Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Madsen, Mrs. John (Evelyn or "Evie" Wilson) '70

1970 - 1974 Address: 601 Belvidere, Plainfield

601 Belvidere, Plainfield

1975 Address: Crabapple Lane, Plainfield

Last address: 1551 Crabapple Lane, Plainfield

Evie and Betty Hackman Plant at Tree

2002-05-31

Shakesepare Garden
Shakespeare In Bloom

Evie and Betty Hackman Plant at Tree

photo not dated

Evie gives her famous Shakespeare Garden Lecture

2004-06

Shakespeare Garden
Shakespeare In Bloom, Cedar Brook Park, Plainfield

Evelyn Madsen

Photo by Jeanne Turner
Not Dated

Evie Madsen makes a tussy mussy

Not Dated

Evie and the PGC

January 21, 1998
Orange Lawn Tennis Club

Back Row, left to right:
Maryann Gonder, Jeanne Turner, Toddy Pond, Elisabeth Loizeaux, Joan Vivian, Jane Burner, Tucker Trimble, Nina Weil, Carroll Keating

Second Row, left to right:
Bernice Swain, Jane Craig, Evie Madsen, Barbara Lang, Mary Kent

Seated, left to right:
Sally Kroll, Meechy Loosli, Betty Hackman, Anne Wigton, Martie Samek, Sally Booth

Front Row, left to right:
Barbara Peek, Diana Madsen

Evie in the Shakespeare Garden

Not dated

Evie walking in the Shakespeare Garden

photo not dated

Evie near the knot garden

photo not dated

Evie and the Peonies

photo not dated

Evie and a friend above the East Border

photo not dated

Evie

Garden Club of America The Bulletin article on Evie Madsen

September 2007

Mary Kent, Susan Lorentzen, Diana Madsen, Darlene Kasten, Evie Madsen, Nancy Plumeri, Barbara Sanford, Bernice Swain, Judy Buehler, Phyllis Alexander, Lorraine Ciemniecki and Laurie Skorge

Plainfield Country Club
Plainfield, NJ

September 2007

Evie Madsen, Barbara Sanford, Bernice Swain and Jane Burner
Plainfield Country Club
Plainfield, NJ

September 2007

Mary Kent, Susan Lorentzen, Kathy Andrews, Sally Booth, Diana Madsen, Evie Madsen, Phyllis Alexander, Barbara Sanford, Darlene Kasten, Bernice Swain, Nancy Plumeri, Bernadette Neill, Jane Burner, Laurie Skorge, Bev Gorman, Judy Buehler, Lorraine Ciemniecki, Lauren Shepard
Plainfield Country Club
Plainfield, NJ

Evie Madsen in the Shakespeare Garden

not dated

Evie Madsen and Jane Burner

June 2005
Shakespeare in Bud party before the scheduled Shakespeare In Bloom the following day

2010-08-04 Shakespeare Garden & Evie's Bench

Evie Madsen's Bench
This is a photo of the concrete bench owned by Evie Madsen at her garden on Crabapple Lane, Plainfield

Photo by Diana Madsen

Evie's Sundial

This is the sundial from Evie's garden on Crabapple Lane, Plainfield.

The Madsen family has generously donated both the bench and the sundial to be placed in the Shakespeare Garden in memory of Evie and all her invaluable contributions to the garden and the PGC.

Photo by Diana Madsen (Evie's daughter-in-law)

Evie's Garden

2010-08-04 Evie's Garden
Crabapple Lane, Plainfield

Photo by Susan Fraser

Evie Madsen's Bench

2010-08-04 The Evie Madsen Bench
Crabapple Lane, Plainfield
Evie's garden

Photo by Susan Fraser

Moving Day

2010-08-04 Moving Day
Diana Madsen arrives as well as current Plainfield GC president Mandy Zachariades to load the garden bench from the Crabapple Lane garden.

Photo by Susan Fraser

Moving Evie's Bench

Diana Madsen and Mandy Zachariades assist our young men volunteers (Jack Fraser and Nick Petrow) loading the heavy top into the back of Diana's car.

Photo by Susan Fraser

Moving Day

2010-08-04 The Top
The heavy concrete bench is dotted with moss and lichens from its time spent under a tree in Evie's garden.

Photo by Susan Fraser

Current President Mandy Zachariades & Evie's daughter-in-law Diana Madsen

2010-08-04
Mandy and Diana

Mandy decided to place the bench in the southern most part of the West Border so that when sitting, the view would be of Evie's most cherished "rose wheel" where she educated many on the historic Shakespeare roses that grow within the wheel. In particular, Evie was well versed in the history of Rosa 'Lancaster' and Rosa 'York'

Photo by Susan Fraser

The bench in the West Border

2010-08-04 The Evie Madsen Bench
Photo by Susan Fraser

Evie's family

2010-08-04
Diana Madsen and her sister-in-law Nancy Madsen Hance

Photo by Susan Fraser

From a distance

2010-08-04
The Plainfield Garden Club extends sincere appreciation to the Madsen family for the lovely donation of Evie's personal bench from her own Plainfield garden.

Sally Booth, Diana Madsen and Nancy Madsen Hance

Photo by Susan Fraser

Family of Gardeners

2010-08-04
Evie's family of gardeners: Sally Booth (Evie's neice, Evie's husband, Jack Madsen, was Sally's mother's brother), Diana Madsen (Evie's daughter-in-law) and Nancy Madsen Hance (Evie's daughter), member of the Somerset Hills GC

Photo by Susan Fraser

March 12, 2008 New York Times obituary Evelyn Madsen

Evelyn Madsen Obituary, New York Times
Published: March 12, 2009
MADSEN–Evelyn W.,wife of the late John E. Madsen died on March 10th of natural causes. Born in 1917, she lived in Plainfield and Bay Head, NJ. Surviving are her three children, Dr. John E. Madsen, Jr., Nancy R. M. Hance, M. Peter Madsen, their spouses, nine grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held at Crescent Ave. Presbyterian Church in Plainfield, NJ on Saturday, March 14th at 10am. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be sent to Crescent Ave. Presbyterian Church, 716 Watchung Ave., Plainfield, NJ 07060 or The Shakespeare Garden in Cedar Brook Park c/o The Plainfield Garden Club, 1734 Sleepy Hollow Ln., Plainfield, NJ 07060.

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9E03E2DC123AF931A25750C0A96F9C8B63

Final address

1554 Crabapple Lane, Plainfield, NJ
Sold Summer 2010

1992 GCA Horticultural Achievement Certificate

awarded to Mrs. John Madsen and Mrs. Robert Hackman

1983 Medal of Merit

1983 Medal of Merit to Evie Madsen

A Plainfield Garden Club member, Marge Elliot, had Evie Madsen's Medal of Merit framed so that the medal could be seen from both the front and back of the frame.

The front of the frame is an oval of carefully cut-out flowers with the engraved bronze medal of a classical figure and the words "GARDENCLUB OF AMERICA" Long time Plainfield Garden Club member Marjorie Elliott crafted the frame and the artwork within.

The back of the frame shows the back of the medal which says:

MRS. JOHN MADSEN
IN APPRECIATION
OF HER DEDICATED
WORK FOR THE
SHAKESPEARE
GARDEN, CANNONBALL
MUSEUM PROJECTS
AND THE LIBRARY
GROUNDS

Decoupaged pictures surround the medal on the frame's mat. The top left hand corner shows a silhouette of Crescent Avenue Church in Plainfield, the top picture is a watercolor of her home on Crabapple Lane, garden tools, flowers, a beach scene (for her beloved Bay Head) and a black labrador retriever.

1983 Medal of Merit

January 21, 2010 Jeanne Turner's Tribute to Evie Madsen, Betty Hackman and Nancy Kroll Gordon

January 21, 2010 Jeanne Turner's Tribute to Evie, Betty & Nancy
There in Spirit¡
In Bon Appetit (August 2009), Editor-in-Chief, Barbara Fairchild, reviews the film Julie & Julia. She says of Julia Child, somehow, though, I like to think that she was there in spirit and that her curiosity, passion and determination forged a life that influenced [others].

The Plainfield Garden Club lost three precious long-time members in 2009. They were similarly ¡nfluential icons for our Club. We miss their friendship, hard work, and dedication to our unique Shakespeare Garden and to the Plainfield Garden Club.

In the spring, while working in the garden, our President, Phyllis Alexander, said Evelyn Madsen was there in Spirit! We had just worked in that part of the garden where Evie was often seen faithfully working. If you needed to find her, she was usually there. She had been Chairman of the Garden for many years. Her wonderful tours included many quotes from Shakespeare as she identified both the bloom and the Bard's writings about it.

Betty Hackman, our perfectionist, would trim the topiary birds, make perfect wreaths and often receive first in flower shows. She was a mentor who shared her expertise and vast knowledge freely. Betty was always willing to lend her containers and perfectly appropriate garden and floral ideas. She is sorely missed.

