Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Loizeaux, Mrs. J. Harold (Marion Pratt Foster) '40

1940 Treasurer Book, Active: Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux 1/16/41 Pd. (no entry for 1940)

1941 - 1942 - 1943 Treasurer Book, Active: Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux 12/2/41 Pd. 11/24/42 Pd. 12/7/43 Pd. 12/15/44 Pd. 6/46 May 14, 1947 May 27, 1948 1949 June 15, 1950 May 1951 June 1952

Driftway Farm, Scotch Plains

1942 Address: R. F. D. #1 Cooper Road, Fanwood

1953 Address: R. F. D. #1 Cooper Road, Scotch Plains

1970 - 1975 Address: 1600 Cooper Road, Scotch Plains

Mother-in-law to current Affiliate member (2010):
Loizeaux, Elisabeth (Mrs. Peter T.) '78


Also related to these other Plainfield Garden Club members:

Foster, Mrs. David Scott (Constance Elena Titus) '46
Foster, Mrs. Henry Pratt (Katherine G. or "Kay") '69

Mrs. J. Harold (Marion Foster) Loizeaux '40 mother:
Foster, Mrs. Howard Crosby (Ethel Emmagene Pratt) '18

Foster, Mrs. John Gray '15

Not certain of relationship with Plainfield Garden Club member Mrs. Charles E. Loizeaux, Jr. '69

Archives of American Gardens, Smithsonian Horticulture Services Division
Reference Number = NJ388 for Loizeaux Garden

Loizeaux, Mrs. J. Harold '40

photo circa 1950

Loizeaux, Elisabeth (Mrs. Peter T.) 78

back of photo, circa 1950

1915 - 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

page 18

1915 - 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

page 19

1915 - 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

page 23

1915 - 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

page 26

The infamous 1962 canoe trip

From PGC Member Connie Foster's on-line album

1946? Ruth and Bud Brackett wedding reception at the Harold Loizeaux home on Cooper Road, Scotch Plains

From PGC Member Connie Foster's on-line album

1947 Christmas Eve at the Loizeaux farm/home on Cooper Road

From PGC Member Connie Foster's on-line album

Foster family
December 1947 Christmas Eve at the Loizeaux home

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1942 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg, version 2

[Editor's note: The original document was too faded to scan. This is a different version of a history written by Mrs. Etheldreda Anderegg from 1941 1947]

Plainfield Garden Club History
Continued to 1947

On May 14th, 1941 six years ago to-day in Cedarbrook Park the Anniversary Dogwood Trees were formally presented to the Park Commission. In making the presentation, Mrs. Arthur Nelson, president, said the garden club wished to make a gift of lasting beauty to mark its anniversary. Mr. Tracey responding for the Park Commissioners commended the club for its civic interest and declared the trees would bring a touch of beauty to thousands of lives. The gift was identified by a large boulder bearing a bronze marker. Mrs. Holliday as chairman of the Dogwood Tree Committee and of the Boulder Committee arranged the anniversary celebration.

That year, 1941, an article appeared in Horticulture in praise of our Shakespeare Garden.

A teacher of the Jefferson School staff was sent to the Audubon Nature Camp in Maine.

Handsome new yearbooks containing a revised constitution, membership lists and permanent covers with loose leaves were issued. About this time some of our members looking back upon some of our achievements of the past, and forward for new horizons to explore, agreed that once more we should storm the ramparts of the Garden Club of America. No organization in garden club circles offers to its members such a wide field of opportunities and assured prestige. This reporter has sat in many important national and state conferences were the effect of this prestige could be observed. When important decisions were due there was an intangible inference in the atmosphere which stemmed to imply "All those not members of the Garden State of America may now retire to the Jim Crow car."

Better to have failed in the high aim than to succeed vulgarly in the low one" said Browning.

So a committee to explore the possibilities of our being accepted for membership was named by Mrs. Nelson. With Mrs. Corriel as chairman, the committee consisted of Miss Elsie Harmon, Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler, Miss Elizabeth Browne, Miss William Tyler, Mrs. William A. Holliday, Mrs. James Devlin and your historian. Our search for new worlds to conquer began with a meeting at the home of Mrs. William Tyler, on February 21, 1941, when your historian read a letter she had been asked to write to Mrs. Frederic Kellogg, of Morristown Garden Club, prominent garden club personality. The letter would be interesting at this point, but unfortunately it has been lost. Suffice to say, our prise of ourselves was so completely uninhibited that the committee itself was profoundly impressed by the record of performance of the Plainfield Garden Club set forth therein. Shakespeare said "Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful." After all they could not know our worth unless we told them. This time we forestalled a verdict that we had "accomplished nothing."

It might be interjected here that during Mrs. Goddard's regime an effort was made to join the Garden Club of America. Mrs. Kellogg, approached on that occasion, graciously entertained Mrs. Goddard and Mrs. Holliday at luncheon, and they left with the impression that Plainfield, having rejected an invitation to become a charter member of that organization during Mrs. Herring's tenure, it would be futile ever to hope for membership.

An active campaign was launched by all who had relatives or friends in member clubs. This was accelerated when it was learned that a neighboring club had an identical ambition, and had found a sponsor. Because of geographical allocation, we realized that only one of us would be admitted. When it became apparent that we had aroused interest, and had a semblance of chance for acceptance, a special meeting was called at the home of Mrs. Corriel, and the advantages of membership in the Garden Club of America, as well as the financial obligations thoroughly explored. The club was asked to decide whether they wished the committee to proceed with the negotiations. The vote was unanimously affirmative.

Subsequently Mrs. Kellogg requested that the Morristown Club have the pleasure of proposing us, and Mrs. Lauderdale of Short Hills offered to have that club second us. While we waited for the verdict, our campaign never waned.

On May 11th, 1941, tenth anniversary of Iris Garden, the executive board gave a tea to honor Miss Halloway. Mrs. Holliday arranged a delightful affair in the field house. Members of the garden club and thirty guests were invited. Miss Halloway's friends came from far and near while the Iris Garden glowed in a rainbow of colors for the occasion.

The war which was sweeping over France while Mrs. VanBoskerck's history concluded had now reached our shores. "Come to open purple testament of bleeding war." (King Richard) Our members were working for the U.S.O., the Red Cross and Camp Kilmer, apart and in conjunction with the garden club. Plans were sent to the camp to enhance its barren scenes, and seeds to Brittain. Victory gardens were planted, two new chairmanships were added to the executive board War Activities and Victory Gardens.

In May 1943, we provided vases and began to send flowers regularly to the chapels at Camp Kilmer. This is still being done. Garden books from the Garden Center were placed in the Public Library. Because of gasoline and food rationing it was becoming difficult to hold meetings. Speakers were reluctant to use scarce gasoline and tires for small groups. The war organizations were asking for more things, more effort and more money. The garden club was striving to provide all three.

In June 1943 a delegation from the Garden Club of America came to inspect our members' gardens. Those gardens chosen to head the list were duly explored and approved, but unfortunately the sand of time ran out before they could see them all, and they will never realize all they missed. However, they did see the dogwood planting, the Shakespeare and Iris gardens.

At the annual meeting Mrs. Samuel Carter gave a particularly interesting history of the Shakespeare garden, which was later read by request at the Shakespeare Club. Mrs. Carter said in part: "It has been said that we of the Western World love flowers for what they are, and that the peoples in the East love them for what they suggest. A Shakespeare Garden is full of suggestions, a speaking garden revealing the tradition, folklore and romance of the ancient and timeless plants." Mr. Tracey quoted an authority on the subject as saying that Mrs. Carter's was the finest Shakespeare Garden in the country and that over 15,000 people visited it last year.

Mrs. Coriell announced at the executive board meeting February 2nd, 1944, that Plainfield Garden Club had been elected to membership in the Garden Club of America, and letters of welcome received from sponsoring clubs. It had required three years to reach the new horizons, but a poet once said, "A horizon is nothing but the limit of our sight" so each one attained shows another beckoning in the distance.

Because of rationing, meetings were held in semi-public places of central location. Speakers stressed every phase of conservation. Garden club members were working hard at Camp Kilmer, for the Red Cross and the U.S.O.

In 1945 we became a Founder of the Blue Star Drive, our members contributing generously to this beautiful tribute to the men who served in the armed forces. It is hoped, and the hope is rapidly being fulfilled, that ultimately it will stretch from New Jersey to California.

A new custom was instituted, that of sending a sum of money to the Red Wood Tribute Grove in memory of deceased members. This year, 1945, a dance recital was given to help defray expenses of war activities. Naturally it was under the chairmanship of Miss Maud vonBoskerck, whose motto might well be "Music is my talent my dearest one." It was very successful artistically and financially.

We helped the New York Botanical Garden celebrate its Fiftieth Anniversary by sending hostesses every day for a week, and by a substantial sum of money for plant research.

In 1945 Lyons Hospital was included on our flower and plant list, and we have continued to supply it weekly for two months of each year. Flowering trees were planted along Blue Star Drive in memory of members' sons lost in the war.

Mrs. Samuel Carter and Miss Harriette Halloway received awards from the Garden Club of New Jersey for their work in Shakespeare and Iris gardens respectively.

