Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Reid, Mrs. Bruce Andrews (Beverly Paulson) '61

1970 - 1990 Address: Clarke's Lane, Plainfield

1999 Address: "Boxwoods" Clarke's Lane, Scotch Plains

NOTE: House number may be "1071" Clarke's Lane, Scotch Plains

1984 - 1990: Active
1991 - 1998: Affiliate
1999 - 2000: Deceased

Plainfield Garden Club Member Mrs. J. Harold (Marion Foster) Loizeaux was Mrs. Bruce A. (Beverly Paulson) Reid's aunt-by-marriage. Bev's mother was Mabel Loizeaux Paulson and her brother was J. Harold Loizeaux. Mabel had two other brothers: Fred Loizeaux, father of Plainfield Garden Club member Bernice Loizeaux Swain, and Charles Loizeaux.

November 2000 Dedication by Evie Madsen

to see original, click: 2000 Archives

Beverly Reid was born in California near the town of Beverly Hills. She liked to say it was for this reason she was named Beverly. Shortly thereafter, her father, a physcian, established his practice in medicine in Plainfield where she spent most of her growing years and then those with Bruce and their three children.

Beverly was a person of many talents dedicated to excellence. Her home was the center of her life. I like to think she personified the glorious role of housewife pictured by Martha Stewart. She enjoyed canning and preserving the fruits of her husband's vegetable garden, arranging flowers cut from her own picturesque garden, hooking rugs and, as a warm and hospitable hostess, loved to entertain.

But she also saved time for the community serving as a trustee for the Plainfield Historical Society and, with Dorothy DeHart, had a hand in decorating the Drake House and, too, the Stage House Inne with her friend and architect, Charlie Detwiller.

She served two terms as President of The Plainfield Garden Club, was instrumental in the planning of the Vest Pocket Park, was part of a group winning a blue ribbon for a garden design at New York's Horticultural Show many years ago and has chaired many fund raising events for the club. Her active interests and energy have been projected into many projects within this church house.

The Plainfield Garden Club is indeed proud to have known her as one of our long and dedicated members – Evie Madsen

Bev Reid's garden, Boxwoods, documented by Betty Hackman for the Smithsonian

resource

Betty Hackman documented Plainfield Garden Club member Bev Reid's garden for the Smithsonian.

Mrs. Bruce A. ("Bev") Reid '61
Clarke's Lane, Plainfield 1970 - 1980
Clarke's Lane, Scotch Plains - 1999


Boxwoods 1999.

Forms part of: Garden Club of America Collection,

Phy. Description: 1 folder+ 9 35 mm. slides.

Summary: The folder includes a worksheet and garden description.

General Note: This two-acre garden site, established in 1954, surrounds a house dating to 1845 (with subsequent renovations). Landscape architect Roberta Freeman Dixon laid out the three-part plan in 1956, which has been closely followed by the owners since that time. Windbreaks were important to cut weather and frame the house in the field. Evergreen bedding plants surround the house and edge the meandering landscape. The vegetable beds and cutting garden are behind hurdle fencing allowing them to be kept in less than pristine condition without detracting from the rest of the garden, Boxwood was brought in from Virginia and is used solely as foundation planting, accented with Ilex crenata, including 'Bulatta'. Native rhododendron, Leucothoe, hollies, cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus), hemlock, and dogwoods are used repeatedly in the landscape, giving a peaceful background of lush greenery with occasional bloom interest. A wonderful old barn and a pump house on the property add charm and are enhanced with a choice Chinese white wisteria on the barn's car entrance and a climbing boxwood espaliered on the pump house. An original sculpture, "Inspiration," by David Edstrom, is used with water in a little side garden entrance off the library. It is surrounded with a holly hedge and Buxus microphylla at the base of the planting, making it handsome in all seasons. This is a charming garden with many unique features that complement the historic farmhouse setting.
Persons associated with the property include: Charles Detwiller (architect, 1954); Roberta Freeman Dixon (landscape architect, 1956); David Edstrom (sculptor, 1927); and Lois Poinier (landscape architect, 1968).