Though Nancy Kroll Gordon, moved away a few years ago, she is fondly remembered for her friendly persona, talent in flower arranging and gardening. She and Betty Hackman were members of the GCA House Committee for many years. They enjoyed making flower arrangements to decorate the GCA headquarters in New York.

These three exceptional Plainfield Garden Club members indeed continue to be There in Spirit.

Respectfully submitted,
Jeanne Turner

PGC Membership Years:
Mrs. John Madsen '70
Mrs. Robert K. Hackman '70
Mrs. Prince H. Gordon (Nancy Kroll) '60.

1990 Annual Program Report

In March at Crescent Avenue Church, the Horticulture program featured our Mrs. John Madsen who gave a fascinating talk on the gardens of Elizabethan times including a history of our Shakespeare Garden in Cedar Brook Park. Mrs. Victor King, with the assistance of Mrs. John Tyler followed with a slide program showing lovely scenes and plants in the garden. The hostesses were Mrs. Susan Callendar and Mrs. Northrup Pond.

Report of the Shakespeare Garden 1989 - 1990

Report of the Shakespeare Garden 1989 - 1990

March 18, 1981 Meeting Minutes

May 17, 1982 First Meeting of Executive Board

May 17, 1982 First Meeting of Executive Board

May 17, 1982 First Meeting of Executive Board

Toddy Pond, Evie Madsen, Jane Craig, Betty Hackman, Barbara Sandford, Bernice Swain

Evie Madsen, left; Jane Craig, right

From the Corresponding Secretary file

postmarked Oct 25, 2002

From the Corresponding Secretary file

Thomas Nash Cochran

Thursday

Dear Betty,

My brothers and I are very grateful for the superlative efforts of the Plainfield Garden Club team in making Mother's memorial service such a success.

Until I visited the kitchen of the Guild Room at the Church, I had not realized how considerable an effort was required to make the event such a success.

Our thanks to you and your team – we could not have done it without you!

Sincerely,
Tom Cochran

From the Corresponding Secretary file

postmarked Mar 9 1998

From the Corresponding Secretary file

From the Corresponding Secretary file

1551 Crabapple Lane
Plainfield, New Jersey 07060

Dear Jane and the Membership Committee,

I think the time has come now that the Garden Club has several new and talented members with other prospects being considered for me to request a change in the status of membership from active to sustainer.

I still am eager to help the Garden Club grow and have, I hope, many years to be at service so trust you will not forget me whose place (not legible) a project when I can be of some assistance.

Thank you for your consideration.

Respectfully,
Evie Madsen

(not legible)

From the Corresponding Secretary file 1995

[stapled to Martie Samek's letter]

Crabapple Lane
Plainfield, New Jersey 07060

Dear Jane –

This note with accompanying check for $50.00 arrived at my house yesterday.

I have sent the check on to Anne Shepherd but are sending this note to you so that you can express the appreciation of the Garden Club to Mrs. Mueuch and I guess Martie, too.

Thank you – Hope your vacation is a wonderful one for you both –

Affectionately,

Evie [Madsen]

July tenth

From the Corresponding Secretary file

July 2, 1995

Dear Evie,

The enclosed gift is in memory of our dear friend Helen Nash. Please use it to buy something for the Shakespeare Garden.

I would very much appreciate the Corresponding Secretary letting "Nashie's" daughter Liz Nash know that this is one of the ways we've chosen to honor her memory:

Mrs. Thomas Muench (Liz)
32 Nimrod Road
Simsbury, CT 06092

Sincerely,

Martie [Samek]

$50.00 (Gift)

From the Corresponding Secretary file

postmarked Oct 21 1995

From the Corresponding Secretary file

from the Corresponding Secretary file

1551 Crabapple Lane
Plainfield, New Jersey 07060

Dear Jane and Members of the Garden Club,

It was an unbelievable surprise and honour to receive the very special award at our October meeting. I feel priviledged to work with such an enthusiastic and caring membership and, also, feel that this award should go to all, as one cannot achieve the beauty in the Shakespeare Garden that we have attained by working alone. It takes all of us and it is a wonderful feeling to know that in our Garden Club the spirit of volunteerism rings on.

And the painting I love. It will occupy a very special spot in my home reminding us always of my association with the great group of gardeners in the Plainfield Garden Club.

Thank you so much –

Most sincerely, Evie

October, twenty-second

from the Corresponding Secretary file

Painting of the Shakespeare Garden

image sent in from Wendy Madsen, April 18, 2011

From the Corresponding Secretary file

postmark APR 16 1993

From the Corresponding Secretary file

From the Corresponding Secretary file

postmark MAR 16 1993

From the Corresponding Secretary file

Dear Evie

Now that Spring is here (3+days?) its time to carry (not legible) place.

Here is my check to help with your Shakespeare Planting this year.

I know Elizabeth would be right in there helping & (not legible) it will love to be there (not legible)

Victor

March 15/93

1995 Flower Show at the Frelinghuysen, Morristown

Background left: Toddy Pond
Background right: Evie Madsen

Unknown member at the table

Shakespeare Garden 50th Anniversary

June 1978

Evie Madsen speaking to a lovely woman wearing white gloves, knee-length skirt, sleeves and beautiful upswept hair.

Not dated circa 1979

Letters
"We are wondering"

Each Wednesday morning, from early spring until late fall, a group of interested gardeners volunteer their time and effort to maintain the beauty of the Shakespeare Garden in Cedarbrook Park, Plainfield. This they have been doing with the cooperation of the park employees since founding of the garden more than 50 years ago.

These last two years, however, have seen an increase in vandalism to the point this summer where we are very discouraged. After spending a considerable amount of money on plant material, we are finding plants being stolen, bricks being pulled up and tossed about, flowers being stepped upon and on a Wednesday morning, several weeks ago, more than $200 in new planting pulled up and destroyed. There appears to be no respect, no love for the beauty we are trying to create.

Is it worthwhile for us to continue in the face of this vandalism? Are there those who enjoy a walk through this garden recreated from one in Shakespeare's time? We are wondering.

Evelyn W. Madsen
Plainfield

Email from Elisabeth Loizeaux February 22, 2011

Thank you for the photo –- I had been a member for four years and was all of 48 years old – the mornings in the garden were fun. Evie Madsen and Betty Hackman knew all the latin names of plants.

Greetings from Maui,

Elisabeth
–– Original Message ––
From: skf729@aol.com
To: ekloizeaux@comcast.net
Sent: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 3:38:50 PM
Subject: found a photo of you!


I am scanning in a large scrapbook spanning years and years of the club. When I got to 1982 I found you! Remember these days in the garden? Susan

Newark Star Ledger July 25, 1982

Shakespearean splendor blooms in garden

How to get there
Take Route 22 to Somerset Street exit. Continue straight through Plainfield until reaching Muhlenberg Hospital. Turn right onto Randolph Road and follow to Cedar Brook Park.

By Helen Brunet

One of the oldest Shakespeare Gardens in America is located in Plainfield's Cedar Brook Park. Begun in 1927, on the 363rd anniversary of William Shakespeare's birth, the garden was suggested by Howard Fleming, a member of the Plainfield Shakespeare Club.

The garden, which has some 40 varieties of plants mentioned in Shakespeare's plays and sonnets, was designed by the Olmsted Brothers of Brookline, Mass., landscape architects. (The firm's founder, Frederic Law Olmsted, designed New York's Central Park in 1858.) The Union County Park Commission created the Shakespeare garden according to the landscape plans and the Plainfield Garden Club has maintained it ever since.

Today the garden is a wonderfully maintained formal garden that invites strolling. The entrance is through an arbor covered with a handsome stand of trumpet vine. A large boulder and plaque commermorates the famous poet. Plantings of hawthorns, flowering crab, mulberry, holly and yews provide screening at one end. A rustic fence defines the garden and separates it from the street.

"All of the garden plants are ones mentioned by Shakespeare," said Evelyn Madsen, chairwoman of the committee that cares for the garden. "In some cases the names are different today. For instance, the flower then called marigold (as in Act II, Scene 3 of Winter's Tale: "The marigold, which goes to bed with the sun/And with him rises, weeping!") is actually Calendula officinalis. What we call larkspur Shakespeare called lark's heels."

The garden is composed of 17 flower and herb-filled beds edged in brick with grass paths running between. Twin bird-shaped topiaries, made of clipped yew, carry out the formal tone. The first flowers appear in the garden in mid April and there is something in bloom until November.

Shakespeare used flowers in many ways – to set a mood, as in Love's Labor's Lost, "When daisies pied and violets blue/And lady-smocks all silver white,/And cuckoo-buds of yellow hue/Do paint the meadows with delight.", and to intensify dramatic effect through they symbolic meaning flowers had for the Elizabethans. Thus the very choice of flowers in Ophelia's garland in Hamlet foretold her tragic end. "There, with fantastic garlands did she come/Of crow flowers, nettles, daisies, and long purples . . . " (Act IV, scene 7).