Besides bouquets were made twice a week for the wards at Camp Kilmer, beginning in May. Our members volunteered to arrange them.

By this time we were discovering that those "new worlds to conquer" for which we had longed, were providing more opportunities than we could well cope with, and so a junior membership was formed, now numbering six.

The associate membership was enlarged to thirty-five so that active members might be enabled to transfer to it. A questionnaire was sent of work they wished to do. In a Garden Club of America contest for a year's program, Miss Halloway's won honorable mention.

Beginning early in December members of the club met every day in Mrs. Boardman Tyler's studio to make Christmas decorations for the hospital at Camp Kilmer. A big fire blazed in the stove, tons of varied evergreens were provided as well as all other necessary equipment. The studio hummed like Santa Claus' workshop, and great quantities of wreaths with large red bows, small bouquets and other favors emerged to cheer the soldiers at Camp Kilmer and Lyons Hospitals. Joyce Kilmer, for whom the camp was named, wrote of his experience in the other World War: "My shoulders ache beneath my pack, Lie easier cross upon his back" We hoped we eased their burden just a little.

The opportunities offered by the Garden Club of America in the field of conservation are so many and so varied, it was necessary to choose which tangent to pursue. In view of the community and national problems of vandalism and child delinquency, it was thought wise to concentrate the major effort in combating these evils. Working through the public schools seemed the most logical procedure. Mr. Wimer of Jefferson School and Mrs. Rulison of the Park Commission have offered sympathetic cooperation. The first step in the program is the establishment of school gardens, now in process of being planted. The garden club provided the funds. A trial garden, or proving bed was started in Cedarbrook Park in 1946. This year many new perennials were added.

Mrs. Hubble's artistic ability was employed so successfully in redecorating the Garden Center, this observer could scarcely recognize it.

The Garden Club of New Jersey bestowed an award upon us for meritorious work at Camp Kilmer. Miss Halloway has made additions to the peony, Iris and Narcissus gardens. It again became necessary to raise money, and a repeat performance by request, of the dance recital was staged by Miss Van Boskerck.

A suggestion from the Garden Club of New Jersey that we plant a tree to honor garden weekled, after consultation with Mr. Tracey, to the beginning of a dogwood arboretum comprising all the varieties that will grow in this vicinity. Twenty-five varieties have already been planted.

Santa Claus helpers gathered again in Mrs. Tyler's studio to make decorations for Camp Kilmer, and surpassed their effort of the previous year. Our work in this Project was not equaled by that of any club either year.

A thrill of pride must have quivered through our membership from founders to newest recruits, triumphs of our members who exhibited in the New York Flower Show. In the realm of flower arrangement there is no more coveted award than the Fenwick Medal. Our Mrs. deHart was runner up fro that prize last year. This year four exhibits won three blue ribbons and two special awards. It was a magnificent performance which won for us third place in the sweepstakes.

Chapel flowers still are sent to Camp Kilmer. Our members arrange them. We take our turn with the other clubs supplying flowers for the entire hospital regularly from gardens when possible, from florists in cold weather. Two gray Ladies representing Plainfield Garden Club, arrange and distribute the flowers through the wards. The by-laws were again revised and new books issued for the permanent covers.

The executive committee has not overlooked the fact that a War Memorial is of paramount interest to the garden club. Much time as been spent in discussion and deep thought given the matter. Mrs. Boardman Tyler has been named a member of the committee. This year we are sending a teacher to the Audubon Nature Camp in Maine, and another to the Conservation Workshop in Trenton.

Several members have been invited to speak on varied subjects, notably Mrs. Garret Smith on Church Gardens, and Miss Halloway on horticultural subjects. Mrs. Garret has been honored as founder of the Little Garden Club of New York City, of which she is honorary president.

A big of biographical information picked up while perusing the minutes is that our new president, Mrs. Loziuex, became a member of the club in 1940, second vice president in 1942, again in 1945, first vice president in 1946 and president in 1947.

Having been a member of the club only ten years, your historian cannot speak with absolute authority, but thinks it probably that the club reached greater heights of achievement under this administration of Mrs. Tyler than during any comparable period of time. This is partly true because of the new opportunities offered by affiliation with the Garden Club of America, and partly due to Mrs. Tyler's dynamic energy and her determination that the Plainfield Garden Club take advantage of these opportunities and assume its rightful position in the vanguard of progressive garden clubs.

Junius described Mrs. Tyler perfectly when he wrote: "the heart to conceive, the understanding to direct and the hand to execute."

We notice as we go over the chronicles of the garden club, the absence of names once listed so frequently:

Those whom we loved so long, and see no more
Loved and still love,
Not dead, but gone before.

If we ever adopt a coat of arms, it might well show crossed trowels over a field of flower arrangements, the other expounding the futility of vandalism to a young cub. And the motto? It must be from Shakespeare, and it is from The Tempest: Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground.

Or if we choose to abandon the classics: Never a dull moment!

Etheldreda Anderegg
Historian, 1947

May 17, 1957 Club Commemorates Founding of Iris Garden

Caption: GARDEN MARKER VIEWED – Standing before the marker commemorating the 25th anniversary of the Iris Garden in Cedar Brook Park are (left to right) Mrs. Frederick Lockwood, Victor B. King, Jr., John C. Wister, Mr. Richard Tracy and Miss Harriette R. Halloway, founder of this garden. (Courier photo by E. T. Wiggins)

The Plainfield Garden Club and guests yersterday dedicated the the entranceway of the of the Iris Garden in Cedar Brook Park.

Miss Harriette R. Halloway, found of the garden and chairman of the garden of the Iris Garden [not legible] the project was started in 1932, was presented a medal by Mrs. Frederick M. Lockwood, president of the Garden Club.

The medal is [not legible] "from the grateful members of the Plainfield Garden Club Harriette R. Halloway founder and director of the Iris gardens of Cedar Brook Park, Plainfield, 1932 - 1957."

[Not legible] viewed a recently installed [not legible] tablet marking the anniversary of the garden.

"Excercise in Perfection"
Victor R. King, president of the Union County Park Commission, led the gathering [not legible] the garden display was "an excercise in perfection is [not legible]," he said.

The park commission provides the setting for the garden and have [not legible] in the project [not legible]

W. [not legible] Tracy, executive had of the Park Commission when the Iris Garden was started paid tribute to Miss Halloway for her "tireless work and painstaking effort."

Another speaker was Dr. John C. Wister of Swarthmore, Pa., president of the American Iris Society when the garden was started and author of [not legible] article about the garden in the current issue of the Journal of the New York Botanical Gardens.

Miss Halloway spoke briefly and [not legible] on the work of the [not legible] who care for the Iris Garden. She introduced Kenneth Smith, one of the largest contributors of plants to the garden [not legible]

Mrs. Lockwood presided at the program. Guests included members of [not legible] garden clubs and contributors to the garden.

The Iris Garden Committee includes Mrs. Morris E. Benton, Mrs. Alden de Hart, Mrs. Lockwood, Mrs. Donald E. Luce, Mrs. William K. Dunbar, Jr., Mrs. C. Northrop Pond, Mrs. Webster Sandford, Mrs. Arthur D. Seybold, Mrs. John R. Wells, Mrs. Willian G. Wigton, Mrs. Robert MacLeod, vice chairman, and Miss Halloway, chairman.

Special slides [not legible] for the chairman were Mrs. Charles A. Eaton, Jr., Mrs. F. Willoughby Frost ad Mrs. Edwin M. Treat, Jr.

Mrs. Victor M. King was chairman of the special committee assisted by Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux, Mrs. E. B. Newberry, and Miss Margaret Tyler. Also cooperating were Mrs. N. C. Barnhart, Jr., Mrs. William P. Elliott, Mrs. Homer Cochran and Mrs. H. I. Flanders.

Hostesses (not legible)
Other hostesses were Mrs. William W. Coriell, Mrs. Leslie E. Fort, Mrs. William A. Holliday, Mrs. Richard M. Lawton, Mrs. Robert T. Stevens, Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler, Mrs. William S. Tyler. Mrs. Thomas Van Boskerck and Mrs. Orville G. Waring.

The Iris Garden now has more than 1,800 named varieties properly labeled, representing all types of Iris and totaling more than 75,000 plants.

The main part of the garden is [not legible] caring Iris [not legible] and is expected to be is good blooms thorugh the rest of the month.

Smithsonian

NJ388
entry NJ0388001

From a note by Elisabeth Loizeaux, daughter-in-law of Mrs. Marion Loizeaux,

"Dear Darlene,
The picture you sent is of the south side of my in-laws's house. It must have been taken before 1960, because Mrs. Lois Poignier, at the time "the" GC garden designer in NJ, designed a lovely seating area around a small fountain in that space. The two trees are beech trees.

There never was a "garden" per se, such as a flower garden. On the property, which encompasses over 20 acres, was a truly splendid vegetable garden, maintained by a full time farmer. There was an asparagus bed, rows of tomatoes, raspberries, strawberries, peas and string beans, all in neat rows, as well as majestic stalks of corn. Along the walkway always was a row of parsley, as a decorative border. Black Angus were grazing on the nearby fields. In other words, my father-in-law (who was on the Park Commission, by the way) had the place run as a farm.

