Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Van Boskerck, Mrs. Thomas Rowe (Lucy Otterson) '15

1919 Address: 1332 Prospect Avenue, Plainfield

1922 Adress: 1332 Prospect Avenue, Plainfield

1928 Treasurer Book April 15th $5.00
1929 Treasurer Book Active $5.00
1930, 1931 Treasurer Book Active "Mrs. T. H. Van Boskerck Pd."
1932, 1933, 1934, 1935 Treasurer Book Active

1932 Directory* Address: 1332 Prospect
* = This directory is not dated but presumed to be from the year 1932.

1936 Treasurer Book: Mrs. T. R. Von Boskerck 1/15/36 PAID Transferred 4/36
Treasurer Book Associate: 1936

1937 Treasurer Book, under "Associate": Mrs. Thomas R. Van Boskerck 1/11/37 Pd.

1938 Treasurer Book, Associate: Mrs. Thomas R. Van Boskerck 1/18/38 Pd 1/25/39 Pd 1/4/40 Pd. 1/22/41 Pd. 12/18/41 Pd. 2/20/43 Pd. 1/18/44 Pd. 12/16/44 Pd. 1/26/46 June 5, 1946 July 17, 1947 June 28, 1948 June 29, 1949 June 30, 1950 May 1951 June 1952

1942 Directory: 1332 Prospect Avenue
NOTE: Listed as "Associate Member"

1947 - 1948 Treasurer Book, Active: Van Boskerck, Mrs. T. R. no notation of date of payment. Her name is crossed off.

Founding Member of the Plainfield Garden Club

Most likely related to founding member Mrs. Arthur L. Otterson '15

Sister-in-law to Mrs. William Seymour Tyler '15

Related to Miss Maud Van Boskerck '44 and Miss Edith Van Boskerck '16

1332 Prospect Avenue, Plainfield, NJ 07060

1332 Prospect Avenue, Plainfield, NJ 07060

1332 Prospect Avenue, Plainfield, NJ 07060

1332 Prospect Avenue, Plainfield NJ 07060

1332 Prospect Avenue, Plainfield NJ 07060

1332 Prospect Avenue, Plainfield NJ 07060

October 17, 2014

October 17, 2014

Sally does it again!

Over our 100 year history, the PGC has submitted TEN local gardens for inclusion in the Smithsonian's Archives of American Gardens. As you know, it has been the Garden Club of America's great initiative to document gardens across the nation and have their photos and plans preserved there. Our own Mary Kent just concluded her two-year term as the National Chairman of that GCA committee titled "Garden History & Design." GCA clubs from across the US have painstakingly documented gardens for the Smithsonian. But as most of us can recall, technology wasn't what it is today so some things became "lost" in the great vaults of the Smithsonian. One of these things were the submitted photographs of 1332 Prospect Avenue in Plainfield.

1332 Prospect Avenue was home to Plainfield Garden Club Founding Member Mrs. Thomas Rowe (Lucy Otterson) Van Boskerck '15. Later, it was home to Honorary Member Bernice Swain. Before it became the current home of Jim McGreevey, it belonged to Chris and Kathleen Onieal. Your Editor was once showed these photographs as they were told "they stay with the house" but again, they had been misplaced.

In comes Sally. Sally is friends with Mrs. Van Boskerck's granddaughter, Caroline Norman, who resides in Seattle. Sally remembers visiting 1332 Prospect Avenue often as a child and tells great stories of playing in the attics. Sally, who is a third generation member of the PGC, inquired once more of her friend Caroline if she could locate these mythical photographs. And today they were found and returned to us – and the six sepia photographs are every bit as beautiful as Your Editor remembered.

In addition, Caroline sent along never-before-seen photographs of her Aunt Ethel Tyler and her house at 520 8th Street. We also received our first photo of Mrs. Noss. And perhaps best of all, we are the recipients of some beautiful photographs of 17 year-old Sally, a dashing young Carter and Sally's beautiful children. ENJOY!!

1332 Prospect Avenue and other photos for the Van Boskerck, Tyler, Clendenin, Noss, Genung, Madsen & Booth Families

Van Boskerck, Mrs. Thomas R. '15

photo circa 1950

Van Boskerck, Mrs. Thomas R. '15

photo circa 1950, back of photo

May 8, 1951 Plainfield NJ Courier

Social News

GARDEN CLUB PICNICS IN PARK – Members of the Plainfield Garden Club had a picnic lunch yesterday in the arboretum in Cedar Brook Park. Picnic marked the fifth anniversary of the arboretum and the 20th of the first dogwood plantings in the park. (L to R) Ralph Carver, Union County Park Commission horticulturalist; Mrs. Charles A. Eaton Jr.; Mrs. E. H. Ladd 3rd, president of club; Mrs. R. T. Stevens, new chairman of cornus committee; Miss Harriette R. Halloway, retiring chairman; Mrs. Thomas Van Boskerck, Mrs. Alden de Hart and W. R. Tracy of Union County Park commission

Handwritten date: May 7, 1951
Date on back of clipping: May 8, 1951

NOTE: This clipping was discovered April 2010 in a member's home who had been storing a leather case filled with old medals won by different Plainfield Garden Club members over the years. In this case included a Garden Club of America medal awarded to Harriette Halloway.

Ethel Van Boskerck

Ethel Van Boskerck married to become Mrs. William Seymour Tyler '15

She was sister-in-law to Mrs. Thomas R. Van Boskerck

1915 - 1940 The First Twenty-five Years of the Plainfield Garden Club

written by Mrs. Thomas Van Boskerck, founding member 1915

page 5

The First 25 Years by Mrs. Van Boskerck

page 6

The First 25 Years by Mrs. Van Boskerck

page 7

1915 - 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

page 14

1915 - 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

page 27

Postcard of garden, dated 1936

found in Plainfield Library Archives

Postcard of garden, dated 1936

found in Plainfield Library Archives

Postcard of garden, dated 1936

May 16, 2010 The Seattle Times Obituary for Lucy Winslow Van Boskerck Mitchell

Lucy Otterson Van Boskerck's daughter

Lucy Winslow Van Boskerck Mitchell | Visit Guest Book


Lucy Winslow Van Boskerck MITCHELL Lucy died peacefully on a beautiful May evening at the age of 97. Born to Thomas Rowe and Lucy Otterson Van Boskerck in Plainfield, NJ, Lucy moved to Seattle in 1941 when she married Edwin Potter. They had three children, Caroline, Edwin, Jr. (Andy), and Susan. In 1974 she mar ried Harold DeLong Mitchell, with whom she shared nearly 25 happy years of great compatibility. Her many interests included art, his tory, music, theater, gardening, cooking, traveling, and especially being with people. She had many friends and wrote frequent handwrit ten letters to those who lived in other parts of the country and the world. She was a member of the Junior League, Lake Washington Garden Club, Arboretum Unit 39, Sunset Club, Colonial Dames, an active do cent for 20 years at the Seattle Art Museum, and a member of Epipha ny Parish for over 60 years. Lucy was also active politically, marching to save the Public Market in the 1960s, writing letters until the end of her life to politicians express ing her support for or dissent with their position on a variety of issues, mostly those involving the environ ment, peace, and helping the less for tunate. It was her unremitting con viction that we should at minimum support policies that further educa tion and help those in need, especial ly where children were concerned. She is survived by her children, her beloved grandchildren, Jennifer, Beth, Alex, Audrey, Klara, and Gina, her great-grandchildren, Avery, Patrick, Emily, and Connor, her devoted son-in-law, Rene' Heuscher, and by legions of people who were her friends. A memorial service in celebration of her life will be held at Epiphany Parish on Friday, June 11th at 10:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that gifts be made to Epiphany Parish, Seattle Art Museum. or the Hospice unit of Swedish Visiting Nurse Services

February 22, 1912 New York Observer Wedding Announcement

New York Observer

At the home of her brother, Arthur Leader Otterson, Evergreen Avenue, Plainfield,

Daugher of the late Dr. and Mrs. William Carter Otterson

Reverend Vicars Stevenson of Grace P.E. Church

August 18, 1898 New York Times Obituary for Dr. William Carter Otterson

Prominent surgeon in New York and wrote a book about surgical practices in the Civil War.

1332 Prospect Avenue, Plainfield English Holly

from Gregory Palermo's Plainfield Tree Blog

Sally Booth's memories of Lucy Van Boskerck

Sally remembered that Lucy was a potter and artisan.

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Van Boskerck

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Van Boskerck

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Van Boskerck

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Van Boskerck

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Van Boskerck

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Van Boskerck

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Van Boskerck

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Van Boskerck

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Van Boskerck

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Van Boskerck

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Van Boskerck

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Van Boskerck

second copy with signature

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

May 17, 1957 Club Commemorates Founding of Iris Garden

Caption: GARDEN MARKER VIEWED – Standing before the marker commemorating the 25th anniversary of the Iris Garden in Cedar Brook Park are (left to right) Mrs. Frederick Lockwood, Victor B. King, Jr., John C. Wister, Mr. Richard Tracy and Miss Harriette R. Halloway, founder of this garden. (Courier photo by E. T. Wiggins)

The Plainfield Garden Club and guests yersterday dedicated the the entranceway of the of the Iris Garden in Cedar Brook Park.

Miss Harriette R. Halloway, found of the garden and chairman of the garden of the Iris Garden [not legible] the project was started in 1932, was presented a medal by Mrs. Frederick M. Lockwood, president of the Garden Club.

The medal is [not legible] "from the grateful members of the Plainfield Garden Club Harriette R. Halloway founder and director of the Iris gardens of Cedar Brook Park, Plainfield, 1932 - 1957."

[Not legible] viewed a recently installed [not legible] tablet marking the anniversary of the garden.

"Excercise in Perfection"
Victor R. King, president of the Union County Park Commission, led the gathering [not legible] the garden display was "an excercise in perfection is [not legible]," he said.

The park commission provides the setting for the garden and have [not legible] in the project [not legible]

W. [not legible] Tracy, executive had of the Park Commission when the Iris Garden was started paid tribute to Miss Halloway for her "tireless work and painstaking effort."

Another speaker was Dr. John C. Wister of Swarthmore, Pa., president of the American Iris Society when the garden was started and author of [not legible] article about the garden in the current issue of the Journal of the New York Botanical Gardens.

Miss Halloway spoke briefly and [not legible] on the work of the [not legible] who care for the Iris Garden. She introduced Kenneth Smith, one of the largest contributors of plants to the garden [not legible]

Mrs. Lockwood presided at the program. Guests included members of [not legible] garden clubs and contributors to the garden.

The Iris Garden Committee includes Mrs. Morris E. Benton, Mrs. Alden de Hart, Mrs. Lockwood, Mrs. Donald E. Luce, Mrs. William K. Dunbar, Jr., Mrs. C. Northrop Pond, Mrs. Webster Sandford, Mrs. Arthur D. Seybold, Mrs. John R. Wells, Mrs. Willian G. Wigton, Mrs. Robert MacLeod, vice chairman, and Miss Halloway, chairman.

Special slides [not legible] for the chairman were Mrs. Charles A. Eaton, Jr., Mrs. F. Willoughby Frost ad Mrs. Edwin M. Treat, Jr.

Mrs. Victor M. King was chairman of the special committee assisted by Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux, Mrs. E. B. Newberry, and Miss Margaret Tyler. Also cooperating were Mrs. N. C. Barnhart, Jr., Mrs. William P. Elliott, Mrs. Homer Cochran and Mrs. H. I. Flanders.

Hostesses (not legible)
Other hostesses were Mrs. William W. Coriell, Mrs. Leslie E. Fort, Mrs. William A. Holliday, Mrs. Richard M. Lawton, Mrs. Robert T. Stevens, Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler, Mrs. William S. Tyler. Mrs. Thomas Van Boskerck and Mrs. Orville G. Waring.

The Iris Garden now has more than 1,800 named varieties properly labeled, representing all types of Iris and totaling more than 75,000 plants.

The main part of the garden is [not legible] caring Iris [not legible] and is expected to be is good blooms thorugh the rest of the month.

Smithsonian

Hi Darlene,
This job is AAG Garden #NJ201 Van Boskerck Garden. According to the garden file in the GCA Collection, the documentation was submitted by Evelyn Madsen in 1993. The Garden Owner Release was signed by [Ivy?] Van Boskerck Mitchell on behalf of her parents, Thomas and Lucy Van Boskerck. There are (6) historic images c. 1928-1940 (reflecting the Van Boskerck era) in the archives; the photographer is unknown.

