Fraser,

If you search our historic newspaper collection on the library's website (www.woodbridgelibrary.org) for Andregg I believe that you will find many articles of interest to you. I just did a quick search in the 1930s (you have to search by decade) and there were several articles that mentioned the Andreggs - including a mention of her gardens and judging of a Christmas decoration contest. In addition, if you go to the website for the Woodbridge Township Historic Preservation Commission (I am also a Commissioner,) www.wthpc.org, you can download the recent Colonia Historic Tour brochure that has a picture and some history of the Andregg house. You might also want to save Sunday May 6th on your calendar. The Commission will be hosting a bus tour of the New Dover Rd. section of Colonia and the Andregg home will be one of the houses discussed as part of the tour. Check back on the Commission's website in early/mid April - registration information will be available then and we expected the tours will fill up quickly.

Thank you for your interest in Woodbridge history. If I can be of additional assistance, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Wendi Rottweiler

Local History Librarian
Woodbridge Public Library
1 George Frederick Plaza
Woodbridge, NJ 07095
732-634-4450 x7131

Possibly related

to PGC Member Mrs. Edward H. III (Margaret or "Marge" Cone) Ladd '39 who grew up in Colonia and was from one of the founding famlies.

http://www.wthpc.org/Colonia%20Tour.pdf

A unique part of Colonia is the "Colony," a
planned community that was first formed in
the 1890s through the work and development
of several businessmen from New York, and
through the dedication and sense of unity
among its residents grew to acquire its present
place within the township. The making of
modern Colonia is partly due to the
work of several families in the Colony,
without whom the town would likely not have
progressed into the community that it is
today. The Cone, Savage, and Pattison families
were all residents of Colonia whose influence
and commitment had immense impact on the
creation and history of the community.

Builder of the Anderegg Home

Note for: James Hora, 1 OCT 1781 - 21 NOV 1852 Index
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Burial:
Date: 23 NOV 1852
Place: Rahway Cemetery, Rahway, Union County, New Jersey

Name Note: Source: Notes from Anne Vail, taken from a family Bible, Date of Import: Jul 24, 1999. This compiled various names and dates regarding the Hora Family, marriages and children.

Individual Note:
These notes about the Hora family were taken from notes from Anne Vail.
The Hora's probably descended from Spaniards wrecked in the Armada. A variant on the family name would have been Hoare. Rumor had it that James Hora left Ireland because of his choice of a wife. A copy of their ship's captains receipt says, "Received, Warren Point, April, 11, 1801, from James Hora, nine guineas for his passage together with his wife, April 6, 1801. (they finding their own provisions on the 'Penelope' for New Castle or New York. Signed Obadiah Cosgrove.
From an indenture mortgage foreclosure dated 1813 James was a tailor. He and his sons owned many stores in a very well expressed letter from New Orleans, dated 1849, he speaks of his store on Canal Street there.
In 1843 James wrote to Margaret Kennedy in Warington Downe, Ireland, speaking of his family. He was then in Rahway but building a house in New York, because his family did not like the country, where they came originally to avoid the pestilence of New York. He lived in the old Kate Cone house in Colonia, built the Anderegg House across the street, and several other houses in Rahway. He died Nov 21, 1852 at 71 years old.
In searching the death records for Rahway, Union County, New Jersey for the time frame of James death, nothing was found to substantiate that he actually died in Rahway. He is however buried in Rahway Cemetery. He may have died in Colonia, New Jersey, or in New York City, where it is believed he also owned a home.
His Last Will and testament gives a great deal of information concerning James Hora. He was a man of considerable wealth and owned numerous properties in New York City and also in Rahway, N.J. which he left to various children.

The dates for birth of James Hora and Mary Kennedy came from a book "DuBose Genealogy" Supplement , 1980, and have not been confirmed.

From a certificate currently in possession of Mrs. Donald Slappey of Birmingham, Alabama, James Hora was naturalized as a United States Citizen dated September 12, 1809 in New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Plainfield Public Library Archive

1940

The International Garden Club has announced a pilgrimmage to three old houses and gardens, also for British relief. The Bartow Mansion at Pelham Bay, N. Y., now the clubhouse of the International Garden Club, will be opened Wednesday, as will be Bolton Priory in Pelham Manor and High Low House in Greenwich, Conn.