My mother-in-law, Marion Foster Loizeaux, at one time president of the PGC, was especially fond of trees. There are two Cedrus atlantica "Glauca" on the property, as well as two Metasequoia (Dawn Redwood), besides other interesting trees.

The property was called Driftway Farm. The house was built for my in-laws in the early 1930s in the Williamsburg style, it was surrounded by exquisite boxwoods, carefully covered in burlap boxes every fall by the farmer ..– I don't know the criteria by which a house/garden was chosen for the Smithsonian records.

The property was sold after my father-in-law's death and the next owners promptly turned the house into Tara, adding columns to the font of the house and an ungainly new wing., eliminating Mrs. Poignier's masterpiece. They had the boxwoods pulled out, added some Wild West ranch paraphernalia and a tennis court and swimming pool. They named the place Ponderosa Farm and eventually sold it to Union County.

The house still stands at 1600 Cooper Road in Scotch Plains."

From Elisabeth Loizeaux, January 2011:

Did you know that Mrs. Howard Cosby Foster (Ethel Emmagene Pratt) '18, is Marion Foster Loizeaux's mother? And my husband's grand-mother, of course.
I love the name Emmagene.....
Elisabeth

Correspondence with Elisabeth Loizeaux

Thank you for the info on Marge Elliott. Come spring, we are planning to drive around and see what is left of some of these notable homes and gardens. Lois Poinier is still alive and "sharp as a tack" according to Cathy McGraw of the Short Hills Garden Club. She is living in Mystic, CT. Hopefully she will be able to provide some of the descriptions we need on her gardens. The plots thickens as they say!


On Tue, Jan 25, 2011 at 2:47 PM, Elisabeth Loizeaux <ekloizeaux@comcast.net> wrote:

Very interesting about Lois Poinier (I misspelled her name in previous mail) She, by the way, also did our own landscaping many years back. Yes, of course I would be able to identify other pictures of Driftway Farm, after all, my husband Peter was born there and we were next door neighbors all our married life in NJ.

I do not know the Sanders property at all, but am very familiar with Marge Elliot's (Mrs. William) on Black Birch Road in Scotch Plains. When Charles Detweiler moved her historic house from behind what is now Union County Tech. to its present location, we bought old beams belonging to a barn of that house and had them installed in our house, which was also designed by Charles Detweiler. We were quite involved with the Elliot project –– I wonder how much of her unique :farm" garden is still intact. Lois Poinier and Marge did a fantastic landscaping job, I am glad there are pictures. We had many GC meetings at Mrs. Elliot's house. Barbara Sandford will know all the details, she was a close friend of Marge's. I can't remember the number on Black Birch Road, but it is the only historic house in the development, in fact it has a marker, it's on the left hand side as you drive up Black Birch.

As far as "old Plainfield" family relationships and connections are concerned, Sally Booth, having grown up in Plainfield, would probably also be knowledgeable. Other than that Barbara Peek and Jane Burner also grew up in Plainfield. Consider me the expert on Loizeaux and Fosters.......

Elisabeth

Correspondence with the Smithsonian

Dear Darlene, Hi! Thanks so much for the fill in and what fun! Although it sounds like unwrapping a big ball of twine, you are making some really great discoveries. I was sort of piecing it together from the emails that I was copied on, but this explanation fills in all the blanks for me. I saw that one of the gardens was designed by Lois Poinier. She is a member of the Short Hills Garden Club, and although she doesn't live in this area anymore she is in Mystic, CT she is still probably as sharp as a tack. Her mother was one half of a famous landscape design business in Short Hills Wodell and Cotrell. Many of their gardens are in the archives. Lois was the daughter of Mrs. Wodell. Good luck! - Cathy

From: Darlene Kasten [mailto:dkas@comcast.net]
Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 8:44 AM
To: 'Cathy McGraw'
Cc: 'Susan King Fraser'; kentmary@me.com
Subject: Smithsonian & PGC

Hi Cathy,

Mary Kent suggested I write you to fill you in on what I have been doing in connection with the Smithsonian Archives. I am sure you have been wondering with all the emails you have been copied on!

A small ad hoc committee within PGC has been busy reading through archives in the Plainfield Public Library to try to put together a master list of all members since our founding in 1915 in anticipation of the GCA Centennial in 2013. In doing so we have discovered all kinds of fun facts about our former members' accomplishments as well as pictures and descriptions of their delightful gardens. We had read in some of the minutes that some previously unknown garden pictures had been submitted to the Smithsonian by our then GH&D Chair Betty Hackman which led us to the Archives online. We saw an entry for an "unidentified" garden and requested a jpeg of the image thinking it would be of the garden identified in the minutes. We instead found that it was for another member's garden, Mrs. Roswell H. Rausch. Since then we have been given a number of other gardens to identify and describe which also belonged to former (deceased) PGC members, Sanders, Loizeaux and Elliott. We are actively trying to provide the Smithsonian with addresses and descriptions for these gardens. We are eager to complete their original submissions and hope they will be available online soon. All of these are available on the Plainfield Garden Club website (see links below).

In addition we requested jpegs of our Shakespeare Garden which were part of the original GCA collection. http://plainfieldgardenclub.org/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=4725

There are also a couple of "mystery gardens" we have so far been unable to identify, http://plainfieldgardenclub.org/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=4726 .

Please let me know if you have any questions. Hope to see you soon on the photography circuit!

Thanks, Darlene Kasten

Rausch, Mrs. Roswell H. (Louise Cornell) '65
Sanders, Mrs. David F. (Molly) '58, President 1966 - 1968
Loizeaux, Mrs. J. Harold (Marion Foster) '40, President 1947 - 1949
Elliott, Mrs. William Potter (Marjorie Blackman) '46

Correspondence with Elisabeth Loizeaux

Not at all! This is a great help as we have very few "witnesses" in the club who can corroborate our findings. So happy you have taken the time to look through the albums. I guess I have the frigid weather to thank too!

We do plan on taking our questions to Barbara Sandford but we want to be prepared with all our questions. I am copying Susan Fraser on this email as she is the lead archivist on this project. She has been particularly interested in maiden names as these are integral to finding the connections to PGC. As an aside, I did find out from the Smithsonian that the 3 gardens (Loizeaux, Sanders and Wm. Elliott) they asked us to research were all submitted by Lois Poinier not the Plainfield Garden Club. They have additional pictures of Driftway Farm and I have asked to send them Perhaps you can help to describe those views as well? Are you at all familiar with the Sanders or Elliott gardens? I was planning to bring those pictures to Barbara to see if she can help. We have the addresses which the Smithsonian did not and we do plan to drive by in the spring to see if anything remains but personal anecdotes are simply the best. Susan and I have been loving the atmospheric descriptions of tea parties and weddings, etc.
"Talk" soon, Darlene


On Mon, Jan 24, 2011 at 9:40 PM, Elisabeth Loizeaux <ekloizeaux@comcast.net> wrote:

Darlene, I did look up my mother-in-law's album (and Bev Reid's). I do have questions about my mother-in-law. Charles Loizeaux, who was a two term State Senator in New Jerse y and my husband's father's brother ( I did not know that he was also the mayor of Plainfield) was married to a woman named Bertha .........?. They lived on Westervelt and Brook Ave. but as far as I know had no connection to PGC. Charles and Bertha would have been my husband's mother, Marion Foster Loixeaux's , brother and sister-in-law and it would make no sense to include them in her album, don't you agree? The photo, called "the Loizeaux garden" with a tent on their property has no connection to Marion Foster Loizeaux nor the PGC.

Connie Foster, married to Marion Foster' Loizeaux's brother David, was a member of PGC so her inclusion in the album makes sense.

I'm sorry, there were just too many Loizeaux in Plainfield. I think Marion, my mother-in-law, and I were the only Loizeaux members of PGC. Whoever looked up information at the Library in Plainfield , had a hard time identifying who all the different family members were. Marion Foster L. definitely never lived on Westervelt and Brook Ave. and had no connection to that "Loizeaux garden".

Elisabeth

P.S. Fred Loizeaux : father of Bernice Swain
J. Harold Loizeaux: father of my husband Peter, husband of Marion Foster L.
Charles Loizeaux : State Senator and maybe mayor of Plainfield, brother of Fred and J. Harold above, no connection to PGC
Mabel Loizeaux Paulsen: mother of Bev Reid, and sibling of the above three men

By now I know you are sorry you asked!!

Correspondence with Elisabeth Loizeaux

Thank you! The connections are all very interesting. Yes Beverly Reid's garden, Boxwoods, was documented by Betty Hackman and the pictures can be viewed on the Smithsonian Archives website. We also have a Member Album devoted to Beverly. You can find it on www.plainfieldgardenclub.org by looking in the "Notable Members in Plainfield Garden Club History" under History and see Betty's pictures. There is an album for your mother-in-law too.

Thank you again!!!