Please feel free to let me know if you have any questions.

Thank you,
Joyce C, AAG

Joyce Connolly | Museum Specialist

Smithsonian Institution | Smithsonian Gardens | Archives of American Gardens
P.O. Box 37012 | Capital Gallery, Suite 3300, MRC 506 | Washington, DC 20013-7012

202-633-5852 (t) | 202-633-5697 (f) | connollyjo@si.edu (email) | www.gardens.si.edu

Smithsonian Archives of American Gardens

1941 - 1942 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg, version 2

[Editor's note: The original document was too faded to scan. This is a different version of a history written by Mrs. Etheldreda Anderegg from 1941 – 1947]

Plainfield Garden Club History
Continued to 1947

On May 14th, 1941 – six years ago to-day in Cedarbrook Park – the Anniversary Dogwood Trees were formally presented to the Park Commission. In making the presentation, Mrs. Arthur Nelson, president, said the garden club wished to make a gift of lasting beauty to mark its anniversary. Mr. Tracey responding for the Park Commissioners commended the club for its civic interest and declared the trees would bring a touch of beauty to thousands of lives. The gift was identified by a large boulder bearing a bronze marker. Mrs. Holliday as chairman of the Dogwood Tree Committee and of the Boulder Committee arranged the anniversary celebration.

That year, 1941, an article appeared in Horticulture in praise of our Shakespeare Garden.

A teacher of the Jefferson School staff was sent to the Audubon Nature Camp in Maine.

Handsome new yearbooks containing a revised constitution, membership lists and permanent covers with loose leaves were issued. About this time some of our members looking back upon some of our achievements of the past, and forward for new horizons to explore, agreed that once more we should storm the ramparts of the Garden Club of America. No organization in garden club circles offers to its members such a wide field of opportunities and assured prestige. This reporter has sat in many important national and state conferences were the effect of this prestige could be observed. When important decisions were due there was an intangible inference in the atmosphere which stemmed to imply – "All those not members of the Garden State of America may now retire to the Jim Crow car."

Better to have failed in the high aim than to succeed vulgarly in the low one" said Browning.

So a committee to explore the possibilities of our being accepted for membership was named by Mrs. Nelson. With Mrs. Corriel as chairman, the committee consisted of Miss Elsie Harmon, Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler, Miss Elizabeth Browne, Miss William Tyler, Mrs. William A. Holliday, Mrs. James Devlin and your historian. Our search for new worlds to conquer began with a meeting at the home of Mrs. William Tyler, on February 21, 1941, when your historian read a letter she had been asked to write to Mrs. Frederic Kellogg, of Morristown Garden Club, prominent garden club personality. The letter would be interesting at this point, but unfortunately it has been lost. Suffice to say, our prise of ourselves was so completely uninhibited that the committee itself was profoundly impressed by the record of performance of the Plainfield Garden Club set forth therein. Shakespeare said "Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful." After all they could not know our worth unless we told them. This time we forestalled a verdict that we had "accomplished nothing."

It might be interjected here that during Mrs. Goddard's regime an effort was made to join the Garden Club of America. Mrs. Kellogg, approached on that occasion, graciously entertained Mrs. Goddard and Mrs. Holliday at luncheon, and they left with the impression that Plainfield, having rejected an invitation to become a charter member of that organization during Mrs. Herring's tenure, it would be futile ever to hope for membership.

An active campaign was launched by all who had relatives or friends in member clubs. This was accelerated when it was learned that a neighboring club had an identical ambition, and had found a sponsor. Because of geographical allocation, we realized that only one of us would be admitted. When it became apparent that we had aroused interest, and had a semblance of chance for acceptance, a special meeting was called at the home of Mrs. Corriel, and the advantages of membership in the Garden Club of America, as well as the financial obligations thoroughly explored. The club was asked to decide whether they wished the committee to proceed with the negotiations. The vote was unanimously affirmative.

Subsequently Mrs. Kellogg requested that the Morristown Club have the pleasure of proposing us, and Mrs. Lauderdale of Short Hills offered to have that club second us. While we waited for the verdict, our campaign never waned.

On May 11th, 1941, tenth anniversary of Iris Garden, the executive board gave a tea to honor Miss Halloway. Mrs. Holliday arranged a delightful affair in the field house. Members of the garden club and thirty guests were invited. Miss Halloway's friends came from far and near while the Iris Garden glowed in a rainbow of colors for the occasion.

The war which was sweeping over France while Mrs. VanBoskerck's history concluded had now reached our shores. "Come to open purple testament of bleeding war." (King Richard) Our members were working for the U.S.O., the Red Cross and Camp Kilmer, apart and in conjunction with the garden club. Plans were sent to the camp to enhance its barren scenes, and seeds to Brittain. Victory gardens were planted, two new chairmanships were added to the executive board – War Activities and Victory Gardens.

In May 1943, we provided vases and began to send flowers regularly to the chapels at Camp Kilmer. This is still being done. Garden books from the Garden Center were placed in the Public Library. Because of gasoline and food rationing it was becoming difficult to hold meetings. Speakers were reluctant to use scarce gasoline and tires for small groups. The war organizations were asking for more things, more effort and more money. The garden club was striving to provide all three.

In June 1943 a delegation from the Garden Club of America came to inspect our members' gardens. Those gardens chosen to head the list were duly explored and approved, but unfortunately the sand of time ran out before they could see them all, and they will never realize all they missed. However, they did see the dogwood planting, the Shakespeare and Iris gardens.

At the annual meeting Mrs. Samuel Carter gave a particularly interesting history of the Shakespeare garden, which was later read by request at the Shakespeare Club. Mrs. Carter said in part: "It has been said that we of the Western World love flowers for what they are, and that the peoples in the East love them for what they suggest. A Shakespeare Garden is full of suggestions, a speaking garden revealing the tradition, folklore and romance of the ancient and timeless plants." Mr. Tracey quoted an authority on the subject as saying that Mrs. Carter's was the finest Shakespeare Garden in the country and that over 15,000 people visited it last year.

Mrs. Coriell announced at the executive board meeting February 2nd, 1944, that Plainfield Garden Club had been elected to membership in the Garden Club of America, and letters of welcome received from sponsoring clubs. It had required three years to reach the new horizons, but a poet once said, "A horizon is nothing but the limit of our sight" so each one attained shows another beckoning in the distance.

Because of rationing, meetings were held in semi-public places of central location. Speakers stressed every phase of conservation. Garden club members were working hard at Camp Kilmer, for the Red Cross and the U.S.O.

In 1945 we became a Founder of the Blue Star Drive, our members contributing generously to this beautiful tribute to the men who served in the armed forces. It is hoped, and the hope is rapidly being fulfilled, that ultimately it will stretch from New Jersey to California.

A new custom was instituted, that of sending a sum of money to the Red Wood Tribute Grove in memory of deceased members. This year, 1945, a dance recital was given to help defray expenses of war activities. Naturally it was under the chairmanship of Miss Maud vonBoskerck, whose motto might well be "Music is my talent – my dearest one." It was very successful artistically and financially.

We helped the New York Botanical Garden celebrate its Fiftieth Anniversary by sending hostesses every day for a week, and by a substantial sum of money for plant research.

In 1945 Lyons Hospital was included on our flower and plant list, and we have continued to supply it weekly for two months of each year. Flowering trees were planted along Blue Star Drive in memory of members' sons lost in the war.

Mrs. Samuel Carter and Miss Harriette Halloway received awards from the Garden Club of New Jersey for their work in Shakespeare and Iris gardens respectively.

Besides bouquets were made twice a week for the wards at Camp Kilmer, beginning in May. Our members volunteered to arrange them.

By this time we were discovering that those "new worlds to conquer" for which we had longed, were providing more opportunities than we could well cope with, and so a junior membership was formed, now numbering six.

The associate membership was enlarged to thirty-five so that active members might be enabled to transfer to it. A questionnaire was sent of work they wished to do. In a Garden Club of America contest for a year's program, Miss Halloway's won honorable mention.

Beginning early in December members of the club met every day in Mrs. Boardman Tyler's studio to make Christmas decorations for the hospital at Camp Kilmer. A big fire blazed in the stove, tons of varied evergreens were provided as well as all other necessary equipment. The studio hummed like Santa Claus' workshop, and great quantities of wreaths with large red bows, small bouquets and other favors emerged to cheer the soldiers at Camp Kilmer and Lyons Hospitals. Joyce Kilmer, for whom the camp was named, wrote of his experience in the other World War: "My shoulders ache beneath my pack, Lie easier cross upon his back" We hoped we eased their burden just a little.

The opportunities offered by the Garden Club of America in the field of conservation are so many and so varied, it was necessary to choose which tangent to pursue. In view of the community and national problems of vandalism and child delinquency, it was thought wise to concentrate the major effort in combating these evils. Working through the public schools seemed the most logical procedure. Mr. Wimer of Jefferson School and Mrs. Rulison of the Park Commission have offered sympathetic cooperation. The first step in the program is the establishment of school gardens, now in process of being planted. The garden club provided the funds. A trial garden, or proving bed was started in Cedarbrook Park in 1946. This year many new perennials were added.

Mrs. Hubble's artistic ability was employed so successfully in redecorating the Garden Center, this observer could scarcely recognize it.

The Garden Club of New Jersey bestowed an award upon us for meritorious work at Camp Kilmer. Miss Halloway has made additions to the peony, Iris and Narcissus gardens. It again became necessary to raise money, and a repeat performance by request, of the dance recital was staged by Miss Van Boskerck.

A suggestion from the Garden Club of New Jersey that we plant a tree to honor garden weekled, after consultation with Mr. Tracey, to the beginning of a dogwood arboretum comprising all the varieties that will grow in this vicinity. Twenty-five varieties have already been planted.

Santa Claus helpers gathered again in Mrs. Tyler's studio to make decorations for Camp Kilmer, and surpassed their effort of the previous year. Our work in this Project was not equaled by that of any club either year.

A thrill of pride must have quivered through our membership from founders to newest recruits, triumphs of our members who exhibited in the New York Flower Show. In the realm of flower arrangement there is no more coveted award than the Fenwick Medal. Our Mrs. deHart was runner up fro that prize last year. This year four exhibits won three blue ribbons and two special awards. It was a magnificent performance which won for us third place in the sweepstakes.

Chapel flowers still are sent to Camp Kilmer. Our members arrange them. We take our turn with the other clubs supplying flowers for the entire hospital regularly from gardens when possible, from florists in cold weather. Two gray Ladies representing Plainfield Garden Club, arrange and distribute the flowers through the wards. The by-laws were again revised and new books issued for the permanent covers.

The executive committee has not overlooked the fact that a War Memorial is of paramount interest to the garden club. Much time as been spent in discussion and deep thought given the matter. Mrs. Boardman Tyler has been named a member of the committee. This year we are sending a teacher to the Audubon Nature Camp in Maine, and another to the Conservation Workshop in Trenton.

Several members have been invited to speak on varied subjects, notably Mrs. Garret Smith on Church Gardens, and Miss Halloway on horticultural subjects. Mrs. Garret has been honored as founder of the Little Garden Club of New York City, of which she is honorary president.

A big of biographical information picked up while perusing the minutes is that our new president, Mrs. Loziuex, became a member of the club in 1940, second vice president in 1942, again in 1945, first vice president in 1946 and president in 1947.

Having been a member of the club only ten years, your historian cannot speak with absolute authority, but thinks it probably that the club reached greater heights of achievement under this administration of Mrs. Tyler than during any comparable period of time. This is partly true because of the new opportunities offered by affiliation with the Garden Club of America, and partly due to Mrs. Tyler's dynamic energy and her determination that the Plainfield Garden Club take advantage of these opportunities and assume its rightful position in the vanguard of progressive garden clubs.

Junius described Mrs. Tyler perfectly when he wrote: "the heart to conceive, the understanding to direct and the hand to execute."

We notice as we go over the chronicles of the garden club, the absence of names once listed so frequently:

Those whom we loved so long, and see no more
Loved and still love,
Not dead, but gone before.

If we ever adopt a coat of arms, it might well show crossed trowels over a field of flower arrangements, the other expounding the futility of vandalism to a young cub. And the motto? It must be from Shakespeare, and it is from The Tempest: Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground.

Or if we choose to abandon the classics: Never a dull moment!