Restrictions: Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
For information or study purposes only. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.

Subject-Topical: Gardens – New Jersey – Scotch Plains

Subject - Geographical: Boxwoods (Scotch Plains, New Jersey)

Repository Loc: Smithsonian Gardens, Smithsonian Institution, PO Box 37012, Capital Gallery, Suite 3300, MRC 506, Washington, DC 20013-7012

Local Number: NJ135000

Co-Creator: Detwiller, Charles, architect.
Dixon, Roberta Freeman, landscape architect.
Edstrom, David, sculptor.
Poinier, Lois W., landscape architect.

Boxwoods] [slide]: the front of the house from the driveway entrance, with the pump house on the far left

Boxwoods] [slide]: the wall of the pump house, with Buxus microphylla (sport) espaliered in the shape of a horseshoe

Photo by Robert K. Hackman

[Boxwoods] [slide]: the barn, showing wisteria

Photo by Robert K. Hackman

Boxwoods] [slide]: rear door of porch and edge of patio

Photo by Robert K. Hackman

[Boxwoods] [slide]: path into woods

Photo by Robert K. Hackman

[Boxwoods] [slide]: a path, facing northwest

Photo by Wendy A. Reid

[Boxwoods] [slide]: looking northeast from the west side of the house

Photo by Robert K. Hackman

[Boxwoods] [slide]: looking east from the east side of the house, with the sculpture, "Inspiration," in the center

Photo by Wendy A. Reid

[Boxwoods] [slide]: clematis near the barn

Photo by Robert K. Hackman

May 19, 1980 Board Meeting Minutes

Smithsonian

Smithsonian

Smithsonian

Smithsonian

Smithsonian

Smithsonian

Smithsonian

Smithsonian

Smithsonian

May 17, 1982 First Meeting of Executive Board

May 17, 1982 First Meeting of Executive Board

May 17, 1982 First Meeting of Executive Board

April 16, 1982 King, King and Goldsack

April 16, 1982 King, King and Goldsack

April 16, 1982 King, King and Goldsack

December 2, 1982 and December 20, 1982

circa 1983

1987 Archives

From the Corresponding Secretary file

Contributors in Marge Ladd's Memory for the Shakespeare Garden

Mrs. Philip Nash
Mrs. Lawrence Heely
Mrs. Richard Eckert
Mrs. Webster Sandford
Mrs. June [not legible]
Standish Ave and Wood Ave
Mrs. Bruce Reid
Mrs. Northrop Pond
Mrs. Alden De Hart
Mrs. E. J. Fitzpatrick
Mrs. William Elliot
Mrs. Charles Eaton Jr.
Mrs. William Shepherd

Total $445.00

Elisabeth Loizeaux's recollection of Mrs. Reid and Boxwoods

"Beverly Reid, by the way, was another cousin (of Peter Loizeaux and Bernice Swain), the daughter of one of the sisters in the Loizeaux family.. She of course is another at one time president of PGC, she was the most "perfect" GC member I can remember. Entertaining the club with her, you spent a lot of time dusting her Rhododendrons next to the front door beforehand.................. I hope her house and garden are in the Archive, she truly had the most beautiful garden, everything in perfect harmony with the surrounding landscape. English flower garden, vegetables, Wisteria over the garage doors, there wasn't anything that wasn't "just right", plus she was a first rate flower arranger."

Correspondence with Elisabeth Loizeaux

Not at all! This is a great help as we have very few "witnesses" in the club who can corroborate our findings. So happy you have taken the time to look through the albums. I guess I have the frigid weather to thank too!

We do plan on taking our questions to Barbara Sandford but we want to be prepared with all our questions. I am copying Susan Fraser on this email as she is the lead archivist on this project. She has been particularly interested in maiden names as these are integral to finding the connections to PGC. As an aside, I did find out from the Smithsonian that the 3 gardens (Loizeaux, Sanders and Wm. Elliott) they asked us to research were all submitted by Lois Poinier not the Plainfield Garden Club. They have additional pictures of Driftway Farm and I have asked to send them Perhaps you can help to describe those views as well? Are you at all familiar with the Sanders or Elliott gardens? I was planning to bring those pictures to Barbara to see if she can help. We have the addresses which the Smithsonian did not and we do plan to drive by in the spring to see if anything remains but personal anecdotes are simply the best. Susan and I have been loving the atmospheric descriptions of tea parties and weddings, etc.
"Talk" soon, Darlene


On Mon, Jan 24, 2011 at 9:40 PM, Elisabeth Loizeaux <ekloizeaux@comcast.net> wrote:

Darlene, I did look up my mother-in-law's album (and Bev Reid's). I do have questions about my mother-in-law. Charles Loizeaux, who was a two term State Senator in New Jerse y and my husband's father's brother ( I did not know that he was also the mayor of Plainfield) was married to a woman named Bertha .........?. They lived on Westervelt and Brook Ave. but as far as I know had no connection to PGC. Charles and Bertha would have been my husband's mother, Marion Foster Loixeaux's , brother and sister-in-law and it would make no sense to include them in her album, don't you agree? The photo, called "the Loizeaux garden" with a tent on their property has no connection to Marion Foster Loizeaux nor the PGC.

Connie Foster, married to Marion Foster' Loizeaux's brother David, was a member of PGC so her inclusion in the album makes sense.

I'm sorry, there were just too many Loizeaux in Plainfield. I think Marion, my mother-in-law, and I were the only Loizeaux members of PGC. Whoever looked up information at the Library in Plainfield , had a hard time identifying who all the different family members were. Marion Foster L. definitely never lived on Westervelt and Brook Ave. and had no connection to that "Loizeaux garden".

Elisabeth

P.S. Fred Loizeaux : father of Bernice Swain
J. Harold Loizeaux: father of my husband Peter, husband of Marion Foster L.
Charles Loizeaux : State Senator and maybe mayor of Plainfield, brother of Fred and J. Harold above, no connection to PGC
Mabel Loizeaux Paulsen: mother of Bev Reid, and sibling of the above three men

By now I know you are sorry you asked!!

Correspondence with Elisabeth Loizeaux

Thank you! The connections are all very interesting. Yes Beverly Reid's garden, Boxwoods, was documented by Betty Hackman and the pictures can be viewed on the Smithsonian Archives website. We also have a Member Album devoted to Beverly. You can find it on www.plainfieldgardenclub.org by looking in the "Notable Members in Plainfield Garden Club History" under History and see Betty's pictures. There is an album for your mother-in-law too.

Thank you again!!!


On Mon, Jan 24, 2011 at 1:38 PM, Elisabeth Loizeaux <ekloizeaux@comcast.net> wrote:

Hello Darlene,
My husband's father and Bernice's father were brothers, Bernice's father was the oldest and my husband's father the youngest of the family. Beverly Reid, by the way, was another cousin , the daughter of one of the sisters in the Loizeaux family.. She of course is another at one time president of PGC, she was the most "perfect" GC member I can remember. Entertaining the club with her, you spent a lot of time dusting her Rhododendrons next to the front door beforehand.................. I hope her house and garden are in the Achive, she truly had the most beautiful garden, everything in perfect harmony with the surrounding landscape. English flower garden, vegetables, Wisteria over the garage doors, there wasn't anything that wasn't "just right", plus she was a first rate flower arranger. Are you familiar with her house? Did you know her? One certainly learned a lot working with her, but her perfectionism was nerve-wracking!

You may of course share my personal information. The story of Driftway Farm , after it was sold, I don't think concerns the GC in any way, that was for your information only. And please be sure to refer to the property as DRIFTWAY FARM, that was what it was called for 50 +/- years. (To the best of my knowledge there isn't a single Ponderosa pine on the property, I don't think my in-laws would have liked the name.)

Regards,

Elisabeth

From the Corresponding Secretary File

postmarked July 5, 2000

From the Corresponding Secretary file

July 5, 2000

Bruce Andrews Reid

Dear Jane:

My children and I deeply appreciate your thoughtful note of condolence.

As you mentioned, Bev was a wonderful, caring person and one with multiple talents. She will be sorely missed.

Again, many thanks for your warm expression of sympathy.

Sincerely, Bruce

Smithsonian Archives of American Gardens

From the Corresponding Secretary file 1991

Beverly P. Reid

Dear Elizabeth –

I have enjoyed over thiry years of active membership in the Plainfield Garden Club, and find now it is time to ask The Board to accept my resignation. With Bruce retired and a relaxed lifestyle becoming more and more to my liking – it is best to be be released from meetings and membership obligations.

I have called the N. Y. office and from Millie Roman, one of the staff, understand for $4 a year I can become a 'subscriber-in-club member.' In this way I will still receive the Bulletin and newsletters. I would like to apply for this benefit.

I shall continue to earnestly follow and support our club, and have greatly enjoyed my membership.

Cordially,

Beverly Paulson Reid

Thursday
March the twenty-sixth

From the Corresponding Secretary file

Corresponding Secretary Annual Report June 5, 2001

Corresponding Secretary Annual Report May 15, 1992

Email from Elizabeth Loizeaux to Susan Fraser February 12, 2011

Dear Susan,

Yes, I remember the postcard well. I believe it was a State wide project for GCA clubs to acquaint people with native plants (it could even have been a Nation wide project). I am sorry, but I can't recall what year it was undertaken . I would suggest you ask Barbara Sandford about Gerri Acomb. If I remember correctly, she grew up in Northern India and was a painter of botanical subjects, quite well known. I now wonder if PGC ever owned the original painting of the clematis? I remember endless trips to the printer, and I was never really happy with the colors .We all had to buy a certain number of cards and then sell them to our friends and acquaintances. If the date is really important, maybe GCA has records, I recall going to a meeting (maybe a Zone meeting) and seeing a large collection of other cards.

But do ask Barbara about Ms Acomb, she was an unusual person. In fact, please let me know what you find out. There are so many interesting stories about "old Plainfield" people, how they were related, how they intermarried etc. ––- I could not believe my eyes when I saw Beverley Reid's letter of resignation. She must have been really disappointed in us younger members. She was MRS Gardenclub, a super talented horticulturist and arranger, trained by the previous super GC members: The two sisters Mrs. Frost and Mrs. de Hart, Marge Elliot, Mrs. Ladd (who went to flower shows with her maid in attendance who had to hand her tools and flowers at her command, the way a nurse hands surgical instruments to the surgeon!)

Best regards,

Elisabeth

Memory of Bev Reid from Diana Madsen; February 14, 2011

We were having some sort of fund-raising sale and everyone brought things to the sale. It was outside and next to a garage, there were two, large urns to be sold. Bev Reid was a very talented woman and she had an eye for everything. She stood looking around, pointed to the urns and said, "You and you – move those urns." And as she said that she pointed to me, and I had just joined, and to Anne Marie Seybold who was a fairly elderly person at the time.

Without hesitation, here we were struggling to move these huge heavy urns to one side - -me and this tiny old lady. But Bev said to do it and we did.

Shakespeare Garden 50th Anniversary Party

June 13, 1978

Top Photo: Peonies

Middle Photo: Dana Wigton, Bev Reid, Anne Zeller

Bottom Photo: Shakespeare Anniversary Party

Shakespeare Garden 50th Anniversary Party

June 13, 1978

Dana Wigton, Bev Reid, Anne Zeller

Memory of Bev Reid from Phyllis Alexander: February 16, 2011

I remember Bev Reid. I had just joined the club and was hosting a luncheon at my home, [May 17, 1999] Bev had asked that I serve a particular type of tea for the luncheon. I was already serving two types of tea. Being a new member, I was concerned that I had to provide this particular type of tea. Betty Hackman could seen the concern rising and she said to me, "If you start giving in to everyone's wishes, you'll spend all day. Two types of tea are enough." And that is what we served.

June 12, 1978

Plainfield Garden Club celebrates
50th Anniversary of Shakespeare Garden

PLAINFIELD - The Plainfield Garden Club, a member of The Garden Club of America, will celebrate the 50th anniversary of teh Shakespeare Garden at Cedarbrook Park on June 13. The Union County Park Commissioners and Mayor Paul O'Keeffe have been invited as special guests at the observance.

The Garden Club members, with the Union County Park's help and cooperation, have maintained the garden since it was established in 1928 by the Shakespeare Society of Plainfield and the Plainfield Garden Club.

The garden is composed exclusively of plants, herbs, trees, and shrubs, named in Shakespeare's plays and sonnets. Two years ago, the Plainfield Garden Club members designed and planted a knot garden which is a patterned or geometric design often found in English gardens. The knot garden is planted with gray and green santolina and the border is germander. On June 13, this garden will be dedicated in memory of Mrs. Hugh Gaston, a former member of the Plainfield Garden Club and devoted worker in the Shakespeare Garden for many years.

The Garden Club members not only have dedicated many hours a week planting and weeding in the Garden under the supervision of Mrs. Robert Hackman, Mrs. Arthur Seybold, and Mrs. Victor King, but also have made many donations to the Garden. In April, each member brought an authentic plant to the regular meeting, and Mrs. Edward Ladd III gave an English Hawthorne tree.

Mrs. Bruce Reid is restoring the markers for the plants which identify the quotes from Shakespeare that the plants are mentioned in.

Caption:

PLAINFIELD GARDEN CLUB MEMBERS READY FOR CELEBRATION
. . . the Shakespeare Garden has been maintained by the club for 50 years

Newark Star-Ledger July 25, 1982

Shakespearean splendor blooms in garden

How to get there
Take Route 22 to Somerset Street exit. Continue straight through Plainfield until reaching Muhlenberg Hospital. Turn right onto Randolph Road and follow to Cedar Brook Park.

By Helen Brunet

One of the oldest Shakespeare Gardens in America is located in Plainfield's Cedar Brook Park. Begun in 1927, on the 363rd anniversary of William Shakespeare's birth, the garden was suggested by Howard Fleming, a member of the Plainfield Shakespeare Club.

The garden, which has some 40 varieties of plants mentioned in Shakespeare's plays and sonnets, was designed by the Olmsted Brothers of Brookline, Mass., landscape architects. (The firm's founder, Frederic Law Olmsted, designed New York's Central Park in 1858.) The Union County Park Commission created the Shakespeare garden according to the landscape plans and the Plainfield Garden Club has maintained it ever since.

Today the garden is a wonderfully maintained formal garden that invites strolling. The entrance is through an arbor covered with a handsome stand of trumpet vine. A large boulder and plaque commermorates the famous poet. Plantings of hawthorns, flowering crab, mulberry, holly and yews provide screening at one end. A rustic fence defines the garden and separates it from the street.

"All of the garden plants are ones mentioned by Shakespeare," said Evelyn Madsen, chairwoman of the committee that cares for the garden. "In some cases the names are different today. For instance, the flower then called marigold (as in Act II, Scene 3 of Winter's Tale: "The marigold, which goes to bed with the sun/And with him rises, weeping!") is actually Calendula officinalis. What we call larkspur Shakespeare called lark's heels."

The garden is composed of 17 flower and herb-filled beds edged in brick with grass paths running between. Twin bird-shaped topiaries, made of clipped yew, carry out the formal tone. The first flowers appear in the garden in mid April and there is something in bloom until November.

Shakespeare used flowers in many ways – to set a mood, as in Love's Labor's Lost, "When daisies pied and violets blue/And lady-smocks all silver white,/And cuckoo-buds of yellow hue/Do paint the meadows with delight.", and to intensify dramatic effect through they symbolic meaning flowers had for the Elizabethans. Thus the very choice of flowers in Ophelia's garland in Hamlet foretold her tragic end. "There, with fantastic garlands did she come/Of crow flowers, nettles, daisies, and long purples . . . " (Act IV, scene 7).

"Working in the garden each week is a real learning experience, something like a science lab, " Mrs. Madsen said.

"And, like anything scientific, things sometimes backfire," added Anne Marie Seybold, a regular volunteer in the garden. "Fifteen years ago one of our members brought a plant with pretty green leaves and white flowers which appeared on long spikes. We planted it and it began to spread so fast we thought it would take over the whole garden. Later we learned it was Bishop's-weed (Aegopodium podraria) which is highly invasive." But by this time, she explained, one whole section of the garden was covered with the weed, an area known as the wheel which was five symetrical flower beds. The only solution, except using herbicide, which the committee did not wish to do, was to cover the beds completely with thick black plastic covered with wood chips and allow them to lie dormat for three years.

"Thank goodness it worked, " Mrs. Seybold said. "We have replanted three of the beds – one with various thymes, one with different sages and a third in dwarf lavenders. We are still deciding what to plant in the last two beds – but so far, the weed hasn't reappeared."

At the center of the wheel design is a large bed containing old fashioned roses including Rosa damascena, the original Rose of Damascus, and the York and Lancaster roses, all popular in England in Shakespeare's time. The rose pips are used with flowers and foliage from the garden to make dried wreaths; at Christmas these are distributed to various civic groups.

Members of the Plainfield Garden Club meet every Wednesday morning from April until mid-November to weed and dig and sometimes to quote Shakespeare. Beverly Reid, president of the Plainfield Garden Club, said of the garden: "We consider it a retreat and a great place to share knowledge. It combines gardening with history – what could be better?"

The Shakespeare Garden is open to the public at all times, free of charge. It is located on the left side of Randolph Road as it enters Cedar Brook Park in Plainfield.

[caption reads] Evelyn Madsen, chairman of the Shakespeare Garden Committee, Plainfield Garden Club, works at the garden.

Newark Star-Ledger July 25, 1982

Newark Star Ledger July 25, 1982

Members of the Plainfield Garden Club spruce up the Shakespeare Gardens, which includes introducting a new patch of greenery, right

Bev Reid is the woman in the photo on the right with the white skirt, black top and a handbag on her arm

Summer 1982

From Left to Right:

Anne Marie Seybold, Peggy Tyler, Betty Hackman, Bev Reid

Summer 1982

Back of Photo

Summer 1982

Anne Yearling (?), Bev Reid, Peggy Tyler and Anne Marie Seybold

Summer 1982

Back of Photo

Shakespeare Garden June 1987

Betty & Bev

Shakespeare Garden June 1987

Back of Photo

Mrs. Hackman and Mrs. Reid

Shakespeare Garden May 1990

Evie Madsen, Bev Reid, Sally Kroll (facing away)

Hillside Cemetery

September 14, 2011
Photo by S. Fraser

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

September 20, 1999 Board Meeting Minutes page 2

September 22, 1999 Meeting Minutes page 2

September 22, 1999 Meeting Attendance Sign in

January 20, 1999

Helen Goddard and Ruth Crocker Floral Arranging Workshop
Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church, Plainfield, NJ

Photo by Jeanne Turner

Carroll Keating and Bev Reid

Smithsonian

Smithsonian Reference

Boxwoods 1999.

Title:
Boxwoods 1999.
Forms part of:
Garden Club of America Collection,
Phy. Description:
1 folder+ 9 35 mm. slides.
Summary:
The folder includes a worksheet and garden description.
General Note:
This two-acre garden site, established in 1954, surrounds a house dating to 1845 (with subsequent renovations). Landscape architect Roberta Freeman Dixon laid out the three-part plan in 1956, which has been closely followed by the owners since that time. Windbreaks were important to cut weather and frame the house in the field. Evergreen bedding plants surround the house and edge the meandering landscape. The vegetable beds and cutting garden are behind hurdle fencing allowing them to be kept in less than pristine condition without detracting from the rest of the garden, Boxwood was brought in from Virginia and is used solely as foundation planting, accented with Ilex crenata, including 'Bulatta'. Native rhododendron, Leucothoe, hollies, cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus), hemlock, and dogwoods are used repeatedly in the landscape, giving a peaceful background of lush greenery with occasional bloom interest. A wonderful old barn and a pump house on the property add charm and are enhanced with a choice Chinese white wisteria on the barn's car entrance and a climbing boxwood espaliered on the pump house. An original sculpture, "Inspiration," by David Edstrom, is used with water in a little side garden entrance off the library. It is surrounded with a holly hedge and Buxus microphylla at the base of the planting, making it handsome in all seasons. This is a charming garden with many unique features that complement the historic farmhouse setting.
Persons associated with the property include: Charles Detwiller (architect, 1954); Roberta Freeman Dixon (landscape architect, 1956); David Edstrom (sculptor, 1927); and Lois Poinier (landscape architect, 1968).
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Subject-Topical:
Gardens – New Jersey – Scotch Plains
Subject - Geographical:
Boxwoods (Scotch Plains, New Jersey)
United States of America New Jersey Union County Scotch Plains
Repository Loc:
Smithsonian Gardens, Smithsonian Institution, PO Box 37012, Capital Gallery, Suite 3300, MRC 506, Washington, DC 20013-7012
Local Number:
NJ135000
Co-Creator:
Detwiller, Charles, architect.
Dixon, Roberta Freeman, landscape architect.
Edstrom, David, sculptor.
Poinier, Lois W., landscape architect.

May 9, 1974 Spring Potpourri Guestbook

October thru December 1999 General Meeting Minutes & Sign In Sheets

December 1999 Flower Show Report

2000 January thru June General Meeting Minutes and Sign-in Attendance

2000 September thru December Executive Board Meeting Minutes

1996 October thru December Board Meeting Minutes

1984 Cocktail Party at the Reid's

June 22, 2013 Bruce Andrews Reid

Bruce Andrews Reid, 87, died Tuesday (June 18, 2013) at JFK Medical Center in Edison. Born in New York City, he was raised in Greenwich, CT and lived in Scotch Plains for over 60 years. Mr. Reid, who graduated from Princeton University in 1947, served as the Director of Grants at the Seeing Eye in Morristown for many years. He was also a veteran of World War II, having served in the US Army. He was predeceased by his wife, Beverly Paulson Reid, who died in 2000. He is survived by his daughters, Wendy Andrews and Helen Thomson; and his son, Bruce A. Reid, Jr.; two brothers, Robert and George; his sister, Katherine Frick; and two grandchildren. A private graveside service was held at Hillside Cemetery in Scotch Plains. Those who wish may make memorial donations to Crescent Ave. Presbyterian Church, 716 Watchung Ave., Plainfield, NJ 07060. For additional information or to sign the guestbook, please visitwww.fanwoodmemorial.com.

As many of us remember, Bev Reid was an active and vital participant in the Plainfield Garden Club. She joined the club in 1961 and served as President from 1981 through 1984. Bev had a lovely garden and home "Boxwoods" located on Clarke's Lane, Scotch Plains. The garden was designed by renown garden designer Lois Poiner and documented by The Club for inclusion in the American Garden Archives at the Smithsonian. Bev passed away in 2000 after 39 years of membership in The Club.

To remember more of the Reid's contributions to the PGC, click here:
Reid, Mrs. Bruce A. (Beverly Paulson or "Bev") '61,

Memories from Brenda Anderson June 25, 2013

Thanks Susan, yes Bev Reid was a lovely person, I had the opportunity to visit her home on a couple of occasions. She was a cousin of Bernice Swain and she held a delightful bridal luncheon shower for Ann Swain in her garden. I ddi meet Bruce too but missed his obit.

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

1962

1973-1974 PGC Directory

1963

1963

1963 Bev Reid

1974-1975 Directory

1987 Correspondence and Documents from the Archives of Barbara Tracy Sandford

This is just a small sampling of meeting minutes, correspondence and notes from the memorabilia of Barbara Tracy Sandford. Barbara was the Garden Club of American Zone IV (NJ) Director in 1987. 1987 is the same year Zone IV hosted the Annual Meeting of the Garden Club of America.

Also mentioned assisting with the planning and execution of the Annual Meeting are PGC Members: Kroll, Hackman, Hunziker, Fitzpatrick, Reid, Vivian, Madsen, Booth, Tyler and King.

1987 Documents From the Archives of Barbara Tracy Sandford

1998-1999 PGC Annual Report

August 21, 1967 Letter from Bev Reid to Barbara Sandford

August 21, 1967 Letter from Bev Reid to Barbara Sandford

Barbara,

Just a line re "P.field Beauty." Hear you were down briefly so perhaps you saw for yourself the trees all cut down on the railroad tracks opposite the Police Station. I was horrified and took Virginia down. We investigated inside and were told the Police wanted to clear the area there so a sniper could not hide in the trees and inhibit the Police Force in another riot situation. I can understand this – and all the more reason for roses or pyracantha on the banks – let someone with a gun get mixed up with THAT! It still looks stupid and severe – but what can you do –

#2. Containers in front of The Needle & Consommers Liquor I vote as being the prettiest in town. They are lush-blooming and I think bear copying. Red geraniums, white cascade petunias, ageratum (sp?) stunning. Mrs. H's in front of Commerce is blooming but stupid with that TREE! I don't think any flowers have been planted in front of Blairs-Vogue etc. which goes on with my duties. I have been around and do think yew or arborvitae should go at the station – but I think we should wait and do a spring planting. I was talking to Dom. Toresco and he doesn't think the plants will get a chance to become well enough established before the Earth freezes – I would hate to see so much money go into each pot and be taking a chance on it living. Go ahead set the pots up on the platform – then come middle of Nov. we could stick a cut scotch pine in for Christmas and I think you'll be amazed at how long that will last and be attractive. Come spring – bang in goes our living green and a whole season of being able to acclimate.

Thats all from me. Am on to the hills Saturday. Will watch carefully whats done abroad perhaps some new ideas will sprout forth. One last thing – the benches for bus people are being painted green & yellow – they should not be so obvious 00

See you in October. hope your getting a well deserved rest & not running a hotel. Love, Bev

August 21, 1967 Letter from Bev Reid to Barbara Sandford

May 14, 1983 Centennial The Wardlaw Hartridge School

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1993-1994 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1989-1990 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

Cocktail party circa 1984 at Bev Reid's

Cocktail party circa 1984

18 photographs were taken from negatives found, unmarked, at the Plainfield Library March 22, 2013.

Martie Samek was instrumental in helping to identify many of the attendees. Location unknown as well as date.

Jack Roome on left with wife Dodie in pink. Ned King (Victor...son of Elizabeth King) speaking to Betty Fitzpatrick. Ned's former wife, Ysmina, has her back to the photographer.

The party was held at the home of Mrs. Reid:

Reid, Mrs. Bruce A. (Beverly Paulson or "Bev") '61, President 1981 - 1984 on Clarke's Lane in Scotch Plains. The Garden was documented for the Smithsonian by the Club in 1999.

Cocktail party circa 1984 at Bev Reid's

Ed Samek is next to the tree. Anne Marie Seybold is to Ed's right. Beverly Reid is in the foreground facing the photographer.

For more photos from this part, visit 1984

Cocktail party circa 1984 at Bev Reid's

Beverly Reid (center)

Cath Detwiller facing away in blue and white print.

Martie Samek in the background speaking to a gentleman in the plaid jacket.

Cocktail party circa 1984 at Bev Reid's

Bev Reid, Betty Fitzpatrick, Ned and Yamina King, Dodie and JAck Roome

1984-1985 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1988-1989 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

Club History by Anne Marie v. G. Seybold

1984-1985 History of the Plainfield Garden Club by Anne Marie v. G. Seybold

Exhibition

Then in March, 1966 came a very special event. Designed by Mrs. William Elliott with the assistance of Mmes. Wayne Holman, Victor King, Alex Kroll, Edgar Davis, Richard Sheble, Bruce Reid and Benson Wigton, the "Back Yard Garden" captured the first prize for the Club at the International Flower Show at the Coliseum in New York City.

Ways and Means

In 1982 the Executive Board chose a "Rosemary Topiary" for the Club's official logo, adapted from an original drawing by Alex Seidel, staff artist for Steuben Glass. After considerable work done by Mrs. Bruce Reid, assisted by Mrs. A. D. Seybold and with the professional advice of Mr. Victor R. King, the Club became incorporated in March, 1983