Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Stevens, Mrs. Horace Nathaniel (Helen Coburn) '15

1919 Address: 1415 Prospect Avenue, Plainfield

1922 Address: 1415 Prospect Avenue, Plainfield

1928 Treasurer Book April 15th $5.00
1929 Treasurer Book Active April $5.00
1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936 Treasurer Book Active

1932 Directory* Address: 1415 Prospect Avenue
* = This directory is not dated but presumed to be from the year 1932.

1937 Treasurer Book: Mrs. Horace N. Stevens 1/11/37 Pd. Transferred Dec. 11

1937 Treasurer Book, under "Associate": Mrs. John P. Stevens 1/8/37 Pd.

[Listed under her name in a different ink is "Mrs. Horace N. Stevens"

1938 Treasurer Book, Associate: Mrs. Horace N. Stevens 1/11/38 Pd 1/14/39 Pd.

1940 - 1941 Treasurer Book, under "Active": Mrs. Horace N. Stevens 1/9/41 Pd. with a note in the margin "trans. Nov. 1940"

1940 - 1941 Treasurer Book, under "Associate": Mrs. Horace N. Stevens 2/13/40 Pd. Her name is crossed out.

1941 - 1942 - 1943 Treasurer Book, under "Active": Mrs. Horace N. Stevens 11/28/41 Pd. Her name is crossed out and in the margin it is written "ass"

1941 - 1942 - 1943 Treasurer Book, Associate: Mrs. Horace N. Stevens 12/28/42 Pd. 11/23/43 Pd. 11/27/44 Pd. 12/4/45 May 14, 1946 May 19, 1947 May 27, 1948 June 23, 1949 May 29, 1950 May 1951 June 1952

Helen C. Stevens passed away in 1956.

Mrs. Horace N. Stevens (Helen Coburn) '15 daughter is Mrs. Merton (Mary Vic) Griswold '44

Other Stevens relatives include:

Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P.") '15
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P."), Jr. (Edith S.) '37
Stevens, Mrs. Robert T. '37, '47

1909 Plainfield Directory

Stevens, Horace N, h. 945 Hillside Av
Stevens, John P, h. 985 Hillside Av

Mrs. Horace N. Stevens '15

photo circa 1950

Mrs. Horace N. Stevens '15

back of photo

Monday Afternoon Club

Mrs. Horace N. Stevens, President 1917 - 1930

Mr. and Mrs. Horace N. (Helen Coburn) Stevens, Plainfield, NJ

Victoria Griswold

Essex Chambers Music Players: http://www.ecmp.org/players.html

Grandaughter of Mrs. Horace N. (Helen) Stevens '15
Daughter of member Mrs. Merton Griswold '44

Victoria Griswold, Pianist

Victoria Griswold is a classical pianist who has concertized in Europe and Brazil. At her debut recital in New York City, a reviewer from the New York Times characterized her as "an elegant pianist." She received her Bachelor and Master of Music degrees from Manhattan School of Music, and her principal teachers include the late William Nelson of Carleton College, Zenon Fishbein at the Manhattan School of Music, and Jeaneane Dowis in New York City and the Aspen Music Festival. She has recorded several new works for piano and orchestra by William Thomas McKinley' on the MMC label, including Wind, Fire and Ice; Silent Whispers; and Mostly Mozart.

Her musical background includes appearances as solo recitalist; soloist with orchestra; chamber pianist; pianist and Music Director for professional musical theatre productions; Music Director and harpsichordist for Ars Musica Antiqua, an early music ensemble; and as church organist. She also served as staff accompanist at Jersey City State College for six years.

Ms. Griswold taught piano for 30 years in her private studio, and has adjudicated for many young people's competitions and auditions sponsored by such organizations as the New Jersey Symphony, the Music Educators Association of New Jersey, the Piano Teachers Congress of New York, and the New Jersey Music Teachers Association.

Victoria Griswold is also the owner of the Plainfield (NJ) Music store, a retail establishment specializing in printed music.

She is the granddaughter of Horace N. Stevens.

Mrs. Stevens daughter, born 1916 Helen Coburn Stevens

http://capecodhistory.us/genealogy/wellfleet/i4712.htm

Entry shows Mrs. Horace N. (Helen Coburn) Stevens was born June 5, 1877

Horace N. Stevens

http://www.wickedlocal.com/northandover/town_info/history/x1909893785

North Andover – The late 1800s was a simpler time.
A $5 gold piece from Grandma was a ceremonious event, school baseball games meant the world, and the new coffee flavor "seemed the height of ice cream bliss."

It was also a time when loved ones contracted typhoid and scarlet fever and when travel in New England's winter meant facing dangerous elements.

Music and history lovers can experience the past at North Parish Church this Sunday, Oct. 21, 2:30 p.m., with the premiere of "Growing Up in North Andover (1874-1892)," the memoirs of Horace N. Stevens set to music performed by The Essex Chamber Music Players.

The overall program, entitled "A Glimpse of Local History," will also include Harold Shapero's "Whittier Songs," featuring five John Greenleaf Whittier poems with music, in celebration of the bicentennial of the Haverhill poet's birth.