Etheldreda Anderegg
Historian, 1947

Sally's Memory of Mrs. Von Boskerck's attic

My mother [Mrs. Genung] and Lucy were friends and I played there a lot. I have been all through the attic and basement of that house. She had a beautiful garden with daffodils and I can picture her working in the garden.

One day, Caroline Potter, who lived out of town, came to visit. Mrs. Potter would come annually to "visit the boys at the bank" in New York and Caroline and some of her other children would also visit. This is who I played with when my mother went to see Mrs. Von Boskerck. This one time for some reason it was just myself, Caroline Potter and Mrs. Von Boskerck eating in this large elborate dining room. Mrs. Von Boskerck was talking about the squirrels in the garden and how they were a nuisance. She said, "I use those have-a-heart traps to get them and then I drown them!"

"It was so big and dark and scary...lots of boxes and hanging clothes....great for hide and seek. we had a lot of fun up there." – Sally Genung Booth describing the Von Boskerck's attic

August 19, 1898 New York Times Obituary

Dr. William Carter Otterson

Dr. William Carter Otterson of 144 Pierre-pont Street, one of the oldest and best known physicians of Brooklyn, died Wednesday at his country home, at Long Branch, where he had been living since August 1897, when he was first taken sick. Heart disease was the cause of death. Dr. Otterson was born in New York City in 1829. His father was the late Rev. Dr. Otterson, a prominent clergyman in his day, and his mother, before her marriage, was Sarah Dady, a member of the Dady family who were among the first settlers of Nova Scotia, Canada. He was educated in the public Schools of New York City, and in 1853 was graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons. At the outbreak of the civil war he enlisted as a volunteer Surgeon and served in that capacity for three years. Shortly after the war he married Miss Josephine Curtis, daughter of Arthur Curis, a well-known patent medicine man, and went to Brooklyn, where he began the practice of his profession, in which he was successful. Mrs. Otterson died two ywars ago. In 1876-7 he was Sanitary Inspector of the Brooklyn Board of Health, and at the same time Chairman of the Brooklyn Ambulance Service, which was then in its first year. In 1886-7 he was Deputy Commissioner of the Brooklyn Board of Health. He was the author of several books, which met with large sale, among them "Notes on Military Surgery During the Civil War," and "Uses of Water Applied to Diseases." Dr. Otterson was a member of numerous clubs and societies in Brooklyn and New York among them the Kings County Medical Society, the New York Physicians' Mutual Aid Society, and the New York Medical Society. For the past four years Dr. Otterson had done but little work in his profession.

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F50916FA345911738DDDA00994D0405B8885F0D3

New York Observer 1912

VAN BOSKERCK - OTTERSON – On Thursday, Feb. 22, 1912 at the home of her brother, Arthur Leader Otterson, Evergreen Avenue, Plainfield, N.J. by the Rev. E. Vicars Stevenson of Grace P.E. Church. Lucy, daughter of the late Dr. and Mrs. William Carter Otterson to Thomas Rowe Van Boskerck.

http://books.google.com/books?id
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PA287&dq=william+carter+otterson&source
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Plainfield CC

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf res=F70C12FC3A5414728DDDA
10994D0405B818CF1D3

New York Times August 18, 1901

CUP GOLF AT PLAINFIELD

Results of Weekly Marches at Hillside and Park Clubs.

PLAINFIELD, N. J. Aug. 17 – Notwithstanding the warm weather, there was a good attendance at the links of the Hillside Golf Club today. In the contest for the Mellick Cup, played this morning, Miss Maude Van Boskerck carried off the honors, the scores being: Miss Maude Van Boskerck 116, 12 - 104; Miss Herwarden, 110, 4 - 106, Miss May Holly, 137, 30 - 107; Miss May Wharton, 150, 35 - 115; Miss Louise Holly, 172, 25 - 137.

In the play for the Golf Committee Cup on the Hillside links, T. R. Van Boskerck led W. L. Glenny today by three points. The scores were: T. R. Van Boskerck, 92, 12 - 80; W. L. Glenny, 88 6 - 83; Walter Peterson, 99, 15 - 84; W. C. Faber, III, 27 -84; C. W. Abbott, 94, 8 - 86; C. A. Stevenson, 116, 24 - 92; C. C. Burke, Jr., 111, 19 - 92; E. W. Hedges, 115, 22-93; J. W. Sandford, 107, 13 -94; E. W. Newkirk, 122, 27 - 95; H. C. Tracey, 123, 17 - 96; L. H. Van Buren, 113, 15 - 98; J. R. Blake, 118, 18 -100; H. C. Munger, 114, 12 - 102; R. Rushmore, 127, 20 -107.

There was a comparatively small field in the weekly competition for the President's Cup at the Park Golf Club, and first and second honors went to Joseph L. Myers and Charles L. Nichols, respectively, who are newcomers in the race, while Charles B. Morse took third place. Senator Charles A. Reed still leads for the trophy.

The score cards better than 100 were: Joseph L. Myers, 117, 30 - 87; Charles L. Nichols, 119, 30 - 80; Charles B. Morse, 107, 15 - 92; William R. Faber, 113, 21 - 97; H. G. Phillips, 124, 25 - 90; Henry C. Wells, 118, 19 - 99.

Plainfield Public Library Archives

A planting of dogwood trees presented to the Union County Park Commission by the Plainfield Garden Club are dedicted in Cedar Brook Park where the trees were set out. The gift, which is noted on the bronze tablet members of the club and Park Engineer W. R. Tracy (extreme right) are surveying, marks the 25th anniversary of the club. Left to right are Mrs. Charles A. Eaton, Mrs. William W. Coriell, Mrs. Arthur G. Nelson, president; Mrs. Thomas R. Van Bosckerck, Mrs. Henry C. Wells, Mrs. William A. Holliday and Mr. Tracy (Story on Social Page)

circa 1940

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfield Public Library Archive

1936

Mrs. Clifford Baker Heads Garden Club; Reports Stress Recent Civic Improvements

Election of officers of the year's work, especailly that of a civic nature recently undertaken, and an address by Mrs. Otto Lane, who gave instructions in making conservation Christmas wreaths, featured the annual meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club yesterday at the home of Mrs. George W. Fraker in Rahway Road.

Mrs. Leslie Runyon Fort, retiring president, was in charge of the business session. These officers were chosen for the coming year: President, Mrs. Clifford M. Baker; vice-presidents, Mrs. Harry P. Marshall and Mrs. Raymond V. V. Miller; recording secretary, Mrs. Anna Stewartl corresponding secretary, Miss Laura Detwiller; treasurer, Mrs. Frederick W. Yates.

Mrs. Samuel T. Carter, Jr., gave a report of the work in the Shakespeare Garden in Cedar Brook Park. During the year there were a number of plantings in the garden which have added to its attractiveness.

Mrs. Thomas R. Van Boskerck requested donations of jellies for the Flower, Plant and Fruit Guild for distribution among the sick and shut-ins. They can be sent to her home, 1232 Prospect Avenue.

The following letter was received from Edward Baker, Jr., president of the Lions club:

"I am writing you in behalf of the Lions Club of Plainfield in regarde to the very wonderful work the Plainfield Garden Club is doing around our city. Some of the members of our club have seen the work in Cottage Place and also, the brook in Watchung Avenue, which is about completed. We just want you to know that we consider this one of the finest pieces of civic service which has been rendered Plainfield. As citizens and members of the Lions Club we certainly appreciate this work."

A report of unusual interest was presented by the conservation committe of the club. It was in part as follows:

"In early October, 1931, at the request of the Chamber of Commerce a survey was made by our president, Mrs. Leslie R. Fort and the chairman of the conservation committee of the Chamber of Commerce. This report embodied suggestions for work at conscpicuous places in the city . . . be of help in unemployment relief the club made an appropriation to be used as far as possible for wages only. Great interest was at once shown not only by club members, but also by people in many walks of life.

"Two projects were undertaken. The one first begun was Cottage Place close to the railroad tracks. Following some publicity for the work being attempted, gifts came freely – top soil, manure, plants, trees and shrubs. City officials, those of the park and street departments and the New Jersey Central, co-operated gernerously.

"Today a beautiful little park awaits the spring. There have been planted 31 trees where none stood before; 26 rose bushes and over 375 other plants and shurbs have been most carefully set out. This work employed 139 hours at 50 cents an hour and 312 hours at 40 cents an hour. The expenditure was $169.50. Cottage park has been evolved.

"It was evident when the work at Cottage Place was well underway that a second piece of work could be begun. The south bank of Green Brook at the Watchung Avenue bridge was chosen as the worst eyesore in the city. Here, as in Cottage Place, advice was generously given that nothing could be done. But the gardeners just kept on working. Gifts kept coming. A tractor was brought in to cope with stones and debris impossible for men to move. Today another pleasnt little park created by the garden club also awaits the spring.

"Because in pioneer days the little stream, now called Green Brook, was called the Sahcunk River, streams, and the tribe dwelling here along its banks were teh Sahcunk Indians, this little park made by our club is now called Sahcunk Park. In those early days from Rock Avenue to Bound Brook there was located Waccaho-vo-howiohy Village, the name meaning "where you can dig into the ground."

"In two projects 28 1/4 hours at 50 cents an hour and 211 3/4 hours at 40 cents an hour made an expenditure of $99.30. The total planting of 51 trees, 89 roses and 750 other plants and shrubs cost $268.60. Every cent went for wages so the garden club has the enviable record of being able to dispense 100 per cent relief. The fine co-operative spirit shown in every direction made every moment a delight.

"Those of us who really dug in the gardens are quite conscious that many defects may be discovered easily by those so minded. But we trust that these plots, slected as behicles for helping those in distress will be filled with flowers and restful shade. And we hope that each succeeding year will find these spots a little lovelier because of our civic interest in them and that this part of co-operative effort will not be forsaken."

Among the women who were actively engaged in these enterprises were Mrs. Leslie R. Fort, president; Mrs. J. L. Devlin, Mrs. Thomas R. VanBoskerck, Mrs. Garret Smith, Mrs. Henry L. DeForest, Mrs. Clinton Ivins, Miss Elsie Harman, Mrs. Charles A. Eaton and Mrs. Henry Wells.

Plainfield Public Library Archive

Plainfield Public Library Archive

Plainfield Public Library Archive

Plainfield Public Library

April 27, 1956

25TH ANNIVERSARY – A dogwood tree commerating the 25th anniversary of Cornus Arboretum was planted yesterday in Cedar Brook Park by the Plainfield Garden Club. Ralph H. Carver, chief forester of the Union County Park Commission, is turning a spade of earth. Left to right are: Mrs. W. K. Dunbar Jr., horticulture chairman; Mrs. Georges J. His, chairman of the Cornus Arboretum Committee; Mrs. Robert T. Stevens, chairman of the 25th anniversary project and past chairman of the Cornus Arboretum Committee; Mrs. Victor R. King, retiring president; Miss Harriette R. Halloway, founder of the Cornus Arboretum who served as its chairman for eight yeras, and Mrs. Frederick Lockwood, incoming president. Mrs. Thomas VanBoskerck, one of the original committee members, is not shown here.

Plainfield Public Library

April 29, 2012 Email re: Tyler and Van Boskerck Families

Hi Susan,
You are going to love this...I mean really love it.
CPN is Caroline Potter Normann, my friend, the writer. The person who wrote these notes was her mother, Lucy Van Boskerck Potter Mitchel who grew up in Plainfield in the house where the ex governor lives on Prospect Ave. She moved to Seattle when she married. That is the garden she writes about.
If you have any questions, let me know.
Sally


––Original Message––
From: Caroline Normann <caponor@gmail.com>
To: Sally Booth <sbooth1954@aol.com>
Sent: Sun, Apr 29, 2012 9:38 pm
Subject: Tyler information

Dear Sally, I hope I haven't delayed too long. I had to do some digging. Mom wrote pages and pages of memoires, all interesting, occasionally repetitive, as they were written over many years. Happily, I had transcribed them. Some I added comments for the benefit of Jenny and Beth.

There isn't a lot about Aunt Susan. I do remember going to her home for tea when we came to visit. That would have been when I was in grade school. She died quite a while before I went to college. Their home was filled with interesting furniture, paintings and lovely rooms. It was all very formal, but she was always very kind and easy for a child to be with. You are correct about the portrait that she gave to the Met. Its companion piece hung in Aunt Ethel's home and also hangs in the Met next to that given by Aunt Susan. Needless to say I didn't know her well. Aunt Ethel was the youngest of my grandfather's siblings and lived into her late 80s, so I knew her very well and always enjoyed being with her. She was amazingly youthful, open-minded, and contemporary for one of her generation. I visited her often while I was in college.