Thursday, May 22, the Rahway unit of the British War Relief Society will sponsor a Garden Tour. Open Gardens include those of Mrs. John Garderegg [Anderegg] of Colonia, a member of the Plainfield Garden Club; Mrs. Edward K. Cone of Colonia, whose daughter , Mrs. Edward H. Ladd 3rd, also is a member of the

Plainfield Public Library Archive

GARDEN FAIR WORK BEGINS – Four members of the Plainfield Garden Club, which will sponsor a garden fair Friday and Saturday at Park Ave. and Crescent Ave. began actual work yesterday in preparing the ground for exhibit purposes. Two gardens will be exhibited and several types of plant material will be on sale. A "Country Cupboard" also will be featured. Left to right are: Mrs. F. W. Frost, exhivition chairman; Mrs. Charles Eaton Jr., horticulture chairman; Mrs. John S. Anderegg, executive board member; and Mrs. Alden deHart, horticulture committee member.

Records indicate that Garden Fairs were held at this location 1952, 1953, 1954

Plainfield Public Library Archive

Plainfield Public Library Archive

May 10, 2012 GCA Zone IV Awards Luncheon

PGC Members Jeanne Turner, Patti Dunstan and Phyllis Alexander researched over 275 members chronicled on our website, www.plainfieldgardenclub.org, and chose the following ladies as "themes" for the luncheon tables:

Eight Notable Women of the PGC

1952 Check Book

No. 927
Feb. 20, 1952
Ethel Anderegg
Xmas Wreaths (wire, ribbon, twine)
$9.55

1953 Check Book

No. 991
Feb. 13, 1953
G.C.A.
Founders Fund
$25.00

No. 992
March 2, 1953
Fanny K. Day
Rental Williamsburg film 5.00
Rental Projector 2.00
Tran. Exp. Dr. Keck 3.00
Program Com. $10.00

No. 993
March 2, 1953
Ethel Anderegg
Xmas Wreaths
ribbon etc
$9.90

1954 Check Book

No. 1064
Jan. 25, 1954
Mrs. John S. Anderegg
expenses for wreaths – string, wire, etc.
$11.35

1957 Check book

No. 1243
January 8, 1957
Ethel Anderegg
$23.00

1946 Check Book

No. 613
Oct. 14, 1946
Harriette R. Halloway
Horticulture Comm.
Iris - Budget
$10.00

No. 614
Nov. 13, 1946
Harriette R. Halloway
Iris Budget
$15.00

No. 615
Nov. 13, 1946
American Red Cross
flowers for Kilmer
through April 1st 7.00
Bedside flowers for November 10.00

In margin:

Gift (Mrs. McLellan 5.00)
Mrs. Anderegg
for war services
$15.00

1946 Check Book

No. 616
Nov. 19, 1946
Union County Parks Commission
for dogwood
Budget
$8.79

No. 617
Nov. 21, 1946
Garden Club of N. J.
Dues 1947
$10.00

No. 618
Dec. 2, 1946
Interstate Printing
postcards Recording
Secretary
$17.00

In left margin:

from Mrs. Anderegg $15.00

1947 Check Book

No. 622
Jan. 2, 1947
Susan W. Tyler
twine 1.80
fir 5.00
ribbon 30.00
$36.80
War Services

No. 623
Jan. 6, 1947
Ethel Anderegg
wire 5.25
" 5.00
tip 5.00
$15.25
War Services

No. 624
Jan. 6, 1947
Caroline H. Ladd
express on slides
$2.50
Program

In left margin:

Mrs. Anderegg
(xmas paper) 6.30

Mrs. Whitehead
gift $5.00

Anderegg 10.00
Dunellen

Anderegg 20.00
Mr. Louis Watson ??
Rahway 20.00

1947 Check Book

In left margin:

Apr. 22 from Mrs. Anderegg (for flower show) 32.00

1947 Check Book

In left margin:

From Mrs. Anderegg 75.00

1947 Check Book

In left margin:

Cranford Garden Club
(Anderegg) $25.00

Anderegg - DAR
WC dollar ?? 10.00

Spade & Trowel
(Anderegg) 25.00

Right margin:

No. 683
Dec. 16, 1947
Etheldreda P. Anderegg
string 7.90
tip 5.00
$12.90

1948 Check Book

No. 697
Feb. 14, 1948
John M. Fogg, Jr.
February lecture
Program
$55.00

No. 698
Feb. 19, 1948
State Teachers
College
Conservation Workshop
Conservation
$22.00