On Mon, Jan 24, 2011 at 1:38 PM, Elisabeth Loizeaux <ekloizeaux@comcast.net> wrote:

Hello Darlene,
My husband's father and Bernice's father were brothers, Bernice's father was the oldest and my husband's father the youngest of the family. Beverly Reid, by the way, was another cousin , the daughter of one of the sisters in the Loizeaux family.. She of course is another at one time president of PGC, she was the most "perfect" GC member I can remember. Entertaining the club with her, you spent a lot of time dusting her Rhododendrons next to the front door beforehand.................. I hope her house and garden are in the Achive, she truly had the most beautiful garden, everything in perfect harmony with the surrounding landscape. English flower garden, vegetables, Wisteria over the garage doors, there wasn't anything that wasn't "just right", plus she was a first rate flower arranger. Are you familiar with her house? Did you know her? One certainly learned a lot working with her, but her perfectionism was nerve-wracking!

You may of course share my personal information. The story of Driftway Farm , after it was sold, I don't think concerns the GC in any way, that was for your information only. And please be sure to refer to the property as DRIFTWAY FARM, that was what it was called for 50 +/- years. (To the best of my knowledge there isn't a single Ponderosa pine on the property, I don't think my in-laws would have liked the name.)

Regards,

Elisabeth

Smithsonian

NJ0388002

From Elisabeth Loizeaux,
"They are before and after pictures of the southside of the house, before Lois Poinier installed the small terrace with a fountain. As I recall, she used Epimedium and Leucothoe and the seating area was shaded by a Beech tree. It was understated and choice."

Smithsonian

NJ0388004

All photos for the Smithsonian submission were taken by Lois Poinier and dated 1967.

Smithsonian Archives of American Gardens

Email from Elisabeth Loizeaux to Susan Fraser February 13, 2011

Hello Susan,

The collection of botanical prints I gave Sally, are in no way connected with the postcard projects. They belonged to Marion Foster Loizeaux, my mother-in-law. I gave them to PGC in the hope that they could be used in a fund raiser, maybe even at an annual meeting "boutique". There are so many that your intent of posting them on line does not seem practical.

The following is a description I found on the internet:

Mary Vaux Walcott
These beautiful first edition lithographs are from Mary Vaux Walcott's North American Wildflowers, published in 1925 by the Smithsonian Institution. Each large folio print is based on Walcott's original watercolors from her many trips across North America and throughout the Canadian Rockies. Her work was praised for both its beauty and accuracy, and Walcott was often called the "Audubon of botany," a notable accomplishment during a time when few American women were visible in the field of scientific rese

The postcards were a GCA project. Each club had to choose a NATIVE plant in their State, it was meant, I'm sure, to educate folks –– Now, as to playing at Mrs. Tyler's (I assume it is Mrs. Boardman Tyler) My husband Peter also played at Mrs. Tyler's, except he played squash on her private squash court. He also "played" in Rome, at Mrs. Tyler's daughter's home. She was married at the time to an Italian painter, Len Creo, who when visiting Plainfield, painted portraits of "locals" – the one he painted of my mother-in-law is hanging here in our apartment in Boston. It actually doesn't look very much like her. My husband, who was at the time on a three months trip around the world, is rumored to have danced on one leg at the above mentioned party in Rome. He was 25 years old, we have been married 50 years, rest assured that I have never seen him dance on one leg. So it must have been quite a party.

Regards,

Elisabeth

Marion Foster Loizeaux

It is a picture of Marion Foster Loizeaux, taken on Oct. 31, 1960, at our wedding in Zurich Switzerland.

Elisabeth
email dated February 15, 2011

Email from Elisabeth Loizeaux: February 15, 2011

Hello again,

I now vaguely am starting to remember a Betty Loizeaux who sort of "left the scene" in Plainfield. Maybe Diana Madsen who spends sumers in Bay Head would know about Betty? - As you know I did not join the club until 1978. I can't remember ever seeing her at a meeting.

Her husband's sister, at the time called Elaine Greene, remarried after her husband's death, and I think still lives in Princeton.

My in-law's address was always 1600 Cooper Road. Marion Foster Loizeaux died in 1978.

I'm sorry I can't access the link you sent about Betty –- I get a message "access denied".

I just talked to my older sister-in-law, she can't remember anything about Betty either, but thinks her husband Charles is still living in Maine?

Elisabeth

Emails from Elisabeth Loizeaux: February 16, 2011

Cant' explain the discrepancy in the Driftway Farm address. According to my husband, it was always 1600 Cooper Road, at least during the time that the L.s bought the farm land and had a house built on it in the early 30s. ( Just double-checked with Peter's older sister, she says it is possible that very early on there was NO number on Cooper Road, since it was before the township parceled up the land for other homeowners.

I would like to suggest to remove the "before" picture under the Smithsonian heading and replace it with the "after" picture, which shows Mrs. Poinier's seating area, a vast improvement over basically a house wall on the "before" picture, no?

Elisabeth


Sorry, sorry, sorry –– the two Smithsonian pictures presently in the archive are both "after" pictures and perfect.

Who is Mrs. John Gray Foster? I don't believe she is in any way related to Marion Foster Loizeaux or Connie and Kay Foster, nor Ethel Hegeman Foster, the mother of David, Henry, Marion and Ruth (who lived in Wyckoff NJ).

I'm off to Hawaii tomorrow to rest up from all this genealogical research........

Elisabeth

1915 Marion Pratt Foster, Ruth Hegeman Foster, Ethel Pratt Foster, Henry Pratt Foster, David G Foster

1st Prize New York Flower Show 1951

Smithsonian Archives
http://collections.si.edu/search/results.jsp?view=&date.slider=&q=plainfield+&dsort=&start=60


fullscreen resource
Catalogued Data:
Title:New York Flower Show [slide]
Physical description: 1 slide: glass lantern, col.; 3 x 5 in
Type: Projected media
Place: United States of America, New York, New York
New York (State)
New York City
Date: 1951
03/05/1951
Topic: Spring
Flower shows
Flower arrangement
Niches (Architecture)
Local number: NY208195
Restrictions: Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Notes: No Names for Picture. Class A - 1st prize - Mrs. J. Horold Loizeaux, Plainfield Garden Club
Data Source: Archives of American Gardens
Record Identifier:siris_arc_193387

3rd Prize New York Flower Show 1950

Smithsonian Archives
http://collections.si.edu/search/results.jsp?view=&date.slider=&q=plainfield+&dsort=&start=60


Catalogued Data:
Title:New York Flower Show [slide]
Creator: Hugelmeyer, John
Physical description: 1 slide: glass lantern, col.; 3 x 5 in
Type: Projected media
Place: United States of America, New York, New York
New York (State)
New York City
Date: 1950
03/22/1950
Topic: Spring
Flower shows
Niches (Architecture)
Sculpture
Flower arrangement
Pussy willows
Local number: NY208233
Restrictions: Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Notes: No Names for Picture. Class 1 - Wednesday - 3rd prize - Mrs. J. H. Loizeaux, Plainfield Garden Club
Data Source: Archives of American Gardens

Honorable Mention New York Flower Show 1946

Smithsonian Archives
http://collections.si.edu/search/results.jsp?view=&date.slider=&q=plainfield+&dsort=&start=60


Catalogued Data:
Title:New York Flower Show [slide]
Creator: Cassebeer, F. W
Physical description: 1 slide: glass lantern, col.; 3 x 5 in
Type: Projected media
Place: United States of America, New York, New York
New York (State)
New York City
Date: 1946
03/18/1946
Topic: Spring
Flower shows
Flower arrangement
Interior views
Tables
Tulips
Sculpture
Painting
Local number: NY208296
Restrictions: Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Notes: No Names for Picture. "Arrangement against wall, green colors predominating." New Hampshire, 18th c. Colonial, Honorable Mention Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaus, Plainfield, N. J
Data Source: Archives of American Gardens
Record Identifier:siris_arc_193488

1st Prize New York Flower Show 1947

Smithsonian Archives
http://collections.si.edu/search/results.jsp?view=&date.slider=&q=plainfield+&dsort=&start=60


Catalogued Data:
Title:New York Flower Show [slide]
Creator: Cassebeer, F. W
Physical description: 1 slide: glass lantern, col.; 3 x 5 in
Type: Projected media
Place: United States of America, New York, New York
New York (State)
New York City
Date: 1947
03/00/1947
Topic: Spring
Flower arrangement
Flower shows
Tables
Local number: NY208328
Restrictions: Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Notes: No Names for Picture. "Early American Pine Room" Friday; yellow and grey plant material; Occasional Table. 1st prize; Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux, Plainfield, N. J
Data Source: Archives of American Gardens
Record Identifier:siris_arc_193520

Introduction in Rhyme of Skit for Garden Club Meeting May 1956 by Marge Elliott

Introduction

Imagine that you are our garden club
type here the powers that be
What things go on in a garden club
you'll be surprised to see

The cast are famous actresses
All brought at great expense
So please be kind to others, my friends
Lest they should take offense.

The President's name is Hazel
And its Lockwood thats for sure
She presides as "to-the-manner-born"
But her arrangements they are poor.

Elizabeth King of Programs She's
all fluttering, cooing and coy.
To find the right speaker for just the right day
Is her constant delight and her joy.

Introduction in Rhyme of Skit for Garden Club Meeting May 1956 by Marge Elliott

Page 2

Ways and Means Chairman is Shirley
Bernhart we're meaning of course
She's breathless, naive and appealing
But hasn't the sense of a horse.

Marrion Loizeaux is chairman
of membership looks la-de-da
But don't let that big hat delude you
She's a great one for making faux pas.