Let me know if any of the attached are useful to you or if you have an follow-up questions.

Love, Caroline


Caroline Normann
18317 Sunset Way
Edmonds, WA 98026
(425) 771-8925
(425) 530-6687(cell)

April 29, 2012 by Caroline Normann

Aunt Susan Tyler started a class to teach us to make pottery. She had her own studio and kiln in a part of their garage. She was a very cultured lady, a Smith college graduate from the time when that was a rarity, and she had great artistic taste and talent and had traveled widely. She opened up the world of art to us. There were five of us, Peggy Lawrence, Jean Moment, Emilie Parsons, Ruth Foster and me. I now know that in her perceptive way she realized that we each needed something. After our work in the studio, we would go into her beautiful library and were served an elegant tea in front of the fire. She had a glamorous La Salle roadster with a rumble seat, and Patrick her chauffeur, would deliver us home afterwards. She took us to new York to the Metropolitan Museum, to lunch in a fine restaurant like Sherrys and to the opera and to plays. It was a whole new world to me. These things have been my greatest interest every since. She talked about travel and wonderful things to see in Europe. For years after I was grown she and I shared ideas, and I always went to see her when I visited in the East until she finally died at a very old age.

Aunt Ethel interested me in antiques and she was full of creative ideas. She painted stencils and was an outstanding flower arranger and won many prized in the New York Flower Show for the Plainfield Garden Club. She was a gourmet cook herself in spite of having a regular cook in her household. We always had a lot of fun together and were close friends. She had a great sense of humor and of adventure.

Aunt Edith gave me lessons in painting, perspective and color values and later guided me to go to the Art Students league. She realized that I had no skills to fall back on and after studying for a few years she had me work in her interior decorating business in New York to get some practical experience.

Aunt Susan Tyler
Tyler, Mrs. Cornelius Boardman (Susan Tilden Whittlesey)'25 President 1944 - 1947

Aunt Ethel
Tyler, Mrs. William Seymour (Ethel Van Boskerck) '15

Aunt Edith
Noss, Mrs. Henry (Edith Edwards Tyler) '66

Sent in April 29, 2012 written by Lucy Van Boskerck Potter Mitchel

THE GARDEN

Having grown up in Brooklyn, Mother didn't know anything about plants, but she was eager to learn about gardening. The property they bought had originally been a nursery and had many fine large trees, tall pines, oaks, hard wood maples, a tulip tree and locusts in the front of the house. They acquired a good strong Italian gardener, Paul Scalera, who was an immigrant from the Naples area with his wife and numerous children. They lived in South Plainfield about 5 miles away. He used to walk to work and later had a bicycle. The children became educated and eventually were important people in the community. He worked for us for years and we loved and respected him. He was small and gradually grew very stooped. He had dark piercing eyes and a felt hat always somewhat over them. He always spit on his hands before tackling a piece of work with a hoe or a shovel. He seldom washed. He brought delicious thick sandwiches for his lunch filled with sausage and garlic. One day Mother was horrified to discover me in the process of taking a bite which has had offered. She always washed and sterilized everything and my lunches were usually baked potatoes, spinach and lamb chops. I thought his much more exciting. Paul called Mother "the mist" and was "the little mist."

When he first worked for us Mother was upset because he was pulling plants out of the garden and throwing them away. "Paul, what are you doing?" she cried. "He do be die", he told her. One day he appeared with a gift of several little dogwood trees. She was delighted. "Where did you get them, Paul?" "Me catch up at Loiz." Mr. Loizeaux was our neighbor with scads of white Cornus Florida trees in his garden. Mother was embarrassed but could hardly take them back and explain, so she planted them. She bought many more from a nursery and they lined the semi-circular driveway in front of our house with more in back under the tall pine trees.

It was a beautiful garden with stretches of lawn patterned by light and shade. There was a woodsy wild garden with ferns, hypatica, bloodroot, trillium, and masses of fragrant violets, orchids, mertensia and other choice plants, lots of mountain laurel and vivid areas of azaleas. There was a large perennial garden with delphinium, lilies, double campanulas sweet William and other plants. Roses were planted below the terrace. Daddy had a big vegetable garden with grapes and fruit trees as well.

Mother was one of the founders of the Plainfield Garden Club and started the Cornus Arboretum in one of the parks. She was very active in it for years. Every June Mother and Auntie Flo gave two luncheons back-to-back in the garden when everything was in full bloom. It was lovely.

The Swains who bought the house in 1958 have kept up the garden. She was a Loizeaux, so it is fitting that she fell heir to the dogwood trees that Paul gave Mother. There are many birds in the garden: Kentucky cardinals, wrens, orioles, etc.

Sent in April 29, 2012 written by Lucy Van Boskerck Potter Michel

Aunt Ethel Tyler was the youngest Van Boskerck. She was also artistic in a very practical manner. Everything she did was in perfect taste. She added warmth and "fun" to whatever she did. She was a gourmet cook and taught me a lot. She had a cook and maids, but did a lot of fine touches herself (CPN: and always cooked when it was the maid's day off. I visited her often when I was in college, and she was my favorite of all the blood relatives after my grandmother Mom Mom died in early 1960). She won many prizes for her flower arrangements for the Plainfield Garden Club in the big NY flower show. Her husband, William Seymour Tyler, came from an old distinguished New England family. He and his brother, Boardman Tyler, shared a law partnership in NY. Their properties on 7th and 8th Streets in Plainfield ran together at the back with fine gardens. Several of their ancestor paintings are now in the American wing of the Metropolitan Museum. The Tylers had Greek and Latin professors from Amherst College in their background.

Uncle Will ( a century ago) was a man for this "green" era. Aunt Ethel and Aunt Susan both had electric cars which had to be battery charged when not used. They were elegant round with windows, steered with a tiller, and always a crystal vase with a rose. At Lake Sunapee he had an electric boat which glided through the water silently and smoothly. Its batteries were also charged in the boat house when not in use. When they built their summer "camp" he did not want to cut down trees, so they grew right up through the broad railings of the porch. The architecture fitted right into the setting. He bought acres of land and cut a trail through it and gave it in perpetuity to the village, as the Nature Conservancy now.

In Plainfield he started the Boy Scouts and was on the town council. Uncle Boardman was chairman of the library board. They were both active in the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church. After World War I the milk was very bad, so the two brothers bought more property and started Woodbrook Farms. It was all done hygienically, well pasteurized, and the cows taken care of properly. (CPN note: pasteurization was new to the US in early 1900's and not generally required until several decades later, so these men were ahead of their time in trying to provide healthy milk at a time when typhoid, diphtheria and other such diseases were often caused by impure milk.) Our milk from there was delivered by horse & wagon. Uncle Will's cousin was president of Abercrombie and Fitch, which had the best sporting goods equipment, and was an important store then. I had an "old town" canoe from there, and Uncle Will taught me how to paddle "Indian style", kneeling on the floor. (bottom of the canoe).
I

Note from Sally Booth:

Jean Moment was the daughter of Dr. Moment the minister of Crescent Ave. Pres. Church. She married Walter Douglas. I don't know if she was a member...I kind of think not. Peggy Lawrence never married. She taught at Spence or Chapin (girl's schools) in NYC I don't know who Ruth Foster married and I would only know her by her married name.

George W. Van Boskerck

George W. Van Boskerck

Birth: Aug. 21, 1832
Hackensack
Bergen County
New Jersey, USA
Death: Apr. 22, 1911
Plainfield
Union County
New Jersey, USA

Former Resident Dead.

George W. Van Boskerck, a former resident of this town, died at his home in Plainfield last Saurday morning after a short illness. He was an active worker in the Episcopal church and one of its liberal supporters during his residence in Westfield. Of his life, the Plainfield Courier-News says:

"Mr. Van Boskerck was born in Hackensack, New Jersey, August 21, 1832. His father was John Van Boskerck, and his mother Elizabeth Taylor. His grandfather, George Van Boskerck, of New York City, was of old Dutch Colonial stock, and was a soldier in the Revoluntionary army.

"Mr. Van Boskerck was one of the original members of the old Corn Exchange, which became the New York Produce Exchange, of which he was at the time of his death one of the oldest members, and where he has been engaged in the commission business for the past sixty years. He was a veteran of the Seventh Regiment, N.Y.N.G., of which he became a member in 1857, in the Sixth Company, with which he saw active servie during the "draft riots," in New York City, at Webb's Shipyard. He was a member of the Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York.

"Mr. Van Boskerck has been a resident of Plainfield for the past twenty-two years. He is survived by his widow, two sons, and five daughters: Thomas R. and George T. Van Boskerck; the Misses Sarah M., Maude and Edith Van Boskerck, and Mrs. William S. Tyler, of this city, and Mrs. William Bloodgood, of New York."

The funeral was held from his late residence on West Seventh street, Plainfield, last Monday, and was attended by a large gathering of relatives and friends. Rev. E. Vicara Stevenson, rector of Grace Episcopal church, of Plainfield, officiated, and interment was made in Woodlawn Cemetery, New York. There was a large collecton of floral tributes from friends, who are grieved over his demise. A quartette sang with a wealth of expression and feeling, "Nearer My God to Thee," Peace, Perfect Peace," and "Now the Strife is O'er."

Published by The Westfield Leader on April 26, 1911.


Burial:
Woodlawn Cemetery
Bronx
Bronx County
New York, USA

Created by: Lnanaa
Record added: Jun 07, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 91514578

1927 Plainfield Directory

http://archive.wmlnj.org/CityDirectory/1927/pg_0553.pdf

Van Boskerck Edith interior decorator r718 Central
Van Boskerck Geo T grain merchant (NY) h718 Central av
Van Boskerck Maud music tchr (piano) 825 Park av h do
Van Boskerck Sarah M. social service wkr r718 Central av
Van Boskerck Thos R (Lucy) broker h1332 Prospect

2006 September thru December Board and Meeting Minutes

The Van Boskerck home, also the former home of PGC member Bernice Swain, was discussed by the PGC to be included on a garden tour. The home is currently owned by Kathleen Onieal.

1920 Muhlenberg Hospital Womens Auxiliary

Mrs. T. R. Van Bosckerck
1332 Prospect Avenue

1915 - 1923 List of Meetings

1925 Meeting Minutes

May 13

May 13, 1925 Meeting Minutes

June 10, 1925 Meeting Minutes

June 24, 1925 Meeting Minutes

1936 - 1937 Meeting Minutes

1938-1939 Meeting Minutes

1918 Meeting Minutes

1919 Meeting Minutes

1920 Meeting Minutes

March 23, 2013 Email from Caroline Potter

Dear Susan, how thoughtful of you to send this to me. I have to imagine that Sally Booth gave you my name and contact information. I am sorry to say the only person who looks at all familiar to me is the lady with the camera and also on the right in #15 of the pdf file, who I think might be Geraldine (Gerry) Acomb. She and my mother (Lucy Van Boskerck Potter Mitchell) and Sally's mother were close friends. I have two portraits Gerry she did, one very large and elegant one of my mother in a Victorian gown that hung in the front hall of my grandparents' home on Prospect Avenue, and another small one of me as a very young child. Sadly none of the other people in your photos look at all familiar with the possible exception of the man on the left in #3 who could be Henry Noss, Ethel's son-in-law, husband of Edith. But I can't imagine if he were there that Edith, Ethel's daughter, would not also have been, and there is no one in any of these photos who looks like Edith. The Nosses did live in Plainfield in 1965, as I used to visit them in the early 1960s. If they attended the event, I"m sure the photographer (Gerry?) would have captured them both, likely with Ethel. Edith wrote a history of the club which is in the archives. He was a devoted gardener (and retired NYU history professor who I believe also served as dept chair for some years). Unless they were away when the event took place I cannot imagine that they were not there. There are also multiple photos and references to all of the Van Boskerck/Tyler members from the beginnings.

I regret being of little help to you and wish my mother were still living. She would have known and delighted in identifying many of them of the older set in attendance, but alas she died in 2010 at 97.

Feel free to ask anything else of me.

