Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Frost, Mrs. F. Willoughby (Virginia Voorhis), Jr. '39

**NOTE: There were probably two "Mrs. Frost's" in the club - Mrs. F. Willoughby (Alice A. Birney Blackwell) Frost who joined in 1918 and her daughter-in-law, Mrs. F. Willoughby (Virginia Voorhis) Frost '39. Both the Frosts and the Voorhis families lived on Rahway Road.

1919 Address: Rahway Road, Plainfield

1922 Address: Rahway Road, Plainfield

1932 Directory*: Not Listed
* = This directory is not dated but presumed to be from the year 1932.

1937 Treasurer Book Active: (written lighting in pencil) Mrs. Willoughbby Frost Oct. 1939
1938 Treasurer Book, Active: (written lightly in pencil) Oct. 11 Mrs. F. Willoughby Frost Jr. and then a "0" under the 1939 column. 4/6/40 Pd 4/8/41 Pd.

1941 - 1942 Treasurer Book, Active: Mrs. F. Willoughby Frost Jr. 1/12/42 Pd. 12/1/42 Pd.

1942 Address: Rahway Road

1943 - 1945 Treasurer Book, Active: Mrs. F. Willoughby Frost "resigned"

1946 - 1947 Treasurer Book: Frost Willoughby Dec. 11-46 reinstated

1947 - 1948 Treasurer Book, Active: Frost, Mrs. F. W. May 12, 1947 June 4, 1948 June 12, 1949 June 30, 1950 June 1951 June 1952

1970 - 1986 Address: 1251 Rahway Road, Plainfield
NOTE: Listed as a "Sustaining Member"

1987-1995: 30 Old Driftway, Wilton, CT 06897

2001: Letter sent to notify Mrs. Frost of "Honorary Membership" status

1984 - 1986: Sustaining
1986 - 1993: Affiliate
1994 - 1995: Resigned
1995 - 2000: Honorary
2000 - 2001: Deceased

Mrs. Dorothy de Hart '38 and Mrs. Virginia Frost were sisters. Their maiden name was Voorhis and both grew up in Plainfield, NJ.

Frost, Mrs. F. Willoughby (Virginia) '39

Photo circa 1950

Frost, Mrs. F. Willoughby (Virginia) '39

back of photo, circa 1950

1915 - 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

page 8

1915 - 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

page 18

1915 - 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

page 19

1915 - 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

page 20

1915 - 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

page 21

1915 - 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

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1915 - 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

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http://plainfieldgardenclub.org/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=1810&vid=15836

page 24

Frost Family History

Virginia Voorhis Frost

born February 1, 1909

Married Francis Willoughby Frost, Jr. who was born June 29, 1909 and died April 24, 1992

They had at least one child, Francis Willoughby Frost III born August 28, 1936

The Home News March 13, 1974

Garden Club wins award

Award to Garden Club Result of Hard Work

Award to Garden Club Result of Hard Work
circa 1958 - 1960

by Mrs. William P. Elliott
(Exhibitions Chairman)
Plainfield Garden Club

The second prize awarded to the Plainfield Garden Club this week for te mosaic garden it staged at the International Flower Show in the New York Coliseum was not easily won. Our entry was the product of three months of concentrated effort.

Those who see our exhibit at the show, which opened Saturday and will remain open through Saturday, often ask: "How does one go about such a project."

This is how we did it. Our story starts with the arrival just before Christmas of the Garden Club of America's schedule of classes for the show. We studied it and decided to attempt an entry in the gardens class.

The requirements were: "Four competitive pool plantings, mosaic in design, Flowers and ground cover to be used. Flowers to be predominate. Color combinations, white-yellow, apricot, brown and green. Space approximately 10 feet by five feet. Free form shape. Plant material not to exceed two feet in height from the floor."

Committee Begins Work

As soon as our application was accepted, the committee I headed set to work. Our dedicated members were Mrs. F. Willoughby Frost, Mrs. Linden Stuart, Mrs. Alden de Hart, Mrs. Victor King, Mrs. Charles Detwiller and Mrs. Harry Brokaw Smith.

We conducted research in museums and libraries to find out everything possible about mosaics (both ancient and modern), their designs and techniques.

Trips to greenhouses followed. Our investigation of plant materials available caused us to travel many miles in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. Incidentally, there are no finer people to deal with than the nurserymen we met.

The next stop involved our spending many hours with pencil and paper. Finally, we decided to use a design created by Mrs. Frost. Her inspiration was a picture of a mosaic walk in Alicante, Spain, which had been brought back by one of our members, Mrs. David Foster, who recently traveled there.

Mechanical Problems

We then put our "theories" into practice by working with sample plant materials on patterns cut to scale in order to determine the amounts of plant material required and the amount of real moss necessary to fill the given space. We also faced the mechanical problmes of "putting it together."

Then, followed the problem of transporting all our precious materials to the Coliseum March 3. Fortunately, we were able to find a wholesale florist in Scotch Plains who could provide a heated truck and a driver.

The morning of March 8 finally arrived, and with it the snow. What a blizzard that was! In spite of it all, however, our courageous driver collected and loaded the plants and other materials into the truck and set forth to battle the elements en route to the city. We are grateful to him for their safe arrival.

Meanwhile, our president, Mrs. Robert F. MacLeod, had braved the storm to drive to New York to receive our precious cargo upon its attival at the Coliseum. After her job was done, storm and traffic conditions made it impossible for her to return to Plainfield, and she had to spend the night with friends in the city.

Five of us left Plainfield at 7 a.m. the next day and, after a slow but safe drive, reached the Coliseum in time to take the final steps in our project. By 6 p.m. we were finished in more ways than one.

Award to Garden Club Result of Hard Work

May 17, 1957 Club Commemorates Founding of Iris Garden

Caption: GARDEN MARKER VIEWED – Standing before the marker commemorating the 25th anniversary of the Iris Garden in Cedar Brook Park are (left to right) Mrs. Frederick Lockwood, Victor B. King, Jr., John C. Wister, Mr. Richard Tracy and Miss Harriette R. Halloway, founder of this garden. (Courier photo by E. T. Wiggins)

The Plainfield Garden Club and guests yersterday dedicated the the entranceway of the of the Iris Garden in Cedar Brook Park.

Miss Harriette R. Halloway, found of the garden and chairman of the garden of the Iris Garden [not legible] the project was started in 1932, was presented a medal by Mrs. Frederick M. Lockwood, president of the Garden Club.

The medal is [not legible] "from the grateful members of the Plainfield Garden Club Harriette R. Halloway founder and director of the Iris gardens of Cedar Brook Park, Plainfield, 1932 - 1957."

[Not legible] viewed a recently installed [not legible] tablet marking the anniversary of the garden.

"Excercise in Perfection"
Victor R. King, president of the Union County Park Commission, led the gathering [not legible] the garden display was "an excercise in perfection is [not legible]," he said.

The park commission provides the setting for the garden and have [not legible] in the project [not legible]

W. [not legible] Tracy, executive had of the Park Commission when the Iris Garden was started paid tribute to Miss Halloway for her "tireless work and painstaking effort."

Another speaker was Dr. John C. Wister of Swarthmore, Pa., president of the American Iris Society when the garden was started and author of [not legible] article about the garden in the current issue of the Journal of the New York Botanical Gardens.

Miss Halloway spoke briefly and [not legible] on the work of the [not legible] who care for the Iris Garden. She introduced Kenneth Smith, one of the largest contributors of plants to the garden [not legible]

Mrs. Lockwood presided at the program. Guests included members of [not legible] garden clubs and contributors to the garden.

The Iris Garden Committee includes Mrs. Morris E. Benton, Mrs. Alden de Hart, Mrs. Lockwood, Mrs. Donald E. Luce, Mrs. William K. Dunbar, Jr., Mrs. C. Northrop Pond, Mrs. Webster Sandford, Mrs. Arthur D. Seybold, Mrs. John R. Wells, Mrs. Willian G. Wigton, Mrs. Robert MacLeod, vice chairman, and Miss Halloway, chairman.

Special slides [not legible] for the chairman were Mrs. Charles A. Eaton, Jr., Mrs. F. Willoughby Frost ad Mrs. Edwin M. Treat, Jr.

Mrs. Victor M. King was chairman of the special committee assisted by Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux, Mrs. E. B. Newberry, and Miss Margaret Tyler. Also cooperating were Mrs. N. C. Barnhart, Jr., Mrs. William P. Elliott, Mrs. Homer Cochran and Mrs. H. I. Flanders.

Hostesses (not legible)
Other hostesses were Mrs. William W. Coriell, Mrs. Leslie E. Fort, Mrs. William A. Holliday, Mrs. Richard M. Lawton, Mrs. Robert T. Stevens, Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler, Mrs. William S. Tyler. Mrs. Thomas Van Boskerck and Mrs. Orville G. Waring.

The Iris Garden now has more than 1,800 named varieties properly labeled, representing all types of Iris and totaling more than 75,000 plants.

The main part of the garden is [not legible] caring Iris [not legible] and is expected to be is good blooms thorugh the rest of the month.

March 18, 1981 Meeting Minutes

December 20, 1982

From the Corresponding Secretary file

1986

September 23, 1986

Dear Jane [Craig]

I see that our adddress is garbled in the Year Book – It is:

30 Old Driftway
Wilton, CT 06897
Telephone: 203-762-1158

I'd hate to have any cherished news from home to astray! Please point this out at the next meeting. Hope all goes well with you –

Many thanks [not legible]
Virginia Frost

September 19, 1987

Virginia Frost
30 Old Driftway
Wilton, Connecticut 06897

Sept. 19th

Dear Jane [Craig] –

My year book finally arrived – delayed because of an incorrect zip code. And so, I looked at my address in the year book and saw the wrong zip there. Last year you go the name of our street wrong – Remember? One reason for remaining a member is for address references in this book, and I don't want to have my mail go astray – letters mean so much when you move.

So – will you please announce my correct zip (06897) at the next meeting? Also please send a card of correction to the following non-resident members?:

Barlow, Barnhart, Budenbach, Davis, Roome, Sheble, Wigton and Detwiller whose new address is Mrs. Charles Detwiller, P.O. Box 386 S. Harwich, Mass 02661

I would appreciate this and hop eyou understand my concern.

With all the best! Virginia

September 19, 1987

From the Corresponding Secretary file

postmark Oct 24 1995

From the Corresponding Secretary file

From the Corresponding Secretary file

Dear Jane,

I am so thrilled and grateful to be remembered and honored by all of you – thank you!

How I wish we could all have the chance to do it over again. Whay happy memories!

With my best wishes –

Gratefully,

Virginia Frost

23rd October

From the Corresponding Secretary file

From the Corresponding Secretary file

3/21 [1995]

Hi Anne –

It's time for me to resign from the Plainfield Garden Club. Would you kindly notify the Membership Chairman of this?

Thank you!
Virginia Frost

Corresponding Secretary Annual Report June 5, 2001

Corresponding Secretary Annual Report June 13, 1996

Corresponding Secretary Annual Report June 10, 1995

Email from Elisabeth Loizeaux to Susan Fraser February 12, 2011

Dear Susan,

Yes, I remember the postcard well. I believe it was a State wide project for GCA clubs to acquaint people with native plants (it could even have been a Nation wide project). I am sorry, but I can't recall what year it was undertaken . I would suggest you ask Barbara Sandford about Gerri Acomb. If I remember correctly, she grew up in Northern India and was a painter of botanical subjects, quite well known. I now wonder if PGC ever owned the original painting of the clematis? I remember endless trips to the printer, and I was never really happy with the colors .We all had to buy a certain number of cards and then sell them to our friends and acquaintances. If the date is really important, maybe GCA has records, I recall going to a meeting (maybe a Zone meeting) and seeing a large collection of other cards.

But do ask Barbara about Ms Acomb, she was an unusual person. In fact, please let me know what you find out. There are so many interesting stories about "old Plainfield" people, how they were related, how they intermarried etc. ––- I could not believe my eyes when I saw Beverley Reid's letter of resignation. She must have been really disappointed in us younger members. She was MRS Gardenclub, a super talented horticulturist and arranger, trained by the previous super GC members: The two sisters Mrs. Frost and Mrs. de Hart, Marge Elliot, Mrs. Ladd (who went to flower shows with her maid in attendance who had to hand her tools and flowers at her command, the way a nurse hands surgical instruments to the surgeon!)

Best regards,

Elisabeth

2nd Prize New York Flower Show 1950

Smithsonian Archives
http://collections.si.edu/search/results.jsp?view=&date.slider=&q=plainfield+&dsort=&start=60


Catalogued Data:
Title:New York Flower Show [slide]
Creator: Hugelmeyer, John
Physical description: 1 slide: glass lantern, col.; 3 x 5 in
Type: Projected media
Place: United States of America, New York, New York
New York (State)
New York City
Date: 1950
03/21/1950
Topic: Spring
Flower shows
Sculpture
Niches (Architecture)
Flower arrangement
Orchids
Local number: NY208223
Restrictions: Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Notes: No Names for Picture. Class 1 - Tuesday - 2nd prize, Mrs. T. Willoughby Frust, Plainfield Garden Club
Data Source: Archives of American Gardens

1st Prize New York Flower Show 1947

Smithsonian Archives
http://collections.si.edu/search/results.jsp?view=&date.slider=&q=plainfield+&dsort=&start=60


Title:New York Flower Show [slide]
Creator: Cassebeer, F. W
Physical description: 1 slide: glass lantern, col.; 3 x 5 in
Type: Projected media
Place: United States of America, New York, New York
New York (State)
New York City
Date: 1947
03/00/1947
Topic: Spring
Flower shows
Flower arrangement
Interior views
Mantels
Baskets
Local number: NY208318
Restrictions: Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Notes: No Names for Picture. "Moderate Cost Room, Tues., Cost little or nothing." Mantelpiece. 1st prize, Mrs. F. W. Frost, Plainfield, N. J
Data Source: Archives of American Gardens
Record Identifier:siris_arc_193510

1926 Charles H. Frost and his wife Gertrude's film of the Middle East

Smithsonian Archives
http://siris-archives.si.edu/ipac20/ipac.jsp?&profile=all&source=~!siarchives&uri=full=3100001~!288656~!0#focus

Charles H. Frost's Travel footage of the Middle East, 1926 1926



Title: Charles H. Frost's Travel footage of the Middle East, 1926 1926

Phy. Description: reference one video cassette (3 minutes) silent b&w 1/2 inch VHS
master one video cassette (3 minutes) silent b&w BetacamSP
archival original one film reel (90 feet) silent b&w 9.5mm

Bio / His Notes: Charles H. Frost was the publisher of the Plainfield Courier News, Plainfield, New Jersey. His wife, Gertrude, graduated from Johns Hopkins in 1892.

Summary: Footage of a trip to the Middle East. Scenes are probably all from Egypt and include desert, camels, men fishing with large nets from shore (of Mediterranean?), street scenes in small town, and brief shots of excavation with the Great Pyramid in background and the sphinx surrounded in scaffolding.

Provenance: Donated by Louise Besch in 2002.

General Note: title supplied by Archives staff (unpublished work)–archival collection
Supplementary materials: photographs (1913 trip to Mediterranean), postcards (Mediterranen, correspondence and other travel related materials including guide books, shore itineraries and menus.

Restrictions: Information on reproduction and fees available from Human Studies Film Archives

Subject-Topical: Great Pyramid (Egypt)
Travel
Tourists – Egypt
Camels
Archaeology – Egypt
Deserts – Egypt
Amateur films

Subject - Geographical: Sphinx
Africa
Egypt

Form / Genre: Motion pictures (visual works)

Repository Loc: Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Museum Support Center, Suitland, MD

Local Number: HSFA 2002.2.1

Charles H. Frost Home Movies

Smithsonian Archives

Charles H. Frost's Home Movies, ca. 1927 ca. 1927



Title: Charles H. Frost's Home Movies, ca. 1927 ca. 1927

Phy. Description: reference one video cassette (21 minutes) silent b&w 1/2 inch VHS
master one video cassette (21 minutes) silent b&w BetacamSP
archival original one film reel (540 feet) silent b&w 9.5mm

Bio / His Notes: Charles H. Frost was the publisher of the Plainfield Courier News, Plainfield, New Jersey. His wife, Gertrude, graduated from Johns Hopkins in 1892.

Summary: Footage seems to be taken at two locations, one with two houses on a lake (noted as "cottage" on film cans) which is probably the Frost family homestead in Ontario, Canada, and the other, possibly, a house in town (New Jersey?). Footage includes family and friends (?) milling around outside the two houses on the lake, some goofing around with a young woman sitting in baby stroller and playing with dog; adults in water with little children while some look on from the dock (one child in the water is crying); adults and two toddlers outside garage (adults encourage the toddlers to hug); towing and rowing a floating dock; toddlers on lawn walking and falling; and a 1927 regatta (personal motor boats, launches, sculls, steamer, and other water craft) with viewers on opposite shore. One scene shows a toddler playing on lawn with a ball, a woman brings a rocking chair onto lawn, places ball on the chair as though to entice the child to climb into chair, she walks away, and the child walks toward camera, ignoring the chair and ball.

Provenance: Donated by Louise Besch in 2002.

General Note: title supplied by Archives staff (unpublished work)–archival collection
aSupplementary materials: photographs (1913 trip to Mediterranean), postcards (Mediterranen, correspondence and other travel related materials including guide books, shore itineraries and menus.

Restrictions: Information on reproduction and fees available from Human Studies Film Archives

Subject-Topical: Children playing
Children
Lakes – Canada
Boats and boating
Family recreation
Amateur films

Subject - Geographical: North America
Canada
United States

Form / Genre: Home movies
Motion pictures (visual works)

Repository Loc: Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Museum Support Center, Suitland, MD

Local Number: HSFA 2002.2.2

Frost Family History

And so in April, 1874, amid the years of panic and pov-
erty and disaster, succeeding the year of the great fire of
1871, the first number of the first American civil engineering
journal was launched in Chicago. There was no money
with which to lubricate the ways ; even money with which
to pay the postage. $30, on the first issue, had to be bor^
rowed; the one assistant had to be dismissed before the
second issue was pul^lished ; possible subscribers were like
the proverbial "angels' visits," and advertisements were con-
spicuous by their absence. However and "somehow," the
thing "went ;" the most ingenious methods of making "one
hand wash the other" were employed ; it was long hours of
labor, both of day and night ; but through it all credit was
maintained, and paper dealers and printers were generous,
and finally the struggling craft found itself in reasonably
smooth sailing, over which seas it has since navigated with


IN ENGLAND AND AMERICA 159

ever-increasing leeway from, the rocks and shoals of bank-
ruptcy which for so many of its early years threatened its
frail existence. "Engineering News" has never missed an
issue "on time" from the day of its birth ; it has never
contracted a single debt, small or large, which it has not
paid ; its employes are now over one hundred in number,
and their salaries or wages are at the top notch in their
various grades ; three or four considerable fortunes have
been taken out by retiring partners, and after these thirty-
five years of varying fortune the original founder is still
in control as sole owner of what is acknowledged to be the
loading civil engineering weekly of the entire world. Its
history is a romance and is so interwoven with the life of
the writer that they are practically inseparable. It is not,
however, the purpose of this little book on genealogy to
fill its pages with such a history. A chief lesson of such a
history is, however, that there is in the Frost character,
from Edmund Frost to date, an indomitable spirit of indus-
try, a simple but unimpeachable honesty in all dealings and,
apparently, utter ignorance of the hour of defeat. The
writer has studied the generations of Frosts for three hun-
dred years, and in all the branches descended from the
emigrant Edmund the same qualities of industry, honesty,
perseverance, and, very largely, of simple piety, have been
dominant notes in their quiet and uneventful lives.

George H. Frost m., in Chicago, December 3. 1868,
Louisa (b. August 29, 1839, in New York City), daughter
of Edwin and Sophia Hunt, both of Liverpool, England,
then of New York, and later of Chicago. The children of
this marriage are:

Charles Hamilton Frost, b. February 22, 1870, in Chi-
cago.

Harwood Frost, b. February 15, 1872, in Smith's Falls,
Ontario, his mother having moved there at time of great
fire in Chicago, October, 1871.

Edwin Hunt Frost, b. July 23, 1874, in Chicago.

Frances Willoughby Frost, b. March 23, 1876, in Chicago.

In the summer of 1876 the pressure of "hard times"
rendered the removal of the family of mother and four
young boys to the hospitable home in Canada a necessity,
leaving the breadwinner of the family to buck against
Chicago conditions unhampered by family anxieties. By
1878 it became apparent that only in one American city
were the conditions favorable to publishing an engineering


160 THE FROST FAMILY

journal, and in the first week of January, 1879, Engineering
News was issued from its New York office in the Tribune
Building. It may be interesting to note here that its owner
left Chicago on December 1. 1878, after a little over fifteen
years at hard labor in that enterprising city, with a ticket
over the Grand Trunk Railway to New York, $35 in pocket,
and two valises in hand; borrowing $500 in Smith's Falls
on the way, he opened his bank account with that sum a
few days later in the metropolis. Benjamin Franklin wheel-
ing his papers to the post-office has been well exploited in
history ; the publisher of Engineering News didn't even
wheel his product – he "backed" it for a year or more to the
ofifice in Chicago. At the present writing the weekly issue
requires nearly eight tons of paper.

Success was so snfTficiently assured by July, 1881, that
the family was removed to New York, where boarding-
house life, with its summer vacations, was endured until
June, 1886, when housekeeping was resumed in Plainfield,
New Jersey, and where the entire family has been domiciled
ever since, with only occasional absences in travel.
Europe
– once extended to Egypt and the Upper Nile – has been
visited six times, the Pacific Coast twice, and nearly every
state in the Union; the sons and their wives have all en-
joyed European travel, one of them, Harwood, having been
in business in London, England, for several years, and the
youngest. Francis, besides European travel, having been a
member of the party of the then Secretary Taft to the
Philippines, when Alice Roosevelt was of the party also ;
he, however, left the Miss Roosevelt party in Pekin and
journeyed to the Great Wall, in company with a Cincinnati
friend, and with whom he continued on around the globe
making nine months' absence from home.


George H. Frost in early life became a member of the
United Presbyterian Church of Scotland, and is now a
member of the Crescent Avenue Church (Presbyterian) of
Plainfield ; like his father, Ebenezer, he is a Republican in
politics, becoming a naturalized citizen of the United States
as soon as possible after his arrival in 1863; he was a
member of the Plainfield Common Council for five years,
the only political office he has held, and is now practically
retired from active business, although keeping in close touch
with his several interests, one of which being the large
manufactory of The Frost & Wood Company in Canada,
of which, through the death of his brother Charles in April,

Frost Family History cont.

IN ENGLAND AND AMERICA 161

1909, he became a large stockholder. He is also an Associate
of the American Society of Civil Engineers; is a member of
the Canadian Society of Civil Engineers ; honorary member
of Engineering Associations in several states of the Union,
member of the Historical Genealogical Society, Boston.

Charles Hamilton Frost, eighth generation from Ed-
mund, was educated in a primary school in Smith's Falls,
Canada; in a public school. New York City; a military
school for boys in Poughkeepsie, N. Y. ; at St. Johnsbury
Academy, Vt. ; High School. Plainfield, N. J., and Yale
University, Xew Haven, Conn., from which last institution
he graduated in the class of 1892. He spent some months
as assistant to contractors on the railroad tunnel under the
city of Baltimore, and later as assistant superintendent on
a contract sectio n of the Chicago drainage canal. He
later entered the service of The Frost & Wood Company in
Smith's Falls. On June 26, 1896, he married Marian Ger-
trude Hemming, of Drummondville, Province of Quebec,
by whom he has three children, all living at present. In
October, 1904, he resigned from his place as manager of the
Publicity Department of The Frost & Wood Company, to
assume the sole management of the Plainfield Daily Courier-
News, purchased in July previous purposely to bring him
and his family to New Jersey. The Daily Courier-News is
the consolidation by purchase of two small dailies, and in
1904, when George H. Frost became the sole owner, it was
fifteen years old. Under the management of Charles H.
Frost it has grown from a small eight-page paper to a ten
or twelve-page paper of same size of metropolitan journals ;
the small plant of 1904 has been replaced by one of the
costliest and best in the state of New Jersey, and it will be
installed in its own building in March, 1910. one of the
model printing outfits of the country. It is considered one
of the staunchest Republican journals of New Jersey.

Harwood Frost, eighth generation, b. in Canada, was
educated in the schools of Smith's Falls, Poughkeepsie and
Plainfield ; he graduated after a four years' course in Lehigh
University, Bethlehem, with the degree of Mechanical Engi-
neer. Later he entered the service of The Frost & Wood
Company, manufacturers of agricultural implements, and
represented that firm as manager of their exhibit, at the
Glasgow (Scotland) Exhibition; following that service, an
office and warehouse was opened by the comtiany in Lon-
don, England, which is still maintained by The Frost &



162 THE FROST FAMILY

Wood Company as their central office for a large and
growing foreign trade in their machinery. Harwood Frost,
however, after six years as manager for the company in
England, returned in 1904 to New York to enter the service
of the Engineering News Publishing Company, of which he
is the secretary, and also manager of the Book Publishing
Department. He married in Chicago, 111., October 8, 1903,
Evelyn Newton Lynas (b. June 13, 1880), daughter of
Thomas R. Lynas, manager for Illinois and Wisconsin of
the Etna Life Insurance Company. They live in Plainfield,
N.J.

Edwin Hunt Frost, eighth generation, was born in Chi-
cago August 23. 1874; was educated in a private school in
New York City, in the public school, and in a private
academy of Plainfield ; entered the service of Engineering
News in 1889, where he spent fifteen years, until failing
health compelled him to seek out-of-door occupation. After
two seasons of travel in Europe and at home, he bought
a farm in the Litchfield Hills, Connecticut, where he and his
wife live from April to November. He has become an
enthusiastic farmer, and has not yet had occasion to regret
his investment. He m. October 8, 1902, at Yonkers, N. Y.,
Sarah Marguerite (b. October 8, 1876). daughter of Hon-
orable Gilbert Hilton Scribner. former Secretary of State
of New York and president of the Belt Line Street Railroad
of New York. Mr. Scribner was a successful lawyer, but
retired from active practice of his profession many years
ago. Both he and his wife are still living in Yonkers ; they
have been wide travelers in Europe and Africa, remaining
with their children abroad one period of six years. Margue-
rite (Scribner) Frost is not only a clever artist, but has
marked ability as a poet and story writer.

Francis Willoughby Frost, eighth generation, was b.
in Chicago March 23, 1876, and was educated in same
schools with his brother Edwin FI. He also early in life
commenced his business life in the accounting department
of Engineering News, where, with the exception of vaca-
tions spent in Europe and one trip to the Philippines in the
party of Secretary Taft and thence making the circuit of
the globe, he has since been actively employed. He is at
present writing (1909) treasurer and auditor of the Engi-
neering News Publishing Company, at 220 Broadway, New
York. He married. October 20, 1907, Alice Birney (b.
December 14, 1881). daughter of Frank E. Blackwell, a New




IN ENGLAND AND AMERICA 163

York lawyer; of this marriage one child, a son, was born
June 29, 1909. The parents live at 1011 Madison Avenue,
Plainfield. N. J.

New York Times Marriage Announcement October 27, 1907

The New York Times, Oct. 27, 1907
FROST-BLACKWELL WEDDING.

Will be Held Nov. 26 in the Church of the Incarnation.
_______
Miss Alice Birney Blackwell, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank E. Blackwell, and Frank Willoughby Frost who are to be married on Nov. 26 in the Church of the Incarnation, have decided upon their attentdants. Miss Blackwell will have her sister, Miss Jennet D. Blackwell, as her maid of honor and only attendant. Harry Fowler Woods of Cincinnati is to be the best man. H. Harwood Frost and Edwin Hunt Frost, brothers of the bridegroom; Birney Blackwell, a brother of the bride; Robert Arthur Beebe, Frederick Worth Goddard, and Wylie Brown will be the ushers.

The ceremony will take place at 3:30, and will be followed by a small reception at the home of the bride's parents, 32 West Seventy-Fifth Street.

August 26, 1894 New York Times Article: Plainfield, City of Homes

Some of the others that do business in New York and have handsome homes here are . . .; George H. Frost of The Engineering News;

December 14, 2011 Hillside Cemetery

Francis Willoughby Frost, Jr.
June 29, 1909 - Apr. 24, 1992

Virginia Voorhis Frost
Feb. 1, 1909 - Apr. 5, 2001

Sally Booth recalled that Mrs. Frost was a very formidable person. Tucker Trimble remembers her from the club.

Alice A. Birney Blackwell

Alice A. (Birney) Blackwell
Daughter of James and Amanda (Moulton) Birney of Bay City, MI
1936 Obituary. (Contributed by Allen W. Whittemore - Apr., 2004)

New York Times
MRS. FRANK E. BLACKWELL

Daughter of James Birney, Former Minister to the Netherlands
_______________________
Sunday, 18 Oct. 1936.

Mrs. Frank Engs Blackwell, daughter of the late James Birney, United States Minister to the Netherlands, and the grandaughter of James G. Birney, who ran for President on the Abolitions ticket, died yesterday of heart ailment in her home at 1,235 Park Avenue.

Mrs. Blackwell, who was in her eighty-fifth year, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. Her childhood was spent in Bay City, Mich. She enter Vassar College the second year after the opening of that institution.

Her husband, the late Frank Engs Blackwell, a descendant of an old New York family, was a member of the bar in this city for forty years. Mrs. Blackwell resided in New York since her marriage more than sixty years ago.

Three children, Mrs. Francis W. Frost of Plainfield, N.J.; Mrs. James Harvey Williams and Frank Engs Blackwell of this city survive.

Sunday, 18 Oct 1936:

BLACKWELL - Alice Birney at her residence, 1,235 Park Av., on Oct 17, wife of the late Frank E.Blackwell and daughter of the late Amanda Moulton and James Birney, in her eighty-fifth year. Funeral private. It is requested that no flowers be sent.

1907 - Wedding of daughter, Miss Alice Birney Blackwell. (Added Jun, 2009)

The New York Times, Oct. 27, 1907
FROST-BLACKWELL WEDDING.

Will be Held Nov. 26 in the Church of the Incarnation.
_______
Miss Alice Birney Blackwell, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank E. Blackwell, and Frank Willoughby Frost who are to be married on Nov. 26 in the Church of the Incarnation, have decided upon their attentdants. Miss Blackwell will have her sister, Miss Jennet D. Blackwell, as her maid of honor and only attendant. Harry Fowler Woods of Cincinnati is to be the best man. H. Harwood Frost and Edwin Hunt Frost, brothers of the bridegroom; Birney Blackwell, a brother of the bride; Robert Arthur Beebe, Frederick Worth Goddard, and Wylie Brown will be the ushers.

The ceremony will take place at 3:30, and will be followed by a small reception at the home of the bride's parents, 32 West Seventy-Fifth Street.

Additional Notes:

Alice A. Birney was the daugher of James Birney III and Amanda S. Moulton. Her marriage to Frank E. Blackwell took place on September 24, 1874, at her parent's residence in Bay City, MI. They had the following children: Birney, Frank, Alice and Jennett.

1974 Junior League Designer Showcase: The Martine House

1974 Designer Showcase Martine House Cover to Page 25

1974 Designer Showcase Martine House Page 26 to End

In addition to saving the 1988 Program for the Designers Showhouse of Cedar Brook Farm (aka The Martine House) which was organized by the Muhlenberg Auxiliary, PGC Member Anne Shepherd also kept the 1974 Designers Showcase of the very same home, organized by the Junior League.

Within the program pages, you will find mentioned many PGC members. They include: Clawson, MacLeod, Kroll, Davis, Wyckoff, Stevens, Loizeaux, Swain, Hunziker, Connell, Foster, Dunbar, Elliott, Fitzpatrick, Gaston, Hackman, Holman, Lockwood, Morrison, Royes, Rushmore, Sanders, Williams, Barnhart, Bellows, Burger, Burner, Carter, Clendenin, DeHart, Detwiller, Eaton, Eckert, Fort, Frost, Gonder, Keating, Laidlaw, Loosli, Madsen, Mann, Marshall, Miller, Moody, Moon, Morse, Murray, Mygatt, Barrett, Peek, Perkins, Pfefferkorn, Pomeroy, Pond, Royes, Samek, Sandford, Sheble, Stevens, Shepherd, Stewart, Stout, Trewin, Vivian, Zeller, Cochran, Mooney and Hall.

February 8, 2012 Developer touches up piece of newspaper's history

Courier News http://www.mycentraljersey.com/article/20120205/NJNEWS/302050008/Developer-touches-up-piece-newspaper-s-history

PHOTO: The faded "COURIER-NEWS" sign at the top of a historic Park Avenue building in downtown Plainfield before its recent renovation. / Photo courtesy Bernice Paglia.

Landmark poised to open historic Plainfield building to renters, restaurant


PLAINFIELD – When Landmark Developers several years ago acquired the Frost Building on Park Avenue, one of a handful of city properties it purchased and tabbed for renovation as part of what many hope will be a wider effort to revitalize the downtown, company principal Frank Cretella had a big decision to make: what to do with the faded, crumbling, barely visible "COURIER-NEWS" sign running along the top of the majestic three-story historic structure.

It would have been easy just to cover it up with a fresh coat of paint, glossing over the portion of the newspaper's history that saw it move there in the early part of the 20th century with a new state-of-the-art printing press in tow. But something stopped Cretella.

"It's too cool to cover up," he explained. "I hope you guys don't mind."

Mind? On the contrary.

The Courier News' historic roots are in Plainfield," said Paul C. Grzella, general manager/editor of the Courier News and the Home News Tribune, "and though we have moved to different facilities over the past 128 years, we are proud of our long association with the Queen City."

What's more, the gesture by Cretella – which came along with a name change for the building, now known as the "Courier News Building" – came free of charge.

"Well," he added jokingly, "I may be sending you a bill."

The newspaper traces its earliest beginnings back to Plainfield, where on June 2, 1884 at 7 Somerset St., Thomas W. Morrison printed the first edition of The Evening News, a four-page product that sold for 2 cents.

It was the first daily newspaper in Plainfield, then a town of just 8,000 people, but competitors soon followed. Brothers William L. and Albert L. Force, who published a local weekly, The Constitutionalist, established the Daily Press at Park and North avenues in 1887, while Frank W. Runyon, the publisher of another weekly, established the Plainfield Courier in 1891 at Front and Somerset streets.

The three-way competition was short-lived. Runyon bought the Evening News from Morrison in November 1894, creating the Plainfield Courier News. The paper was purchased in 1904 by George H. Frost, who in 1909 moved it to what today is Cretella's building on the 200 block of Park Avenue. The Daily Press was sold to former New Jersey Gov. John Franklin Fort in 1911 but, lagging in circulation, was eventually bought in 1916 by the Plainfield Courier News.

The publication then became an early acquisition for Frank E. Gannett, founder of Gannett Company – today the nation's largest newspaper company as measured by daily circulation among its more than 80 sites spread across the country. The Plainfield Courier News was one of the first two papers that Gannett bought outside of New York and was part of a growth spurt beginning in 1925 that doubled the number of newspapers he owned.

Heirs of Frost sold the paper to Gannett, William Morrison and Chauncey Stout in April 1927, with Stout becoming publisher, then Gannett Group bought out the interests of Stout and Morrison in 1939. Ground was broken for the Plainfield Courier News' planned new offices on Church Street two years later – where Plainfield's Union County College campus exists today – and the newspaper published its first edition there in 1942.

The Courier moved to Bridgewater in 1972, where it stayed for nearly four decades before moving to its current location on East Main Street in Somerville in 2009. Along the way the newspaper dropped the "Plainfield" and the hyphen from its name, but despite a newfound focus on Somerset County news, it continued to cover the city of its birth.

It's a commitment that lives on today, Grzella explained.

"Just as residents will see the Courier News name in their city," he said, "they can be assured that they will continue to see the city's name and news on prominent display in our newspaper and digital platforms."

The future of the Courier's former home certainly sounds promising: Cretella, an established developer whose projects have included rental housing and fine-dining restaurants across North and Central Jersey, has plans to open eight apartments on the building's second and third floors. Residents could start moving in as early as March 1, Cretella added, and he's seeking a municipal liquor license to lure a restaurant into the space on the first floor. Recent renovations included additions on the back of the building, doubling the space on the top two floors to make them roughly match the 5,000 square feet on the first floor.

"It's a beautiful building. I really love it," Cretella said. "We're really putting a lot of effort into it."

Also slated to be preserved is the entrance marquee, reading "Frost Building A.D. 1909," Cretella added. The marquee recently was removed in order to restore it pending its replacement, he said.

"I feel that you just want to keep the character of the building where you can," Cretella explained. "I even liked the (Courier News) sign when it was just kind of a ghost sign, but it was just getting too faded."

"I think it's a cool element now," he said. "It identifies the building. And it's the newspaper's building."

The publication then became an early acquisition for Frank E. Gannett, founder of Gannett Company – today the nation's largest newspaper company as measured by daily circulation among its more than 80 sites spread across the country. The Plainfield Courier News was one of the first two papers that Gannett bought outside of New York and was part of a growth spurt beginning in 1925 that doubled the number of newspapers he owned.

Heirs of Frost sold the paper to Gannett, William Morrison and Chauncey Stout in April 1927, with Stout becoming publisher, then Gannett Group bought out the interests of Stout and Morrison in 1939. Ground was broken for the Plainfield Courier News' planned new offices on Church Street two years later – where Plainfield's Union County College campus exists today – and the newspaper published its first edition there in 1942.

The Courier moved to Bridgewater in 1972, where it stayed for nearly four decades before moving to its current location on East Main Street in Somerville in 2009. Along the way the newspaper dropped the "Plainfield" and the hyphen from its name, but despite a newfound focus on Somerset County news, it continued to cover the city of its birth.

It's a commitment that lives on today, Grzella explained.

"Just as residents will see the Courier News name in their city," he said, "they can be assured that they will continue to see the city's name and news on prominent display in our newspaper and digital platforms."

The future of the Courier's former home certainly sounds promising: Cretella, an established developer whose projects have included rental housing and fine-dining restaurants across North and Central Jersey, has plans to open eight apartments on the building's second and third floors. Residents could start moving in as early as March 1, Cretella added, and he's seeking a municipal liquor license to lure a restaurant into the space on the first floor. Recent renovations included additions on the back of the building, doubling the space on the top two floors to make them roughly match the 5,000 square feet on the first floor.

"It's a beautiful building. I really love it," Cretella said. "We're really putting a lot of effort into it."

Also slated to be preserved is the entrance marquee, reading "Frost Building A.D. 1909," Cretella added. The marquee recently was removed in order to restore it pending its replacement, he said.

I feel that you just want to keep the character of the building where you can, " Cretella explained. "I even liked the (Courier News) sign when it was just kind of a ghost sign, but it was just getting too faded."

"I think it's a cool element now," he said. "It identifies the building. And it's the newspaper's building."

Frost Building

February 8, 2012 from Elisabeth Loizeaux

Do we remember Virginia Frost? We do, as well as her sister Mrs. deHart (both lived on Rahway Road). I used to occasionally help my mother-in-law arrange the flowers at Crescent Avenue Church, and when those two ladies were there, it was like having a master class in flower arranging – you didn't want to make a wrong move and you better paid attention. –– Mrs. deHart had one of her arrangements featured in a book, it was in an antique candle mold, just exquisite in its restrained perfection.

May I suggest that "info" sign her messages?

Elisabeth

Damaged Lions Another Legacy Lost

by Bernice Paglia
http://ptalker2.blogspot.com/2012/02/damaged-lions-another-legacy-lost.html

For many years, a pair of lions flanked the entry of the downtown building currently restored as the Courier-News site.

One lion was literally knocked off its feet by a car that careened up on the sidewalk.

The remaining lion suffered the indignity of being defaced by vandals.

Last week, the surviving lion statue was horribly damaged.

Plaintalker does not know when the lions were first installed. The Frost Building, as we now know it, was built in 1909 and was the home of Courier-News Publishing. Later it became the Thomas Furniture building and before it was purchased by developer Frank Cretella, it was the home of Jeff Satkin's company, Atkol.

Cretella uncovered the original 1909 marquee during renovations. It would be nice if the lions could be restored as well. If not, chalk the loss up to changes downtown that include covering up stonework at the former Eiseman's Lighting building on Park Avenue and demolition of an historic 1886 building on North Avenue, along with the partial demolition of an 1885 building that was the original home of the Plainfield Music Store.

Thank heavens we have the postcard and photo archives at the Plainfield Public Library to remind us of remarkable structures of the past. Next time you are there, take a few minutes to watch the slide show on the monitor near the entrance. Through its annual exhibits, the library encourages present-day photographers to document Plainfield landmarks for future generations of scholars and historians.

–Bernice
February 9, 2012

Plainfield Public Library Archives

GARDEN FAIR WORK BEGINS – Four members of the Plainfield Garden Club, which will sponsor a garden fair Friday and Saturday at Park Ave. and Crescent Ave. began actual work yesterday in preparing the ground for exhibit purposes. Two gardens will be exhibited and several types of plant material will be on sale. A "Country Cupboard" also will be featured. Left to right are: Mrs. F. W. Frost, exhivition chairman; Mrs. Charles Eaton Jr., horticulture chairman; Mrs. John S. Anderegg, executive board member; and Mrs. Alden deHart, horticulture committee member.

Plainfield Public Library Archive

Plainfield Public Library Archive

Plainfield Public Library Archive

May 12, 2012 GCA Zone IV Meeting and Awards Luncheon

PGC Members Jeanne Turner, Patti Dunstan and Phyllis Alexander researched over 275 members chronicled on our website, www.plainfieldgardenclub.org, and chose the following ladies as "themes" for the luncheon tables:

Eight Notable Women of the PGC

May 9, 1974 Spring Potpourri Guestbook

1954 Check Book

No. 1072
Mar. 18, 1954
Jeanette W. Stuart
exhibtion in N. Y. Whos
$12.50

No. 1073
Mar 18, 1954
Virginia V. Frost
exhibition in N.Y. Show
1/2 exhibit
$18.75

No. 1074
Mar. 18, 1954
Dorothy V. de Hart
exhibition in N.Y. Show
1/2 exhibit
$6.25

1957 Check Book

No. 1264
May 13, 1957
Virginia V. Frost
N. Y. Flower Show
expenses
$15.00

1958 Check Book

No. 1293
February 19, 1958
Virginia V. Frost
Hospitality N. Y. Flower
Show.
$30.00

1958 Check Book

No. 1337
Dec. 29, 1958
Virginia Frost
$3.73

1947 Check Book

No. 628
Jan. 20, 1947
Garden Club of America
Mrs. Frost
Mrs. Elliott
Mrs. Foster
Dues
$12.00

No. 629
Feb. 17, 1947
Emma B. Coriell
for conservation
luncheon guests
$7.00

No. 630
Feb. 19, 1947
Mrs. Walter Hine
Feb. lecture
Program $25.00

1947 Check Book

No. 636
April 1, 1947
Virginia V. Frost
Flower Show
exhibit
Budget
$10.00

1950 Check Book

No. 820
Mar. 10, 1950
Virginia Frost
Exhibitor flower show
$12.50

No. 821
Mar. 10, 1950
Marion Loizeaux
Exhibitor flower show
$12.50

No. 822
Mar. 10, 1950
Marjorie Elliott
Exhibitor flower show
$12.50

1950 Check Book

No. 868
Dec. 12, 1950
Interstate Printing
Post cards 40.25
Programs 11.00
1 Halftone 5.01
$56.26

No. 869
Dec. 12, 1950
Elizabeth B. Browne
stationery
$10.50

No. 870
Dec. 12, 1950
The Plainfield Book Shop
Book for Mrs. Frost
Program
$5.45

1951 Check Book

No. 889
March 21, 1951
S. Helena Rosse
(speaker)
$56.00

No. 890
Mar. 30, 1951
Dorothy de Hart
expenses paid by same for the
store window at the New York Flower Show
$333.63

No. 891
Mar. 30, 1951
Virginia Frost
expenses paid by same for the
store window N. Y. Flower Show
$24.89

2001 January thru June Executive Board Meeting Minutes

2001 January thru June Meeting Minutes and Sign in Attendance Sheets

A Fond Memory of a Heck of a Lady

May 2001 Newsletter

Mrs. Willoughby Frost

Word has come that Mrs. Willoughby Frost has passed to her reward – and a "great reward" it should be!

Virginia, as you may be aware, is one of the Plainfield Garden Club's honorary members, an honor well deserved. We are all so proud of her exceptional talents – we were often in awe of what she could accomplish in so many fields.

One of her projects which I remember was with others running the Junior League Garden Club – it was a great way to inform the uniformed about gardening, and mostly about flower arranging, so there would be people somewhat trained to join the Plainfield Garden Club.

We had regular classes and projects to work out, beginning with three flowers (unbought – one had to grow or steal the flowers) and greens. Then Virginia or her sister, Dorothy de Hart, or Marion Loizeaux would criticize our work and highlight our errors. That was the fun part! She could be funny – "Well, clearly someone spent money on this one," or "You didn't need to cut down the whole tree for a few greens. Go out, look up, and find a branch that is growing the direction the way you want it – then cut that branch!"

Virginia was a respected GCA judge. She worked hard in the Shakespeare Garden – trimmed the topiaries, etc. She was also a landscapist in planning a project – or pointing out how to bring back to size a too large or vigorous Victorian shrub, removing a tree, or suggesting an improvement in design.

The Plainfield Garden Club decided to put in a "vest-pocket" park (which were the current rage at the time), and we found a narrow plot on Park Avenue which would suit the purpose. Virginia drew the plans and we planted it accordingly – letting her beatus into visiting the park each day for watering and trash pick-up. It was duly admired and very successful.

Another first for Plainfield city streets: Virginia and I guessed Jean Stewart went to a GCA meeting and came home with the idea to plant trees in the sidewalks along the curbs! After much study as to variety and spacing, the club bought a dozen Moraine Locusts with tiny blow-away leaves to give filtered shade. They turned out to be a real demonstration, as the city went ahead the next season and bought seventy-five more! Though 35 - 40 years old now, they still line Front Street, and Park Avenue from Front to the railroad bridge.

When the annual Flower Show was announced in New York City, Virginia and the girls all put their heads together to compete. Several times there were big landscape classes – a back door landscaped wiht proper planting – Virginia always in the thick ot if, bringing home the blues.

Or if she competed on her own, she got her material, books and containers, and locked herself in an upstairs room, sometimes for days, until all was set. Soak the wisteria vine in the bathtub, curve it this way or (change) that – the bed was important. The family was "on its own" at these times – but this meant so much to Virginia, there were often tears of frustration. She cared, she wanted it right, and the "blues" flowed in.

Mrs. Frost knew her duty, too: drove the Hartridge carpool, worked endlessly at the church (behind the scenes), had punch parties before dancing school, and all that. A wonderful entertainer, with everything "just so". She had her feisty side too – I have to mention that to give a well-rounded picture – but she could speak up at times for us all to hear.

Barbara Sandford


2001 Jan Mar Apr May Newsletters

"Questover," Residence of the Late Charles Hamilton Frost, 1060 Central Avenue

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

Residence of Warren R. Voorhis, Rahway Road

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

1995 September thru December Board Meeting Minutes

1995 May and June Board and General Meeting Minutes

Friday, October 19, 2012 Bernice Paglia's Blog Plaintalker II

A marquee on the old Courier News building on Park Avenue has been painted to blend in with the new doors and facade of a proposed "French bistro." The marquee reads, "Frost Building A.D. 1909." Developer Frank Cretella still has to restore or remove two lion figures that flank the entrance.

November 15, 2012

From Dan Damon's blog. Tree Damage at Questover, 1060 Central Avenue
Hurricane Sandy which struck New Jersey Monday, October 29, 2012

1920 Muhlenberg Hospital Womens Auxiliary

Mrs. C. H. Frost
1060 Central Avenue

Mrs. G. H. Frost
745 Watchung Avenue

Mrs. Frank E. Blackwell

New York Times
MRS. FRANK E. BLACKWELL

Daughter of James Birney, Former Minister to the Netherlands
_______________________

Sunday, 18 Oct. 1936.

Mrs. Frank Engs Blackwell, daughter of the late James Birney, United States Minister to the Netherlands, and the grandaughter of James G. Birney, who ran for President on the Abolitions ticket, died yesterday of heart ailment in her home at 1,235 Park Avenue.

Mrs. Blackwell, who was in her eighty-fifth year, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. Her childhood was spent in Bay City, Mich. She enter Vassar College the second year after the opening of that institution.

Her husband, the late Frank Engs Blackwell, a descendant of an old New York family, was a member of the bar in this city for forty years. Mrs. Blackwell resided in New York since her marriage more than sixty years ago.

Three children, Mrs. Francis W. Frost of Plainfield, N.J.; Mrs. James Harvey Williams and Frank Engs Blackwell of this city survive.

Sunday, 18 Oct 1936:

BLACKWELL - Alice Birney at her residence, 1,235 Park Av., on Oct 17, wife of the late Frank E.Blackwell and daughter of the late Amanda Moulton and James Birney, in her eighty-fifth year. Funeral private. It is requested that no flowers be sent.

1907 - Wedding of daughter, Miss Alice Birney Blackwell. (Added Jun, 2009)

The New York Times, Oct. 27, 1907
FROST-BLACKWELL WEDDING.

Will be Held Nov. 26 in the Church of the Incarnation.
_______

Miss Alice Birney Blackwell, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank E. Blackwell, and Frank Willoughby Frost who are to be married on Nov. 26 in the Church of the Incarnation, have decided upon their attentdants. Miss Blackwell will have her sister, Miss Jennet D. Blackwell, as her maid of honor and only attendant. Harry Fowler Woods of Cincinnati is to be the best man. H. Harwood Frost and Edwin Hunt Frost, brothers of the bridegroom; Birney Blackwell, a brother of the bride; Robert Arthur Beebe, Frederick Worth Goddard, and Wylie Brown will be the ushers.

The ceremony will take place at 3:30, and will be followed by a small reception at the home of the bride's parents, 32 West Seventy-Fifth Street.

Additional Notes:

Alice A. Birney was the daugher of James Birney III and Amanda S. Moulton. Her marriage to Frank E. Blackwell took place on September 24, 1874, at her parent's residence in Bay City, MI. They had the following children: Birney, Frank, Alice and Jennett.''
1850 - New York Births: Columbia, New York

Frank Engs Blackwell born April 4, 1850, parents James M. and Jannet D. Blackwell.
1860 - Census: Bay City, Bay, Mich.

Birney, Alice - b. 1853, Ohio
1900 - Census: Manhtatten, New York

Blackwell, Frank - age 54, b. NY
Alice, wife - age 47, Ohio
Frank, son - age 25, NY
Alice J., daughter - age 20, NY
Jennet, daughter - age 15, NY

http://bjmi.us/bay/1he/writings/obit-birney-alice-blackwell.html

1909 Plainfield City Directory

FROST CHARLES H, manager Courier-News Publishing Co, 201 Park av, h 317 Franklin pl

Frost, Francis W., Engineering News, New York, h 1011 Madison av
FROST GEORGE H, president Courier-News Publishing Co, 201 Park av, h. 745 Watchung av
Frost Harwood, editor Technical Digest, h 508 Woodland av

1915 - 1923 List of Meetings

1936 - 1937 Meeting Minutes

1938-1939 Meeting Minutes

1918 Meeting Minutes

March 21, 1950 Mrs. Frost's entry

Title:
New York Flower Show [slide]
Forms part of:
Garden Club of America Collection,
Phy. Description:
1 slide: glass lantern, col.; 3 x 5 in.
Digital Reference:

Produced:
03/21/1950
General Note:
No Names for Picture. Class 1 - Tuesday - 2nd prize, Mrs. T. Willoughby Frust, Plainfield Garden Club.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Subject-Topical:
Spring
Flower shows
Sculpture
Niches (Architecture)
Flower arrangement
Orchids
Subject - Geographical:
New York (State) – New York City
United States of America New York New York
Repository Loc:
Smithsonian Gardens, PO Box 37012, Capital Gallery, Suite 3300, MRC 506, Washington, DC 20013-7012
Local Number:
NY208223
Co-Creator:
Hugelmeyer, John

March 1947 Mrs. Frost's entry

Title:
New York Flower Show [slide]
Forms part of:
Garden Club of America Collection,
Phy. Description:
1 slide: glass lantern, col.; 3 x 5 in.
Digital Reference:

Produced:
03/00/1947
General Note:
No Names for Picture. "Moderate Cost Room, Tues., Cost little or nothing." Mantelpiece. 1st prize, Mrs. F. W. Frost, Plainfield, N. J.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Subject-Topical:
Spring
Flower shows
Flower arrangement
Interior views
Mantels
Baskets
Subject - Geographical:
New York (State) – New York City
United States of America New York New York
Repository Loc:
Smithsonian Gardens, PO Box 37012, Capital Gallery, Suite 3300, MRC 506, Washington, DC 20013-7012
Local Number:
NY208318
Co-Creator:
Cassebeer, F. W.

1919 Meeting Minutes

Mrs. Frost Jr.

Crescent Avenue Historic District

Application to the National Register of Historic Places

743-47 Watchung Avenue
c. 1895
75' x 150'
Items of special interest: Ornate cast terra cotta relief in the frieze – one large projecting bay extension on the first floor with exceptional stained glass windows in the bay and stair landing. Loggia type front porch with rhythmic, rounded arches. The red tile roof, campanile, tower, and the porch style gives a Mediterranean look.

Unusual style with very little alteration and completely appropriate to the District.

In 1895, the home of George H. Frost, "Editor, Engineering News, N. Y."

Crescent Avenue Historic District

Application to the National Register of Historic Places

744-50 Watchung Avenue
c. 1925

Situated on two lots, owned in 1895 by Mrs. Anna M. Martine, widow of Daniel Martine, and the corner lot, owned by Isaac Miller, "lawyer, N. Y." Mrs. Martine and Mr. Miller lived and owned houses on those properties.

Limestone or cast cement surrounds for the trim of the windows and quoins – cast cement diamond orientation between the first and second story windows – shallow cast concrete brackets under the front windows on the first, third and fourth floor. Interior plan – Ninety tow rooms; twenty six apartments.

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

May 21, 1954

Cath Detwiller's Plainfield Garden Club Party ca. 1965

sent in by Rick Detwiller, June 13, 2012

Dear Susan -

I thought you would enjoy those photos and I'm glad they will be fun for the older members to see. I know that Betty Horn, Valentine Fort, Toni Mann, Peggy Brower Newberry-Burger, Betty Fitzpatrick, June Barlow and Dot Davis are among the group and it's good to know you recognized Mrs. Seybolt. I'm sure Mrs. Sandford will be glad to see so many friends with herself among them!

Laura Detwiller was Dad's Aunt - she was his father's sister. Attached are a few more of her watercolors she did when she lived in Greenville, NJ that you may want to add to her page. We have lots of them, but most are now in the collection of the Bronx Botanical Garden. Also attached is a picture of Dad, Charles H. Detwiller, Jr. with his mother Ethel Hassel Detwiller in what I believe is Aunt Laura Detwiller's garden at 971 Hillside Ave. in Plainfield when she would have been a Garden Club member. Aunt Laura or Charles Sr. must have taken the photo since I have another one of her in the garden, probably taken at the same time. I'll send that second photo along with more garden club related material as I find it.

Thanks,

Rick D.

Mrs. Furman's daughter identified Mrs. Frost on the left – white floral dress with pink sweater.

Mrs. Frost circa 1965

Mrs. Frost was identified in this photo by Sandy Furman, daughter of PGC member Victoria Houck Furman. She writes on November 12, 2013:

Yes, yes I knew the Frosts (Virginia). We often spent July 4th at their house and then went to the fireworks together at the Plainfield Country Club. Her brother was a professor of history at Randolph-Macon Woman's College, which was the connection that led me to go there. It's amazing how intertwined all our lives were, now that I think about it. Sandy

George Henry Frost

George Henry Frost

George Henry Frost

George Henry Frost

George Henry Frost

Monday, October 5, 1970 Courier-News

City garden club to host zone meeting

PLAINFIELD – Four national officers of the Garden Club of America, several national committee chairmen and a number of zone chairmen from all over the United States will be guests of the Plainfield Garden Club Wednesday and Thursday at a New Jersey Zone meeting here. They will join some 45 delegates from the 11 garden clubs in the New Jersey area affiliated with the Garden Club of America.

This marks the first time the 55 year-old Plainfield Garden Club, which has been a member of the national organization since 1944, has hosted a zone meeting. An extensive tour of the Garden Club's many beautification and conservation projects in Plainfield will be a major activity on the Wednesday schedule.

There also will be business, horticultural and conservation meetings and special guests speakers, tours of private gardens of two members, a garden walk along Rahway Road, a dinner at the Plainfield Country Club Wednesday evening and a cookout luncheon at the F. Willoughby Frost barn on Rahway Road Thursday.

The emphasis on the two day meetings will be conservation. Dr. E. Alan Bromely, professor of nuclear physics at Yale University, will discuss clean power and its relation to conservation efforts at the dinner Wednesday.

Other speakers will be Dr. Robert E. Loveland, associate professor of Zoology at Rutgers University, who will discuss ecology at a conservation meeting Thursday morning at a 9:30 a.m. in the home of Mrs. Alden R. Loosli, 927 Rahway Road.

Herb horticulture will be the topic Wednesday at a meeting in the Monday Afternoon Club, by Mrs. William Y. Dear Jr., a life member of the Herb Society of America.

The bus tour of Plainfield on Wednesday afternoon will include visits to the Vest Pocket garden in Park Avenue near Depot Place, which the Plainfield Garden Club planned and planted last year and cares for on a continuing basis; the Shakespeare Garden in Cedarbrook Park which was first conceived in 1927; the Iris Garden and the dogwood collection there; a number of plantings of shade trees in the downtown area and other beautification projects the club has undertaken or supported.

The garden walk, planned through gardens on Rahway Road, will take place Thursday morning from Mrs. Loosli's home at 11:30 a.m. following the conservation meeting.

The tour will include the grounds, home and gardens of Mr. and Mrs. Roswell H. Rausch, Mr and Mrs. DeWitt D. Barlow Jr., Mr. and Mrs. F. Willoughby Frost, Mr. and Mrs. David F. Sanders and Mr. and Mrs. David S. Foster and will conclude at the 200-year-old home of Mrs. Laurence S. Heely.

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Stevens will be hosts of a cocktail part for the delegates Wednesday evening, prior to the dinner at the country club at which Mr. and Mrs. Edwin J. Fitzpatrick and Mr. and Mrs. Frederick M. Lockwood will be hosts.

Mr. and Mrs. Rausch have planned a cocktail party prior to Thursday's cookout at the Frost barn and hosts at this luncheon will be Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Holman Jr. and Mr. and Mrs. David F. Sanders. Mrs. Holman is chairman of arrangements for the two-day meetings and Mrs. Sanders is co-chairman. Mrs. Arthur D. Seybold is president of the Plainfield Garden Club.

Monday, October 5, 1970 Courier-News

1990 Application for the GCA Zone IV Historic Preservation Award: Marge Eillott

1990 Application for the GCA Zone IV Historic Preservation Award: Marge Elliott

September 3, 1977 Elizabeth Daily Journal

Garden Club Spruces Up Cannonball House Museum

This Spring Cannonball House Museum has a new look – thanks to the Plainfield Garden Club. For their Bi-Centennial project, Garden Club members voted to help restore the landscaping around the historic Scotch Plains house as it might have looked during Colonial times.

Since 18 of the Plainfield Garden Club members are Scotch Plains residents and many are also members of the Scotch Plains-Fanwood Historic Society, the club enthusiastically committed itself to earning money for the landscaping project.

Mrs. Virginia Frost, a Scotch Plains landscape gardener and Plainfield Garden Club member, drew up a master plan for the grounds around Cannonball House, and work began early this Spring. First the old hedge had to be removed from in front of the house. Next the overgrown bushes and ancient cedar trees in the backyard had to go. A new brick walk was laid leading to the front porch and a Colonial-type board fence was installed. Many new shrubs and trees were planted including four boxwoods, two holly and a dogwood. The landscaping "master plan" still has many areas to be completed such as a Colonial herb garden and backyard trees and hedges. Officers of the Cannonball House museum have established a special "landscaping" account for money donated specifically for this purpose. Mrs. William Elliott, president of the Historic Society, hopes that clubs and other organizations within the community will be interested in supporting the landscaping project.

On Sunday afternoon, May 2, Cannonball House Museum will recognize the new plantings with a dedication ceremony at 2 p.m. Honored guests will include Mrs. Alden Loosli, president of the Plainfield Garden Club and the many club members who helped make the landscaping dream become a reality. Spring flowers arranged in antique containers will add a festive air to the many interesting exhibits inside the old home. Cannonball House museum is located on Front Street in Scotch Plains across the street from the Stage House Inn. The public is cordially invited to tour the grounds and the house from 2 to 4 p.m. on Sunday afternoons.

Thursday, July 26, 1979 Scotch Plains-Fanwood The Times

New Colonial gardens are unveiled at Village Green

A garden patch straight out of Colonial Williamsburg, debuted in Scotch Plains this week, as the local Historical Society sponsored an old-fashioned outdoor tea party to show off the recently completed garden. Ladies in the lovely pastels and flowered print dresses of summer strolled the brick and chip paths to admire the latest addition to the Village Green Park adjacent to the municipal building.

The gardens about the Cannonball Museum. Behind low white fences next to the museum is a geometric garden. Brick paths create a six-sided walkway around a center plot of geraniums, boxwood and yew. Broad corner borders are planted with impatiens and tiny boxwood. Another section of the ?? garden includes orderly rows of herbs – wormwood, southernwood, winter savory, parsley, lambs ears, etc.

Behind the fenced garden is a second garden, with divided planting sections featuring beautiful examples of Colonial horticulture. The rear garden, which features sections of lavender, hyssop, mini basil, silver lace artemesia and thyme, with each patch edged in brick. In the center is a primitive rock with a concave center, which creates a tiny pool. The tock has local historical significance of a sort. As explained by Mrs. William Elliott of the historical group, the rock once was located on the property of Marion Clark's Scotch Plains home. It was partially buried below grounds, so the concavity served as a bowl for chicken feed for Mrs. Clark's grandmother's chickens. The second garden has been given to the residents of Scotch Plains by the Loizeaux family in honor of Marion Foster Loizeaux.

Behind the Cannonball House, an arbor awaits the planting of grapes, banks of myrtle have been planted and the old time "privy" has been enhanced with simple landscaping which includes a second large rock – a fossilized rock, which had been on the grounds of the tiny museum.

The landscaping of Cannonball began as a Bicentennial project in 1976, when the Garden Club of Plainfield contributed $3,000. The initial contribution went toward gardening in front of the museum - holly trees, dogwood, and fencing. The latest formal gardens were funded as part of the local township Village Green project. Virginia Frost, a prominent Colonial landscape gardener from Plainfield designed the gardens.

Mayor Alan Augustine in a subdued khaki suite, and Township Engineer Edward Bogan, were the two sober notes among the pastels. Augustine was highly enthusiastic about the new park and expressed his dedication to maintaining the entire new complex in "green" condition. An effort will be made to establish continuity among the maintenance staff, so that the same workmen are always assigned to Village Green, Augustine said, and the township will set the same high standards of greenskeeping that now receive top priority at the municipal golf course.

Viewing the rows of Colonial herbs, Augustine quipped: "I will call this 'herbal renewal'"

1973-1974 PGC Directory

1973-1974 Consultant for Vest-Pocket Park

1974-1975 Directory

August 21, 1967 Letter from Bev Reid to Barbara Sandford

August 21, 1967 Letter from Bev Reid to Barbara Sandford

Barbara,

Just a line re "P.field Beauty." Hear you were down briefly so perhaps you saw for yourself the trees all cut down on the railroad tracks opposite the Police Station. I was horrified and took Virginia down. We investigated inside and were told the Police wanted to clear the area there so a sniper could not hide in the trees and inhibit the Police Force in another riot situation. I can understand this – and all the more reason for roses or pyracantha on the banks – let someone with a gun get mixed up with THAT! It still looks stupid and severe – but what can you do –

#2. Containers in front of The Needle & Consommers Liquor I vote as being the prettiest in town. They are lush-blooming and I think bear copying. Red geraniums, white cascade petunias, ageratum (sp?) stunning. Mrs. H's in front of Commerce is blooming but stupid with that TREE! I don't think any flowers have been planted in front of Blairs-Vogue etc. which goes on with my duties. I have been around and do think yew or arborvitae should go at the station – but I think we should wait and do a spring planting. I was talking to Dom. Toresco and he doesn't think the plants will get a chance to become well enough established before the Earth freezes – I would hate to see so much money go into each pot and be taking a chance on it living. Go ahead set the pots up on the platform – then come middle of Nov. we could stick a cut scotch pine in for Christmas and I think you'll be amazed at how long that will last and be attractive. Come spring – bang in goes our living green and a whole season of being able to acclimate.

Thats all from me. Am on to the hills Saturday. Will watch carefully whats done abroad perhaps some new ideas will sprout forth. One last thing – the benches for bus people are being painted green & yellow – they should not be so obvious 00

See you in October. hope your getting a well deserved rest & not running a hotel. Love, Bev

August 21, 1967 Letter from Bev Reid to Barbara Sandford

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1993-1994 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1984-1985 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

Club History by Anne Marie v. G. Seybold

1984-1985 History of the Plainfield Garden Club by Anne Marie v. G. Seybold

Conservation

1968 saw the creation of a Vest Pocket Park. Mrs. Willoughby Frost, who designed the park, and her committee worked diligently to transform a litter-strewn plot into a spot of beauty. After completion, Conservation turned the park over to a special committee. The "mini" park captured several awards and an article about it was published in the GCA Bulletin. The park has been maintained by the Garden Club members on a regularly scheduled basis.

Exhibition

In 1975 a windowbox was done for the Philadelphia Flower Show by Mrs. Willoughby Frost and her Committee and several members worked as judges' aides.

In 1976-1977 Mrs. Alden de Hart conducted a flower arranging workshop and Mrs. Willoughby Frost captured a first at the Zone IV judging workshop. Mrs. William Elliott's decoupage tray won third prize at the Bryant Park Annual Show.

In 1980 we exhibited at the newly established GCA Flower Show at City Corp's "Autumn in the Atrium" and also served as hostesses. At the Atrium show in October, 1982 our entry, "A City Window", won third prize and a collection of dwarf conifers captured first place. At the same show in 1984 a far more ambitious exhibit was undertaken. A four foot by six foot city garden was designed by Mrs. Willoughby Frost and, after being tenderly cared for by Mrs. Robert Hackman and her Committee for three months, was taken to New York and captured a blue ribbon for our Club.

Much in demand throughout the Zone are our three accredited judges, Mmes. Frost, Sheble and Kroll.

1995-1996 Annual Report

1994-1995 Annual Report

1949-1950 Program

This small brochure was found in the bottom of a box belonging to Barbara Tracy Sandford '50. 12/22/13

1949-1950 Program

September 13, 1985 Harold Voorhis NY Times Obituary

See here

HAROLD VOORHIS, 89, EX-N.Y.U. SECRETARY AND VICE PRESIDENT
Published: September 13, 1985

Harold Oliver Voorhis, former senior vice president and secretary of New York University, died of cancer Aug. 31 at Northside Convalescent Center in Atlanta, where he had lived in recent years. He was 89 years old.

Until his retirement in 1962, Mr. Voorhis had been associated with New York University for 42 years, first as a student and an economics teacher in the early 1920's and, after 1925, as secretary. He was also vice chancellor from 1945 to 1956, when the title was changed to senior vice president.

Over the years, Mr. Voorhis's signature appeared on 183,000 N.Y.U. diplomas and he wrote and delivered at commencement exercises some 300 citations for honorary degrees. At his retirement, N.Y.U. awarded him an honorary doctorate of laws and letters, and the citation called him ''a master of June's own literary form: the honorary degree citation.''

Mr. Voorhis was born in Kokomo, Ind., on July 29, 1896. He graduated from Colgate University in 1919, after interrupting his studies to serve in World War I as an Army lieutenant. He earned a master's degree in economics from N.Y.U. in 1922.

Mr. Voorhis, whose ancestors were Dutch, was a former president of the Netherlands-American Foundation and of the Holland Society of New York. Queen Juliana of the Netherlands in 1959 made him a Commander of the Order of Orange-Nassau. He was a trustee emeritus of Colgate and a former trustee of the Parsons School of Design.

His wife, Rosalie M. Voorhis, died in 1980. He is survived by two sisters, Dorothy DeHart and Virginia Frost, both of Plainfield, N.J.; three daughters, Patricia Grinnell of Santa Barbara, Calif.; Joanna Beattie of New Castle, Del., and Katrina Mabon of Atlanta; seven grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.

A memorial service will be held at 3:30 P.M. Oct. 2 at the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church in Plainfield.

Photo of Harold O. Voorhis (William R. Simmons, 1956)

NYU Biography: http://dlib.nyu.edu/findingaids/html/archives/voorhis/bioghist.html

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

March 23, 2016 Questover