"Working in the garden each week is a real learning experience, something like a science lab, " Mrs. Madsen said.

"And, like anything scientific, things sometimes backfire," added Anne Marie Seybold, a regular volunteer in the garden. "Fifteen years ago one of our members brought a plant with pretty green leaves and white flowers which appeared on long spikes. We planted it and it began to spread so fast we thought it would take over the whole garden. Later we learned it was Bishop's-weed (Aegopodium podraria) which is highly invasive." But by this time, she explained, one whole section of the garden was covered with the weed, an area known as the wheel which was five symetrical flower beds. The only solution, except using herbicide, which the committee did not wish to do, was to cover the beds completely with thick black plastic covered with wood chips and allow them to lie dormat for three years.

"Thank goodness it worked, " Mrs. Seybold said. "We have replanted three of the beds – one with various thymes, one with different sages and a third in dwarf lavenders. We are still deciding what to plant in the last two beds – but so far, the weed hasn't reappeared."

At the center of the wheel design is a large bed containing old fashioned roses including Rosa damascena, the original Rose of Damascus, and the York and Lancaster roses, all popular in England in Shakespeare's time. The rose pips are used with flowers and foliage from the garden to make dried wreaths; at Christmas these are distributed to various civic groups.

Members of the Plainfield Garden Club meet every Wednesday morning from April until mid-November to weed and dig and sometimes to quote Shakespeare. Beverly Reid, president of the Plainfield Garden Club, said of the garden: "We consider it a retreat and a great place to share knowledge. It combines gardening with history – what could be better?"

The Shakespeare Garden is open to the public at all times, free of charge. It is located on the left side of Randolph Road as it enters Cedar Brook Park in Plainfield.

[caption reads] Evelyn Madsen, chairman of the Shakespeare Garden Committee, Plainfield Garden Club, works at the garden.

Newark Star Ledger July 25, 1982

Courier News May 14, 1990

[photo caption] The Shakespeare Garden has 17 flower beds in various designs.

Love's Labor not lost in garden

By Phili Hosmer
Courier-News Staff Writer
[handwritten] May 14, 1990

"Now 'tis the spring, and weeds are shallow-rooted; Suffer them now and they'll overgrow the garden." – From Henry VI by William Shakespeare

Each Wednesday, just after the sun has risen over Plainfield, Evelyn Madsen and friends meet at Cedarbrook Park to battle the weeds in the Shakespeare Garden.

They pull and they cut and they dig, ensuring that the weeds don't overgrow the graden. Most of the flowes in the garden are species that the Bard mentioned in his plays and sonnets.

From April to October, the Garden Club toild in the dirt to nurture its horticultural tribute to Shakespeare. Clearly, it's a labor of love for Madsen and the other Plainfield Garden Club members.

"I've always loved flowers," said Madsen, who has been weeding the garden for 20 yeras. "It's very relaxing and I enjoy being out of doors."

From 1 to 4 PM Wednesday and Sunday, she and other gardeners will lead special public tours of the Shakespeare Garden. And on Wednesday, there will be an indoor flower show called "Here's Flowers For You" at the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church in Plainfield. The show will feature several flower arrangements, each designed around a Shakespearean reference to types of flowers.

The Shakespeare Garden was designed and planted in 1927 on the 363rd anniversary of Shakespeare's birth. The 100-foot long garden was designed by the internationally known landscape architects, the Olmsted Brothers of Brookline, Mass.

Among the many flwoers there are climbing roses, clematis vines, hawthorns, yew, mulberry, thyme, violets and Eglantine rose. There are many herbs and even rhubarb, which was mentioned in a Shakespeare play.

Madsen said the floral tribute is fitting because Shakespeare was the first writer to bring drama into gardens and add the color and sunlight of nature to theater.

June 1990

Roses, English Daisies, Sage

Betty Hackman (in slacks) speaks to her friend, Evie Madsen (green apron)

The Courier News Tuesday, May 17, 1994

[photo caption] Students stroll through the Shakespeare Garden at Cedar Brook Park in Plainfield as part of a Union County College class on Shakespeare. All of the flowers are mentioned in Shakespeare's plays.

PLAINFIELD

Shakespeare Students amazed by garden's sights and beauty

About 20 Union County College students learn about city garden that bears the famous author's name.

"It's beautiful – what a nice spot to be in" Shirley Ducatman, student

By Bernice Paglia
Courier-News Staff Writer

PLAINFIELD – "Here's flowers for you," William Shakespeare wrote in "A Winter's Tale."

A group of students in a Shakespeare course got to see, smell and touch flowers named by the Bard in his works. And they got to meet some fo the dedicated Plainfield Garden Club members who make sure the Shakespeare Garden in Cedar Brook Park is still available for enjoyment 67 years after its creation.

About 20 of English professor Karl Oelke's students in a "Learning is Forever" (L.I.F.E.) class at Union County college listened to a brief explanation of the garden by club president Evelyn Madsen before they strolled under the pergola and along the brick-edged walks. Scotch broom, small purple pansies called "johnny-jump-ups," columbines, lily of the valley, English daises, primroses and rue were in bloom.

"I just find it terribly interesting, " said Oelke of the garden and its markers with quotes set out for the day. "Several students can recall the characters who spoke the lines."

Oelke himself said until he saw the bushy, yellow-flowered broom, he did not realize it was a plant mentioned in "A Midsummer Night's Dream;" "Puck and I will sweep with a broom the dust from thy heavens," he quoted.

The garden will be at its best in early June, Madsen said.

Garden Club members groom its formal herb beds and weed the flower borders weekly. A current challenge is to restore the leafy beak to one of four large topiary creatures that resemble hens.

The pergola is entwined with trumpet vines that erupt in orange red flowers each summer.

Some things have been spoiled or stolen by vandals, including a bronze plaque that disappeared in 1982 after being fastened to a large stone under the pergola since 1928. The plaque bore a likeness of Shakespeare and marked the cooperative effort of the city's Shakespeare Club, the Plainfield Garden Club and the Union County Parks Commission in establishing the garden.

A glimpse of the garden can be seen on pages 2 and 3 of the 1994-1995 New Jersey Bell Plainfield-Somerville telephone directory.

"It's beautiful – what a nice spot to be in," student Shirley Ducatman said Wednesday.

The visit came on the last day of class for the course, which is part of a program started by Oscar Fishstein to offer lifelong learning to seniors.

The Courier News Tuesday, May 17, 1994

Shakespeare Garden May 1990

Evie Madsen (far left)
Sally Kroll (facing away)

Shakespeare Garden September 1990

Evie Madsen and Elizabeth King

Shakespeare Garden September 1990

Back of Photo

The Historic Preservation Commission of Plainfield

May 13, 1993

Receiving the Preservation Award

May 13, 1993

Evie Madsen

Receiving the Preservation Award

May 13, 1993

Left to right: 3rd person Sally Booth; 4th person Evie Madsen

Courier News article June 1995

Garden Club shows off blooms to 2nd-graders

If you go

Cedar Brook Park is open to the public during daylight hours. To reach the Shakespeare Garden, enter off Randolph Road on Rose Street and follow one-way signs to parking near the brick fieldhouse. The garden is open for viewing only.

By Bernice Paglia
Courier-News Staff Writer

PLAINFIELD – Garden Club membes who spend Wednesdays grooming the Shakespeare Garden showed it off to about 65 second-graders Thursday.

The children walked from Cedarbrook School to Cedar Brook Prk and were soon finding seed pods in the johnny-jump-ups, sniffing thyme and lavender, and smoothing furry lamb's-ears leaves against their cheeks.

"This place is cool!" Erice Moorman exclaimed. "I like all the pretty flowers and the way they smell good."

The garden is at its peak with a bed of peonies planted in 1930 ready to bloom once more, and roses, yellow millfoil and pinks flowering along the borders. The garden has formal herb beds and four fat topiary birds. One bed has fancy-flowered relatives of onions and garlic, including giant allium's starry purple globes on a single stalk.

For the visit, the Garden Club set out a dovecote and sundial reminiscentn of Elizabethan garden accessories, and small printed markers with Shakespeare references. Bright sunshine enhanced the sights and scents of teh 16th-century plant varieties.

"They're soft," Melissa Richardson said, fingering a lamb's-ear leaf. Another student learned that the woolly leaves were used in olden times the way Band-Aids are now.

Eduardo Ocotilla held an opened johnny-jump-up seed pod in his hand, its three neat compartments full of seeds. One class brought notebooks and students including Tyesha Davis and Marte Smith wrote down names of flowers as they meandered along the brick-edged paths.