Best regards,
Caroline

[NOTE: See 1965 Archives for more information]

March 23, 2013 Email from Caroline Normann

Dear Susan, how thoughtful of you to send this to me. I have to imagine that Sally Booth gave you my name and contact information. I am sorry to say the only person who looks at all familiar to me is the lady with the camera and also on the right in #15 of the pdf file, who I think might be Geraldine (Gerry) Acomb. She and my mother (Lucy Van Boskerck Potter Mitchell) and Sally's mother were close friends. I have two portraits Gerry she did, one very large and elegant one of my mother in a Victorian gown that hung in the front hall of my grandparents' home on Prospect Avenue, and another small one of me as a very young child. Sadly none of the other people in your photos look at all familiar with the possible exception of the man on the left in #3 who could be Henry Noss, Ethel's son-in-law, husband of Edith. But I can't imagine if he were there that Edith, Ethel's daughter, would not also have been, and there is no one in any of these photos who looks like Edith. The Nosses did live in Plainfield in 1965, as I used to visit them in the early 1960s. If they attended the event, I"m sure the photographer (Gerry?) would have captured them both, likely with Ethel. Edith wrote a history of the club which is in the archives. He was a devoted gardener (and retired NYU history professor who I believe also served as dept chair for some years). Unless they were away when the event took place I cannot imagine that they were not there. There are also multiple photos and references to all of the Van Boskerck/Tyler members from the beginnings.

I regret being of little help to you and wish my mother were still living. She would have known and delighted in identifying many of them of the older set in attendance, but alas she died in 2010 at 97.

Feel free to ask anything else of me.

Best regards,
Caroline

[NOTE: See 1965 Archives for more information]

Email from Caroline Potter March 28, 2013

Dear Susan,

of course I do not mind that Sally shared my contact information, and you may contact me anytime.

I have two portraits Mrs. Acomb painted. The one of mother was probaby done in the early 1930s and is stored elsewhere right now ... it is very large and my house does not accommodate that much wall space, but your request gives me incentive to retrieve it from my friend's kind care. I appreciate your patience as I do this. Meanwhile a photo of the small portrait of me is easy and is attached. Mom wrote on its back that is of me and was painted in late 1943 or early 1944 when I was just over a year old.

I wish you well as you continue your search for the identity of those dinner guests.

Best regards, Caroline

Email from Caroline Potter March 28, 2013

Caroline Andrews Potter
1 year old 1943
Geraldine de Goutiere Acomb

1915 Meeting Minutes

Plainfield Garden Club
Minutes of regular meetings
May 12, 1915 to March 20, 1918
From its origination

May 12 – 1915

Minutes of the 1st General Meeting

First general meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club was held at the home of Mrs. Conner on Wednesday, May 12th at 3.30 o'clock.

President in the chair. Roll call showed 39 members present.

During the meeting rain began to fall to everyones regret making a tour of Mrs. Conner's garden impossible.

A few ? of congratulations on the formation of the Club by the President was followed by some notices given, and request to have members offer to exchange plants when possible.

We then listened to a most comprehensive talk on perennials given by Mr. Maurice Field of New York which was greatly enjoyed and appreciated by the members. He brought specimens of many plants showing how to divide and separate grubs and other garden enemies.

Continued.

All felt stimulated and helped by his talk and as the rain prevented us from going in the garden his lecture of two hours ?? too long.

After a cup of tea the meeting adjourned.

Ella M. Gilbert Secy
Approved.


May 26, 1915

Minutes of the 2nd General Meeting

Second general meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club was held at the home of Mrs. Barrows on Wed. May 26th at 3 oclock.

President in the Chair.

Roll call showed 33 members present.

Minutes of previous meeting were read and approved.

Giving to the inclement conditions of the weather the meeting was held indoors. ?? later on the sun came out and a visit to the garden was enjoyed by all.

Mrs. E. Yarde Breeze of Raritan ? Garden Club gave a very delightful paper on foreign gardens.

A letter was read from Mrs. W. S. Tyler giving notice of sale of garden things for the benefit of a young boy that she and some others were especially interested in.

It was noted ?? bring out of town guests and the Hostess. Plainfield friends After enjoying the hospitality of the hostess tea being served the meeting adjourned.

Ella M. Gilbert secy
Approved


June 2 – 1915

Minutes of the 3rd general meeting

The third general meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club was held in the garden of Mrs. Dumont on Wednesday June 9th at three oclock.

The president in the chair.

Roll call showed 25 members present. Minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved.

Miss R. E. Zimmerman of Brooklyn gave a most interesting and helpful talk in "L?? garden flowers."

It was noted to have a "Bird talk" during the year and also to have Mr. Maurice Field give a course of lectures during our next season beginning in April.

It was a most glorious June day and the garden most beautiful which was enjoyed and appreciated by those present who strolled about among the flowers. Tea was served in the tea house. The meeting then adjourned.

Ella M. Gibert Secy
Approved

June 23 -1915

Minutes of the 4th general meeting

The fourth general meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club was held in the garden of Mrs. Runkle, on Wednesday June 23rd at 3 oclock.

The president in the chair.

Roll call showed 25 members present.

Minutes of the former meeting were read and approved.

Mrs. L. A. Brown of Shedvira?? Garden Club Garden City L. I. read a most useful and interesting paper on color harmony in gardens she also answered very pleasantly all questions asked regarding plants and flowers.


July 14 – 1915

Minutes of the 5th General Meeting of the Garden Club was held on July 14 in the garden of Mrs. Fleming.

The day was a perfect summer one and we were addressed by Mr. L. V. F. Randolph who read an original paper on "What Some Plants Feel and Think."

An interesting discussion followed after which we took a stroll in Mrs. Fleming's charming garden and then were refreshed with fruit punch and cakes served under a ?? on the lawn. After a delightful afternoon meeting adjourned.


Ella M. Gilbert Secy
Per H. B. H.


September 15 – 1915

Minutes of the 5th General Meeting of the Garden Club

A regular meeting of the Garden Club was held at the delightful farm of Mrs. Eaton on Valley Road, on Wednesday, Sept. 15th. The President presiding.

In the absence of the Secy, Mrs. Patterson called the roll and heard the minutes of the last regular meeting. The Pres. Welcomed the members of the Club after the separation of the summer & suggested that some slight expression of gratitude for the please we had enjoyed at the Garden Club meetings or shown by a gift of 100 glasses of jelly to the Fruit & Flower ?ision. This idea was approved by the members present in that 2 glasses of fruit jelly from each member may be sent to the house of the Pres. For this purpose. A letter was read from Mr. Chester Jay Hunt extending a warm invitation to the Garden Club to visit his tulip gardens next spring and make a picnic of the day there. We then listened to a delightful talk on "Roses" by Mr. Geo. H. Peterson of Fair Lawn, N. J. and were afterwards ?? with fruit punch and cakes in an arbor on the grounds.

A visit to the farm buildings & flower garden brought to a ?? a delightful day.

Ella M. Gilbert Secy
From H. B. H.


September 22 – 1915

Minutes of the 7th General Meeting of the Garden Club

A regular meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club was held at the Bungalow of Mrs. Mellick on Wednesday Sept. 22nd at three o'clock.

Mrs. E. J. Patterson acting as Sec'y in the absence of Mrs. Gilbert.

The afternoon was given up to a talk on "Birds in Our Gardens" by Mr. Bucher S. Bowdish – Secty v ?? of the ?? State Audubon Society of was felt greatly moved by the pleasure of Mrs. William Dra??? Who has done so much for the conservation of Bird Life in America. The Club was entertained delightfully by Mrs. Mellick after which we adjourned.

Ella M. Gilbert – Secy
Per H. B. H.


Oct 13 – 1915

Minutes of the 8th General Meeting of the Garden Club

A regular meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club was held at the residence of Mrs. H. N. Stevens on Wednesday Oct 13th at 3 o'clock. Pres. In chair. After roll call & minutes of last meeting read to approved, a letter was read from our lecturer on "Birds" of the meeting before. Minutes were approved by two of the members. The day was like one in June and all enjoyed the interchange of ideas and the informal talk of our garden troubles. The lecturer of the day was Mr. Otto Shilow Sec'y & Treas. Of the Duer ? Co. who gave us a most instructive and helpful talk on "the care of our gardens." All had so many questions to ask that after a long ?? it was difficult for Mr. Shilow to get a cup of tea before his departure for Philadelphia.

All expressed the wish that we might have the pleasure of having him again. After a social gathering about Mrs. Stevens tea table, the club adjourned.

Ella M. Gilbert, Secy
Per H. B. H.


NOTE: This next entry follows in the order the Meeting Minute notebook was photographed, however the date is "1916" – not sure if this entry is from 1916 or was not recorded correctly as "1915" which seems unlikely.


Oct. 27, 1916

Minutes of the 9th General Meeting of the Garden Club

A regular meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club was held at the residence of Mrs. E. T. Barrows on Wednesday Oct. 24? At 3 o'clock.

The Pres. In the chair. After the roll call and the minutes of the previous meeting read & approved, the Pres. Brought up the subject of the mid winter lecture, to be held in the evening and for which an admission should be charged.

After some discussion it was decided to have Mr. Shilow give his illustrated lecture "Flowers From Snow to Snow" admission to be 50 center and each member to be responsible for two tickets.

The time and place was left to be determined.

The Pres. Expressed our great sorrow in the death of Mrs. Louis Hyde – the members of the Club all standing and moved that a note of condolence be sent to Mr. Hyde and his family.

The Pres. Announced that Mrs. Ackerman and Mrs. Ivins had provided a lecture from Mr. Field for the . . . instead of having a meeting of their homes this year. He then spoke to us on "Bulbs.: Late in the afternoon tea was served & the meeting adjourned.

Lucy Van Boskerck
Secy pro tem

1915 - 1918 Meeting Minutes

March 27, 2013 New York Times

James McGreevey, This Side of Redemption

Crescent Avenue Historic District

Crescent Avenue Historic District form for the National Register of Historic Places

825 Park Avenue
c. 1890

Somewhat classical treatment of the recessed entryway through the adaption of the original porch columns and pediment. Leaded glass fan and side lights in the front door surround. The scalloped valance on the third story is not original.

Four family

This house has been extensively but tastefully altered, which has changed much of the original design to the extent that it is difficult to determine the original elements. The general effect is of a quite elegance and it has been well adapted its use as professional offices. The front picket fence on a stone base relates well to the District.

Marsh & Gette Architects

Architectural Review Volume 4

July 29, 2013 Mrs. Van Hoesen's War Effort

Terrain, that wonderful garden store in PA, sent along an article titled "American Gardener: Victory Gardens"

Between 1941 and 1945, posters like the ones above [See Link] dotted the American landscape, encouraging citizens to support the war by planting a vegetable garden at home. First planted in 1917 during WWI, "victory gardens" became especially important during WWII, when a combination of rationing, transportation shortages, and the need for canned goods to feed overseas troops meant that Americans had to find new ways to put food on the table. While alleviating the pressure on the nation's food supply, the gardens also provided a morale boost to citizens by letting them contribute to the war effort. At the height of the movement, more than 20 million gardens were planted in backyards, at schools, and even on city rooftops. The campaign was a stunning success– in 1944, an estimated 40% of all vegetables grown in the US came from victory gardens. Similar efforts took root in the UK and Canada, with related initiatives that encouraged canning homegrown vegetables. America's most famous victory gardener was First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, who planted her own plot at the White House.

Want to learn more? Two original victory gardens are still growing– the Fenway Victory Gardens in Boston, and the Dowling Community Garden in Minneapolis. You can also visit a modern garden based on a 1943 pamphlet design at the National Museum of American History in Washington D.C.

In our own 1942 Archives, Mrs. Anderegg writes:
The war which was sweeping over France while Mrs. Van Boskerck's history* concluded had now reached our shores. "Come to open purple testament of bleeding war." (King Richard) Our members were working for the U.S.O., the Red Cross and Camp Kilmer, apart and in conjunction with the garden club. Plans were sent to the camp to enhance its barren scenes, and seeds to Brittain. Victory gardens were planted, two new chairmanships were added to the executive board – War Activities and Victory Gardens.

*Mrs. A refers to the club history, the first 25 years, written by Mrs. VB in 1940, mere months before the bombing of Pearl Harbor and our nation's entry into WWII.

One of the most interesting bits of information we have from the WWII years, is a speech by Mrs. Van Hoesen telling of her personal experience in garden therapy at Camp Kilmer in Edison.