Fanny Day has charge of the minutes
Madame Secretary no less
But I must in confidence tell you
All her reports are a mess.

Hiely that's Polly the Treasurer
Does weird things to the books
She was never good at her figures
And so for the balance gad - zooks!

Introduction in Rhyme of Skit for Garden Club Meeting May 1956 by Marge Elliott

Hospitality chairman is Barbara
Sandford's the rest of her name
She's very smart but sarcastic
the "country tweed type" is this dame.

Conservation is Anne Marie Seybold
She is a lady who knows what is what
She has no time for the frivilous
In her ways she's terribly sot.

Abie Mooney our wonderful speaker
Rosa Bunda she has quite a past
And now you know all that you need to
about our illustrious cast.

So please let the music be quiet
I see the house lights are low
Put on the fools and the spotlights
All right curtain ready? Let's go!

Introduction in Rhyme of Skit for Garden Club Meeting May 1956 by Marge Elliott

Hillside Cemetery

September 14, 2011
Photo by S. Fraser

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

February 8, 2012 memories from Elisabeth Loizeaux

Do we remember Virginia Frost? We do, as well as her sister Mrs. deHart (both lived on Rahway Road). I used to occasionally help my mother-in-law arrange the flowers at Crescent Avenue Church, and when those two ladies were there, it was like having a master class in flower arranging – you didn't want to make a wrong move and you better paid attention. –– Mrs. deHart had one of her arrangements featured in a book, it was in an antique candle mold, just exquisite in its restrained perfection.

May I suggest that "info" sign her messages?

Elisabeth

Email April 29, 2012 re: Van Boskerck and Tyler Families

Hi Susan,
You are going to love this...I mean really love it.
CPN is Caroline Potter Normann, my friend, the writer. The person who wrote these notes was her mother, Lucy Van Boskerck Potter Mitchel who grew up in Plainfield in the house where the ex governor lives on Prospect Ave. She moved to Seattle when she married. That is the garden she writes about.
If you have any questions, let me know.
Sally


––Original Message––
From: Caroline Normann <caponor@gmail.com>
To: Sally Booth <sbooth1954@aol.com>
Sent: Sun, Apr 29, 2012 9:38 pm
Subject: Tyler information

Dear Sally, I hope I haven't delayed too long. I had to do some digging. Mom wrote pages and pages of memoires, all interesting, occasionally repetitive, as they were written over many years. Happily, I had transcribed them. Some I added comments for the benefit of Jenny and Beth.

There isn't a lot about Aunt Susan. I do remember going to her home for tea when we came to visit. That would have been when I was in grade school. She died quite a while before I went to college. Their home was filled with interesting furniture, paintings and lovely rooms. It was all very formal, but she was always very kind and easy for a child to be with. You are correct about the portrait that she gave to the Met. Its companion piece hung in Aunt Ethel's home and also hangs in the Met next to that given by Aunt Susan. Needless to say I didn't know her well. Aunt Ethel was the youngest of my grandfather's siblings and lived into her late 80s, so I knew her very well and always enjoyed being with her. She was amazingly youthful, open-minded, and contemporary for one of her generation. I visited her often while I was in college.

Let me know if any of the attached are useful to you or if you have an follow-up questions.

Love, Caroline


Caroline Normann
18317 Sunset Way
Edmonds, WA 98026
(425) 771-8925
(425) 530-6687(cell)

Email April 29, 2012 by Caroline Normann
Aunt Susan Tyler started a class to teach us to make pottery. She had her own studio and kiln in a part of their garage. She was a very cultured lady, a Smith college graduate from the time when that was a rarity, and she had great artistic taste and talent and had traveled widely. She opened up the world of art to us. There were five of us, Peggy Lawrence, Jean Moment, Emilie Parsons, Ruth Foster and me. I now know that in her perceptive way she realized that we each needed something. After our work in the studio, we would go into her beautiful library and were served an elegant tea in front of the fire. She had a glamorous La Salle roadster with a rumble seat, and Patrick her chauffeur, would deliver us home afterwards. She took us to new York to the Metropolitan Museum, to lunch in a fine restaurant like Sherrys and to the opera and to plays. It was a whole new world to me. These things have been my greatest interest every since. She talked about travel and wonderful things to see in Europe. For years after I was grown she and I shared ideas, and I always went to see her when I visited in the East until she finally died at a very old age.

Aunt Ethel interested me in antiques and she was full of creative ideas. She painted stencils and was an outstanding flower arranger and won many prized in the New York Flower Show for the Plainfield Garden Club. She was a gourmet cook herself in spite of having a regular cook in her household. We always had a lot of fun together and were close friends. She had a great sense of humor and of adventure.

Aunt Edith gave me lessons in painting, perspective and color values and later guided me to go to the Art Students league. She realized that I had no skills to fall back on and after studying for a few years she had me work in her interior decorating business in New York to get some practical experience.

Aunt Susan Tyler
Tyler, Mrs. Cornelius Boardman (Susan Tilden Whittlesey)'25 President 1944 - 1947

Aunt Ethel
Tyler, Mrs. William Seymour (Ethel Van Boskerck) '15

Aunt Edith
Noss, Mrs. Henry (Edith Edwards Tyler) '66

Email April 29, 2012 written by Lucy Van Boskerck Potter Mitchel

THE GARDEN

Having grown up in Brooklyn, Mother didn't know anything about plants, but she was eager to learn about gardening. The property they bought had originally been a nursery and had many fine large trees, tall pines, oaks, hard wood maples, a tulip tree and locusts in the front of the house. They acquired a good strong Italian gardener, Paul Scalera, who was an immigrant from the Naples area with his wife and numerous children. They lived in South Plainfield about 5 miles away. He used to walk to work and later had a bicycle. The children became educated and eventually were important people in the community. He worked for us for years and we loved and respected him. He was small and gradually grew very stooped. He had dark piercing eyes and a felt hat always somewhat over them. He always spit on his hands before tackling a piece of work with a hoe or a shovel. He seldom washed. He brought delicious thick sandwiches for his lunch filled with sausage and garlic. One day Mother was horrified to discover me in the process of taking a bite which has had offered. She always washed and sterilized everything and my lunches were usually baked potatoes, spinach and lamb chops. I thought his much more exciting. Paul called Mother "the mist" and was "the little mist."

When he first worked for us Mother was upset because he was pulling plants out of the garden and throwing them away. "Paul, what are you doing?" she cried. "He do be die", he told her. One day he appeared with a gift of several little dogwood trees. She was delighted. "Where did you get them, Paul?" "Me catch up at Loiz." Mr. Loizeaux was our neighbor with scads of white Cornus Florida trees in his garden. Mother was embarrassed but could hardly take them back and explain, so she planted them. She bought many more from a nursery and they lined the semi-circular driveway in front of our house with more in back under the tall pine trees.

It was a beautiful garden with stretches of lawn patterned by light and shade. There was a woodsy wild garden with ferns, hypatica, bloodroot, trillium, and masses of fragrant violets, orchids, mertensia and other choice plants, lots of mountain laurel and vivid areas of azaleas. There was a large perennial garden with delphinium, lilies, double campanulas sweet William and other plants. Roses were planted below the terrace. Daddy had a big vegetable garden with grapes and fruit trees as well.

Mother was one of the founders of the Plainfield Garden Club and started the Cornus Arboretum in one of the parks. She was very active in it for years. Every June Mother and Auntie Flo gave two luncheons back-to-back in the garden when everything was in full bloom. It was lovely.

The Swains who bought the house in 1958 have kept up the garden. She was a Loizeaux, so it is fitting that she fell heir to the dogwood trees that Paul gave Mother. There are many birds in the garden: Kentucky cardinals, wrens, orioles, etc.

Sent in April 29, 2012 written by Lucy Von Boskerck Potter Mitchel

Aunt Ethel Tyler was the youngest Van Boskerck. She was also artistic in a very practical manner. Everything she did was in perfect taste. She added warmth and "fun" to whatever she did. She was a gourmet cook and taught me a lot. She had a cook and maids, but did a lot of fine touches herself (CPN: and always cooked when it was the maid's day off. I visited her often when I was in college, and she was my favorite of all the blood relatives after my grandmother Mom Mom died in early 1960). She won many prizes for her flower arrangements for the Plainfield Garden Club in the big NY flower show. Her husband, William Seymour Tyler, came from an old distinguished New England family. He and his brother, Boardman Tyler, shared a law partnership in NY. Their properties on 7th and 8th Streets in Plainfield ran together at the back with fine gardens. Several of their ancestor paintings are now in the American wing of the Metropolitan Museum. The Tylers had Greek and Latin professors from Amherst College in their background.

Uncle Will ( a century ago) was a man for this "green" era. Aunt Ethel and Aunt Susan both had electric cars which had to be battery charged when not used. They were elegant round with windows, steered with a tiller, and always a crystal vase with a rose. At Lake Sunapee he had an electric boat which glided through the water silently and smoothly. Its batteries were also charged in the boat house when not in use. When they built their summer "camp" he did not want to cut down trees, so they grew right up through the broad railings of the porch. The architecture fitted right into the setting. He bought acres of land and cut a trail through it and gave it in perpetuity to the village, as the Nature Conservancy now.