"Just think, there's so much about Plainfield that people don't even know, " parent Mary Haynes said. Taking in the array, she said, "It makes me want to go home and plant some flowers."

Garden Club members who led the outdoor lessons were Bernice Swain, Diana Madsen, Evelyn Madsen, Jeanne Turner, Joan Vivian and Sally Kroll. Club members have also educated third graders at the school on how to pot plants and take care of them

[caption to photo of painting]
Cheryl O'Halloran McLeod's pastel rendition of the bucolic Shakespeare Garden in Plainfield

Courier News article October 1995

Gardening mastergy grows to work of art

Evelyn Madsen's many hours of tending the famed Shakespeare Garden have been rewarded with a specially commissioned paintingn of her favorite landscape.

Madsen not only weeds and prunes plants in the garden on Wednesday mornings, she has researched plants mentioned in Shakespeare's works and introduced them into the garden. She has served as chairwoman of the garden for the Plainfield Garden Club since 1979.

The garden was designed by the Olmstead brothes of Brookline, Mass. It has formal herb and flower gardens, topiary chicks, a vine-covered arbor and borders full of plants mentioned in Shakespeare's plays and sonnets. The beauty of the garden in early summer was captured by artist Paul McCormack, who was commissioned by the club to create the gift in thanks for Madsen's service.

The painting was presented Wednesday at the club's regular meeting.

The Shakespeare Garden is in Cedar Brook Park in the south end of the city. Garden club members take care of it weekly under Madsen's guidance.

Courier News article May 4, 2000

How does their garden grow?

[captions]

Evelyn Madsen of Plainfield, a member of the Plainfield Garden Club, works Wednesday on The Shakespeare Garden in Cedar Brook Park in Plainfield. The garden, which was established in 1927, will be the setting for Shakespeare in Bloom from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on June 10. Madsen is a former chairwoman of the garden

Margaret Tyler of Watchung, a member of the Plainfield Garden Club, works on the garden Wednesday.

Spring 1997

Peggy Tyler, Evie Madsen and Betty Hackman

Courier News June 4, 1998

Courier News
by Bernice Paglia
Staff Writer

Much ado about Bard in city garden

[If you go
The tour of the Shakespeare Garden will be from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. The garden is in Cedar Brook Park, accessible from Park Avenue.]

PLAINFIELD – A labor of love won't be lost on people who visit the Shakespeare Garden on Saturday.

Plainfield Garden Club members have wedded, clipped, pruned, mulched and manicured the garden for its second public tour. They're preparing the flower markers and plaques with quotes from the Bard to match the array of 16th-century blooms.

The free event also will include a demostration of cooking with herbs, Elizabethan music and sales of garden-realted items and dried florals.

The garden, designed in 1927 by the Olmstead Brothers of Brookline, Mass., contains 40 species mentioned in Shakespeare's works. It was planted on the 363rd anniversary of his birth.

The Union County freeholders honored the garden and the club in March with a historic preservation commendation.

Garden club members said the tour of 17 beds and two borders with more than 150 16th- and 17th-century plants promises to be rich in Shakespeare lore.

Club member Carroll Keating recently was shearing four plump topiary birds for the big day. It was the first time she had been asked to take on that special task.

"I feel so honored," she said.

Stooping to pull a maple seedling from a border in the formal knot garden, club member Betty Hackman said the clipped hedges add "a bit of whimsy to the garden."

The art of cutting hedges into special shapes "goes way back to the first century," she said.

Two of the birds had their bushy beaks knocked off over the winter, so club members planned to make prosthetic ones of wire and sprigs for the tour.

Longtime member Margaret Tyler sat on the sun-warmed ground to groom one of the flower beds.

"I love to see the foxglove come back," she said. "I love their little cups."

Member Evelyn Madsen rubbed a pink dianthus flower, a bloom used to flavor wine in Shakespeare's time, to release its cinnamon fragrance. Madsen said she enjoyed seeing Franco Zeffirelli's production of "Romeo and Juliet" on television because of all the floral references.

Visitors can see love-in-a-mist, lady's mantle, giant allium, Scotch broom, gas plant and many roses and herbs.

Amid all the pastel blooms and feathery foliage, a bare holly tree given a radical pruning by county workers looks like a start modern sculpture, but club members softened it by ringing the trunk with handsome hosta plants.

Star-Ledger, Wednesday, August 16, 2000

NOTE: This article was written about the Shakespeare Garden at the College of Saint Elizabeth in Morris Township as well as the Shakespeare Garden in Cedar Brook Park. Sister Agnes Vincent tends the garden in Morris Township's Convent Station.

Half way through the article, the writer, Valerie Sudol, discusses our garden:

If Sister Agnes often labors in solitude, the tending of Plainfield's Shakespeare garden is ordinarily a social affair. On a steamy Wednesday morning in early August, nearly a dozen members of the Plainfield Garden Club were cheerfully sweating over their chores in the garden, which occupies a grassy rise in Union County's Cedar Brook park.

"I love working among the herbs," says Evelyn Madsen, taking a breather from heading back plants grown lush with rain. "The fragrance is wonderful."

A garden keeper for "20 or 25 years," Madsen finds the same appeal in these plants as any student of days long past.

"Rue, known as 'herb-o'-grace,' once was used in the baptismal bowl," she offers. "And agrimony – it was boiled as a soak for sore feet, and was good for sleeplessness, or so goes the old wives' tale. Rich in tannins, it's now used by the pharmaceutical industry."

Within a paling fence, the herbs – rue, marjoram, rhubarb, thyme, rosemary, sage, fennel, angelica – occupy beds that are like spokes of a wheel, with a circular bed of antique roses and pinks at the hub. Geometric beds, some lined in boxwood grown from slips sent from Mount Vernon, George Washington's Virginia estate, stretch to the far end where a rustic pergola supports trumpet vine and wisteria; the parterre of beds sits between two 100-foot borders, abrim with foliage and flowers.

This garden was made all of a piece in 1927 by noted American landscape firm – the Olmsted Brothers, successor to the business launched by Frederick Law Olmsted, the "father" of American landscape architecture. The Olmsted family had a relationship with the Essex and Union county parks systems that stretched over nearly 50 yeras. Cedar Brook, like Branch Brook Park in Newark and South Mountain Reservation bordering several towns between Millburn and West Orange, were part of a far-reaching and pioneering effort during the "City Beautiful" movement of the '20s and '30s to provide urban dwellers of the Industrial Age with nearby pastoral landscapes.

"The idea for the garden originated with the local Shakespeare Society, one of those old-fashioned intellectual groups popular back then, " says Elva Busch, a regular on the garden task force. "The garden club got involved with the society, and together they put the plan to the park commissioners, who brough in the Olmsted firm as designers."

As keepers of the flame, club members willingly devote every Wednesday morning of the seven-month growing season to garden maintenance. This garden includes not only plants mentioned by Shakespeare, but also species known to Elizabethans of the 16th century.

"A Shakespeare garden is heavy with herbs and roses and is at its peak in late May and June," Bernice Swain points out. "In late summer, there isn't much color, so we've added some annuals, like calendula – known back then as Mary-buds, for the Virgin Mary."

Betty Hackman mentions that in the past, the garden suffered from vandalism, mostly the work of kids.

"Some years back, a group of youngsters came here and saw our stone monument, inscribed with Shakespeare's nam," she recalls. "'Is Shakespeare buried here?' they wanted to know, all wide-eyed. So, I explained. We try now to involve the kids, using the garden as a classroom. We need everyone to take responsiblity for keeping it in good order."

Has it worked?

"Well," says Hackman, "last year I was picking some rue for a flower show when a young man went by on his bicycle. He turned around, came back, and called to me: 'Miss – don't you know you're not supposed to be picking flowers here?'"

Hackman laughs. It's a good memory and a good sign.

"I think we have something going," she adds. "The garden has survived for nearly 75 years. I think it will be around for awhile."

Evie's Twine

See 2011-05-03 The Daffodils

Evie gave the garden this very large ball of twine, which is still in use and due to its size, will be in use for a very long time.

'Giggleswick' by Marjorie Blackman Elliott 1989

PGC Member Marjorie Blackman Elliott traces the history of the Mellick family and in particular PGC founding member Mrs. George P. (Ella Hartley) Mellick '15 and her well known estate, 'Giggleswick'

Mrs. Elliott thanks Mrs. John Madsen for her assistance with this project.

1998 Winter Party at Carroll Keating's Home

Evie Madsen, Joan Vivian, Carter Booth, and Bob Vivian

Boxwood Topiary Workshop at Nina Weil's House

circa 1998
Jeanne Turner and Evie Madsen

Boxwood Topiary Workshop at Nina Weil's House

circa 1998
Bernice Swain, Betty Hackman, Evie Madsen and Elisabeth Loizeaux

1984 Questover Designers Showhouse Program

Questover Program pages 1 through 55

Questover Program pages 56 through 106

Questover Program pages 107 through 131

April 24 - May 30, 1988 Cedar Brook Farm Designers Showhouse

Many PGC members were also members of the Muhlenberg Auxiliary that staged amazing designer homes in Plainfield in an effort to raise money for the hospital.