Camp Kilmer in 1945 served as an Army Hospital for returning injured soldiers and the PGC was very involved there with the therapy gardens, a Victory Garden, a flower garden and delivering, twice a week, flower arrangements to the wards even though there was gasoline rationing making even local travel very difficult. (During WWII, our meetings were held at a locale that was in walking distance of everyone's homes.)

Mrs. Hoesen was asked to give this speech at the national Victory Garden Conference of the WFA (War Food Administration):

Through gardening, Plainfield Garden Club Member Mrs. Van Hoesen Helps Our Nation's Heroes Recover

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

April 23, 1965 Garden Club History Reviews Past 50 Years

A history of the Plainfield Garden Club was presented to members Wednesday by Mrs. Edward H. Ladd 3rd at the club's annual meeting in the home of Mrs. Edgar F. Davis, 1080 Rahway Rd. Mrs. Alexander Kroll was co-hostess.

The history has been published to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Garden Club, which was formed in 1915.

The first part of the history was written by a charter member, now deceased, Mrs. Thomas Van Boskerck. The second part, covering the years from 1940-1965, was written by Mrs. Gerald Furman, and highlights the accomplishment of all the departments of the club.

Special emphasis is given to the three continuing projects: the Shakespeare Garden started in 1927; the Dogwood Collection, sponsored since 1946; and the Iris Garden begun in 1932; all in Cedar Brook Park. These three gardens have received national recognition and many awards for excellence.

The Union County Park Commission has just named the dogwood planting, "The Harriette R. Halloway Cornus Collection," in appreciation of the club's many years of service to park activities. Miss Halloway, 90, is the Garden Club's oldest living member and an authority on cornus and iris.

Mrs. Edwin J. Fitzpatrick, nominating chairman, present the slate of officers which was elected as follows: President, Mrs. Wayne J. Holman Jr.; first vice president, Mrs. David Sanders; second vice president, Mrs. F. Gregg Burger; treasurer, Mrs. William K. Dunbar Jr.; recording secretary, Mrs. C. Northrup Pond; and corresponding secretary, Mrs. C. Benson Wigton Jr.

Mrs. Holman and Mrs. Sandford will attend the annual meeting of the Garden Club of America in Cleveland, Ohio from May 10-14. Mrs. Holman will present a resume of recent program given by members of the Plainfield Club on the botanical background of the mallow plant family.

Mrs. John Wells of Valley Road, Watchung, said the club will again give scholarships to the Audubon summer camps or the N. J. State School of Conservation at Stokes Forest, as has been done since 1941. School teachers and scout leaders are eligible to apply for the scholarships.

A colored movie, entitled "Wings Over Blitzen," was shown, picturing wildlife in its natural state in the Malheur Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Ore.

Tea followed the meeting. Mrs. C. Benson Wigton and Mrs. Blanche P. Nash presided at the tea table, which was decorated with an arrangement of white spring flowers.

Tuesday, May 8, 1956

Tea to Honor Pioneer in Planting of Dogwood

Almost as though it had the power of imagination, the dogwood in Cornus (Dogwood) Dr., Cedar Brook Park, is expected to reach its annual stage of flowering beauty this week.

For tomorrow, at 4 p.m., members of the Plainfield Garden Club and its Cornus Arboretum Committee will hold a tea and reception to honor two pioneers in the 25-year-ago development of what has become the most outstanding horticultural display in this section of the country.

They are Mrs. Thomas van Boskerck and Miss Harriette R. Halloway and the tribute will be paid to them in the Field House of Cedar Brook Park, with Mrs. Robert T. Stevens acting as chairman, assisted by Mrs. Georges J. His and Mrs. William K. Dunbar Jr.

Commission Cooperated

Mrs. Van Boskerck suggested the planting of a vacant space in Cedar Brook park – then under development – with dogwood, in 1931, a suggestion which aroused immediately the interest of the Garden Club members. Support came from Miss Halloway and the then club president, Mrs. Henry Wells. Cooperation of the Union County Park Commission was obtained.

In 1940, plans were made for an extended planting, with Mrs. William A. Holliday and Mrs. William Tyler as co-chairmen. They approached the Park Commission and that body furnished a large boulder and suitable tablet for the drive entrance.

The 1931 planting had included 78 white and 17 pink dogwoods. In 1940, another 110 were added, on both sides of the drive. The Park Commission added a background of evergreens to make the setting even more attractive.

Plantings Expanded

The suggestion of W. R. Tracey of the commission led, in 1946, to further expansion of the plantings into a full arboretum. In its development, the advice and cooperation of Ralph H. Carver of the commission, was an important factor.

There are now 45 varieties of dogwood in the Arboretum, and some young trees are grown to add to the arboretum in the commission's nurseries. So extensive was the local display grown that it now is necessary to exchange with other arboretums in the nations, since the average nursery no longer has the capacity to supply rare and beautiful varieties.

By request, articles on the Cedar Brook Arboretum have been written for the Bulletin of the Garden Club of America and the Bulletin of the Arboretum organization in Seattle, Wash.

Dr. Donald Wyman, head of the Arnold Arboretum, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., has listed the Cedar Brook plantings in his authoritative "Arboretums and Botanical Gardens of America," a unique distinction.

One rare species is the "Cornus Nuttalli," native of the West Coast from British Columbia to Seattle, Wash. Told that it had once held a single bloom here, Dr. Wyman was astounded.

This year, the rare tree, planted by Miss Halloway, has nine buds.

Tuesday, May 8, 1956

Tuesday, May 8, 1956

1903 Charities: The Official Organ of the Charity Organization Society ..., Volume 10

1903 Charities: The Official Organ of the Charity Organization Society ..., Volume 10

Saturday, May 21, 1966 Something to Be proud of . . . Many Worked Together for County Park Displayt

Caption: DOGWOOD IN FLOWER – Cedar Brook Park's Dogwood Arboretum is a horticultural collection of 61 varieties that is the pride of Plainfield Garden Club and the Union County Park Commission. The display of dogwood blossoms is not the showiest, but it's the most complete in the country. Each year the trees in bloom are a joy to those who visit the planting or follow the drive through Cedar Brook Park. The trees in the Cornus Collections line both sides of the Park Drive.

Something to be Proud of . . .

Many Worked Together for County Park Display

Horticulturalists know it as the "Cornus Collection in Plainfield." The Plainfield Garden Club speaks of it as "our dogwood plantings in Cedar Brook Park." Since last year, the double line of pink and white flowering trees at the Park Ave. entrance to the park as been officially named "The Harriette R. Halloway Cornus Collection."

But to most admirers of the annual evidence that spring is here, it is just "those beautiful trees in the park" whether they refer to them by their botanical or popular name – cornus or dogwood.

Many who come to see the trees are unaware that this collection includes ore than 60 varieties of dogwood, every kind that can grow in this climate. While the trees are beautiful, it is the horticultural collection of so many varieties that counts to the credit of the Plainfield Garden Club even more than the display. It is not the greatest show, but it's the most complete collection.

Dr. Benjamin Blackburn of Drew University in Madison has remarked that this group of trees, growing in a compact reserved area, is a marked achievement on the part of the Union Count Park Commission, the Plainfield Garden Club and Miss Halloway, who served for more than 35 years as a volunteer consultant to the Park Commission and in keeping records of all the plantings.

Miss Halloway, for whom the grove is named, still watches for the flowering season of the dogwood. Now 91, Miss Halloway is a resident at the McCutchen Nursing Home, North Plainfield.

Among the personal possession she treasurers is the Distinguished Service Medal of the Garden Club of America. Also she is a fellow of the Royal Horticultural Society of England and a member of the American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboretums. She is a member of the Plainfield Garden Club and has earned recognition from the New York Botanical Gardens, American Horticultural Society and other organizations for her work and her writings about gardens, flowers, and flowering shrubs and trees.

A great part of the reward to her and the Plainfield Garden Club is that so many people can enjoy the cornus collection in the park. Miss Halloway says: "Each year the trees continue to be beautiful and a joy, if not forever, at least for many years."

THE CEDAR BROOK Park Dogwood Collection is unique, Dr. Blackburn believes. "None other is known to exist in this county," he said, "and a match for it is not be found growing in the Royal Botanic Gardens in London or in Edinburgh or other famous gardens in Great Britain and Europe."

The dogwood collection got its start in 1931 when W. R. Tracy, superintendent of the Union County Park Commission, decided to turn an old city dump into a beauty spot and the Plainfield Garden Club contributed 75 white dogwoods to help the project.

In 1940 the club gave an additional 110 trees to balance the two sides of the drive and complete the groupings. The 61 species now flourishing in the park include nine from Asia, two from Europe and 12 from North America, a number of hybrids and "cultivars," special horticultural selections that have been propagated vegetatively.

The Park Commission has planted a background of evergreens, including hemlocks and pines, to enhance the effect of the dogwoods. Enlarging on its original purpose to beautify the area, the Plainfield Garden Club cooperated throughout the year with the commission in developing the collection and all varieties are now labelled with correct names. A boulder with a tablet also has been installed in the area..

At the 25th anniversary of the Garden Club, held in 1940, Mrs. Thomas R. VanBoskerck, who had written a history of the club's first quarter century, recalled that the members had anticipated the park's work in beautifying the dump area and first had presented 50 dogwood trees to the park through the generosity of Mrs. Charles A. Eaton who took them from her own woods in Watchung. A fund to beautify the park had been started originally in 1924 with Mrs. William Halliday in charge.

Dr. Blackburn points to the Cornus Collection in Plainfield as an admirable example of cooperation among groups interested in the cultural and horticultural riches of a municipality.

25 Years Ago, 1941

Clifford M. Baker, president of the Muhlenberg Hospital board of governors announced that Allen V. Heely, headmaster of the Lawrenceville School, would speak at the graduation exercises for the hospital's school of nursing. Mr. Heely's sister-in-law, Mrs. Lawrence S. Heely, was president of the Women's Auxiliary Hospital. Dr. William B. Fort, senior attending surgeon, was to award the prizes, and William Whitwell Robison and Mrs. Edward Leroy Voorhees were to present diplomas and pins.

The Rev. Harry James Knickle, rector of Grace Episcopal Church, was observing the 10th anniversary of his priesthood.

George A. Ballantyne of 30 Westervelt Ave. was honored by the First Presbyterian Church Session for years of faithful service as head usher.

Saturday, May 21, 1966 Something to Be proud of . . . Many Worked Together for County Park Displayt

Saturday, May 21, 1966 Something to Be proud of . . . Many Worked Together for County Park Displayt

Saturday, May 21, 1966 Something to Be proud of . . . Many Worked Together for County Park Displayt

1941 Courier-News Plainfield Merits Classification as 'City of Beautiful Trees'

November 30, 2013: Found in Barbara Tracy Sandford's memorabilia. Written by PGC Member Mrs. Garret Smith

"I call Plainfield the City of Beautiful Trees," and out-of-town visitor remarked to me the other day. "My business takes me to many towns about this size clear across the country. Trees, or their lack, always impress me most about a town. Beautiful building can't make up for the lack of them. Many towns seem to have choice trees only in one or two sections. Others have only a few tree-lined avenues. But every part of Plainfield has not only interesting individual trees, but long stretches of streets where treetops meet in green arches above the traffic. That doesn't just happen. This town must have been founded by tree-lovers."

The stranger was right, as many specimen trees on old private properties testify. They are trees that were rare and expensive when planted years ago. A number of well-to-do property owners appreciated trees and collected choice kinds. The street trees of about this age also show that far-sighted men planned to make the town keep growing more beautiful in ways that everyone enjoys.

Trees have always been essential to Plainfielders. In the early days elms stretched down North Ave. from east to the west city boundaries. Many still remain now 70 to 80 years old. That avenue helped to establish Plainfield's policy of "beautiful trees for every street."

Value Appreciated
The city's mayors and councilmen have appreciate the value of trees . . . Ginko . . . now ripening, in the edge of the station grounds, near the corner of the drug store.

Among its immediate neighbors, at this station are a Red Maple, Austrian Pine, English Elm, Horse Chestnut, several Magnolias and a Sycamore Maple, the latter near the middle of the grass oval. Purple Beech, White Pine and two Hemlocks stand at the west exit.

Lindens at Spot
On the North Ave. side of the station is an interesting clump of three Lindens – no two alike. Evergreens are represented by three Scotch Pines, an Austrian and a White Pine, and a tall, slender Spruce. In this little park are also Sugar Swamp and Silver Maples, and a clump of low-growing Beeches. Looking upward to the railroad level, one sees, besides the specimen Ginko mentioned, two Catalpas, a Weeping Mulberry, two Red Maples and an Austrian Pine. A big Pin Oak, two or three Scarlet Oaks, a . . . .