In Plainfield he started the Boy Scouts and was on the town council. Uncle Boardman was chairman of the library board. They were both active in the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church. After World War I the milk was very bad, so the two brothers bought more property and started Woodbrook Farms. It was all done hygienically, well pasteurized, and the cows taken care of properly. (CPN note: pasteurization was new to the US in early 1900's and not generally required until several decades later, so these men were ahead of their time in trying to provide healthy milk at a time when typhoid, diphtheria and other such diseases were often caused by impure milk.) Our milk from there was delivered by horse & wagon. Uncle Will's cousin was president of Abercrombie and Fitch, which had the best sporting goods equipment, and was an important store then. I had an "old town" canoe from there, and Uncle Will taught me how to paddle "Indian style", kneeling on the floor. (bottom of the canoe).
I

Note from Sally Booth:

Jean Moment was the daughter of Dr. Moment the minister of Crescent Ave. Pres. Church. She married Walter Douglas. I don't know if she was a member...I kind of think not. Peggy Lawrence never married. She taught at Spence or Chapin (girl's schools) in NYC I don't know who Ruth Foster married and I would only know her by her married name.

June 19, 2012 Driftway Farm becomes a County Park

From farmland to playgrounds: Union County opens new park in Scotch PlainsPublished: Tuesday, June 19, 2012, 7:56 PM

SCOTCH PLAINS – Ann Argila lounged in a beach chair watching her 7-year-old daughter, Cara, hop though a water spray playground, giggling with friends. The Plainfield mother-daughter duo came to the newly opened Ponderosa Farm Park for Cara's "bridging" ceremony in which she and fellow Daisies graduated to Brownies.

"This is probably the first new park in Scotch Plains in decades," said Argila, who has lived in the area for 40 years. "It's clean, it's safe, and my daughter always finds someone to play with."

A few feet away, county officials gathered to celebrate the official opening of Ponderosa Farm Park, a 22-acre farmland property on Cooper Road. The county purchased the property for $10 million in 2003 and converted it into two soccer fields, a water playground, gazebo, gardens and picnic area.

"Where there was once farm equipment and red barns filled with hay, we now see walking trails, playgrounds, athletic fields and a dancing spray park where the children of our community can come to enjoy the day," said Freeholder Chairman Alexander Mirabella.

August 31, 1967

http://archive.wmlnj.org/var/www/TheWestfieldLeader/1967/1967-08-31/pg_0011.pdf

Liozeaux Resigns From County's Park Board


J. Harold Loizeaux of Scotch Plains, president id thhe Union County
Park Commission, submitted his resignation' from the park board
recently.

The resignation, which is effective immediately, was received with
regret by the members of the commission, who commended Loizeaux
for his long service to the people of the county.

Loizeaux, who has served on the park board for 14 years, said he
had intended to retire in November at the end of liis current term.

He said that since there are a number of important items currently
before the commission which will have a vital elfect on the future
policies and plans of the park commission, he is of the opinion that
a new commissioner should be present at the meetings of the park
body as early as possible.

Loizeaux was appointed to the commission in November 1953 in
November 1953 by Superior Court Judge Frank L. Cleary, to fill the
unexpired term of the late State Sen. Robert C. Crane of Westfield.
He was reappointed in 1957 by Superior Court Judge Walter L. Hetfield III.

In 1962, when the supportive powers were changed from the Superior
Court to the Board of Freeholders, Loizeaux was reappointed by the
board for a1 fiVe-year term.

He was president of the park commission in 1967, 1960 and 1959, vice
president in 1966, 1965 ind 1958 and treasurer in 1964. Members of the
commission serve without compensation.

Louiszeaux is a former, director, and first vice, president of the. Chamber of Commerce of Eastern Union County. While with the chamber, he headed the harbor and waterways committee.

He is a former member and secretary of the Greater Elizabeth
Movement and a former trustee of the New Jersey Lumbermen's Association and a member of the executive committee of the New Jersey Parks and Recreation Association.

He owns Driftway Farm in Scotch Plains. He is president of Loizeaux
Builders Supply Co. in Elizabeth and J. D. Loizeaux Lumber Co. in Plainfield

1953 Check Book

No. 997
Mar. 31, 1953
Margaret C. Ladd
Exhibitor at Flower show
$12.50

No. 998
Mar. 31, 1953
Marion Loizeaux
Exhibitor at flower show
$12.50

No. 999
Mar. 31, 1953
Virginia Stillman
Exhibitor Flower Show
$12.50

1954 Check Book

No. 1111
June 21, 1954
J. D. Loizeaux Lumber
crystals par (stoves?) for Formal Garden – Fair
$4.50

No. 1112
June 21, 1954
Mrs. Clarence W. Slocum
75 N. Martine Avenue
Fanwood
news leaf subscription
21 members @ 50 cents
$10.50

No. 1113
July 7, 1954
Snyder Bros.
flowers for Lyons
June 4 & 11
$10.00

1954 Check book

No. 1129
Nov. 15, 1954
Split Rails Garden Shop
sales table supplies
$70.00

No. 1130
Nov. 17, 1954
Mrs. Arsoe Howe Smith
Speaker
$75.00

No. 1131
Nov. 17, 1954
Marion F. Loizeaux
expense for exhibit
Met – Museum of Art
$20.00

1947 Check Book

No. 638
Apr 1, 1947
Marion F. Loizeaux
Budget (flower show exhibitor)
$10.00

1947 Check Book

No. 660
July 10, 1947
Marion F. Loizeeaux
Conference expense
Annual Meeting
$75.00

1947 Check Book

No. 676
Nov. 19, 1947
Marion F. Loizeaux
N. J. Conservation
luncheon
cancelled
not used
$6.00

1948 Check Book

No. 724
July 19, 1948
Marion Loizeaux
Annual Meeting Expenses
$66.00

No. 725
July 19, 1948
Marjorie B. Elliott
repayment for telephone calls
made for Fall Benefit
$1.10

No. 726
August 12, 1948
Harriette R. Halloway
advance for Iris Garden
$25.00

1949 Check Book

No. 784
June 21, 1949
Margaret Ladd
N. Y. Flower Show Exhibitor
$7.00

No. 785
June 21, 1949
Marion Loizeaux
N. Y. Flower Show Exhibitor
$7.00

No. 786
June 21, 1949
Susan Tyler
N. Y. Flower Show Exhibitor
2 exhibits
$14.00

1949 Check Book

No. 805
Ethel Anderegg
tip Frank 5.00
wire 1.75
string 1.75
ribbon 2.00
10.50
xmas wreaths
$10.50

No. 806
Dec. 6, 1949
J. D. Loizeaux
Bird feeder at Bonnie Burn
(taken from Conservation – for caups?)
$21.10

No. 807
Dec. 6, 1949
Margaret C. Ladd
exp. on museum foxes 2.72
dues civid planning ass 2.50
circulars for schools 4.00
9.22
Bird feed for feeder 7.90
$17.12

1950 Check Book

No. 820
Mar. 10, 1950
Virginia Frost
Exhibitor flower show
$12.50

No. 821
Mar. 10, 1950
Marion Loizeaux
Exhibitor flower show
$12.50

No. 822
Mar. 10, 1950
Marjorie Elliott
Exhibitor flower show
$12.50

1951 Check Book

No. 886
March 15, 1951
Marion Loizeaux
$20.00

No. 887
March 15, 1951
The American Horticultural
Society, Inc.
dues
$5.00

No. 888
March 15, 1951
The Monday Afternoon Club
Rental of Screen
Program
$5.00

A Fond Memory of a Heck of a Lady

May 2001 Newsletter

Mrs. Willoughby Frost

Word has come that Mrs. Willoughby Frost has passed to her reward – and a "great reward" it should be!

Virginia, as you may be aware, is one of the Plainfield Garden Club's honorary members, an honor well deserved. We are all so proud of her exceptional talents – we were often in awe of what she could accomplish in so many fields.

One of her projects which I remember was with others running the Junior League Garden Club – it was a great way to inform the uniformed about gardening, and mostly about flower arranging, so there would be people somewhat trained to join the Plainfield Garden Club.

We had regular classes and projects to work out, beginning with three flowers (unbought – one had to grow or steal the flowers) and greens. Then Virginia or her sister, Dorothy de Hart, or Marion Loizeaux would criticize our work and highlight our errors. That was the fun part! She could be funny – "Well, clearly someone spent money on this one," or "You didn't need to cut down the whole tree for a few greens. Go out, look up, and find a branch that is growing the direction the way you want it – then cut that branch!"

Virginia was a respected GCA judge. She worked hard in the Shakespeare Garden – trimmed the topiaries, etc. She was also a landscapist in planning a project – or pointing out how to bring back to size a too large or vigorous Victorian shrub, removing a tree, or suggesting an improvement in design.

The Plainfield Garden Club decided to put in a "vest-pocket" park (which were the current rage at the time), and we found a narrow plot on Park Avenue which would suit the purpose. Virginia drew the plans and we planted it accordingly – letting her beatus into visiting the park each day for watering and trash pick-up. It was duly admired and very successful.