In 1988, the designer showcased home was Cedar Brook Farm which had also been the home of a PGC member, Mrs. Robert F. (Carolyn Waring) MacLeod '55, PGC President 1958 - 1960

To see the progam and learn the history of the house, click these links:

1988 Cedar Brook Farm Designer Showcase Program Cover to Page 25

1988 Cedar Brook Farm Designer Showcase Program Pages 26 to 50

1988 Cedar Brook Farm Designer Showcase Program Pages 51 to 75

1988 Cedar Brook Farm Designer Showcase Program Pages 76 to End

1974 Junior League Designer Showcase: The Martine House

1974 Designer Showcase Martine House Cover to Page 25

1974 Designer Showcase Martine House Page 26 to End

In addition to saving the 1988 Program for the Designers Showhouse of Cedar Brook Farm (aka The Martine House) which was organized by the Muhlenberg Auxiliary, PGC Member Anne Shepherd also kept the 1974 Designers Showcase of the very same home, organized by the Junior League.

Within the program pages, you will find mentioned many PGC members. They include: Clawson, MacLeod, Kroll, Davis, Wyckoff, Stevens, Loizeaux, Swain, Hunziker, Connell, Foster, Dunbar, Elliott, Fitzpatrick, Gaston, Hackman, Holman, Lockwood, Morrison, Royes, Rushmore, Sanders, Williams, Barnhart, Bellows, Burger, Burner, Carter, Clendenin, DeHart, Detwiller, Eaton, Eckert, Fort, Frost, Gonder, Keating, Laidlaw, Loosli, Madsen, Mann, Marshall, Miller, Moody, Moon, Morse, Murray, Mygatt, Barrett, Peek, Perkins, Pfefferkorn, Pomeroy, Pond, Royes, Samek, Sandford, Sheble, Stevens, Shepherd, Stewart, Stout, Trewin, Vivian, Zeller, Cochran, Mooney and Hall.

October 1995

Photo by Jeanne Turner

Diana Madsen and Evie Madsen

October 1995

Photo by Jeanne Turner

Diana Madsen and Evie Madsen

October 1995

Photo by Jeanne Turner

Diana Madsen and Evie Madsen

October 1995

Photo by Jeanne Turner

Diana Madsen and Evie Madsen

October 1995

Photo by Jeanne Turner

Evie Madsen accepting a painting of the Shakespeare Garden

October 1995

Photo by Jeanne Turner

Diana Madsen, Evie Madsen and Nancy Kroll

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Getting ready for the White House – left to right, Mrs. John Madsen, Mrs. William Elliott, Mrs. Alexander Kroll, Mrs. A. D. Seybold and Mrs. Robert Hackman decorate wreaths, while Mrs. Edwin Fitzpatric "supervises."

April 18, 2012

Francie Madsen sent this in thru her Mother (Diana) remembering her Grandmother (Evie) So nice.

I've been hearing about the weather on the east coast this
week...reminds me of one of Grandma Madsen's favorite Robert Frost
poems. I think about her all the time at this time of year because of
it. Thought you might all enjoy!!


The sun was warm but the wind was chill.
You know how it is with an April day
When the sun is out and the wind is still,
You're one month on in the middle of May.
But if you so much as dare to speak,
A cloud comes over the sunlit arch,
A wind comes off a frozen peak,
And you're two months back in the middle of March.

Robert Frost (1874–1963)
Two Tramps in Mud Time (1936)

May 12, 2012 GCA Zone IV Meeting and Awards Luncheon

PGC Members Jeanne Turner, Patti Dunstan and Phyllis Alexander researched over 275 members chronicled on our website, www.plainfieldgardenclub.org, and chose the following ladies as "themes" for the luncheon tables:

Eight Notable Women of the PGC

June 5, 2002

Ann Wigton and Mary Ann Gonder

Background: Phyllis Alexander and Evie Madsen

Care of the Shakespeare Garden

August 6, 2012 – While going through two boxes that are passed from President to President, this description of how to care for the Shakespeare Garden was found. Although not signed or dated, it was clearly written by former Shakespeare Garden Chair, Evie Madsen.

April 22, 2007 Member Information Sheet

Joined: 1968

Eveyln W. Madsen
Maiden Name: Eveyln Wilson
Nickname: Evie

Birthdate: 7/30/1917

Address: 1551 Crabapple Lane, Plainfield NJ 07060
908-756-1910
Email: emcrabapple@earthlink.net

Club position:
Chairman – Horticulture Committee
Chairman – Shakespeare Garden
GCA Horticultural Award for "Horticultural Achievement within the club"
GCA Award in Appreciation of work in the Shakespeare Garden, the Cannonball Museum and the Plainfield Library Grounds

Volunteer/Professional work:
Crescent Ave. Presbyterian Church – flower arrangement chairman
Muhlenberg Hospital Board
United Fund Board

November 4, 2010 Frogs & Foxes Program

Nancy Hance, member of the Garden Club of Somerset Hills and the daughter of Evie Madsen – mentioned within this program

2002 October thru December Newsletters

2004 February thru June Board & Meeting Minutes

2004 September thru December Board and Meeting Minutes

May 9, 1974 Spring Potpourri Guestbook

June 2, 2001 Shakespeare-in-Bloom

June 2, 2001 Shakespeare-in-Bloom

Betty Hackman leans over the East Border to chat with Evie Madsen, Ramona Ferguson and Nina Weil

December 15, 2004

Carroll Keating, Darlene Kasten, Evie Madsen, Nina Weil

December 15, 2004

Carroll Keating, Darlene Kasten, Evie Madsen, Elva Busch, Sandy Lawrence and Nina Weil

December 15, 2004

Evie Madsen, Elva Busch, Carroll Keating and Sandy Lawrence

December 15, 2004

Bernadette Neill, Ramona Ferguson. Mary Kent, Bev Gorman and Evie Madsen

December 15, 2004

Evie Madsen, Elva Busch, Bev Gorman, Ramona Ferguson, Sandy Lawrence, Mary Kent and Susan Fraser

June 9, 2002

June 9, 2002

June 9, 2002

October thru December 1999 General Meeting Minutes & Sign In Sheets

2000 January thru June Executive Board Meeting Minutes

2000 January thru June General Meeting Minutes and Sign-in Attendance

2001 January thru June Meeting Minutes and Sign in Attendance Sheets

2001 September thru December Meeting Minutes and Sign In Attendance

2002 January thru June Meeting Minutes and Sign In Sheets

2002 February thru June Newsletters

Nina (Weil) - for exhibitors page 1

September 2012: Nina determined this was written by PGC Member Nancy Kroll

Nina (Weil) - for exhibitors page 2

1996 The Shakespeare Garden Job Description

September 26, 2012 Email from Evie's daughter, Nancy Madsen Hance

I meant to email you about our address on B. anyway. We were 601 which I do not believe is one of the houses in the book. Having noticed in Mom's bio the dates we lived there, it was about 1958 to about 1975 or so? Not exactly sure of the dates, but that is approx.
Thanks, Nancy

September 26, 2012 Correspondence PGC to Madsen family

Oh yes!! That was my grandparents home!, Infred Theopholis Madsen and Lela Schultz Madsen. They lived there in the early 1900's...until my grandfather died, in approx. 1927, and sometime after that, maybe the late 30's or early 40's when my grandmother moved to an apt. at 744 Watchung Ave. Your puzzle found another piece!!

Have fun!
Nancy


Yes he's Peter's grandfather who started Madsen & Howell, Peter's company...Ingfred Theophylis (so?) Madsen 'Inky'...would love to see the book before it goes back to Nancy...Diana

Susan Fraser email to Nancy Madsen Hance and Diana Davis Madsen:

As I scan this huge picture book into our archives, I found this photo. Any relation?

Residence of I. T. Madsen, 1046 Hillside Avenue

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

1997 Janury thru March Board Meeting Minutes

January thru June 1996 Board and General Meeting Minutes

1996 October thru December Board Meeting Minutes

1995 September thru December Board Meeting Minutes

1995 May and June Board and General Meeting Minutes

Sunday, June 8, 1997 Courier News

An old English garden blooms in Plainfield park

PLAINFIELD – Ophelia went crazy in "Hamlet" and she would have gone batty all over again Saturday with so many choices of flowers to pick.

The spirit of the Bard was in bloom as visitors to the Shakespeare Garden in Cedarbrook Park explored rows of flower beds featuring 40 plants and herbs mentioned in his plays and sonnets.

The show was called "Shakespeare in Bloom"

At the garden's entrance is a rustic trellis made of vines and thin, twisting trees that serves as a cov- . . . .