North Andover Historical Society President Kathy Stevens said her grandfather's memoirs for the "Growing Up" piece chronicle his life in the Old Center.

"He was in his 70s looking back [during the 1940s]," she said. "These are the things that stood out most in his memory."

Kathy Stevens lives in the 83 Academy Road home her grandfather, born in 1874, and his five half-siblings were raised in. At the time, Academy Road was known as Prospect Street.

In his memoirs, he recounts being home schooled on the third floor of the home with his sisters Fan and Sue and several neighbors.

"We played and played, and had not a care in the world," he wrote.

Another carefree time was Thanksgiving at his grandmother's house at what is today 140 Academy Road. The occasion included 50 guests and five scrumptious kinds of pie.

Stevens also described more trying times, in particular his father's death from scarlet fever, which left his young mother to raise six children on her own. She started a small farm on the property and Stevens' memoirs are in part a tribute to his mother's strength as a single mother.

His own bout with typhoid fever and a frightening sleigh ride home during the Blizzard of 1888 are also included in the narration.

Stevens attended Andover's Phillips Academy. Following graduation he went to work for his older brother John's company, J.P. Stevens & Company, in New York. Capt. Nathaniel Stevens, Horace and John's grandfather, had founded Nathanial Stevens and Son mill in 1813 on what's now Stevens Street and was the first to produce flannel in the U.S.

The company eventually merged with J.P. Stevens & Company in 1948 and the headquarters moved to New York.

Stevens returned from New York often to visit his sisters Kate and Fan in their family home.

A piece of local history
The idea for the memoir's music score came after Victoria Griswold, Kathy Stevens' cousin, discovered her grandfather's typewritten memoirs in her mother's house.

Griswold, a pianist and music storeowner, grew up a couple blocks away from Horace Stevens in New Jersey, where he lived out the rest of his life.

"He had his own study on the third floor," she said. "We were always told not to disturb him. Little did we know he was probably writing these memoirs!"

Griswold retyped the worn pages and sent a copy to her friend, world-renowned composer William T. McKinley. At the time she only intended to share a bit of regional history with the Reading resident. In no time, he'd written music for a series of vignettes pulled from the 80-page memoir.

McKinley has written several pieces for Griswold to perform on piano with orchestras, which count among his 350 works to date, and owns label MMC (Master Musicians Collective) that records the music of living composers, some that might not otherwise be heard.

Griswold will perform McKinley's challenging piece on piano Sunday with The Essex Chamber Music Players. The composition will also feature flute, violin, cello, percussion and a male narrator.

"The beauty of the piece is how well he writes the music for the narration," said ECMP Artistic Director and Northern Essex College music professor Michael Finegold, who'll play flute. "He weaves in American patriot and folks songs in a subtle way that adds to the passage."

McKinley has arranged a recording of the piece immediately following the concert for archival purposes. There's also a possibility of recording the song on CD in the future.

Kathy Stevens is just excited the piece will be performed in North Parish Church, which her grandfather attended as a boy.

"We will be hearing his actual words in a space where he actually was," she says.

In the near future, she thinks the Historical Society should start an initiative to collect family stories like hers.

"I love local history – it's so personal," she said. "I'm sure there are other people who have the same kind of stories to share."

Copyright 2007 North Andover Citizen. Some rights reserved

Horace N. Stevens and his brother, John Stevens, founder of JP Stevens

1415 Prospect Avenue Stevens Residence; Architect John P. Benson

From Plainfield, New Jersey's History & Architecture by John Grady and Dorothe Pollard

When the J. P. Stevens Co. moved its offices to New York City, Horace Stevens relocated his family to Plainfield and had John Benson design this massive Shingle Style house for his family on Prospect Avenue. Courtesy of Mary Vic Griswold

The Horace Stevens family pose in the garden of their Prospect Avenue home. Seated are Horace Nathaniel and Hele Coburn Stevens with their three children: Helen, Nathaniel, and Mary Vic. Courtesy of Mary Vic Griswold.

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Von Boskerck

1415 Prospect Avenue, Plainfield

Property Description: February 17, 2011
Elegant Center hall colonial built by modest millionaire in 1911. lovingly maintained and updated throughout.Features 22 rooms, 7 plus bedrooms, 6 fireplaces, 6 1/2 baths, in-law suite w/handicap access. full bath & kitchenette.Maids quarters w/ 2 ...

Resource

$1,200,000
7 Bedrooms
6 Bathrooms
Residential

Hillside Cemetery

September 14, 2011
Photo by S. Fraser

Horace Nathaniel Stevens plot is in another corner of the cemetery, away from his brother John Peters ("J.P.") Stevens, Jr. Horace and J.P.'s parents are reportedly buried at West Point.