. . . boats glided over Green Brook and when Plainfield and New York social leaders came in big carriages, drawn by spanking teams, to garden musicals, gay dinners, dances and teas as the Johnston's guests.

All of Plainfield's school grounds are constantly growing more attractive. Environment of vines, trees, plants and shrubs awaken appreciation of Nature's beauty that is a lifelong source of pleasure.

Hubbard School, one of the city's architectural gems, has always been regarded as in a class by itself. Its beauty is greatly enhanced by choice plant material on its ample grounds, partly framed by Barberry. Large specimen Japanese Yews arrest attention, along with Sourwoods, or "Lily-of-the-Valley Tree," whose branches bear long one-sided racemes of white flowers in summer and whose leaves are vivid scarlet in autumn.

White Pine, Cedar, Pfitzer Junipers are shadowy evergreen foils for airy bloom of Weeping Japanese . . .

Among them are the old Elms in North Ave., mentioned before; London Planes from Watchung Ave. to Terrill Rd.; Ash in St. Mary's Ave.; Pin Oaks and Planes in Park Ave.; Sycamore Maples in Bellevue Ave.; Norway Maples in both Leland and Monroe Ave. sections. Tulip trees now grow in Central St., along Maxon School grounds, and Ginkos in Landsdowne Terr. In Cleveland Ave., near Grace Church, the lacy foliage of the decorative Mountain Ash, or Rowan Tree, contrasts at this season with bunches of bright hollylike berries. Many years ago the late Simeon Cruikshank planted Buckeyes along his corner property ["Sacmoore" 831 Belvidere] at Belvidere and Watchung Aves. Much smaller than familiar Horse Chestnut and with brighter pink flower-spikes they have always been greatly admired. In autumn the brilliant, scarlet, star-shape leaves of Liquid-ambar, or Sweetgum, glorifies a patch of Ravine Rd. After a shower, or if bruised, the foliage is fragrant. Corky bark and thorny-skinned fruit like little apples, complete this tree's unique characteristics.

Close to 150 trees, of many species, are part of the Muhlenberg Hospital landscape. The long front path beneath the Maples, and on the west the wide Elm-bordered stretch of green lawn leading to a quiet pool, with its amusing little bronze fountain figure, form two vistas of ever-increasing charm. Wide borders of intermingling trees and flowering shrubs frame the property.

The purple leaves of the two Schwedler Maples attract much attention in the spring. So do the Apple trees and Dogwoods that trim the grounds like big bouquets, set off by Hemlocks, Spruce and Pine. Chinese Dogwoods, given by graduate nurses, are especially prized. Devoted interest of the late Marie Louis, nature-lover and for years superintendent of Muhlenberg, helped turn once common-plant "grounds" into a tree-shaded garden spot both restful and diverting.

Dogwood Favorites
Native Dogwoods are favorites among the city's flowering trees. The Plainfield Garden Club, on its own recent 25th birthday, gave small grove of these "Jewels of the Forest" to Cedar Brook Park. On the T. H. Van Bosckerck grounds on Prospect Ave. is the handsome large group of Dogwoods on private property in town. On Dr. Elmer Weigel's lawn on Belvidere Ave [630 Belivdere – see Mrs. Joost]. Chinese Dogwood bears much larger and later blooms. Directly across the street from this, and close to the sidewalk, a low-growing Witch Hazel (Hamanelis) bears yellow Forsythia-like flowers in winter.

Before the Talmadge dwelling [714 Belvidere], in the the same street, are majestic Copper Beeches. In early days Beeches were popular selections for large grounds. Probably the finest Weeping Beech in the city grows in deserted grounds in Central Ave. Nearby on the Witon property is a huge Purple Beech – both almost perfect. Farther down the avenue, on Wardlaw School grounds [1030 Central Avenue - see Below], is a fine old Ginko.

The only Katsura Tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum) in Plainfield is owned by former Mayor Leighton Calkins [929 Madison – see Below]. Its strange trunk and heart-shaped leaves, purplish when young, are unusual. It grows in front of the house in Madison Ave.

Unique among Plainfield trees is a native Orange of the South. it is today laden with velvety, green fruit in Mrs. Howard Tracy's Prospect Ave. garden [1331 Prospect Ave]. Probably nowhere else in this region can one be found, according to Shade Tree Commissioner Lithgow Hunter. Sent north from Maryville College in Tennessee 50 years ago. . . .

. . . residents seeking permanent homes. These officials have always planned with the Shade Tree Commission since its organization, so that every year more trees come marching in. Some fill vacancies in the ranks of old trees along old streets. Others shade tireless blocks in new sections of town.

For the last 17 years, one man, Sidney Durant, the Shade Tree Commission's expert supervisor of trees, has directed its work. it includes feeding, pruning, watering and repairing the city's 25,000 street trees, as well removal of dead or too-badly-injured trees and planting new ones. For nearly 20 years Thomas F. Hylan has served on the commission, of which he is now president.

Of all the city's trees, the strange Ginko, or Maiden-hair tree, grows to a height of 80 feet or so. The delicacy of its little leaves, resembling those of the Maiden-Hair fern, contrast sharply with the arrow-straight upswept branches of what is considered one of the most beautiful and unusual of all hardy exotic trees. The Ginko's origin is a mystery. Nowhere on earth is it been found wild, yet fossils prove it was once scattered all over the world. Nothing else today resembles the Ginko, so paleontologists reason that some series of misfortunes destroyed all missing links. Today's closest relative is the Yew family, thought at a glance they appear as unrelated as a Chines and a New England Yankee.

Planted Near Temples
Early explorers found Ginkos planted around Chinese and Japanese temples. The Chinese called in Yin-Hing – "Silver Apricot" – referring to the greenish-yellow, fleshy fruit having a single stone. This fruit, slightly roasted, was served throughout the formal Chinese dinners which lasted all day. Guests nibble the finlike fruit between courses as an aid to digestion.

The Ginko did not reach England until 1754. The first specimen in this country was planted in Woodlands Cemetery, Philadelphia. In 1889 the Ginko fruited for the first time there on the grounds of Charles Wister. fifty years ago these newcomers to America were not only scarce, but expensive. That Plainfield has so many beautiful old specimens of these trees is possibly due to the fact that John Taylor Johnston, then president of the New Jersey Central Railroad and a resident of this city, was not only a patron of the arts, but a lover of trees. Each of Plainfield's railroad station grounds had not only fine specimens of the Ginko, but also a varied collection of other trees, evidently selected by an expert.

Netherwood, nearest the Johnston home [see Below], was especially favored. Here, beside the north track, stands a regal Ginko, carefully located as an artist would plan his canvas, so that its top is etched against the sky. This emphasizes the beauty of leaf and branch and trunk as viewed from the eastbound station platform. ?? may see a younger . . .

. . . White Oak and Elms are among the trees fringing the western boundary.

"The property as a whole is a remarkable small arboretum," said a well-known visiting tree scientist recently, after inspecting the Netherwood station park. "In my travels I've seen no other railroad station grounds with such a variety of trees. This landscaping, too, I can see was done by an expert."

In employing such an expert to beautify the railroad property in his home town, Mr. Johnston was carrying out the spirit of the statement he made at the time the Metropolitan Museum of New York City was founded at his Fifth Ave. mansion. He was quoted as saying:

"The public ought to have a chance to see, to hear and to know more about whatever feeds the mind and is inspiring, if we are to have the best kind in America."

To even a novice in landscaping, the Netherwood station grounds show that underlying motive. One could not imagine either the south or north oval either diminished of enlarged – so true is their scale. It would be hard to find more beautiful flowering trees than those Magnolias; or more intriguing contrast of leaf, branch and trunk than offered by the Ginko and the Pine. On the north side the clump of Lindens, combined with an apparently outcropping "pudding stone," make a "garden composition" that suggest to the home gardener similar effective arrangements, though not necessarily identical in material.

Beautiful Estate
Some old residents recall that Mr. Johnston's estate in E. Front St. was lavishly beautified with choice trees, as were those of most of his neighbors along that splendid avenue of that day. Some of those estates are still being kept up as homes of their owners today, while others have been divided into beautiful setting for developments of small homes.

The Johnston estate, however, furnished the basis of another public development of beauty spots. A portion of it became the site of the new Barlow School [see Below]. These school grounds are said to be unequaled in the state in the variety and placement of superb trees. What some consider the finest Weeping Beech in town grows here, also two majestic evergreens, one a White Pine, the other a Spruce. Elm, Ginko, Cucumber tree, Ash, "Button Ball," Willow and Sugar Maple are also outstanding.

Two of the most interesting, although not the most conspicuous of the group, are a true English Oak (Quercus Robur) and a Yellow Wood (Cladrastis lute). The first has smallish leaves, thick-set upon the branch. A strange characteristic is that the stem adheres to the side of the acorn. The writer knows of only one other English Oak in town – Central Ave., near Stelle Ave.

The Yellow Wood has wisteria-like racemes of white fragrant flowers in midsummer. Leaves resemble the locust. Another fine specimen grows on the property of Miss Laura Detwiller in Hillside Ave.

All were here in the days . . . .

. . . when Cherry, Dogwood and Crab. In early spring the large leathery-leaved evergreen Japanese Andromeda (Pieris) unfold delicate, coppery leaves and waxy white racemes of tiny flowers. These are classified as shrubs, but on these favorable grounds, are almost small trees of exceptional beauty.

Preservation is Theme
The good judgement of George R. Zimmer, who for many years has supervised Plainfield's school grounds, is shown not only in what has already been accomplished, but in developments being planned. "What can we preserve?" not "What can we cut down?" is his motto. Before clearing the recently purchased grounds adjoining Maxon School was begun this summer, Mr. Zimmer marked every large and small tree that "might some day be of use somewhere." Workmen were warned to cut not one of these.

The City Police Headquarters and also the old Public Library have a setting of trees. The little Library Park is said to have been reserved from farmland whose native trees – mostly, Red, White and Black Oaks – were left standing. Across the facade of Fire Headquarters are a Ginko, a London Plane and Horse Chestnut – each an unusually fine specimen. Among Netherwood firemen are enthusiastic gardeners. Each spring many of Plainfield's 3,000 commuters take great interest in "what the boys are doing to their grounds." Everything planted seems to do well, even the peonies, marking the line between the firemen's parklike grounds and the railroad cinder-bed.

On spacious City Hall grounds is not only a variety of evergreens, but also of deciduous trees, selected for beauty of form, leaf or flower. Two Cryptomeria, "Aristocrats of Evergreens," donated recently by Plainfield's near-centenarian, Miss Isabel Tweedy, and a tall Himalayan Pine in town was brought here by the late Harry K. Tetsuka, to adorn his well-known Japanese garden in Belvidere Ave [556 Belvidere].

The Holly tree on City Hall grounds is another tree found on but few properties. It was donated by Herbert Moody [see Below], when The Courier-news gift of 5,000 bulbs roused a widespread interest in more beautiful grounds, in keeping with the architectural beauty of the building. Evergreens were given immediately by former Mayor Marion F. Ackerman, and a Dogwood by Thomas F. Hylan, whose keen interest in the property extends back to 25 years ago, when, as Councilman, he served on the City Hall Building Committee. This season former Councilman Orville G. Waring, son of the late Mayor Waring, donated several valuable Pfitzer Junipers.

Not Monotonous
Many species of trees planted along our city streets make green lanes that are not monotonous.

. . . . stood for most of that time in this sheltered nook. The fruits, when ripe, are decorative, but not edible. Edible oranges grown only on grafted stock. The thorny branches of this small tree resemble Osage Orange, or "Indian Bow-wood."

Figs are also ripening now in Plainfield. Within a stone's throw of Netherwood station is Watson Ave. It is only three blocks long and from spring to fall it glows with flowers. In one little garden grows a carefully tended Fig tree that bears fruit yearly. Each fall the owner buries his Fig tree in a deep trench well below the frost-line. Each spring it is dug out and reset.

One great wide-spreading Mulberry (Morus Multicaulus) towers far above the roof-top of Leslie R. Fort's home in Cedarbrook Rd. This venerable tree is the historic survivor of a Mulberry plantation, established during the "Multicaulus Mania," by the late Senator Martine [11 Brook Lane, see Below], as a venture to yield gigantic profits on his farm that included the Cedar Brook tract. He believed with others that New Jersey would be one of the world's silk-growing centers. Convinced that silk was to take the place of cotton, New Jersey farmers set out thousands of acres of "silk-worm mulberries" about 100 years ago, only to cut down the trees when the bubble burst.