. . . in geometrical designs and two borders 100 feet long – features a myriad of buds interspersed with notable quotations from the plays which contain the flowers.

There are flowers of all shapes, sizes and colors: brooms, pinks, Madonna lilies, blue bottles and widow's tears. There is ivy that grows so fast and spreads so quickly it reminds gardeners of weeds. There are herbs used medicinally for heart ailments and migraine headaches, not to mention seasonings and teas.

"He's just so well-known for connecting flowers and plants with his writing," said Evelyn Madsen, a member of the club, about why the garden was dedicated to Shakespeare 70 years ago.

. . . view the garden and learn about the flowers popular in a bygone era.

Club members tend the garden themselves with little interference from the city and public works department. Madsen said the group meets every Wednesday morning to weed, prune and cultivate the garden.

About 50 people came to see the greenery, including mayoral candidates Al McWilliams and William Hetfield.

"Everyone's a fan of Shakespeare," said on resident, Doreen Kruse. "Everybody knows a line of his 'What's in a name?'"

"People don't think of Plainfield and Shakespeare together. But Plainfield has brought Shakespeare to li . . .

Evie Madsen in the Shakespeare Garden

circa 2003
Photo by Jeanne Turner

Mary Kent in the background

Evie Madsen in the Shakespeare Garden

circa 2003
Photo by Jeanne Turner

Mary Kent in the background

November 16, 2013

Celebration of the Life of Barbara Tracy Sandford

Dr. Charles L. Mead married Evie Madsen's daughter, Nancy Hance, December 2, 1968.

Perhaps Rev. Mead was a relation to "our" Mrs. Mead?

Mead, Mrs. Frederick Goodhue (Marie Louise Myers) '15

Mrs. Mead donated one of the stained glass windows in the church:

1910 New York Observer

Plainfield Church Renovated

The Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church at Plainfield, N. J., of which the Rev. John S. Zelie, D. D., is the pastor, has recently been enriched by the gifts of two handsome stained glass windows. The subject of the first window is "The Presentation in the Temple," and the second, "The Resurrection." The windows are rich and brilliant in color, and are done in painted and stained glass in the style of the renaissance which harmonizes with and carries out the general scheme of decoration of the church.

The first window is a memorial to Frederick G. Mead and Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Myers by Mrs. Frederick G. Mead and the second window is in memory of Mr. Samuel Fisher Kimball, a deacon of the church, by his wife Mrs. Emma C. Kimball. The gifts of these windows follows the entire renovation of the church, which has been one of the the most successful renovations ever carried out. It was finished two years abo under the direction of Mr. Arthur Ware, of New York, and has resulted in making the Crescent Avenue Church one of the most beautiful and churchly edifices in the country.

Frederick, being of course her husband, and Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Myers were Mrs. Mead's parents. Mr. and Mrs. Myers were also founding member Mrs. Jared Kirtland (Mary Ann Stillman) Myers '15 in-laws.

There were many Stillmans in the Club:

Quarles, Mrs. Ernest Augustus (Anita Mary Stillman) '22
Stillman, Mrs. Albert Leeds (Virginia Brown) '41
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Elizabeth B. Atwood) '15
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Ethel Lucille Titsworth) '42

Shakespeare-in-Bloom 2000

Evie Madsen
Photo by Ted Turner
Evie with a tussy mussy.

1990 Application for the GCA Zone IV Historic Preservation Award: Marge Eillott

1990 Application for the GCA Zone IV Historic Preservation Award: Marge Elliott

April 7, 1984 "Belles and Beaux" Scotch Plains Tercentennial Fashion Show & Luncheon

1973-1974 PGC Directory

1973-1974 Exhibitions Chair

1974-1975 Directory

1975-1976 The Junior League of Plainfield

Non-Voting Special Chairman
Charity Ball: Mrs. Charles E. Hance
F.D.C. Liaison: Mrs. John C. Hance

1987 Correspondence and Documents from the Archives of Barbara Tracy Sandford

This is just a small sampling of meeting minutes, correspondence and notes from the memorabilia of Barbara Tracy Sandford. Barbara was the Garden Club of American Zone IV (NJ) Director in 1987. 1987 is the same year Zone IV hosted the Annual Meeting of the Garden Club of America.

Also mentioned assisting with the planning and execution of the Annual Meeting are PGC Members: Kroll, Hackman, Hunziker, Fitzpatrick, Reid, Vivian, Madsen, Booth, Tyler and King.

1987 Documents From the Archives of Barbara Tracy Sandford

1998-1999 PGC Annual Report

1996-1997 PGC Annual Report

Shakespeare Garden Plant Study 1992 - 1993

October 22, 1995 Sunday Star-Ledger

Extraordinary People: Evie Madsen, amateur gardener

Achievement: She was honored last week by the Plainfield Garden Club for her tireless efforts in preserving and maintaining the Shakespeare Garden in Cedar Brook Park in the city since 1979.

Tribute: "She's one of those people who's very modest but works very hard," said garden club member Jeanne Turner. "She's done lots of research, making sure the plantings are correct. She's a real gentle, wonderful woman. Everyone loves her so much, she's just such a wonderful person."

Award: She was given a painting of the Shakespeare Garden by local artist Paul McCormack. It was presented by her daughter-in-law Diana Madsen, who is president of the Plainfield Garden Club.

Where you'll find her: Every Wednesday morning, six months out of the year, at the Shakespeare Garden. And every other nice day, tending her own gardens at her Plainfield home.

Quote: "I love the Shakespeare Garden. I love what it represents. We only grow the flowers that grew during the 16th century during Shakespeare's time."

Favorite flowers: Roses, anemones, and primulas. "I rather like the simpler flowers," she said.

Favorite gardening books: Esther Singleton's "The Shakespeare Garden" and Taylor's "Encyclopedia of Gardening."

– Gabriel H. Cluck

**November 29, 2013 – This never-before-seen article was found in the memorabilia of Barbara Tracy Sandford, Evie's good friend.

October 22, 1995 Sunday Star-Ledger

1995 Shakespeare Garden Plant List

May 14, 1983 Centennial The Wardlaw Hartridge School

Giggleswick by Marjorie Blackman Elliott, 1989

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1995-1996 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

Cocktail party circa 1984 at Bev Reid's

Evie Madsen on left

Dr. Seybold. Elisabeth Loizeaux remembers: "at one time they had a German grand-niece visiting from Germany, maybe the long haired girl is her?"

Cocktail party circa 1984 at Bev Reid's

Evie Madsen (center); "J" Morse in white dress

Cocktail party circa 1984 at Bev Reid's

Evie Madsen on right side. Partial view of the top of Liz Cochran's head next to Evie. "J" Morse with white long sleeved dress and pocketbook speaking to Evie.

One PGC member thinks that may be Meechy Loosli in the background facing right, with pink trimmed dress. However, another memer thinks it is Mrs. Sheble.

The woman partially blocked by the gentleman in the long light blue dress is Diddles Vivian.

Cath Detwiller far left in blue and white printed dress.

Cocktail party circa 1984 at Bev Reid's

Ed Samek second on left. Priscilla Kroll Farnum center, blue dress. Her husband Henry on her left, both speaking to Evie Madsen (facing away) in floral dress.

Cocktail party circa 1984 at Bev Reid's

Evie Madsen in long floral dress
Back of Fanny Day far right.

In front of the woman with the blue floral dress is a glimpse of Joan Hunziker

Mary Rose His standing to Evie's left.

1984-1985 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1991-1992 Year Book of the Garden Club of America

1990-1991 Year Book for the Plainfield Garden Club

1992-1993 Year Book for the Plainfield Garden Club

1987-1988 Annual Report

EXHIBITONS

The In-Club Flower Show was entered by almost all the membership, and evidenced by judging that took almost 2 1/2 hours, was highly praised. The theme of the show reflected by various Shakespeare quotes as defining the classes, was to commemorate our own Shakespeare Garden.

The Blue Ribbons were won by the following:

Novice: Joan Hunziker
Arrangement incorporating bricks: Betty Hackman
Line arrangement: Marge Elliott
Arrangement using daffodils: Evie Madsen
Arrangement using spring flowers: Mary Moon

We had two entries in the Zone IV Flower Show. Nancy and Sally Korll entered the miniature class and won a 3rd. Betty Hackman entered the Native Star Class and won an Honorable Mention.

I want to thank all members who made arrangements for the meetings. And special thanks to Nancy Kroll, Betty Hackman and Mary Moon for all their help throughout the year.