1956 Check Book

No. 1198
Garden Club of America
memorial to Mrs. Horace Stevens
$5.00

1920 Muhlenberg Hospital Womens Auxiliary

Mrs. H. N. Stevens
1415 Prospect Avenue

1915 - 1923 Book: Meetings of The Plainfield Garden Club

PAGE ONE

1915

Oct 23 Mrs. H. N. Stevens
Mr. Oltr Harlow, "Care of Gardens"

1915 - 1923 List of Meetings

1925 Meeting Minutes

1936 - 1937 Meeting Minutes

1918 Meeting Minutes

1919 Meeting Minutes

1920 Meeting Minutes

Mrs. Stevens

March 25, 2013 Martie Samek assists the Club in editing the Stevens Family history

Much discussion was had regarding the very well known Stevens family. Bob Fahrenholtz said the original J.P. Stevens and his wife were buried at West Point and did not know why. Bill Shepherd and Carter Booth remembered that he had served as Secretary of Defense and that his probably why he is buried there. Perhaps there is some confusion...Robert T Stevens, brother of JPStevens, JR., husband of Dorothy Whitney Stevens, was Secretary of the Army under Eisenhower. I have checked the internet and can find no evidence that any Stevens was Secretary of Defense. This cabinet position seems to have come into existence in the 1940's.

A quick Google search found that it was JP Stevens' (senior's) son, Robert, who served as Secretary of the Army. (He was famous for standing up to Senator Joseph McCarthy) Bob Fahrenholtz reported that not too many were buried within the mausoleum. (We always thought that JPStevens, Jr's ashes were buried on the property on Woodland Avenue...Not certain of this, however.) Horace N. Steven's family (a brother to JP Stevens) Senior? is buried in another corner of the Hillside Cemetery.

JPStevens Jr. (husband of Edith) was a civilian general during WWII. He was very proud of this. Many prominent manufacturers whose companies aided in the war effort attained the title. Robert Wood Johnson was one of these. He was always referred to as General Johnson when my husband Ed worked at J and J. Jack Stevens dropped the honorific but always enjoyed sharing stories about his part and the part of the JPStevens company in the war effort.

Edith and Jack moved to their house, an old farm house, on Woodland Avenue at the time of their marriage. As their family grew, they expanded it to fit their needs. They spent their entire married life there. One room, the living room, is especially memorable because it was designed by a famous architect (whose name I no longer remember) and supposedly had the most perfect proportions and was often photographed.

Jack's brother Robert and his wife Dorothy lived next door in the house now owned by Dr. John Ferrante and his wife Mary. Karen and Tom Shea live in the Jack Stevens house. I think it is correct that the senior Stevens built their house on Woodland Avenue after Jack and Edith owned theirs. The Stevens eventually owned most of the land on Woodland Avenue. They farmed it and supplied jobs to many young Plainfield men. As well, they were proud that the farm provided food for many in the area during WWII. We purchased the land on which we built our house from Jack and Edith in 1976.

I am curious about the senior Stevens being buried at West Point....Because Robert Stevens was Secretary of the Army, it makes sense that it was he and his wife who were buried at West Point, not the senior Stevens. Not much history that I can find about them, but I think the senior Mr. Stevens was mainly focused on running the Stevens company.

Hope this is not more than you wanted to know!

Martie


Secretary of the Army:
ROBERT T. STEVENS. Served in the Army in World War I, and during World War II in the Office of the Quartermaster General. With J. P. Stevens and Company, Inc., 1921-1942, 1945-1 953.
Secretary of the Army, 4 February 1953-20 July 1955.

January 26, 1953 Time Magazine Article about JP Stevens' Son, Robert. His wife Dorothy was a member of the PGC. They lived on Woodland Avenue. Their son Whitney...Dorothy's maiden name... was CEO of the Stevens Textile Company for many years.

A tougher case than Wilson's is that of Robert Ten Broeck Stevens, a textile manufacturer, who was appointed Secretary of the Army. His firm, J. P. Stevens & Co. of New York City, does a third (about $125 million a year) of its business with the Defense Department, mostly in cloth for uniforms. It is a family firm. If he sold his stock, management might pass to other hands, the firm might have to be completely reorganized, with consequences that would extend far beyond any personal sacrifice Stevens might have to make. The Stevens firm, however, sells to the Government on the basis of competitive bids, while General Motors has a number of large development contracts and other dealings in which discretion is necessarily in the hands of Government officials and finally in the hands of the Secretary of Defense himself.

1915 Meeting Minutes

Plainfield Garden Club
Minutes of regular meetings
May 12, 1915 to March 20, 1918
From its origination

May 12 – 1915

Minutes of the 1st General Meeting

First general meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club was held at the home of Mrs. Conner on Wednesday, May 12th at 3.30 o'clock.

President in the chair. Roll call showed 39 members present.

During the meeting rain began to fall to everyones regret making a tour of Mrs. Conner's garden impossible.

A few ? of congratulations on the formation of the Club by the President was followed by some notices given, and request to have members offer to exchange plants when possible.

We then listened to a most comprehensive talk on perennials given by Mr. Maurice Field of New York which was greatly enjoyed and appreciated by the members. He brought specimens of many plants showing how to divide and separate grubs and other garden enemies.

Continued.

All felt stimulated and helped by his talk and as the rain prevented us from going in the garden his lecture of two hours ?? too long.

After a cup of tea the meeting adjourned.

Ella M. Gilbert Secy
Approved.


May 26, 1915

Minutes of the 2nd General Meeting

Second general meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club was held at the home of Mrs. Barrows on Wed. May 26th at 3 oclock.