One of the most varied private collection of trees in the city is that of Miss Jessie D. Munger in Prospect Ave. In recent years instructors at Rutgers University have brought students to these grounds to study the trees and other plant material as well as the garden design. Last spring the general public enjoyed the same privilege.

Love of trees is part of the tradition that has helped mould Plainfield into a city of pleasant homes on quiet streets. The late Jonas Lie, one of our city's most distinguished citizens, sensed this characteristic of our community. In the Common Council Chamber at City Hall hangs his gift – a mountain woodland scene, interpreted by his illustrious brush as an inspiring message to us all.

To learn more about the history of some of the people and places mentioned in this article, visit these links:

[Maxson School]
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Elizabeth B. Atwood) '15

[630 Belvidere]
Joost, Mrs. Sherman Brownell (Marie Murray) '19

[714 Belvidere]
Dunbar, Mrs. William Kuhn '17
Rock, Mrs. Robert B. '43
Runkle, Mrs. Harry Godley (Jennie Fitz Randolph) '15
Whitehead, Mrs. James Harold (Jean Fitz-Randolph Heiberg) '43

[1030 Central Avenue – duCret School]
Huntington, Mrs. Howard (Agnes Fales Strong) '19
McGee, Mrs. Walter Miller (Mary Alice Yerkes) '22
Zerega, Miss Bertha Virginia '23

[929 Madison Avenue]
Ackerman, Mrs. Marion S.(Sarah M. Wills) '35

[Johnston Estate on Front Street & Netherwood]
Mali, Mrs. Pierre (Frances Johnston) '18

[Barlow School East front Street – former estate of "Blojocamavi" owned by Lewis V. Fitz Randolph/Johnston estate]
Barlow, Mrs. Carlton Montague (June Simms) '70
Barlow, Mrs. DeWitt Dukes (Mary Lee Brewer), Jr. '65
Dunbar, Mrs. William K., Jr. (Elizabeth or "Libby" Hail Barlow) '47
Perkins, Mrs. Seymour, Jr. (Esther Moody Barlow) '49
(Also see Mrs. Runkle and Mrs. Whitehead above)

[City Hall]
Moody, Mrs. George T. '22
Perkins, Mrs. Seymour, Jr. (Esther Moody Barlow) '49

[11 Brook Lane, Martine House]
MacLeod, Mrs. Robert F. (Carolyn Waring) '55

1941 Courier-News Plainfield Merits Classification as 'City of Beautiful Trees'

1941 Courier-News Plainfield Merits Classification as 'City of Beautiful Trees'

June 6, 1992 Historical Society of Plainfield Secret Gardens Tour

June 6, 1992 Historical Society of Plainfield Secret Gardens Tour

1. Drake House
2. Shakespeare Garden
3. Victorian Hideaway, 935 Madison Avenue

4. Holly, Box and Ivy, 836 Arlington Avenue
King, Mrs. Victor R. (Elizabeth J.) '48

5. Green-Wreathed Carriage House, 825 Carlton Avenue
Lare, Mrs. William Sloane (Dorothy) '54

This is the Carriage House to 1127 Watchung Avenue
Ginna, Mrs. Daniel F. (Katherine Whiting Lewis) '15

6. England Revisited, 922 Hillside Avenue
Atterbury, Mrs. Albert Hoffman (Emma H. Baker) '15

7. Hillside in Bloom, 1314 Highland Avenue
Noss, Mrs. Henry (Edith Edwards Tyler) '66

8. Elegant Serenity, 1332 Prospect Avenue
Van Boskerck, Mrs. Thomas Rowe (Lucy Otterson) '15

Step across the threshold of this latticed Georgian mansion into a kingdom of art and flowers. From the center hall, behold bounty from the cutting garden in every available container, an elegant living room and jewel-toned dining room, an extensive art collection, the enchanting garden room and wide French doors framing an irresistible landscape.

We have no will to resist, and are drawn onto the terrace overlooking the pool, spacious lawns and a broad palette of ornamental shrubs and plants. There's mystery in this secret garden of ivy-draped trees, leafy corridors, the gleam of pale blossoms from a dusky corner. Paths of gravel, over which clumps of snowdrops and dogtooth violets tumble, wander out of sight to places yet to be explored. The invitation is clear: unknown delights are promised just beyond the limits of our vision.

The landscape has matured into a composition of light and shadow, where 20th century sounds disappear into the thick foliage of the trees and shade-loving species raise flower heads of gentle hue in contrast to the paint-box colors of nearby sunny borders. A collage of green fills curving beds around the trees, softening the lawn's flat plane just as vines blur the angular lines of the house. The gardener's painterly use of tone on tone in differing shapes and textures makes the garden a work of art.

Take your ease and light refreshment on the grounds or on the terrace, where a fine selection of floral art and antique botanicals awaits your attention. The gate on the west side of the house will give you passage to the next secret garden.

9. Hidden Harmony, 1401 Chetwynd Avenue

10. Petals on the Paving, 1081 Rahway Road
Barlow, Mrs. DeWitt Dukes (Mary Lee Brewer), Jr. '65

11. Woodland Idyll, 1275 Denmark Road
Sandford, Mrs. Webster (Barbara Tracy) '50

1984-1985 History of the Plainfield Garden Club by Anne Marie v. G. Seybold

The first fifty years (1915 - 1965) of the Plainfield Garden Club have been chronicled by Mrs. Thomas Van Boskerck and Mrs. Gerald Furman who have written so beautifully of its establishment and development, its initiatives and accomplishments. To continue with the next twenty years, the following will briefly touch upon the programs and problems, successes and semi-successes of our diverse interests in a time of increasing challenge and complexity.

Cornus Arboretum

From the 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

Our beautiful dogwood trees stand on what was once the city dump. The story of this evolution of beauty began in 1929 when Mrs. Charles Eaton presented 50 dogwood trees to Cedar Brook Park from her own woods. In 1931, with Mrs. Henry Wells as Chairman, 45 dogwood trees, white and pink, were donated by the Plainfield Garden Club and were planted on one side of the drive entering from Park Avenue. Nine years later, (1940), under the guidance of Mrs. Thomas R. Van Boskerck and Mrs. William Holliday, 110 trees were added to extend the first row and to form another on the opposite side of the road. Since this planting coincided with our own 25th anniversary, a large boulder bearing a bronze marker was placed near the entrance.

In 1946, the Park Commission, a group of progressive and dedicated gentlemen, asked our Club if we would sponsor a Cornus Arboretum, using the Dogwood Drive as a foundation. We accepted – indeed, yes! A committee was formed with Miss Harriette R. Halloway as Secretary and Advisor, whose goal it was to include every Cornus, Specie and Cultivar, which was obtainable and which would thrive in this climate. Through the years, chairmen have included Mrs. R. T. Stevens, Mrs. George His, and Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler. As in our other gardens, the Park Commission has planted, raised seedlings in their nursery and provided maintenance.

Through purchases, gifts and exchanges with other Arboretums, 26 varieties were planted in the next five years. By 1948, there were 219 trees, giving masses of beautiful spring bloom as well as fall display of foliage and berries. Thousands of visitors walked or drove through this fairyland of beauty, surely the better for having seen it.

Today, through the inspired leadership of Miss Halloway, the Cornus Collection contains more than sixty varieties, some quite rare. All the others being horticultural selections of "clones" (cultivars). Experts consider the Cornus Collection to be the outstanding horticultural and civic achievement of our Club. It was highly gratifying in 1957, when officials from the New York Botanical Garden came out to see it.

Prof. Benjamin Blackburn, in a recent article in the American Horticulture Magazine says, 'It does not appear that a comparable collection exists. The Cornus Collection offers an admirable example of cooperation between groups interested in the cultural and horticultural riches of a municipality . . . none other is known to the writer to be existing elsewhere in the country."

To quote Miss Halloway, "each year the trees continue to be beautiful and a joy, if not forever, at least for many years."

Written by Victoria Furman

Plainfield Library Bio Card

Lucy Van Boskerck
Songwriter; Wrote song with William Sektberg which might be adopted as State Anthem.

Plainfield Scrapbook Vol. 1, p. 77

Lucy Winslow Van Boskerck Mitchell

Lucy Winslow Van Boskerck MITCHELL Lucy died peacefully on a beautiful May evening at the age of 97. Born to Thomas Rowe and Lucy Otterson Van Boskerck in Plainfield, NJ, Lucy moved to Seattle in 1941 when she married Edwin Potter. They had three children, Caroline, Edwin, Jr. (Andy), and Susan. In 1974 she married Harold DeLong Mitchell, with whom she shared nearly 25 happy years of great compatibility. Her many interests included art, history, music, theater, gardening, cooking, traveling, and especially being with people. She had many friends and wrote frequent handwritten letters to those who lived in other parts of the country and the world. She was a member of the Junior League, Lake Washington Garden Club, Arboretum Unit 39, Sunset Club, Colonial Dames, an active docent for 20 years at the Seattle Art Museum, and a member of Epiphany Parish for over 60 years. Lucy was also active politically, marching to save the Public Market in the 1960s, writing letters until the end of her life to politicians express ing her support for or dissent with their position on a variety of issues, mostly those involving the environment, peace, and helping the less for tunate. It was her unremitting con viction that we should at minimum support policies that further educa tion and help those in need, especially where children were concerned. She is survived by her children, her beloved grandchildren, Jennifer, Beth, Alex, Audrey, Klara, and Gina, her great-grandchildren, Avery, Patrick, Emily, and Connor, her devoted son-in-law, Rene' Heuscher, and by legions of people who were her friends. A memorial service in celebration of her life will be held at Epiphany Parish on Friday, June 11th at 10:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that gifts be made to Epiphany Parish, Seattle Art Museum. or the Hospice unit of Swedish Visiting Nurse Services
Published in The Seattle Times on May 16, 2010 - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/seattletimes/obituary.aspx?pid=142783320#sthash.VcnLFzMH.dpuf

1332 Prospect Avenue, Plainfield NJ 07060

1332 Prospect Avenue, Plainfield NJ 07060

Three photos of the home & garden of Plainfield Garden Club founding member Mrs. Thomas Rowe (Lucy Otterson) Van Boskerck '15 located at 1332 Prospect Avenue, Plainfield, New Jersey 07060

1961

Lucy Winslow Van Boskerck (Potter) Mitchell (daughter of founding PGC member Mrs. Thomas Rowe (Lucy Otterson) Van Boskerck, with her Aunt, Mrs. William Seymour (Ethel Van Boskerck) Tyler '15 and her cousin, Mrs. Edward Hume (Margaret Rowe Tyler) Clendenin '44 and her husband Edward Hume Clendenin in front of Mrs. William S. Tyler's home at 520 West 8th Street, Plainfield, NJ 07060

Lucy Otterson Van Boskerck

Birth: Feb. 22, 1876
Death: Jan. 26, 1960


Family links:
Spouse:
Thomas Rowe Van Boskerck (1867 - 1945)*

Children:
Ruth Van Buskerck (1917 - 1927)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Hillside Cemetery
Scotch Plains
Union County
New Jersey, USA

Created by: Dianne Delitto
Record added: May 20, 2014
Find A Grave Memorial# 130102006

1912 New York Observer

1898 Medical Record: Dr. William Carter Otterson

August 27, 1898

Obituary Notes – Dr. William Carter Otterson, of Brooklyn, died of heart disease at Long Branch on August 17th, after an illness dating back to last summer. He was born in this city in 1829, and was graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1853. In 1861 he was appointed brigade surgeon of volunteers, and he was assigned to the army of the Southwest as medical director. In the same capacity he was with the ninth corps at Vicksburg and with the twentieth corps on the march to the sea. Later in the civil war he had charge of a military hospital at Nashville, Tenn. He embodied his experiences of this time in a book entitled "Notes on Military Surgery during the Civil War." At the close of the civil war he resumed practice in Brooklyn. He was for two year sanitary inspector of the Brooklyn board of health, and at the same time chairman of the Brooklyn ambulance service, which was then in its first year. Later he was appointed deputy commissioner of the Brooklyn board of health. He was a member of a number of medical and social organizations. Because of failing health he had done but little practice during the past four or five years. He was a widower and three children survive him.