Respectfully submitted,
Sally Kroll

1987-1988 Annual Report

1995-1996 Annual Report

1995-1996 Annual Report

1995-1996 Annual Report

1995-1996 Annual Report

1994-1995 Annual Report

1994-1995 Annual Report

1994-1995 Annual Report

April 30, 2014 Robert Frost Poem

Thinking of Grandma today - the weather out here makes me think of the poem she shared with me! I'm forwarding a poem that Evie shared long ago with our daughter, Francie - I thought our membership might appreciate it too! Diana

"Two Tramps in Mud Time" by Robert Frost

The sun was warm but the wind was chill,
You know how it is with an April day
When the sun is out and the wind is still
You're one month on in the middle of May,
But if you so much as dare to speak
A cloud comes over the sunlight arch.
A wind comes off a frozen peak,
And you're two months back in the middle of March.

Boost your literary background & listen to Frost's poem in its entirety: Two Tramps in Mud Time

September 14, 2014 Netherwood Heights Home Tour

Hurray! Brenda has come up with the addresses for the Netherwood Neighborhood tour on Sunday, September 14th. Listed below are the homes plus the links to the members that once lived there:

559 Belvidere Avenue

601 Belvidere Avenue
Madsen, Mrs. John (Evelyn or "Evie" Wilson) '70

661 Belvidere Avnue

750 Belvidere Avenue

1210 Denmark Road
Hamilton, Mrs. Christie P. (Louise May) '27
Loosli, Mrs. Alden R. ( Demetria "Meechy" Hamilton) '64
Van Hoesen, Mrs. Stephen G. (Eva Lemira Hamilton) '21

1236 Denmark Road

720 Dixie Lane

734 Berkeley Avenue
Hall, Mrs. Frederic L. (Anne Garrigues Wigton) '68

While strolling these streets, be sure to keep an eye out for the neighboring PGC homes:

614 Belvidere
Pond, Mrs. C. Northrup (Alethea or "Toddy" Marder) '53

630 Belvidere Avenue
Joost, Mrs. Sherman Brownell (Marie Murray) '19

633 Belvidere
Clendenin, Mrs. Edward Hume (Margaret Rowe Tyler) '44

Tyler, Miss Margaret R. '44

714 Belvidere "Henry Pearl Talmadge House"
Dunbar, Mrs. William Kuhn '17

Rock, Mrs. Robert B. '43

Runkle, Mrs. Harry Godley (Jennie Fitz Randolph) '15

Whitehead, Mrs. James Harold (Jean Fitz-Randolph Heiberg) '43

715 Belivdere
Connell, Mrs. Philip G. '74

735 Belvidere
Sanders, Mrs. David F. (Molly) '58

740 Belvidere
Coriell, Mrs. William Wallace (Emma Buckle) '25

749 Belvidere
Thomas, Mrs. Eugene P. '22

770 Belvidere Avenue
Nash, Mrs. William Bryan (Blanche Pelz) '32

777 Belvidere
Rushmore, Mrs. Townsend (Jean Betram Murray) '20

789 Belvidere
Vivian, Mrs. Richard C. (Lucille Hutchings or "Diddles") '74

792 Belvidere
Spalt, Mrs. Evan R. (Ellen F.) '71

802 Belvidere
McWilliams, Mrs. Howard (Anna Louise Waldbridge/Mrs. Paul Taylor Brown) '22

1200 Denmark Road
Coriell, Mrs. William Wallace (Emma Buckle) '25

1201 Denmark Road
Lockwood, Mrs. W. L. '25

Lockwood, Mrs. Frederick M. (Hazel Marshall) '52

1216 Denmark Road
Wigton, Mrs. William Garrigues (Ann Hayes) '55

1226 Denmark Road
Foster, Mrs. David Scott (Constance "Connie" Elena Titus) '46

1275 Denmark Road
Sandford, Mrs. Webster (Barbara Tracy) '50

1299 Denmark Road
Diss, Mrs. Albert B. (Alexandra Grosset or "Alex") '62

717 Dixie Lane
Foster, Mrs. David Scott (Constance "Connie" Elena Titus) '46

Furman, Mrs. Gerald S. (Victoria or "Vicky" Houck) '62

737 Dixie Lane
Gaston, Mrs. Hugh M. (Elizabeth Thomson) '54

747 Dixie Lane
Goddard, Mrs. Frederick W. '16

754 Dixie Lane
Foster, Mrs. David Scott (Constance "Connie" Elena Titus) '46

812 Dixie Lane
Morse, Mrs. George Maxwell Randall (Jeanette Clawson or "J" Miner) '74

724 Berkeley Avenue
Cooke, Mrs. William J. '16

737 Berkeley Avenue
Ginna, Mrs. Daniel F. (Katherine Whiting Lewis) '15

September 14, 2014 Netherwood Heights Home Tour

Hurray! Brenda has come up with the addresses for the Netherwood Neighborhood tour on Sunday, September 14th. Listed below are the homes plus the links to the members that once lived there:

559 Belvidere Avenue

601 Belvidere Avenue
Madsen, Mrs. John (Evelyn or "Evie" Wilson) '70

661 Belvidere Avnue

750 Belvidere Avenue

1210 Denmark Road
Hamilton, Mrs. Christie P. (Louise May) '27
Loosli, Mrs. Alden R. ( Demetria "Meechy" Hamilton) '64
Van Hoesen, Mrs. Stephen G. (Eva Lemira Hamilton) '21

1236 Denmark Road

720 Dixie Lane

734 Berkeley Avenue
Hall, Mrs. Frederic L. (Anne Garrigues Wigton) '68

While strolling these streets, be sure to keep an eye out for the neighboring PGC homes:

614 Belvidere
Pond, Mrs. C. Northrup (Alethea or "Toddy" Marder) '53

630 Belvidere Avenue
Joost, Mrs. Sherman Brownell (Marie Murray) '19

633 Belvidere
Clendenin, Mrs. Edward Hume (Margaret Rowe Tyler) '44

Tyler, Miss Margaret R. '44

714 Belvidere "Henry Pearl Talmadge House"
Dunbar, Mrs. William Kuhn '17

Rock, Mrs. Robert B. '43

Runkle, Mrs. Harry Godley (Jennie Fitz Randolph) '15

Whitehead, Mrs. James Harold (Jean Fitz-Randolph Heiberg) '43

715 Belivdere
Connell, Mrs. Philip G. '74

735 Belvidere
Sanders, Mrs. David F. (Molly) '58

740 Belvidere
Coriell, Mrs. William Wallace (Emma Buckle) '25

749 Belvidere
Thomas, Mrs. Eugene P. '22

770 Belvidere Avenue
Nash, Mrs. William Bryan (Blanche Pelz) '32

777 Belvidere
Rushmore, Mrs. Townsend (Jean Betram Murray) '20

789 Belvidere
Vivian, Mrs. Richard C. (Lucille Hutchings or "Diddles") '74

792 Belvidere
Spalt, Mrs. Evan R. (Ellen F.) '71

802 Belvidere
McWilliams, Mrs. Howard (Anna Louise Waldbridge/Mrs. Paul Taylor Brown) '22

1200 Denmark Road
Coriell, Mrs. William Wallace (Emma Buckle) '25

1201 Denmark Road
Lockwood, Mrs. W. L. '25

Lockwood, Mrs. Frederick M. (Hazel Marshall) '52

1216 Denmark Road
Wigton, Mrs. William Garrigues (Ann Hayes) '55

1226 Denmark Road
Foster, Mrs. David Scott (Constance "Connie" Elena Titus) '46

1275 Denmark Road
Sandford, Mrs. Webster (Barbara Tracy) '50

1299 Denmark Road
Diss, Mrs. Albert B. (Alexandra Grosset or "Alex") '62

717 Dixie Lane
Foster, Mrs. David Scott (Constance "Connie" Elena Titus) '46

Furman, Mrs. Gerald S. (Victoria or "Vicky" Houck) '62

737 Dixie Lane
Gaston, Mrs. Hugh M. (Elizabeth Thomson) '54

747 Dixie Lane
Goddard, Mrs. Frederick W. '16

754 Dixie Lane
Foster, Mrs. David Scott (Constance "Connie" Elena Titus) '46

812 Dixie Lane
Morse, Mrs. George Maxwell Randall (Jeanette Clawson or "J" Miner) '74

724 Berkeley Avenue
Cooke, Mrs. William J. '16

737 Berkeley Avenue
Ginna, Mrs. Daniel F. (Katherine Whiting Lewis) '15

August 28, 2014

Email today from the Drake House:

There is a Netherwood House Tour on September 14, 2014, from 1-5PM. Details are on the attached flyer. [See Below]

One of the homes was designed by Evarts Tracy, architect. He also built the old Muhlenberg Hospital and the old Plainfield Police Station, and was the pioneering camouflage officer for the US government during WWI. It is spectacular on the outside.

Thank you for your support of Plainfield.

Nancy Piwowar
President
Historical Society of Plainfield


The Tracy Family had many many family members in the Plainfield Garden Club. They included:

Tracy, Mrs. Evarts '22
Tracy, Mrs. Howard Crosby (Minerva Bingham Lamson) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

These three women open the doors for many more familial Plainfield relations which include the Cox, Streuli and Perkins clans. The Tracy family also boasts a special architectural & artist relationship to Mrs. Mead. In fact, there should be a home tour just using these families' abodes!