President in the Chair.

Roll call showed 33 members present.

Minutes of previous meeting were read and approved.

Giving to the inclement conditions of the weather the meeting was held indoors. ?? later on the sun came out and a visit to the garden was enjoyed by all.

Mrs. E. Yarde Breeze of Raritan ? Garden Club gave a very delightful paper on foreign gardens.

A letter was read from Mrs. W. S. Tyler giving notice of sale of garden things for the benefit of a young boy that she and some others were especially interested in.

It was noted ?? bring out of town guests and the Hostess. Plainfield friends After enjoying the hospitality of the hostess tea being served the meeting adjourned.

Ella M. Gilbert secy
Approved


June 2 – 1915

Minutes of the 3rd general meeting

The third general meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club was held in the garden of Mrs. Dumont on Wednesday June 9th at three oclock.

The president in the chair.

Roll call showed 25 members present. Minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved.

Miss R. E. Zimmerman of Brooklyn gave a most interesting and helpful talk in "L?? garden flowers."

It was noted to have a "Bird talk" during the year and also to have Mr. Maurice Field give a course of lectures during our next season beginning in April.

It was a most glorious June day and the garden most beautiful which was enjoyed and appreciated by those present who strolled about among the flowers. Tea was served in the tea house. The meeting then adjourned.

Ella M. Gibert Secy
Approved

June 23 -1915

Minutes of the 4th general meeting

The fourth general meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club was held in the garden of Mrs. Runkle, on Wednesday June 23rd at 3 oclock.

The president in the chair.

Roll call showed 25 members present.

Minutes of the former meeting were read and approved.

Mrs. L. A. Brown of Shedvira?? Garden Club Garden City L. I. read a most useful and interesting paper on color harmony in gardens she also answered very pleasantly all questions asked regarding plants and flowers.


July 14 – 1915

Minutes of the 5th General Meeting of the Garden Club was held on July 14 in the garden of Mrs. Fleming.

The day was a perfect summer one and we were addressed by Mr. L. V. F. Randolph who read an original paper on "What Some Plants Feel and Think."

An interesting discussion followed after which we took a stroll in Mrs. Fleming's charming garden and then were refreshed with fruit punch and cakes served under a ?? on the lawn. After a delightful afternoon meeting adjourned.


Ella M. Gilbert Secy
Per H. B. H.


September 15 – 1915

Minutes of the 5th General Meeting of the Garden Club

A regular meeting of the Garden Club was held at the delightful farm of Mrs. Eaton on Valley Road, on Wednesday, Sept. 15th. The President presiding.

In the absence of the Secy, Mrs. Patterson called the roll and heard the minutes of the last regular meeting. The Pres. Welcomed the members of the Club after the separation of the summer & suggested that some slight expression of gratitude for the please we had enjoyed at the Garden Club meetings or shown by a gift of 100 glasses of jelly to the Fruit & Flower ?ision. This idea was approved by the members present in that 2 glasses of fruit jelly from each member may be sent to the house of the Pres. For this purpose. A letter was read from Mr. Chester Jay Hunt extending a warm invitation to the Garden Club to visit his tulip gardens next spring and make a picnic of the day there. We then listened to a delightful talk on "Roses" by Mr. Geo. H. Peterson of Fair Lawn, N. J. and were afterwards ?? with fruit punch and cakes in an arbor on the grounds.

A visit to the farm buildings & flower garden brought to a ?? a delightful day.

Ella M. Gilbert Secy
From H. B. H.


September 22 – 1915

Minutes of the 7th General Meeting of the Garden Club

A regular meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club was held at the Bungalow of Mrs. Mellick on Wednesday Sept. 22nd at three o'clock.

Mrs. E. J. Patterson acting as Sec'y in the absence of Mrs. Gilbert.

The afternoon was given up to a talk on "Birds in Our Gardens" by Mr. Bucher S. Bowdish – Secty v ?? of the ?? State Audubon Society of was felt greatly moved by the pleasure of Mrs. William Dra??? Who has done so much for the conservation of Bird Life in America. The Club was entertained delightfully by Mrs. Mellick after which we adjourned.

Ella M. Gilbert – Secy
Per H. B. H.


Oct 13 – 1915

Minutes of the 8th General Meeting of the Garden Club

A regular meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club was held at the residence of Mrs. H. N. Stevens on Wednesday Oct 13th at 3 o'clock. Pres. In chair. After roll call & minutes of last meeting read to approved, a letter was read from our lecturer on "Birds" of the meeting before. Minutes were approved by two of the members. The day was like one in June and all enjoyed the interchange of ideas and the informal talk of our garden troubles. The lecturer of the day was Mr. Otto Shilow Sec'y & Treas. Of the Duer ? Co. who gave us a most instructive and helpful talk on "the care of our gardens." All had so many questions to ask that after a long ?? it was difficult for Mr. Shilow to get a cup of tea before his departure for Philadelphia.

All expressed the wish that we might have the pleasure of having him again. After a social gathering about Mrs. Stevens tea table, the club adjourned.

Ella M. Gilbert, Secy
Per H. B. H.