No. 699
Mar. 9, 1948
Ethel T. Anderegg
Flower Show
Exhibitions
$20.00

1948 Check Book

No. 712
April 28, 1948
Ethel T. Anderegg
Flower Show Exhibition
extra money taken from Mrs. Anderegg's contribution of 33.25
$13.30

No. 713
April 28, 1948
Dorothy V. de Hart
Flower Show Exhibitor
extra as alone
$6.65

No. 714
April 28, 1948
Margaret C. Ladd
Flower Show Exhibitor
Extra as alone
$6.65

1949 Check Book

No. 805
Ethel Anderegg
tip Frank 5.00
wire 1.75
string 1.75
ribbon 2.00
10.50
xmas wreaths
$10.50

No. 806
Dec. 6, 1949
J. D. Loizeaux
Bird feeder at Bonnie Burn
(taken from Conservation – for caups?)
$21.10

No. 807
Dec. 6, 1949
Margaret C. Ladd
exp. on museum foxes 2.72
dues civid planning ass 2.50
circulars for schools 4.00
9.22
Bird feed for feeder 7.90
$17.12

Dover Road, Colonia, NJ

also known as the Van Wyck farmhouse

1936 - 1937 Meeting Minutes

1938-1939 Meeting Minutes

March 8, 1948

Produced:
03/08/1948
General Note:
No Names for Picture. Class 3 - Niche - Arrangement of living plant material featuring flowers in 2 forms (pyramidal, bunch). Mrs. John S. Anderegg, Plainfield (NJ) Garden Club. 1st prize.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Subject-Topical:
Spring
Flower shows
Flower arrangement
Subject - Geographical:
New York (State) – New York City
United States of America New York New York
Repository Loc:
Smithsonian Gardens, PO Box 37012, Capital Gallery, Suite 3300, MRC 506, Washington, DC 20013-7012
Local Number:
NY208031
Co-Creator:
Cassebeer, F. W.

March 8, 1948 Mrs. Anderegg's entry

Title:
New York Flower Show [slide]
Forms part of:
Garden Club of America Collection,
Phy. Description:
1 slide: glass lantern, col.; 3 x 5 in.

Produced:
03/08/1948
General Note:
No Names for Picture. Class 3 - Niche - Arrangement of living plant material featuring flowers in 2 forms (pyramidal, bunch). Mrs. John S. Anderegg, Plainfield (NJ) Garden Club. 1st prize.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Subject-Topical:
Spring
Flower shows
Flower arrangement
Subject - Geographical:
New York (State) – New York City
United States of America New York New York
Repository Loc:
Smithsonian Gardens, PO Box 37012, Capital Gallery, Suite 3300, MRC 506, Washington, DC 20013-7012
Local Number:
NY208032
Co-Creator:
Cassebeer, F. W.

Mrs. Anderegg

July 29, 2013 Mrs. Van Hoesen's War Effort

Terrain, that wonderful garden store in PA, sent along an article titled "American Gardener: Victory Gardens"

Between 1941 and 1945, posters like the ones above [See Link] dotted the American landscape, encouraging citizens to support the war by planting a vegetable garden at home. First planted in 1917 during WWI, "victory gardens" became especially important during WWII, when a combination of rationing, transportation shortages, and the need for canned goods to feed overseas troops meant that Americans had to find new ways to put food on the table. While alleviating the pressure on the nation's food supply, the gardens also provided a morale boost to citizens by letting them contribute to the war effort. At the height of the movement, more than 20 million gardens were planted in backyards, at schools, and even on city rooftops. The campaign was a stunning success– in 1944, an estimated 40% of all vegetables grown in the US came from victory gardens. Similar efforts took root in the UK and Canada, with related initiatives that encouraged canning homegrown vegetables. America's most famous victory gardener was First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, who planted her own plot at the White House.

Want to learn more? Two original victory gardens are still growing– the Fenway Victory Gardens in Boston, and the Dowling Community Garden in Minneapolis. You can also visit a modern garden based on a 1943 pamphlet design at the National Museum of American History in Washington D.C.

In our own 1942 Archives, Mrs. Anderegg writes:
The war which was sweeping over France while Mrs. Van Boskerck's history* concluded had now reached our shores. "Come to open purple testament of bleeding war." (King Richard) Our members were working for the U.S.O., the Red Cross and Camp Kilmer, apart and in conjunction with the garden club. Plans were sent to the camp to enhance its barren scenes, and seeds to Brittain. Victory gardens were planted, two new chairmanships were added to the executive board – War Activities and Victory Gardens.