The Tracy family lived at 1009 Hillside Avenue – which sits directly behind 1330 Prospect Avenue which is currently owned by Shakespeare Garden helper Virginia Carroll.

Interestingly enough, 1330 Prospect Avenue was said to have been built by Mrs. Streuli, who lived on the next block of Hillside at #1035. Mrs. Streuli also lived at 1331 Prospect Avenue. Yes, that's correct – the next house over! Mrs. Streuli's daughter, PGC member Caroline, married the Tracy boy at 1009 Hillside and well, lets just say, Caroline didn't get too far from both her PGC mother and mother-in-law. Did she have any choice about joining the PGC!?!

Eight homes in Netherwood are photographed on the flyer – does anyone know the addresses? It would be interesting for all of us to see if they once belonged to one of our members!

Netherwood Heights Tour of Homes September 14, 2014

To help you figure out WHO lived WHERE consult our "Home & Garden" page.

601 Belvidere Avenue

September 14, 2014 Netherwood Homes Tour
www.xavierdelavega.com

601 Belvidere Avenue

September 14, 2014 Netherwood Homes Tour
www.xavierdelavega.com

601 Belvidere Avenue

September 14, 2014 Netherwood Homes Tour
www.xavierdelavega.com

601 Belvidere Avenue

September 14, 2014 Netherwood Homes Tour
www.xavierdelavega.com

601 Belvidere Avenue

September 14, 2014 Netherwood Homes Tour
www.xavierdelavega.com

601 Belvidere Avenue

September 14, 2014 Netherwood Homes Tour
www.xavierdelavega.com

601 Belvidere Avenue

September 14, 2014 Netherwood Homes Tour
www.xavierdelavega.com

601 Belvidere Avenue

September 14, 2014 Netherwood Homes Tour
www.xavierdelavega.com

October 17, 2014

October 17, 2014

Sally does it again!

Over our 100 year history, the PGC has submitted TEN local gardens for inclusion in the Smithsonian's Archives of American Gardens. As you know, it has been the Garden Club of America's great initiative to document gardens across the nation and have their photos and plans preserved there. Our own Mary Kent just concluded her two-year term as the National Chairman of that GCA committee titled "Garden History & Design." GCA clubs from across the US have painstakingly documented gardens for the Smithsonian. But as most of us can recall, technology wasn't what it is today so some things became "lost" in the great vaults of the Smithsonian. One of these things were the submitted photographs of 1332 Prospect Avenue in Plainfield.

1332 Prospect Avenue was home to Plainfield Garden Club Founding Member Mrs. Thomas Rowe (Lucy Otterson) Van Boskerck '15. Later, it was home to Honorary Member Bernice Swain. Before it became the current home of Jim McGreevey, it belonged to Chris and Kathleen Onieal. Your Editor was once showed these photographs as they were told "they stay with the house" but again, they had been misplaced.

In comes Sally. Sally is friends with Mrs. Van Boskerck's granddaughter, Caroline Norman, who resides in Seattle. Sally remembers visiting 1332 Prospect Avenue often as a child and tells great stories of playing in the attics. Sally, who is a third generation member of the PGC, inquired once more of her friend Caroline if she could locate these mythical photographs. And today they were found and returned to us – and the six sepia photographs are every bit as beautiful as Your Editor remembered.

In addition, Caroline sent along never-before-seen photographs of her Aunt Ethel Tyler and her house at 520 8th Street. We also received our first photo of Mrs. Noss. And perhaps best of all, we are the recipients of some beautiful photographs of 17 year-old Sally, a dashing young Carter and Sally's beautiful children. ENJOY!!

1332 Prospect Avenue and other photos for the Van Boskerck, Tyler, Clendenin, Noss, Genung, Madsen & Booth Families

Hillside Historic District

August 29, 2015

Hillside Historic District has announced a new website: http://hillsideavenuedistrict.com

They have neatly listed the homes in the district in a similar fashion to our Homes & Gardens page.

It is no exaggeration to say that the PGC helped build Hillside. In fact our first club meeting took place at Mrs. Connor's home at 999 Hillside. Take a look at our PGC Hillside Historic District resident members:

807 Hillside Avenue
Browne, Miss Elizabeth B. '37

810 Hillside Avenue
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15

816 Hillside Avenue
Zerega, Miss Bertha Virginia '23

817 Hillside Avenue
Lawton, Mrs. Richard M. (Edith Clarke) '21

832 Hillside Avenue
Yates, Mrs. Frederick Washburn (Bertha Kedzie Cornwell) '15

921 Hillside Avenue
Detwiller, Miss Laura Cecelia '29
Detwiller, Mrs. Charles H. (Catherine or "Cath" Campbell), Jr. '57

922 Hillside Avenue
Atterbury, Mrs. Albert Hoffman (Emma H. Baker) '15

930 Hillside Avenue
Corey, Mrs. Ella J. '15

937 Hillside Avenue
Hunn, Mrs. John T. Sharpless (Hope Ivins) '37
Ivins, Mrs. DeWitt Clinton (Louise Morton Fox) '15
Ivins, Mrs. Clinton Fox (Marguerite Carpenter) '33

945 Hillside Avenue
Stevens, Mrs. Horace N. (Helen Coburn) '15

950 Hillside Avenue
Harlow, Mrs. Edward Dexter (Elise Cochran Martin) '15
Martin, Mrs. Francis A. (Mary Keech Turner) '22

955 Hillside Avenue
Wallace, Mrs. Frederick W. (Grace Seccomb) '15
deForest, Mrs. Henry Lockwood (Amy Brighthurst Brown) '33

966 Hillside Avenue
Warren, Mrs. Frank D. '15

970 Hillside Avenue
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15
Kroll, Mrs. Alexander (Nancy Dwinnell or Mrs. Prince H. Gordon) '60

975 Hillside Avenue
Runkle, Mrs. Harry Godley (Jennie Fitz Randolph) '15
Albin, Mrs. Leland D. (Jennie Hoag) '36
King, Mrs. Victor E. D. (Yasmina S.) '78
Whitehead, Mrs. James Harold (Jean Fitz-Randolph Heiberg) '43

980 Hillside Avenue
Hall, Mrs. Frederic L. (Anne Garrigues Wigton) '68
Stuart, Mrs. Linden (Jeanette W.), Jr. '52
Wigton, Mrs. Charles Benson (Garrigues) '45

982 Hillside Avenue
Baker, Mrs. Clifford Myron (Margaret Drayton) '32
Valiant, Mrs. John (Katharine Drayton) '40

985 Hillside Avenue
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P.") '15
Stevens, Mrs. Horace Nathaniel (Helen Coburn) '15
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P."), Jr. (Edith S.) '37
Stevens, Mrs. Robert Ten Broeck (Dorothy Goodwin Whitney) '37

996 Hillside Avenue
Wallace, Mrs. Frederick W. (Grace Seccomb) '15
Murray Townsend
Mooney, Mrs. Wandell McMaster (Alice Joy McGee) '47

999 Hillside Avenue
Conner, Mrs. William A. (Florence Tupper) '15
Wigton, Mrs. William Garrigues (Ann Hayes) '55

1000 Hillside Avenue
Lawrence, Mrs. Chester B. (Florence B.), Jr. '22

1005 Hillside Avenue
McWilliams, Mrs. Howard (Anna Louise Waldbridge/Mrs. Paul Taylor Brown) '22

1007 Hillside Avenue
Lockwood, Mrs. Frederick M. (Hazel Marshall) '52
Marshall, Mrs. Henry P. (Dorothy Burke) '30

1009 Hillside Avenue
Tracy, Mrs. Evarts '22
Tracy, Mrs. Howard Crosby (Minerva Bingham Lamson) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

1019 Hillside Avenue
Baker, Mrs. Clifford Myron (Margaret Drayton) '28

1030 Hillside Avenue
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Ethel Lucile Titsworth) '42

1035 Hillside Avenue
Streuli, Mrs. Alfred F. H. (Frederica Michelle Dwyer Hooper) '15

1045 Hillside Avenue
Timpson, Mrs. Lewis Gouverneur (Helen Frances Waring) '15
Waring, Mrs. Orville G. (Dorothy Fleming) '35

1046 Hillside Avenue
Genung, Mrs. Alfred Gawthrop (Dorothy or "Dot" Madsen) '69
Madsen, Mrs. John (Evelyn or "Evie" Wilson) '70

1300 Prospect Avenue
Streuli, Mrs. Alfred F. H. (Frederica Michelle Dwyer Hooper) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

1234 Watchung Avenue
Stevenson, Mrs. E. Vickers '41

1239 Watchung Avenue
Brown, Miss Edna M. '34