NOTE: This next entry follows in the order the Meeting Minute notebook was photographed, however the date is "1916" – not sure if this entry is from 1916 or was not recorded correctly as "1915" which seems unlikely.


Oct. 27, 1916

Minutes of the 9th General Meeting of the Garden Club

A regular meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club was held at the residence of Mrs. E. T. Barrows on Wednesday Oct. 24? At 3 o'clock.

The Pres. In the chair. After the roll call and the minutes of the previous meeting read & approved, the Pres. Brought up the subject of the mid winter lecture, to be held in the evening and for which an admission should be charged.

After some discussion it was decided to have Mr. Shilow give his illustrated lecture "Flowers From Snow to Snow" admission to be 50 center and each member to be responsible for two tickets.

The time and place was left to be determined.

The Pres. Expressed our great sorrow in the death of Mrs. Louis Hyde – the members of the Club all standing and moved that a note of condolence be sent to Mr. Hyde and his family.

The Pres. Announced that Mrs. Ackerman and Mrs. Ivins had provided a lecture from Mr. Field for the . . . instead of having a meeting of their homes this year. He then spoke to us on "Bulbs.: Late in the afternoon tea was served & the meeting adjourned.

Lucy Van Boskerck
Secy pro tem

1915 - 1918 Meeting Minutes

First Unitarian Society of Plainfield

Our Facilities
The sanctuary of our church was built in 1892 and is the oldest Unitarian Church in New Jersey. The architect was O.M. Teale, and the design featured rusticated stone, multiple windows, turrets, and towers placed asymmetrically.
In 1929 the internationally known Norwegian artist Jonas Lie (1880-1940) painted a mural in an arched space above the pulpit. The mural is entitled "I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills".
In 1947 the Robinson Window was installed. This large stained-glass window was designed under the direction of Cateau DeLeeuw and crafted by Oliver Smith of Philadelphia. It faces Park Avenue and is named in memory of the Reverend Alson H. Robinson.
In response to a growing congregation, a connecting Parish Hall was added to the church in 1925. It was designed by Josiah T. Tubby, an architect and one of the society's members. The Parish Hall features a large room with a high ceiling, a stage, offices and kitchen. For a while the Parish Hall was used as a meeting place for a Public Forum. Many well known speakers were heard. Amateur theatricals were held and continue today.

In 1958 another large addition was made to the church, the Stevens Wing, consisting of two floors of classrooms and meeting rooms. This addition extends northwesterly from the Parish Hall. At its farthest end is the Stevens Room, named after prominent member Helen Coburn Stevens. It opens out into the yard and a Memorial Garden.

The First Unitarian Society of Plainfield, N.J. was incorporated August 26, 1889 and, some three years later, the Reverend Hobert Clark christened the building All Souls's Church on May 11, 1892. As of December 11, 2009 All Soul's Church has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The reference number for All Souls is 09001078.

Plainfield, NJ Courier-News, Monday, February 10, 1958

DEDICATION – Taking part in dedication ceremonies of the Helen Coburn Stevens Room in the First Unitarian Church yesterday were (left to right) E. Stanley Go?dman, society president; Horace E. Bunker, past president; Peter Griswold, Mrs. Stevens' grandson, who unveiled the plaque; the Rev. M. Mortimer G???ner Jr., ???, and the Rev. Nicholas C. Cardell Jr. (Courier Photo by E. T. Wiggins)

Unitarians Dedicate Addition

The newly completed addition to the First Unitarian parish house was dedicated yesterday in connection with the morning service. Followig the service, plaques were dedicated in the Church School vestibule and in the Helen Coburn Stevens room, a meeting room named for the late Mrs. Horace N. Stevens who was long active in the church.

The Rev. N Mortimer G??? Jr. minister, delivered the sermon and conducted the act of dedication. He was assisted in the service by the Rev. Nicholas Cardell Jr. associate minister.

The dedicatory plaque in the Church School was unveiled by Mary Lee Doyle, representing the Church School students. The plaque bears the name of the building's architect, Harry K?? White, a member of the church.

The plaque in the Helen Coburn Stevens room was unveiled by Peter Griswold, grandson of Mrs. Stevens. The plaque states: "This room is dedicated by the congregation in loving memory of Helen Coburn Stevens, a warmly devoted member. February 1958."

Mrs. Winifred Linke was chairman of the dedication committee. The reception which followed the ceremonies was in charge of Mrs. Edward Meagher.

First meeting of the Church school classes in the new classrooms will take place next Sunday.

Stevens Room West

Stevens Room North

Stevens Room East

Rose Window

Rose Window (Stevens)
The Rose Window is in memory of Horace N. Stevens who died in 1951 and who for many years was a leader and benefactor of our Society. He was the donor of the Stevens Fellowship [scholarships to encourage and enable people to join the ministry]; one of the first Stevens Fellows, Rev. Nicholas Cardell, became our minister in 1961.

As with the stained glass window on the east wall, there is much symbolism in the Stevens window. It was designed by artist Riva Halfond Barrett, a beloved member of our society. On the Arts and Memorials Committee with Riva were Virginia Goldman, who now resides on Cape Cod, and the late Cateau DeLeeuw, who designed the Robinson Memorial window and chaired the Arts and Memorials Committee at that time. Both windows were executed by Oliver Smith of Philadelphia.