Another first for Plainfield city streets: Virginia and I guessed Jean Stewart went to a GCA meeting and came home with the idea to plant trees in the sidewalks along the curbs! After much study as to variety and spacing, the club bought a dozen Moraine Locusts with tiny blow-away leaves to give filtered shade. They turned out to be a real demonstration, as the city went ahead the next season and bought seventy-five more! Though 35 - 40 years old now, they still line Front Street, and Park Avenue from Front to the railroad bridge.

When the annual Flower Show was announced in New York City, Virginia and the girls all put their heads together to compete. Several times there were big landscape classes – a back door landscaped wiht proper planting – Virginia always in the thick ot if, bringing home the blues.

Or if she competed on her own, she got her material, books and containers, and locked herself in an upstairs room, sometimes for days, until all was set. Soak the wisteria vine in the bathtub, curve it this way or (change) that – the bed was important. The family was "on its own" at these times – but this meant so much to Virginia, there were often tears of frustration. She cared, she wanted it right, and the "blues" flowed in.

Mrs. Frost knew her duty, too: drove the Hartridge carpool, worked endlessly at the church (behind the scenes), had punch parties before dancing school, and all that. A wonderful entertainer, with everything "just so". She had her feisty side too – I have to mention that to give a well-rounded picture – but she could speak up at times for us all to hear.

Barbara Sandford


2001 Jan Mar Apr May Newsletters

1925 Meeting Minutes

Mention of Mayor Loizeaux

April 8, 1925 Meeting Minutes

March 5, 1951 Mrs. Loizeaux's entry

Title:
New York Flower Show [slide]
Forms part of:
Garden Club of America Collection,
Phy. Description:
1 slide: glass lantern, col.; 3 x 5 in.
Digital Reference:

Produced:
03/05/1951
General Note:
No Names for Picture. Class A - 1st prize - Mrs. J. Horold Loizeaux, Plainfield Garden Club.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Subject-Topical:
Spring
Flower shows
Flower arrangement
Niches (Architecture)
Subject - Geographical:
New York (State) – New York City
United States of America New York New York
Repository Loc:
Smithsonian Gardens, PO Box 37012, Capital Gallery, Suite 3300, MRC 506, Washington, DC 20013-7012
Local Number:
NY208195

March 22, 1950 Mrs. Loizeaux's entry

Title:
New York Flower Show [slide]
Forms part of:
Garden Club of America Collection,
Phy. Description:
1 slide: glass lantern, col.; 3 x 5 in.
Digital Reference:

Produced:
03/22/1950
General Note:
No Names for Picture. Class 1 - Wednesday - 3rd prize - Mrs. J. H. Loizeaux, Plainfield Garden Club.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Subject-Topical:
Spring
Flower shows
Niches (Architecture)
Sculpture
Flower arrangement
Pussy willows
Subject - Geographical:
New York (State) – New York City
United States of America New York New York
Repository Loc:
Smithsonian Gardens, PO Box 37012, Capital Gallery, Suite 3300, MRC 506, Washington, DC 20013-7012
Local Number:
NY208233
Co-Creator:
Hugelmeyer, John

March 18, 1946 Mrs. Loizeaux's entry

Title:
New York Flower Show [slide]
Forms part of:
Garden Club of America Collection,
Phy. Description:
1 slide: glass lantern, col.; 3 x 5 in.
Digital Reference:

Produced:
03/18/1946
General Note:
No Names for Picture. "Arrangement against wall, green colors predominating." New Hampshire, 18th c. Colonial, Honorable Mention Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaus, Plainfield, N. J.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Subject-Topical:
Spring
Flower shows
Flower arrangement
Interior views
Tables
Tulips
Sculpture
Painting
Subject - Geographical:
New York (State) – New York City
United States of America New York New York
Repository Loc:
Smithsonian Gardens, PO Box 37012, Capital Gallery, Suite 3300, MRC 506, Washington, DC 20013-7012
Local Number:
NY208296
Co-Creator:
Cassebeer, F. W.

March 1947 Mrs. Loizeaux's entry

itle:
New York Flower Show [slide]
Forms part of:
Garden Club of America Collection,
Phy. Description:
1 slide: glass lantern, col.; 3 x 5 in.
Digital Reference:

Produced:
03/00/1947
General Note:
No Names for Picture. "Early American Pine Room" Friday; yellow and grey plant material; Occasional Table. 1st prize; Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux, Plainfield, N. J.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Subject-Topical:
Spring
Flower arrangement
Flower shows
Tables
Subject - Geographical:
New York (State) – New York City
United States of America New York New York
Repository Loc:
Smithsonian Gardens, PO Box 37012, Capital Gallery, Suite 3300, MRC 506, Washington, DC 20013-7012
Local Number:
NY208328
Co-Creator:
Cassebeer, F. W.

From the Netherwood Neighborhood Association

Courier News Obituary Index

Loizeaux Arthur R. 10/18/1938 News
Loizeaux Arthur R. 5/6/1941 News
Loizeaux Arthur R. 10/18/1941 News
Loizeaux Arthur R. 1/9/1954 News
Loizeaux Arthur R. 1/11/1954Obituary
Loizeaux Arthur R. 1/13/1954 News
Loizeaux Arthur R. n.d. News
Loizeaux Arthur R. n.d. News
Loizeaux Catherine L. 3/9/1938 News
Loizeaux Catherine L. 3/7/1941 News
Loizeaux Catherine L. 3/7/1942 News
Loizeaux Catherine L. 3/3/1943 News
Loizeaux Catherine L. 3/8/1943 News
Loizeaux Catherine L. 5/21/1956 Obituary
Loizeaux Edward 12/31/1937 News
Loizeaux Edward 2/14/1962 Obituary
Loizeaux Elie Timothee 8/7/1956 Obituary
Loizeaux Elise (Duvernoy) husband Elie Timothee 5/28/1962 Obituary
Loizeaux Ella (Case) husband Edward 12/31/1937 News
Loizeaux Ella (Case) husband Edward 12/26/1959 Obituary
Loizeaux F. Parker 10/17/1938 News
Loizeaux F. Parker associated with Frederick D. Loizeaux 10/20/1949 News
Loizeaux F. Parker associated with Frederick D. Loizeaux 10/17/1959 News
Loizeaux F. Parker 10/26/1970 News
Loizeaux
F. Parker
10/30/1970
News
Loizeaux
F. Parker
10/2/1972
Obituary
Loizeaux
F. Parker
n.d.
News
Loizeaux
Frederick D.
12/6/1932
News
Loizeaux
Frederick D.
1/31/1936
News
Loizeaux
Frederick D.
12/7/1937
News
Loizeaux
Frederick D.
1/7/1941
News
Loizeaux
Frederick D.
10/4/1947
News
Loizeaux
Frederick D.
associated with F. Parker Loizeaux
10/20/1949
News
Loizeaux
Frederick D.
10/2/1959
News
Loizeaux
Frederick D.
associated with F. Parker Loizeaux
10/17/1959
News
Loizeaux
Frederick D.
12/31/1971
Obituary
Loizeaux
Frederick D.
n.d.
News
Loizeaux
Jesse (Ferris)
husband F. Parker
10/17/1938
News
Loizeaux
Jesse (Ferris)
husband F. Parker
10/26/1970
News
Loizeaux
Jesse (Ferris)
husband F. Parker
n.d.
News
Loizeaux
Jesse (Ferris)
husband F. Parker
10/29/1977
Annotation
death
Loizeaux
Jesse (Ferris)
husband F. Parker
n.d.
Obituary
Loizeaux
Jesse (Ferris)
husband F. Parker
n.d.
News
Loizeaux
John Gilmore
10/15/1955
Obituary
Loizeaux
John Gilmore
11/3/1955
News
Loizeaux
Joshua Harold
11/28/1951
News
Loizeaux
Joshua Harold
11/21/1953
News
Loizeaux
Joshua Harold
12/30/1953
News
Loizeaux
Joshua Harold
10/14/1957
News
Loizeaux
Joshua Harold
10/15/1957
News
Loizeaux
Joshua Harold
11/26/1958
News
Loizeaux
Joshua Harold
12/8/1958
News
Loizeaux
Joshua Harold
2/23/1959
News
Loizeaux
Joshua Harold
2/25/1959
News
Loizeaux Joshua Harold11/25/1959 News
Loizeaux Joshua Harold 10/30/1962 News
Loizeaux Joshua Harold 11/9/1962 News
Loizeaux Joshua Harold 11/10/1962 News
Loizeaux Joshua Harold 11/23/1966 News
Loizeaux Joshua Harold 8/18/1967 News
Loizeaux Joshua Harold 10/28/1968 News
Loizeaux Joshua Harold 7/16/1983 Obituary
Loizeaux Joshua Harold n.d. News
Loizeaux Joshua T. 4/24/1961 Annotation death
Loizeaux Lydie E. 3/18/1959 Obituary
Loizeaux Lydie E. 3/23/1959 News
Loizeaux Lydie E. 4/8/1959 News
Loizeaux Marion Foster husband Joshua Harold 10/22/1954 News
Loizeaux Marion Foster husband Joshua Harol ?/?/1978 Annotation death
Loizeaux Pauline (Smith) husband Arthur R. 10/18/1938 News
Loizeaux Pauline (Smith) husband Arthur R. 10/18/1941 News
Loizeaux Pauline (Smith) husband Arthur R. 7/29/1977 Annotation death
Loizeaux Pauline (Smith) husband Arthur R. n.d. Obituary

1967 Acomb & Davis Art Exhibit at Swain's Gallery

Loizeaux Builders Supply Company

Loizeaux Builders Supply Company

Loizeaux Builders Supply Company

Loizeaux Builders Supply Company

July 6, 1967 The Westfield Leader

http://archive.wmlnj.org/TheWestfieldLeader
/1967/1967-07-06/pg_0019.pdf

Krestan Retires From UC Park System After 42 Years; Guest at Luncheon

2013-10-27 Email Exchange

Dear Mrs. Faraone,

I stumbled upon your email exchange with the Plainfield Garden Club when I was searching for something else. To the best of my recollection, my family rented 717 Dixie Lane from about 1954 to 1958. I remember the Gastons. Mary Lightburn (the daughter of the Mary Lightburn you mention, I think) was one of my best friends. We were in the same class at Hartridge (1964). My mother, Victoria H. Furman, was an active member of the Plainfield Garden Club. She and my father, Gerald S. Furman, were friends with the Loizeaux and Detwillers. The Loizeaux daughter was also at Hartidge, Class of '64.