*Mrs. A refers to the club history, the first 25 years, written by Mrs. VB in 1940, mere months before the bombing of Pearl Harbor and our nation's entry into WWII.

One of the most interesting bits of information we have from the WWII years, is a speech by Mrs. Van Hoesen telling of her personal experience in garden therapy at Camp Kilmer in Edison.

Camp Kilmer in 1945 served as an Army Hospital for returning injured soldiers and the PGC was very involved there with the therapy gardens, a Victory Garden, a flower garden and delivering, twice a week, flower arrangements to the wards even though there was gasoline rationing making even local travel very difficult. (During WWII, our meetings were held at a locale that was in walking distance of everyone's homes.)

Mrs. Hoesen was asked to give this speech at the national Victory Garden Conference of the WFA (War Food Administration):

Through gardening, Plainfield Garden Club Member Mrs. Van Hoesen Helps Our Nation's Heroes Recover

August 26, 2013 Blue Star Highway

Did everyone see this recent article? Volunteers work to keep Central Jersey highway 'Blue Star' designation vibrant

In 1947, Mrs. Anderegg wrote about the PGC's involvement in the Blue Star Drive:

In 1945 we became a Founder of the Blue Star Drive, our members contributing generously to this beautiful tribute to the men who served in the armed forces. It is hoped, and the hope is rapidly being fulfilled, that ultimately it will stretch from New Jersey to California.

In 1945 Lyons Hospital was included on our flower and plant list, and we have continued to supply it weekly for two months of each year. Flowering trees were planted along Blue Star Drive in memory of members' sons lost in the war.


The current article refers to "The Garden Club of New Jersey" – an organization that the PGC once belonged. However, around 1987 our petite club decided two affiliations to two large national organizations was TOO much and now we are only a "GCA club."

On April 8, 2000, PGC Member Barbara Tracy Sandford '50 wrote to the Courier News which published her letter titled "Trees Along Route 22 Carelessly Destroyed"

Fifty-five years ago, Spencer Miller, Jr., the Commissioner of the state Department of Transportation, and Ross Pell, the DOT Landscape Designer, bought extra right-of-way on both sides of the newly established Route 22 in order to make special plantings to honor the solidiers killed in World War II. The Garden Club of New Jersey then established the Blue Star Memorial Highway on this land.

The first 12 miles of this highway started at North Drive in North Plainfield. A blue star was given to the mother of each boy who gave his life. The Garden Club of New Jersey designed the landscaping and purchased the trees (including many dogwoods and hollies) and shrubs to adorn this area, with the hope that it would enhance the scenery of all highways so designated; the trees also serve surrounding areas as a buffer from highway noise.

Now the plantings that have matured are being whacked down for the construction of the Watchung Square Mall. We only were told the highway was to be widnened and a new traffic light installed at the entrance to the mall. We trusted the buffer zone of trees would be allowed to remain, but now it seems they are changing the landscape completely with the sanction of the DOT. Most of the 55-year-old trees have already been cut, and while roughly $16,000 has been allocated to new landscaping, it will never be the same.

The despicable deed is done!

Scenic New Jersey thinks it is just plain wrong that plans made so long ago and carefully tended by others should be so carelessly destroyed. Board members of the Blue Star Memorial Drive, who meet twice a year in Trenton to oversee the Memorial Highway, ought to have stuck to their guns and said "no" to the developers.

By Barbara T. Sandford
President of Scenic New Jersey of Plainfield

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

May 21, 1954

December 8, 1955

OUCH! Mrs. Homer Cochran (left), treasurer of the Plainfield Garden Club, yells "Ouch!" as she sticks her finger while making wreaths in the home of Mrs. Linden Stuart Jr., 980 Hillside Ave., for Lyons Hospital. Others (left to right) are Mrs. F. N. Lockwood, first vice president; Mrs. Webster Sandford, chairman; Mrs. Robert I. Stevens, wife of the former Army secretary; and Mrs. John S. Anderegg, co-chairman

December 8, 1955 Mrs. Anderegg

1973-1974 PGC Directory

Listed as the only HONORARY MEMBER

1974-1975 Directory

1949-1950 Program

This small brochure was found in the bottom of a box belonging to Barbara Tracy Sandford '50. 12/22/13

1949-1950 Program