Horace Stevens was a rose fancier. He was a good and generous friend of the Unitarian Service Committee, an organization well known in the many countries where representatives of the committee have served. He was also committed to the philosophy of brotherhood and sisterhood and the universality of mankind's religious experience.

The artist has combined in the window the colors of the many roses in the Stevens garden, and the flaming chalice of the U.S.C. symbolizing the holy oil of helpfulness and sacrifice spreading warmth and life. The clasped hands of man and woman extending across the earth, the planets in their orbits, the signs of Yin and Yang – all symbolize the feeling of brotherhood this man had for all people.
[Written by Victoria Long, 1989]

Helen Coburn Stevens Whitlock

ID: I25877
Name: Helen Coburn Stevens
Sex: F
Birth: 3 Jul 1916 in Plainfield, New Jersey
Death: 5 Jan 2006 in Eastham, Massachusetts
Note:
Father: Horace Nathaniel STEVENS b: 3 AUG 1874
Mother: Helen COBURN b: 5 JUN 1877
(Peter Whitlock, :357501)
–––––––––––––––
Provincetown Banner obit
Helen C. ŮSBobsieŮT (Stevens) Whitlock, 90

Social worker helped found APCC & Cape bird club

Helen C. ŮSBobsieŮT (Stevens) Whitlock, 90, of Eastham, died Jan. 5, at her home in Eastham. She was married to Herbert E. Whitlock for 31 years until his death in 1998.

Born and raised in Plainfield, N.J., she was the daughter of the late Horace N. & Helen (Coburn) Stevens. She attended the Hartridge School for Girls in Plainfield and graduated from Smith College in Northampton in 1938 after having spent her junior year in Florence, Italy. Having developed a fascination with art and color, she attended Cambridge School of Design and the Boston Museum School of Art studying painting, drawing and design from 1947 to 1951. In 1958 she graduated from Rutgers University in New Jersey with a masterŮus degree in social work.

She married Herbert E. Whitlock in 1963 and they retired to Eastham in 1967.

Mrs. Whitlock was very active in community affairs. She started the Cape Cod Bird Club in 1972 with her friend Miriam Rowell. She served as board president for one year of Cape Cod Family & Children Service, an organization she helped develop in 1974. She was also a board member of Cape Cod Community Council for six years and the United Way Allocations Committee for three years. She served on the Ministerial Fellowship Committee of the Unitarian-Universalist Association for three years. She was a founding member of the Nauset Fellowship of the UUA of Eastham since its beginning in 1978, and she also served on the Interfaith Council for the Homeless of lower Cape Cod.

Her long and fruitful life was punctuated by her continual interest in the field of social work, her constant love of various art forms, especially pottery and monotype printing. In addition, she was an enthusiastic supporter of the conservation of the natural environment through the Association for the Preservation of Cape Cod, which was started in her living room by her husband and several other concerned Cape residents.

She is survived by her stepson, Ian Whitlock, and his wife Marianne of Kennett Square, Pa.; her grandchildren, Peter Whitlock of Eastham and Erika Whitlock Smith of Fort Myers, Fla.; her sister, Mary V. Griswold of Plainfield, N.J.; two nephews, Peter Griswold and Nathaniel Stevens, and seven nieces, Ann Griswold, Vicky Griswold, Kathy Freeman, Jennifer Dunmire, Cornelia Harris, Judy Weherer and Beth Stevens.

Services for Mrs. Whitlock will be private. If desired, contributions in her memory may be made to the Association to Preserve Cape Cod, P.O. Box 398, Barnstable, MA 02630. Arrangements are under the direction of the Gately-McHoul Funeral Home of Provincetown.

July 27, 2013 Pot made by Mary Vic Griswold

Bernice has another interesting blog: A Garden Cutie

When describing her pretty floral container, Bernice writes: "The very small pot was created by Mary Vic Griswold, who was a potter as well as a philanthropist and is remembered very fondly by many Plainfielders."

Mary Vic Stevens Griswold was a member of the PGC and part of the large Stevens clan. Mary Vic's mother (founding member), aunt (founding member) and cousin-in-law were all notable members of The Club.

Other Stevens relatives/PGC members (also notable!)included:
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15 (aunt)
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm, Jr. (Shirley Clark) '48 (cousin-in-law)
Stevens, Mrs. Robert Ten Broeck (Dorothy Goodwin Whitney) '37 (cousin-in-law)

January 11, 2007 Helen C. "Bobsie" (Stevens) Whitlock Obituary

Helen C. "Bobsie" (Stevens) Whitlock, 90

Social worker helped found APCC & Cape bird club

Helen C. "Bobsie" (Stevens) Whitlock, 90, of Eastham, died Jan. 5, at her home in Eastham. She was married to Herbert E. Whitlock for 31 years until his death in 1998.