I notice there is no photo of my mother on the Notable Members list. I will try to remember to scan the photo I have of her at the Plant and Bake Sale at Drake House in 1962 and email it to you.

Sandy Furman

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

May 21, 1954

October 10, 1954

April 20, 1961 10 Years Ago, 1951

Mrs. Edward H. Ladd was elected president of the Plainfield Garden Club in the home of Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux of Cooper Rd.

1962

Thursday, December 17, 1964 The Courier News

Plainfield Garden Club Meets in Lee House, Scotch Plains

The Plainfield Garden Club was entertained yesterday in historic Lee House, home of Mr. and Mrs. William P. Elliott at 11 Black Birch Rd., Scotch Plains.

Two new members were welcomed by Mrs. Wayne J. Holman, president. Co-hostesses were Mrs. Victor King and Mrs. James R. Bird.

Mrs. Bird introduced the program of readings on "The Symbols and Legends of Christmas" given by Mrs. A. D. Seybold and Mrs. King. As the symbols were describe, they were displayed b Mrs. Benson Wigton Jr.

A letter of congratulations from Mayor Robert C. Maddox to the club member Mrs. Alden DeHart has received a state award in the "Green Thumb Competition" of the New Jersey Tercentenary Commission for her work as chairman of the grounds committee of Drake House.

A member of the Plainfield Historical Society, she supervised outdoor plantain at the museum with funds for the planting donated by the Plainfield Garden Club. She also was awarded a special rose bush which will be planted at Drake House in her name in the spring.

Presiding at the tea table were Mrs. Holman, Mrs. William S. Tyler, Mrs. Webster Sandford, Mrs. Noah C. Barnhart, Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux and Mrs. Charles H. Detwiller.

Thursday, December 17, 1964 The Courier News

Friday, April 30, 1965 Plainfield Woman Acclaimed For Conservation Activities

Caption: CITED FOR HER EFFORTS – Mrs. Garret Smith of Plainfield was cited for her many years of conservation work by the New Jersey Park and Recreation Association last night in Elizabeth. Citation is presented by Mrs. John M. Mackie of Summit, second from left, Mrs. Smith's sponsor for the award, while state Commissioner of Conservation and Economic Development Robert A. Roe, left, and association President F. S. Mathewson of Plainfield look on

Plainfield Woman Acclaimed For Conservation Activities

Elizabeth – Mrs. Garret Smith of 132 Crescent Ave., Plainfield, was honored last night by the New Jersey Park and Recreation Association for the many years she has devoted to conservation.

Mrs. Smith, who received a plaque at a dinner in the Winfield Scott Hotel, was cited as "a conservationist, horticulturalist, civic worker, and speaker."

She has give most of her 89 years, the citation read, "to making this world a better place in which to live by planting trees, plans and flowers and strenuously urging others to do likewise."

Speaking at the program were Robert A. Roe, New Jersey commissioner of conservation and economic development, and John T. Cunningham, author, lecturer and conservationist.

Active With Groups
Mrs. Smith was commended for the following activities: as a long time member of the Plainfield Shade Tree Commission, the only woman to serve on the board of directors of the N. J. Federation of Shade Tree Commissions, members of the Plainfield Garden Club, Garden Club of New Jersey, Garden Club of America, charter member of the Union County Association of Shade Tree Commissioners, originator and life honorary president of the Little Garden Club of New York City, and a member of the N. J. Association of Certified Tree Experts.

"She was an originator and leader in a national movement to beautify and advance the utilitarian use of church grounds," the citation continued, "and has been a strong and articulate advocate of parks, large and small, especially neighborhood parks, and has proposed and helped create parks in her own city."

2 Get Citations
Citations were also presented to W. Richmond Tracy of Summit, retired engineer and secretary of the Union County Park Commission, and to Mrs. Robert L. Loyd, of Morristown, a member of the Morris County Park Commission and leader in the Great Swamp project.

Roe said he favors Senate Bill 234, which could elevate the Bureaus of Parks, Forestry and Recreation to division status.

He notes the "vital concern" his department has in the state's present water shortage, commended the Green Acres program and expressed concern about a proposed state budget provision which would cut $5 million from a fund to help local and state agencies construct sewer facilities.

Cunningham, speaking on "Saving New Jersey's Best," stressed the urgency for preserving open spaces in the state. This land is vitally needed for conservation and recreation, he said. He indicated real estate industrial developments along with various other agencies are ?? to take this land an ? for the purposed other than?? for which it was intended.

F. S. Mathewson of Plainfield was re-elected President of the N. J. Park and Recreation Association. ?? those re-elected to the?? committee were ??? Feiring of Watchung, ??? Victor R. King of Plainfield, and J. Harold Loizeaux of Scotch Plains.

Friday, April 30, 1965 Plainfield Woman Acclaimed For Conservation Activities

Thursday, July 26, 1979 Scotch Plains-Fanwood The Times

New Colonial gardens are unveiled at Village Green

A garden patch straight out of Colonial Williamsburg, debuted in Scotch Plains this week, as the local Historical Society sponsored an old-fashioned outdoor tea party to show off the recently completed garden. Ladies in the lovely pastels and flowered print dresses of summer strolled the brick and chip paths to admire the latest addition to the Village Green Park adjacent to the municipal building.

The gardens about the Cannonball Museum. Behind low white fences next to the museum is a geometric garden. Brick paths create a six-sided walkway around a center plot of geraniums, boxwood and yew. Broad corner borders are planted with impatiens and tiny boxwood. Another section of the ?? garden includes orderly rows of herbs – wormwood, southernwood, winter savory, parsley, lambs ears, etc.

Behind the fenced garden is a second garden, with divided planting sections featuring beautiful examples of Colonial horticulture. The rear garden, which features sections of lavender, hyssop, mini basil, silver lace artemesia and thyme, with each patch edged in brick. In the center is a primitive rock with a concave center, which creates a tiny pool. The tock has local historical significance of a sort. As explained by Mrs. William Elliott of the historical group, the rock once was located on the property of Marion Clark's Scotch Plains home. It was partially buried below grounds, so the concavity served as a bowl for chicken feed for Mrs. Clark's grandmother's chickens. The second garden has been given to the residents of Scotch Plains by the Loizeaux family in honor of Marion Foster Loizeaux.

Behind the Cannonball House, an arbor awaits the planting of grapes, banks of myrtle have been planted and the old time "privy" has been enhanced with simple landscaping which includes a second large rock – a fossilized rock, which had been on the grounds of the tiny museum.

The landscaping of Cannonball began as a Bicentennial project in 1976, when the Garden Club of Plainfield contributed $3,000. The initial contribution went toward gardening in front of the museum - holly trees, dogwood, and fencing. The latest formal gardens were funded as part of the local township Village Green project. Virginia Frost, a prominent Colonial landscape gardener from Plainfield designed the gardens.

Mayor Alan Augustine in a subdued khaki suite, and Township Engineer Edward Bogan, were the two sober notes among the pastels. Augustine was highly enthusiastic about the new park and expressed his dedication to maintaining the entire new complex in "green" condition. An effort will be made to establish continuity among the maintenance staff, so that the same workmen are always assigned to Village Green, Augustine said, and the township will set the same high standards of greenskeeping that now receive top priority at the municipal golf course.

Viewing the rows of Colonial herbs, Augustine quipped: "I will call this 'herbal renewal'"

1973-1974 PGC Directory

1973-1974 Redwoods Chairman

1974-1975 Directory

May 14, 1983 Centennial The Wardlaw Hartridge School

Club History by Anne Marie v. G. Seybold

1984-1985 History of the Plainfield Garden Club by Anne Marie v. G. Seybold

Horticulture
Outstanding, in February, 1966, was the presentation on the "Heath Family" under the leadership of Mrs. Harold Loizeaux and another such program in 1970 on the "Ranunculaceae Family."

1949-1950 Program

This small brochure was found in the bottom of a box belonging to Barbara Tracy Sandford '50. 12/22/13

1949-1950 Program

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership