Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm, Jr. (Shirley O. Clark) '48

1948 - 1949 Treasurer Book, Active: "new" Barnhart, Noah C. Jr. no notation of payment or date made.

1949 - 1950 Treasurer Book, Active: Barnhart, Mrs. N. C. Jr. June 8, 1949 June 15, 1950 June 1951 June 1951

1958 - 1970 address: Woodland Avenue, RFD #1, South Plainfield

1984 - 1992: Affiliate
1993 - 1994: Deceased

The farm stretched between Woodland and Park Avenues and was owned by Mrs. Barnhart's father, Edward F. Clark. He purchased the land in 1915 and called it "Homestead Farm" and Mrs. Barnhart inherited in 1949. It was orginally called "Breezy Acres" and owned by a Mrs. Messenger.

1970 Address: Woodland Avenue, R. F. D. 1, South Plainfield
NOTE: Listed as a "Sustaining Member"

1973 - 1975 Address: 3304 Woodland Avenue, South Plainfield
Listed as Sustaining Member

1976: Moved to North Carolina

1978 - 1985 Address: 2580 Kimbrough Circle, Charlottesville VA

1986 - 1993 Address: 956 Westminister Canterbury Drive
Apt. 311, Winchester, VA 22601

Barnhart, Mrs. N. Chisholm, Jr. '48

photo circa 1950

Barnhart, Mrs. N. Chisholm, Jr. '48

back of photo, circa 1950

1915 - 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

page 9

1915 - 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

page 10

1915 - 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

page 12

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

May 3, 2010 Native American relic donated by Mrs. Noah C. Barnhart, Jr.

Lithic artifacts featured at Nature Center Open House May 8

An ancient Native American relic, hidden in plain sight outside of the South Plainfield Public Library for thirty-four years this month, is the featured exhibit at the Highland Woods Environmental Education Reserve's Nature Center Open House on May 8.

The relic, a mortar stone weighing about 200 pounds, was donated to the South Plainfield Historical Society in May 1976 by Mrs. N.C. Barnhart Jr., formerly of South Plainfield. She recalled the history of the stone in a letter to the Historical Society, also on display. In it she said the mortar stone was discovered around 1890 by a farmer plowing a field on Mrs. Messenger's "Breezy Acres" farm which was located between Woodland and Park Avenues. Mrs. Barnhart's father, Edward F. Clark, purchased the farm in 1915 He renamed it "Homestead Farm," and resided there until 1949. Mrs. Barnhart inherited the property and the mortar stone, which she displayed in her garden for twenty-seven years until donating it to the Historical Society upon her move to North Carolina. The mortar stone was placed near the front entrance of the Public Library where it remained anonymously in the shadows while gathering moss.

With the impending move of the library to a new facility across town, the Historical Society determined it would be appropriate to move the mortar to the Nature Center to complement its Native American Indian display. Under the direction of Historical Society Life Member Robert Bengivenga, the mortar was removed two weeks ago, cleaned and mounted on a dolly inside the Nature Center where it will be more accessible to the public. Other authentic Native American lithic materials on display include full-grooved axe heads, points and scrapers.

According to local historian, Larry Randolph, "it is impossible to ascribe an age to the mortar" because "the artifact has been removed from its site and no other artifacts have been associated with it." The sandstone mortar is one-half of a grinding mill (the other half being the stone pestle which was not recovered). "Such objects are used to process vegetable foods and are often associated with horticultural activities such as growing corn, but they can also be used to process gathered foods such as nuts, berries, and seeds," continued Randolph. "For this reason, it could have been used any time during the several thousand years that the Indians lived in this area. Its large size would have made it very difficult to transport, so it was probably used at the location where it was originally found."

The May 8th Open House runs from 1 pm to 4 pm. Docents will be on hand to discuss exhibits, and two guided nature walks are scheduled for 1:30 and 2:45. There is no charge for today's event. Please consider a donation of a bag of bird seed for the Wild Bird Feeding Station behind the center.

Contact Dorothy Miele at spnaturetrails@verizon.net for further information.

Trails are open from sunup to sundown, seven days a week. The Nature Center is located at 115 Sylvania Place, South Plainfield (off So. Clinton Avenue).

Woodland Avenue, RFD #1, South Plainfield Residence: Barnhart

May 17, 1957 Club Commemorates Founding of Iris Garden

Caption: GARDEN MARKER VIEWED – Standing before the marker commemorating the 25th anniversary of the Iris Garden in Cedar Brook Park are (left to right) Mrs. Frederick Lockwood, Victor B. King, Jr., John C. Wister, Mr. Richard Tracy and Miss Harriette R. Halloway, founder of this garden. (Courier photo by E. T. Wiggins)

The Plainfield Garden Club and guests yersterday dedicated the the entranceway of the of the Iris Garden in Cedar Brook Park.

Miss Harriette R. Halloway, found of the garden and chairman of the garden of the Iris Garden [not legible] the project was started in 1932, was presented a medal by Mrs. Frederick M. Lockwood, president of the Garden Club.

The medal is [not legible] "from the grateful members of the Plainfield Garden Club Harriette R. Halloway founder and director of the Iris gardens of Cedar Brook Park, Plainfield, 1932 - 1957."

[Not legible] viewed a recently installed [not legible] tablet marking the anniversary of the garden.

"Excercise in Perfection"
Victor R. King, president of the Union County Park Commission, led the gathering [not legible] the garden display was "an excercise in perfection is [not legible]," he said.

The park commission provides the setting for the garden and have [not legible] in the project [not legible]

W. [not legible] Tracy, executive had of the Park Commission when the Iris Garden was started paid tribute to Miss Halloway for her "tireless work and painstaking effort."

Another speaker was Dr. John C. Wister of Swarthmore, Pa., president of the American Iris Society when the garden was started and author of [not legible] article about the garden in the current issue of the Journal of the New York Botanical Gardens.

Miss Halloway spoke briefly and [not legible] on the work of the [not legible] who care for the Iris Garden. She introduced Kenneth Smith, one of the largest contributors of plants to the garden [not legible]

Mrs. Lockwood presided at the program. Guests included members of [not legible] garden clubs and contributors to the garden.

The Iris Garden Committee includes Mrs. Morris E. Benton, Mrs. Alden de Hart, Mrs. Lockwood, Mrs. Donald E. Luce, Mrs. William K. Dunbar, Jr., Mrs. C. Northrop Pond, Mrs. Webster Sandford, Mrs. Arthur D. Seybold, Mrs. John R. Wells, Mrs. Willian G. Wigton, Mrs. Robert MacLeod, vice chairman, and Miss Halloway, chairman.

Special slides [not legible] for the chairman were Mrs. Charles A. Eaton, Jr., Mrs. F. Willoughby Frost ad Mrs. Edwin M. Treat, Jr.

Mrs. Victor M. King was chairman of the special committee assisted by Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux, Mrs. E. B. Newberry, and Miss Margaret Tyler. Also cooperating were Mrs. N. C. Barnhart, Jr., Mrs. William P. Elliott, Mrs. Homer Cochran and Mrs. H. I. Flanders.

Hostesses (not legible)
Other hostesses were Mrs. William W. Coriell, Mrs. Leslie E. Fort, Mrs. William A. Holliday, Mrs. Richard M. Lawton, Mrs. Robert T. Stevens, Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler, Mrs. William S. Tyler. Mrs. Thomas Van Boskerck and Mrs. Orville G. Waring.

The Iris Garden now has more than 1,800 named varieties properly labeled, representing all types of Iris and totaling more than 75,000 plants.

The main part of the garden is [not legible] caring Iris [not legible] and is expected to be is good blooms thorugh the rest of the month.

Note from Shirley

Handwritten:

Cannot remember whether its you or the recording secretary I should notify. Love to you all.

From the Corresponding Secretary file, 1986

From the Corresponding Secretary file

postmark 6 APR 1992

From the Corresponding Secretary file

April 3, 1992

Dear Anne,

I just recieved this bill, mailed a good deal earlier in March. Cannot make out the date.

My zip code is 22601 not 23601. This is probably why I did not get the first bill last year.

Say hello to everyong from me. I miss you all.

Shirley Barnhart

Princeton Class of 1931

Noah Chisholm Barnhart 970 Hillside Avenue, Plainfield, NJ

New York Times Obituary Noah C. Barnhart, Hr.

Noah C. Barnhart Jr., Executive, 80
Published: October 28, 1988

Noah Chisholm Barnhart Jr., a retired business executive, died Wednesday at the Winchester (Va.) Medical Center. He was 80 years old and lived in Winchester.

Mr. Barnhart was born in Plainfield, N.J., and educated at the Salisbury (Conn.) School. He was a 1931 graduate of Princeton University. He taught school for a short while before joining J.P. Stevens & Company in Manhattan. He was secretary of the company for 22 years before retiring in 1970.

He is survived by his wife, Shirley, and a sister, Susan Holstein of Newport Beach, Calif.

Introduction in Rhyme of Skit for Garden Club Meeting May 1956 by Marge Elliott

Introduction in Rhyme of Skit for Garden Club Meeting May 1956 by Marge Elliott
To see the handwritten pages, see 1956 Archives


Introduction

Imagine that you are our garden club
type here the powers that be
What things go on in a garden club
you'll be surprised to see

The cast are famous actresses
All brought at great expense
So please be kind to others, my friends
Lest they should take offense.

The President's name is Hazel
And its Lockwood – thats for sure
She presides as "to-the-manner-born"
But her arrangements – they are poor.

Elizabeth King of Programs – She's
all fluttering, cooing and coy.
To find the right speaker for just the right day
Is her constant delight and her joy.

Page 2

Ways and Means Chairman is Shirley
Barnhart we're meaning of course
She's breathless, naive and appealing
But hasn't the sense of a horse.

Marion Loizeaux is chairman
of membership – looks la-de-da
But don't let that big hat delude you
She's a great one for making faux pas.

Fanny Day has charge of the minutes
Madame Secretary – no less –
But I must in confidence tell you
All her reports are a mess.

Hiely – that's Polly the Treasurer
Does weird things to the books
She was never good at her figures
And so for the balance – gad - zooks!

Hospitality chairman is Barbara
Sandford's the rest of her name
She's very smart but sarcastic
the "country tweed type" is this dame.

Conservation is Anne Marie Seybold
She is a lady who knows what is what
She has no time for the frivilous
In her ways she's terribly sot.

Alice Mooney – our wonderful speaker
Rosa Bunda – she has quite a past
And now you know all that you need to
about our illustrious cast.

So please let the music be quiet
I see the house lights are low
Put on the fools and the spotlights
All right – curtain ready? Let's go

1974 Junior League Designer Showcase: The Martine House

1974 Designer Showcase Martine House Cover to Page 25

1974 Designer Showcase Martine House Page 26 to End

In addition to saving the 1988 Program for the Designers Showhouse of Cedar Brook Farm (aka The Martine House) which was organized by the Muhlenberg Auxiliary, PGC Member Anne Shepherd also kept the 1974 Designers Showcase of the very same home, organized by the Junior League.

Within the program pages, you will find mentioned many PGC members. They include: Clawson, MacLeod, Kroll, Davis, Wyckoff, Stevens, Loizeaux, Swain, Hunziker, Connell, Foster, Dunbar, Elliott, Fitzpatrick, Gaston, Hackman, Holman, Lockwood, Morrison, Royes, Rushmore, Sanders, Williams, Barnhart, Bellows, Burger, Burner, Carter, Clendenin, DeHart, Detwiller, Eaton, Eckert, Fort, Frost, Gonder, Keating, Laidlaw, Loosli, Madsen, Mann, Marshall, Miller, Moody, Moon, Morse, Murray, Mygatt, Barrett, Peek, Perkins, Pfefferkorn, Pomeroy, Pond, Royes, Samek, Sandford, Sheble, Stevens, Shepherd, Stewart, Stout, Trewin, Vivian, Zeller, Cochran, Mooney and Hall.

New York Times October 13, 1895

New York Times October 13, 1895

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F40E17F93A5911738DDDAA0994D8415B8585F0D3

THE WEEK IN PLAINFIELD

Entertainment by the Dorcas Society – Monday Afternoon Club

PLAINFIELD, N.J., Oct. 12 – A social event of the last week was the entertainment given by the Dorcas Society, King's Daughters, at the home of Miss Maude Lowrie, in Park Avenue, Monday evening. It was titled "The Circulating Library," and was given for the purpose of raising funds for the benefit of the poor of the city. The guests on arriving were given a blank catalogue, with only numbers on it, and they were to guess the titles of books represented. The Reception Committee was composed of Miss Bowers, Miss Brown, Miss Lowrie and Miss Langdon. Those presiding at the talbes were Mrs. Crane and Miss Wyckoff, assisted by Mrs. Clark, Mrs. C. T. Pond, Miss Minnie French, Miss Green, Miss Ella Blish, and Miss Maltly. In the library were Miss Crane, Miss Cornwell, Miss Lou French, Miss Millie Landgon, Miss Etta BLish, Miss Alice Hayners, Miss Bessie Titsworth, and Miss Kline.

S.E. Hull of Duer Street has returned from Broadway, where he spent the Summer.

The Monday Afternoon Club, Plainfield's leading woman's club, held it sifrst meeting of the Fall. On account of repairs being made at the Casino or the Union County Country Club, where the meeings are usually held, the ladies gathered in the parlors of the Congregational Church. The subject upon which papers are to be read for the coming year is "Some Great Florentines and Their Times." Two papers were read Monday – one by Mrs. Josiah Brown and the other by Mrs. Robert Lowry. Next month the paper will be read by Miss Kenyon, Principal of the Young Ladies' Seminary.

H. M. Stevens of Fanwood gave a reception at the Fanwood Clubhouse Friday evening.

Miss Nellie Saums of Ricefiled is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. R. V. Saums of Clinton Avenue.

George Barton has returned to Keyport after a visit with Mrs. Barton of Madison Avenue.

Edward Hooley of Rockview Avenue has gone to Atlanta.

The Rev. E. L. Hyde of Hyde Park, Mass., is visiting friends in Plainfield.

The Misses Anthony of Crescent Avenue have returned from Europe.

Miss Bessie Booker of Richmond, Va., has been visitng Miss Dryden of West Seventh Street.

James Smith of Elmwood Place has returned from Amesbury, Mass.

Miss May Haberle, who has been visitng her cousin, Miss Lillie Haberle, has returned to her home in Orange.

Miss Mary Ryder of Brooklyn, who has been visiting at the home of Robert Lucky of Fifth Street, has returned home.

Charles L. Case and family of Central Avenue returned this week from their European trip.

Miss Lydia Duffert of Morris County is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Van Dyke of East Front Street.

Mr. and Mrs. John Burnett of Brookyln have been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Charles Doane of Fifth Street.

Charles Potter of West Seventh Street has returned from Philadelphia.

Mrs. Florence Howe Hall of Madison Avenue is in Massachusetts delivering a course of lectures.

Miss Mary and Miss Grace Shreve of New York are guests of B. J. Shreve of Grove Street.

Miss Agnes Baldwin of Brooklyn is the guest of Miss Haviland of Washington Park.

Benjamin Terry of Bridgeport is the guest of the Misses Livergey of Park Avenue.

Thomas H. Keller of East Front Street left this week for a trip South.

C. C. Burke and family have left for their Winter home in New York, after spending the Summer at the cottage on Ravine Road Netherwood.

William Tyler of West Eigth Street has gone to Europe.

David Krymer of West Second Street has gone to Baltimore.

Dr. Frank Searles and Mrs. Searles have returned to Bayonne, after a visit with Dr. and Mrs. H. H. Lourie of Park Avenue.

Dr. John H. Carman and fmaily of Somerset Street returned this week from the Adirondacks.

Dr. B. Van D. Hedges of Watchung Avenue is home from his outing in Maine.

Miss Caroline Fitz Randolph, daughter of ex-Mayor L. V. F. Randolph of East Front Street, sailed Saturday for Europe.

May 8, 2012 New Green Media

An ancient Native American relic, hidden in plain sight outside of the South Plainfield Public Library for thirty-four years this month, is the featured exhibit at the Highland Woods Environmental Education Reserve's Nature Center Open House on May 8.

The relic, a mortar stone weighing about 200 pounds, was donated to the South Plainfield Historical Society in May 1976 by Mrs. N.C. Barnhart Jr., formerly of South Plainfield. She recalled the history of the stone in a letter to the Historical Society, also on display. In it she said the mortar stone was discovered around 1890 by a farmer plowing a field on Mrs. Messenger's "Breezy Acres" farm which was located between Woodland and Park Avenues. Mrs. Barnhart's father, Edward F. Clark, purchased the farm in 1915 He renamed it "Homestead Farm," and resided there until 1949. Mrs. Barnhart inherited the property and the mortar stone, which she displayed in her garden for twenty-seven years until donating it to the Historical Society upon her move to North Carolina. The mortar stone was placed near the front entrance of the Public Library where it remained anonymously in the shadows while gathering moss.

With the impending move of the library to a new facility across town, the Historical Society determined it would be appropriate to move the mortar to the Nature Center to complement its Native American Indian display. Under the direction of Historical Society Life Member Robert Bengivenga, the mortar was removed two weeks ago, cleaned and mounted on a dolly inside the Nature Center where it will be more accessible to the public. Other authentic Native American lithic materials on display include full-grooved axe heads, points and scrapers.

According to local historian, Larry Randolph, "it is impossible to ascribe an age to the mortar" because "the artifact has been removed from its site and no other artifacts have been associated with it." The sandstone mortar is one-half of a grinding mill (the other half being the stone pestle which was not recovered). "Such objects are used to process vegetable foods and are often associated with horticultural activities such as growing corn, but they can also be used to process gathered foods such as nuts, berries, and seeds," continued Randolph. "For this reason, it could have been used any time during the several thousand years that the Indians lived in this area. Its large size would have made it very difficult to transport, so it was probably used at the location where it was originally found."

The May 8th Open House runs from 1 pm to 4 pm. Docents will be on hand to discuss exhibits, and two guided nature walks are scheduled for 1:30 and 2:45. There is no charge for today's event. Please consider a donation of a bag of bird seed for the Wild Bird Feeding Station behind the center.

Contact Dorothy Miele at spnaturetrails@verizon.net for further information.Trails are open from sunup to sundown, seven days a week. The trailhead is located at 115 Sylvania Place, So. Plainfield

Mrs. N. C. Barnhart, Jr.

Crescent Avenue Historic District

Crescent Avenue Historic District form for the National Register of Historic Places

815 Park Avenue
c. 1880

In 1894, the home of John Clark, "Broker." In 1920 the residence of Rev. John J. Moment, pastor for thirty years of the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church.

Dentil molding and Palladian window in the gable gives a classic feeling. Stone lintels and sills. Strong projecting cornice in the gable. Segmental curved hood over the front door hood, supported by consoles. Eastlake patterns in the verge board and on the lintels.

A nice building unfortunately damaged by the sandblasting of the brick which has changed the character of the structure. Otherwise, it is one of the finer representative houses in the District.

Crescent Avenue Historic District

Crescent Avenue Historic District form for the National Register of Historic Places

131 Crescent Avenue
c. 1880
Three car garage and gardener's cottage
In 1895, the home of E. B. Clark, "Insurance, N. Y."

One of the few surviving porte cocheres in the District. Abounds with Eastlake ornamentation in the gables and on the incised window heads and in the porch treatment with champered columns.

Seven apartments.

A most interesting house and of of the few and completely Eastlake influenced designs in the District, only slightly altered and posessing much style and interesting decorations.

Nov. 12, 1980

July 27, 2013 Pot made by Mary Vic Griswold

Bernice has another interesting blog: A Garden Cutie

When describing her pretty floral container, Bernice writes: "The very small pot was created by Mary Vic Griswold, who was a potter as well as a philanthropist and is remembered very fondly by many Plainfielders."

Mary Vic Stevens Griswold was a member of the PGC and part of the large Stevens clan. Mary Vic's mother (founding member), aunt (founding member) and cousin-in-law were all notable members of The Club.

Other Stevens relatives/PGC members (also notable!)included:
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15 (aunt)
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm, Jr. (Shirley Clark) '48 (cousin-in-law)
Stevens, Mrs. Robert Ten Broeck (Dorothy Goodwin Whitney) '37 (cousin-in-law)

George Meade Holstein Princeton Class of '17

1968 Princeton Weekly

Mrs. Barnhart's brother-in-law

Meade Holstein died April 5, 1969 at his winter home in Palm Springs, Cal., at the age of 74. Meade was born in Pulaski, Va. Mar. 9, 1895. He prepared at Lawrenceville. At Princeton he took an active part in undergraduate activities, being especially interested in basketball. In World War I he was a 1st Lt. in the U.S. Engineer Corps attached to the 73rd Artillery which fought at St. Michiel and in the Meuse-Argonne sector. Following his marriage to Susan Barnhart in Sept. 1920 he moved to the west coast and subsequently settled in Newport Beach, Cal. He was one of southern California's first licensed contractors. He established his building firm in Los Angeles in 1923 and built many of the Beverly Hills homes occupied by movie stars of the 1920s and 1930s. Since 1949 his firm built thousands of homes in southern California and in Las Vegas, Nev. An avid golfer he was one of the founders of the Thunderbird Country Club near Palm Springs. Survivors include his wife, Susan of 308 Avenida Cumbre, Newport Beach, Calif., his two sons, George M. 3rd and William, and five grandchildren. To them we extend our deepest sympathy.

The Class of 1917

1970 Summer at the Furmans

Dodie Furman and Shirley Barnhart

1970 Summer at the Furmans

Dodie Roome, Shirley Barnhart and Victoria Furman

1970

Shirley Barnhart

1970

Shirley Barnhart

1970 Summer at the Furmans with Dodie Roome and Shirley Barnhart

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

May 21, 1954

Saturday, April 29, 1961

City Garden Club Planning Tour

The Plainfield Garden Club is holding a tour of members' gardens, for members only, from 2 to 5 p.m. Tuesday with Wednesday the rain date. Mrs. Noah C. Barnhart is general chairman of the tour and Mrs. Edwin J. Fitzpatrick is vice chairman.

Hostesses who will open their gardens for the tour are: Mrs. Richard M. Lawton, 1215 Prospect Ave.; Mrs. Harry Brokaw Smith, 676 W. Eighth St.; Mrs. William P. Elliott, 822 Arlington Ave.; Miss Elsie Harmon, 437 Randolph Rd.; and Mrs. James H. Whitehead, 1340 Watchung Ave.

Thursday, May 5, 1961 Spring's Beauty Displayed on Tour of 6 Gardens

by Jill Koehler

Small gardens are oases from heat-reflecting streets and traffic's din. They're as individual as the people who plan and lovingly nurture them.

That was evident yesterday in the Plainfield Garden Club's tour, for members and their guests, of six members' gardens.

Hostesses in their gardens were: Mrs. Harry Brokaw Smith, 676 W. Eighth St.; Mrs. Victor R. King, 826 Arlington Ave.; Mrs. William P. Elliott, 822 Arlington Ave., Miss Elsie Harman, 437 Randolph Rd.; Mrs. Richard M. Lawton, 1215 Prospect Ave.; and Mrs. James H. Whitehead, 1340 Watchung Ave.

Mrs. Noah C. Barnhart, Jr. was general chairman and Mrs. Edwin J. Fitzpatrick, vice chairman. Mrs. F. Gregg Burger was in charge of publicity.

Covers 3/4 of Acre

The Smith property, which include the horticultural interests of both Mr. and Mrs. Smith, is a series of gardens covering three-quarters of an acre. These contain plantings of ornamental trees, flowering shrubs, bulbs, perennials and a few annuals.

Winding through a small woodland of wild flowers and shrubs is an Enoch's walk, named from the verse about the patriarch in Genesis.

Standing watch over a patterned medieval herb garden is a statue of Fiacre, after whom the first cabs in Paris were named. While surrounded by a rock garden is a rustic pool a-glitter with its whippet swimming goldfish.

Among the hundreds of interesting plantings is: A Swiss mountain pine more than 25 years old that stands less than a foot high; the hinoki cypress that grows just two or three inches a year; Mediterranean heather that blooms all Winter; enkianthus, the bellflower tree with blooms shaped like small Dutchman's pipes.

15-foot Holly

Now a majestic 15-feet is the English holly, "Olive Smith," a seedling raised by Mr. Smith. Just before reaching the shaded walk is a wide swath of grass centered by a huge apple tree with its arms reaching to the birds and sky.

Surround the King garden on three sides is a French chestnut fence that is planted with 11 varieties of clematis.

Heavily shaded in most areas by large maples, white birches and dogwood, the basic planting is evergreen interspersed with such plantings as rhododendron, azalea, cherry laurel, yew, andromeda and recently, as an expedient, three camellia japonica from Oregon.

Early flowering Spring tulips still nod their heads in greeting. White primrose pertly face up at the edges of some beds and gerrymander edges the rose bed in the only sunny spot . . . .

Herb Garden

Planted in the protection of the house is the herb garden which includes sweet woodruff, the herb used by the Germans to make May wine.

Green plantings for shade, enhanced by the use of brick and ironwork, are the features of the Elliott garden.

A lead figure of a young girl called "Growing Things" stands near a pink wall of brick and stucco. The wall is a backdrop for the Fashion roses whose blooms will soon blend with the pink.

Once a glaring white, a mauve colored garage wall now sets a peaceful tone as it catches the shadows of fluttering leaves and is reflected in the pool in front of it.

Ironwork grilles on the pink wall were once horse stall dividers. A grille over the garage window was once a gate an ironwork snow eagles on the edge of the garage roof are from an old Pennsylvania house.

Additions this year include a brick walk to the gate-enclosed compost heap; the steel curbing in the driveway where new plantings have replaced three overgrown cedar trees.

Other Plantings

Among the many plantings are Delaware Valley azaleas, magnolia and flowering cherry trees, skimmer, cotoneaster, jasmine and clematnis.

Visitors to Miss Harman's garden first viewed it as they stepped from living room to terrace. To the right of the terrace is the cryptomeria tree, a native of Japan, that could well be an inspiration to an artist. The texture of its bark is of . . . .and the branching of its arms is unusual.

The large expanse of lawn is gracefully framed by a border of ten varieties of shrubs. Another tree of note is the pine oak, while dogwoods gently branch out over pink and violet tulips.

The path follows a series of "rounds" from an old millstone at the foot of the terrace steps; to a sundial, more than 100 years old, from an English estate; to the Moon Gate with spider web at the end of the garden.

Sandstone Birdbath

Near the terrace is the figure of "Dancing Girl" and an old Jersey sandstone birdbath, probably originally used as a horse trough.

The Lawton garden 60 by 176 feet, contains 48 trees, 94 shrubs, 10 climbing and 22 shrub roses and 102 kinds of herbaceous perennials, not including those in the rock garden.

Stretching its branches gracefully and colorfully is a generous sized crabapple tree that casts comfortable shadows over Summer luncheon spot of the Lawtons.

Fitting in decorously among the many trees is an unusual and Slimly Tall Japanese cherry tree. A silver bell tree over the pool still drinks in refreshing rain for its promised future bloom. While nearby the wild crocus blossomed and sang farewell in March.

Many of the late arriving jonquils still spread their petals wide and the dainty blue flowers of the anchusa dot the ground here and there.

A lush growth of myrtle grown from a few shoots from the garden of Mrs. Lawton's great-grandmother, covers the driveway bank.

Formal Garden

The Whitehead garden of 75 by 200 feet gives one a vista of the more formal English type garden. Designed and maintained by her, until recently, it opens to box hedged rose beds flanking the garden walk.

It is a garden of serenity, a Spring garden with bulbs, anchusa and bleeding hearts followed by white azaleas, lilacs, peonies and pink and white hawthorne trees.

In June the roses will give a delightful contrast to the verdant rich carpet of grass and in the Summer it will become a cool and shady spot.

To the visitor there is the pleasant surprise of a garden within a garden on a right angle at the rear. Focal point of this banked garden, framed with shrubs and flowers, is its pool . . .

1961

From left to right: Mrs. Noah C. Barnhart Jr., Mrs. Victor R. King, Mrs. F. Gregg Burger and Mrs. Elliot

1961

1961

1961 Mrs. Barnhart

Thursday, December 17, 1964 The Courier News

Plainfield Garden Club Meets in Lee House, Scotch Plains

The Plainfield Garden Club was entertained yesterday in historic Lee House, home of Mr. and Mrs. William P. Elliott at 11 Black Birch Rd., Scotch Plains.

Two new members were welcomed by Mrs. Wayne J. Holman, president. Co-hostesses were Mrs. Victor King and Mrs. James R. Bird.

Mrs. Bird introduced the program of readings on "The Symbols and Legends of Christmas" given by Mrs. A. D. Seybold and Mrs. King. As the symbols were describe, they were displayed b Mrs. Benson Wigton Jr.

A letter of congratulations from Mayor Robert C. Maddox to the club member Mrs. Alden DeHart has received a state award in the "Green Thumb Competition" of the New Jersey Tercentenary Commission for her work as chairman of the grounds committee of Drake House.

A member of the Plainfield Historical Society, she supervised outdoor plantain at the museum with funds for the planting donated by the Plainfield Garden Club. She also was awarded a special rose bush which will be planted at Drake House in her name in the spring.

Presiding at the tea table were Mrs. Holman, Mrs. William S. Tyler, Mrs. Webster Sandford, Mrs. Noah C. Barnhart, Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux and Mrs. Charles H. Detwiller.

Thursday, December 17, 1964 The Courier News

The Courier-News
Plainfield, N. J., Thursday, December 17, 1964

Garden Club Entertained at Historic Lee House

By VICTORIA FURMAN
(Club Member)

The Plainfield Garden Club was entertained yesterday by Mr. and Mrs. William P. Elliott in the historic Lee House, located at 11 Black Birch Rd., Scotch Plains.

The ghosts of the historic homestead must be rattling their skeletons with joy this Christmas season because at last, through the efforts of the owners, the house has achieved the charm and beauty it deserves.

The guests stepped over the threshold to a scene of great charm. In the center hall stood a Christmas tree on which members hung gifts of candy, wrapped as ornaments. Later the gifts were taken to Lyons Veterans Hospital where for many years the club has contributed greens and gifts at Christmas.

The president, Mrs. Wayne J. Holman, conducted the meeting and welcomed two new members. The hostess, a member of the club, was assisted by Mrs. Victor King and Mrs. James R. Bird.

Stormy History
A varied and sometimes stormy history has characterized Lee House since 1725, when the original small structure was built at the corner of Cooper and Terrill Rds., by the Lee family. During the Revolutionary War, the house was on the line of march of both British and Colonial armies, and many a tired soldier warmed his feet at its open fires.

The little house was moved to Raritan Rd. in 1828, to be joined to another farmhouse built in 1750 by Moses Frazee. One hundred thirty-five years later, Mr. and Mrs. Elliott had the house moved to its present location. Barns and other small buildings were moved also, and now are grouped around Lee House in companionable symmetry.

The Elliotts have added a wing to the house and restored the old brick and stone, the ceiling beams and original floor boards to keep it authentic Early American home.

The program was announced by Mrs. Bird. Readings on "The Symbols and Legends of Christmas" were given by Mrs. A. D. Seybold and Mrs. King, with incidental music played on the harp b 12-year old Joyce Heiman. As the symbols were described, they were displayed by Mrs. Benson Wigton Jr.

The first of the symbols, an "Advent Wreath," was made of evergreens with four white candles, which are traditionally lighted one at a time on each of the four Sundays during the Advent Season.

Gold Angel
A gold angel brought from Oberammergau, Germany by Mrs. Seybold, was displayed as the second symbol. The reading explained that angels are used throughout the world in forms varying from rough clay figures to the finest of wood carvings and porcelains.

Among symbolic Christmas greens are holly, ivy and mistletoe. Long ago it was thought that holly was the man's plant, ivy the woman's and the one brought into the house first indicated which sex would rule the house that year.

Bells, used to proclaim the joyful tidings, were shown and that beloved yuletide symbol, the Christmas Tree. According to one story, Martin Luther in 1528 cut down a small evergreen tree and carried it into his house, where he fastened candles to the branches and lighted them to share with his family the wonders of the Christmas sky.

A beautiful creche was shown as the most holy and revered symbol. The program ended with angelic tones of the harm and the beloved Christmas blessing, "Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men."

Afterwards guests adjourned to the dining room to exchange greetings before the centuries old fireplace. The tea table was decorated with brilliant red poinsettia massed in an old brass milk pan. Brass candlesticks and an antique samovar, from which coffee was served, completed the picture of early American hospitality.

Presiding at the tea table at intervals were Mrs. Wayne J. Holman, Mrs. William S. Tyler, Mrs. Webster Sandford, Mrs. Noah C. Barnhart, Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux and Mrs. Charles H. Detwiller Jr.

1973-1974 PGC Directory

1974-1975 Directory

1975-1976 The Junior League of Plainfield

Nominating, Sustainers: Charlon Clark

October 30, 2013 Furman Family Sends in Memorabilia

Sandy Furman sent her last two garden club photos and for the first time, we have a nice photo of Shirley Clark Barnhart '48.

October 29, 2013

Sandy Furman has sent in four more photos from her mother's momentos and they are worth taking a peek. She included a 1970 photo with three other PGC members: Dodie Roome; Betty Fitzpatrick; and Sally's mom, Dot Genung! UPDATE: Sally has just written to say that is not her mother . . . can anyone identify the lady in the white dress? Click here.

Also hilarious are two photos of Mrs. Furman dressed up for that crazy period-costume 1962 bake sale at the Drake house.

October 28, 2013

Another family contacts the PGC! Mrs. Furman's daughter has just stumbled across the website and was thrilled to see her mother's virtual scrapbook and has added to it – including a great photograph! See: Mrs. Gerald S. (Victoria Houck) Furman '62.

Mrs. Furman is particularly important to the PGC as it was she who wrote the incredible 50th Anniversary History in 1965. Betty Hackman had shared her copy and it is this document that began the research project into the 250-plus former members of the Club.

When informed of this huge contribution, Mrs. Furman's daughter was not surprised for it seems Mrs. Furman was a well known published author. She is most famous for penning a book on sleep-away camp titled Five in a Tent. It remains a childhood favorite for many.

So it is no wonder that the 50th Anniversary History is so well done – it was written by a published free lancer (Mrs. Furman) and illustrated by the well known artist and PGC member, Mrs. Acomb.

June 1, 1953 Garden Club of New Jersey Roadside Council

May 14, 1983 Centennial The Wardlaw Hartridge School

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

Club History by Anne Marie v. G. Seybold

1984-1985 History of the Plainfield Garden Club by Anne Marie v. G. Seybold

Program

Mrs. Eric Pfefferkorn and Mrs. Noah Barnhart demonstrated their successful skill in "Growing Under Lights" and "Hydroponics."

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

February 24, 2015 Email from Anne Morrell Shepherd

In answer to your email. Mrs Irons was a friend of my grand mothers, Mrs Helen Flanders a friend of my aunt, Helen Clark, Ruth Clark Bird's (ex President of PGC and my cousin). mother. I knew of Helen Flanders. She was a single mother ( divorced or widower I don't know.) She had daughters, maybe five. I remember this because one year two or maybe three were married within months of each other. The bridesmaids wore the same green velvet dresses to each of the weddings adorned with different head pieces and different colored flowers. One was at Christmas with red flowers, one in February with red and white flowers and valentine shaped head pieces. I am sure there was a third but don't remember the color theme.
One of the daughters lived in Montpelier, Vt. in 1949 or 50 and had me over for supper. I was at Vermont College in Montpelier. Mrs. Helen Flanders lived on the north side of Watchung Ave. between Hillside and Woodland. I can picture the house but don't know number My grandmother (Ruth Lounsbery) loved to attend weddings. In those days church weddings were open to any church member and she would take me along.

November 30, 2015 Missing Portrait

November 30, 2015

Another art mystery to be solved!

We received an email today from a descendant of the Stevens family in search of an elusive portrait painted by famed PGC member Geraldine Acomb.

If you do not know about Mrs. Acomb, please take a moment and look through our scrapbook about this very talented member: Acomb, Mrs. Frederick G. (Geraldine de M. Goutiere) '62

According to the email [See Below] Mrs. Acomb painted a mother-daughter portrait of one of the many Stevens' women. One could say that the PGC was built on the foundations of the Stevens clan. Here are all the members that we know of from that family:

Stevens, Mrs. Horace N. (Helen Coburn) '15
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P.") (Edna Ten Broeck) '15
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P."), Jr. (Edith Stevens) '37
Stevens, Mrs. Robert Ten Broeck (Dorothy Goodwin Whitney) '37
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15
Barnhart, Mrs. N. Chisholm, Jr. (Shirley Clark) '48
Griswold, Mrs. Merton Lyman (Mary Victoria "Vic" Stevens), Jr. '44

If any of you would know where to search for this painting or whom to ask, please write in to plainfieldgc@gmail.com

To read about the last painting we found for someone in 2014: Barlow, Mrs. DeWitt Dukes (Mary Lee Brewer), Jr. '65

Email Received from Edward Stevens Gottfried:

I am contacting you as I see the Plainfield Garden Club has a rather extensive posting about the works of one of its late members, Geraldine Acomb. My mother was lucky enough to inherit the portrait Mrs. Acomb painted of my grandmother, and she recently told me that there was a second, later portrait that Mrs. Acomb painted of my grandmother and aunt which was never sold to the family but was instead exhibited. I'm trying to track it down in the hopes of either purchasing it as a gift for my aunt, or (if that is not possible), to have it photographed. Is there any chance that you have a record of the painting, or any other information regarding Mrs. Acomb's works which might lead me in the right direction? Is there any record of her children, so that I might contact them?

For what it's worth, my grandmother was Mrs. Christina Stevens (née Schmidt), and, so far as the family can remember, the portrait was of her and my aunt, Helen Stevens, and was likely taken sometime in the mid-1960's. I figure this is a long shot, but certainly worth a try!

Sincerely,
Edward Stevens Gottfried


UPDATE: November 30, 2015 Email from Rick Detwiller

Hello PGC,

I don't know where the Stevens' portrait might be, but attached is the portrait of my mother Catherine Campbell Detwiller by Gerry Acomb that I promised to send back in 2012. Apparently you already have the photo of her with the portrait taken when she was 96. She is now living in Westwood, MA, going on 100 and just celebrated Thanksgiving with us all at our brother Chip's house in Groton MA.

Regards,

Rick D.

Detwiller, Mrs. Charles Henry (Catherine or "Cath" Campbell), Jr. '57