Born and raised in Plainfield, N.J., she was the daughter of the late Horace N. & Helen (Coburn) Stevens. She attended the Hartridge School for Girls in Plainfield and graduated from Smith College in Northampton in 1938 after having spent her junior year in Florence, Italy. Having developed a fascination with art and color, she attended Cambridge School of Design and the Boston Museum School of Art studying painting, drawing and design from 1947 to 1951. In 1958 she graduated from Rutgers University in New Jersey with a master's degree in social work.

She married Herbert E. Whitlock in 1963 and they retired to Eastham in 1967.

Mrs. Whitlock was very active in community affairs. She started the Cape Cod Bird Club in 1972 with her friend Miriam Rowell. She served as board president for one year of Cape Cod Family & Children Service, an organization she helped develop in 1974. She was also a board member of Cape Cod Community Council for six years and the United Way Allocations Committee for three years. She served on the Ministerial Fellowship Committee of the Unitarian-Universalist Association for three years. She was a founding member of the Nauset Fellowship of the UUA of Eastham since its beginning in 1978, and she also served on the Interfaith Council for the Homeless of lower Cape Cod.

Her long and fruitful life was punctuated by her continual interest in the field of social work, her constant love of various art forms, especially pottery and monotype printing. In addition, she was an enthusiastic supporter of the conservation of the natural environment through the Association for the Preservation of Cape Cod, which was started in her living room by her husband and several other concerned Cape residents.

She is survived by her stepson, Ian Whitlock, and his wife Marianne of Kennett Square, Pa.; her grandchildren, Peter Whitlock of Eastham and Erika Whitlock Smith of Fort Myers, Fla.; her sister, Mary V. Griswold of Plainfield, N.J.; two nephews, Peter Griswold and Nathaniel Stevens, and seven nieces, Ann Griswold, Vicky Griswold, Kathy Freeman, Jennifer Dunmire, Cornelia Harris, Judy Weherer and Beth Stevens.

Services for Mrs. Whitlock will be private. If desired, contributions in her memory may be made to the Association to Preserve Cape Cod, P.O. Box 398, Barnstable, MA 02630. Arrangements are under the direction of the Gately-McHoul Funeral Home of Provincetown.

Ancestory.com

John Peters Stevens
Found 10 Records, 9 Photos and 2,727,042 Family Trees
Born in Plainfield, New Jersey, USA on 2 Feb 1868 to Horace Nathaniel Stevens and Susan Elizabeth Peters. John Peters married Adna Ten Broeck and had a child. He passed away on 27 Oct 1929.
Family Members

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

1330 Highland Avenue April 2008 Greg Palermo's Tree Blog

Hillside Historic District

August 29, 2015

Hillside Historic District has announced a new website: http://hillsideavenuedistrict.com

They have neatly listed the homes in the district in a similar fashion to our Homes & Gardens page.

It is no exaggeration to say that the PGC helped build Hillside. In fact our first club meeting took place at Mrs. Connor's home at 999 Hillside. Take a look at our PGC Hillside Historic District resident members:

807 Hillside Avenue
Browne, Miss Elizabeth B. '37

810 Hillside Avenue
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15

816 Hillside Avenue
Zerega, Miss Bertha Virginia '23

817 Hillside Avenue
Lawton, Mrs. Richard M. (Edith Clarke) '21

832 Hillside Avenue
Yates, Mrs. Frederick Washburn (Bertha Kedzie Cornwell) '15

921 Hillside Avenue
Detwiller, Miss Laura Cecelia '29
Detwiller, Mrs. Charles H. (Catherine or "Cath" Campbell), Jr. '57

922 Hillside Avenue
Atterbury, Mrs. Albert Hoffman (Emma H. Baker) '15

930 Hillside Avenue
Corey, Mrs. Ella J. '15

937 Hillside Avenue
Hunn, Mrs. John T. Sharpless (Hope Ivins) '37
Ivins, Mrs. DeWitt Clinton (Louise Morton Fox) '15
Ivins, Mrs. Clinton Fox (Marguerite Carpenter) '33

945 Hillside Avenue
Stevens, Mrs. Horace N. (Helen Coburn) '15

950 Hillside Avenue
Harlow, Mrs. Edward Dexter (Elise Cochran Martin) '15
Martin, Mrs. Francis A. (Mary Keech Turner) '22

955 Hillside Avenue
Wallace, Mrs. Frederick W. (Grace Seccomb) '15
deForest, Mrs. Henry Lockwood (Amy Brighthurst Brown) '33

966 Hillside Avenue
Warren, Mrs. Frank D. '15

970 Hillside Avenue
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15
Kroll, Mrs. Alexander (Nancy Dwinnell or Mrs. Prince H. Gordon) '60

975 Hillside Avenue
Runkle, Mrs. Harry Godley (Jennie Fitz Randolph) '15
Albin, Mrs. Leland D. (Jennie Hoag) '36
King, Mrs. Victor E. D. (Yasmina S.) '78
Whitehead, Mrs. James Harold (Jean Fitz-Randolph Heiberg) '43

980 Hillside Avenue
Hall, Mrs. Frederic L. (Anne Garrigues Wigton) '68
Stuart, Mrs. Linden (Jeanette W.), Jr. '52
Wigton, Mrs. Charles Benson (Garrigues) '45

982 Hillside Avenue
Baker, Mrs. Clifford Myron (Margaret Drayton) '32
Valiant, Mrs. John (Katharine Drayton) '40

985 Hillside Avenue
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P.") '15
Stevens, Mrs. Horace Nathaniel (Helen Coburn) '15
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P."), Jr. (Edith S.) '37
Stevens, Mrs. Robert Ten Broeck (Dorothy Goodwin Whitney) '37

996 Hillside Avenue
Wallace, Mrs. Frederick W. (Grace Seccomb) '15
Murray Townsend
Mooney, Mrs. Wandell McMaster (Alice Joy McGee) '47

999 Hillside Avenue
Conner, Mrs. William A. (Florence Tupper) '15
Wigton, Mrs. William Garrigues (Ann Hayes) '55

1000 Hillside Avenue
Lawrence, Mrs. Chester B. (Florence B.), Jr. '22

1005 Hillside Avenue
McWilliams, Mrs. Howard (Anna Louise Waldbridge/Mrs. Paul Taylor Brown) '22

1007 Hillside Avenue
Lockwood, Mrs. Frederick M. (Hazel Marshall) '52
Marshall, Mrs. Henry P. (Dorothy Burke) '30

1009 Hillside Avenue
Tracy, Mrs. Evarts '22
Tracy, Mrs. Howard Crosby (Minerva Bingham Lamson) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

1019 Hillside Avenue
Baker, Mrs. Clifford Myron (Margaret Drayton) '28

1030 Hillside Avenue
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Ethel Lucile Titsworth) '42

1035 Hillside Avenue
Streuli, Mrs. Alfred F. H. (Frederica Michelle Dwyer Hooper) '15

1045 Hillside Avenue
Timpson, Mrs. Lewis Gouverneur (Helen Frances Waring) '15
Waring, Mrs. Orville G. (Dorothy Fleming) '35

1046 Hillside Avenue
Genung, Mrs. Alfred Gawthrop (Dorothy or "Dot" Madsen) '69
Madsen, Mrs. John (Evelyn or "Evie" Wilson) '70

1300 Prospect Avenue
Streuli, Mrs. Alfred F. H. (Frederica Michelle Dwyer Hooper) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

1234 Watchung Avenue
Stevenson, Mrs. E. Vickers '41

1239 Watchung Avenue
Brown, Miss Edna M. '34

November 30, 2015 Missing Portrait

November 30, 2015

Another art mystery to be solved!

We received an email today from a descendant of the Stevens family in search of an elusive portrait painted by famed PGC member Geraldine Acomb.

If you do not know about Mrs. Acomb, please take a moment and look through our scrapbook about this very talented member: Acomb, Mrs. Frederick G. (Geraldine de M. Goutiere) '62

According to the email [See Below] Mrs. Acomb painted a mother-daughter portrait of one of the many Stevens' women. One could say that the PGC was built on the foundations of the Stevens clan. Here are all the members that we know of from that family:

Stevens, Mrs. Horace N. (Helen Coburn) '15
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P.") (Edna Ten Broeck) '15
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P."), Jr. (Edith Stevens) '37
Stevens, Mrs. Robert Ten Broeck (Dorothy Goodwin Whitney) '37
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15
Barnhart, Mrs. N. Chisholm, Jr. (Shirley Clark) '48
Griswold, Mrs. Merton Lyman (Mary Victoria "Vic" Stevens), Jr. '44

If any of you would know where to search for this painting or whom to ask, please write in to plainfieldgc@gmail.com

To read about the last painting we found for someone in 2014: Barlow, Mrs. DeWitt Dukes (Mary Lee Brewer), Jr. '65

Email Received from Edward Stevens Gottfried:

I am contacting you as I see the Plainfield Garden Club has a rather extensive posting about the works of one of its late members, Geraldine Acomb. My mother was lucky enough to inherit the portrait Mrs. Acomb painted of my grandmother, and she recently told me that there was a second, later portrait that Mrs. Acomb painted of my grandmother and aunt which was never sold to the family but was instead exhibited. I'm trying to track it down in the hopes of either purchasing it as a gift for my aunt, or (if that is not possible), to have it photographed. Is there any chance that you have a record of the painting, or any other information regarding Mrs. Acomb's works which might lead me in the right direction? Is there any record of her children, so that I might contact them?

For what it's worth, my grandmother was Mrs. Christina Stevens (née Schmidt), and, so far as the family can remember, the portrait was of her and my aunt, Helen Stevens, and was likely taken sometime in the mid-1960's. I figure this is a long shot, but certainly worth a try!

Sincerely,
Edward Stevens Gottfried


UPDATE: November 30, 2015 Email from Rick Detwiller

Hello PGC,

I don't know where the Stevens' portrait might be, but attached is the portrait of my mother Catherine Campbell Detwiller by Gerry Acomb that I promised to send back in 2012. Apparently you already have the photo of her with the portrait taken when she was 96. She is now living in Westwood, MA, going on 100 and just celebrated Thanksgiving with us all at our brother Chip's house in Groton MA.

Regards,

Rick D.

Detwiller, Mrs. Charles Henry (Catherine or "Cath" Campbell), Jr. '57