Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Halloway, Miss Harriette Rice (Hattie) '20

Click on Photo to Enlarge

Date Unknown (referenced in article below) Central Avenue

1922 Address: 225 East 7th Street, Plainfield

1928 Treasurer Book June 28th $5.00
1929 Treasurer Book Active $5.00
1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937 Treasurer Book Active

1932 Directory* Address: 225 East Seventh Street, Plainfield
* = This directory is not dated but presumed to be from the year 1932. NOTE: See "1932 Archives" as the directory found in the Corresponding Secretary notebooks was handwritten on the cover "Hattie Halloway"

1938 Treasurer Book, Active: Miss H. Halloway 6/6/38 Pd 6/5/39 Pd. Miss H. R. Halloway 7/1/40 Pd 6/10/41 Pd. 9/14/42 Pd. 10/27/43 Pd. 9/13/44 Pd. 6/22/45 Pd. 1/3/46 6/13/46 May 12, 1947

1942 Address: 225 East 7th Street

1948 - 1949 Treasurer Book, Active: Halloway, Miss Harriette. Her name is scratched out and no notation made.

1950 - 1951 Treasurer Book: A scrap piece of paper found "Miss Halloway 832 Madison Ave."

1958 Address: 832 Madison Avenue, Plainfield

In 1965, the 50th Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club, Miss Harriette Halloway was listed as an "Honorary Member" and alive.

June 2011: Delivered Shakespeare-in-Bloom invitation to 832 Madison Ave. Notation: 2 apartments

May 8, 1951 Plainfield, NJ Courier

Social News

GARDEN CLUB PICNICS IN PARK – Members of the Plainfield Garden Club had a picnic lunch yesterday in the arboretum in Cedar Brook Park. Picnic marked the fifth anniversary of the arboretum and the 20th of the first dogwood plantings in the park. (L to R) Ralph Carver, Union County Park Commission horticulturalist; Mrs. Charles A. Eaton Jr.; Mrs. E. H. Ladd 3rd, president of club; Mrs. R. T. Stevens, new chairman of cornus committee; Miss Harriette R. Halloway, retiring chairman; Mrs. Thomas Van Boskerck, Mrs. Alden de Hart and W. R. Tracy of Union County Park commission

Handwritten date: May 7, 1951
Date on back of clipping: May 8, 1951

NOTE: This clipping was discovered April 2010 in a member's home who had been storing a leather case filled with old medals won by different Plainfield Garden Club members over the years. In this case included a Garden Club of America medal awarded to Harriette Halloway.

Miss Harriette R. Halloway

In the 1915 - 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club, there are references to Miss Harriette R. Halloway:

The 1915 Membership List shows Miss Harriette R. Halloway as an Honorary Member of the newly founded Plainfield Garden Club

Under the title "Horticulture"

In 1948, Miss Harriette R. Halloway, chairman for many years, received a commendation for her horticultural program in the "Contest of Programs for the Garden Club of America."

Under the title "Cornus Arboretum"

in 1946, the Park Commission, a group of progressive and dedicated gentlemen, asked our Club if we would sponsor a Cornus Arboretum, using the Dogwood drive as a foundation. We accepted – indeed, yes! A committee was formed with Miss Harriette R. Halloway as Secretary and Advisor, whose goal it was to include every Cornus, Specie and Cultivar, which was obtainable and which would thrive in our climate. Through the years, chairmen have included Mrs. R. T. Stevens, Mrs. George His, and Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler. As in our other gardens, the Park Commission has planted, raised seedlings in their memory, and provided maintenance.

Through purchases, gifts and exchanges with other Arboretums, 26 varieties were planted in the next five years. By 1948, there were 219 trees, giving masses of beautiful spring bloom as well as fall display of foliage and berries. Thousands of visitors walked or drove through this fairyland of beauty, surely the better for having seen it.

Today through the inspired leadership of Miss Halloway, the Cornus Collection contains more than sixty (60) varieties, some quite rare. All the woody species of Cornus of Eastern America and Europe are included, the others being horticultural selections of "clones" (cultivars) . Experts consider the Cornus Collection to be the outstanding horticultural and civic achievement of our Club. It was highly gratifying in 1957, when officials from the New York Botanical Garden came out to see it.

Prof. Benjamin Blackburn, in a recent article in the American Horticulture Magazine, says "It does not appear that a comparable collection exists. The Cornus Collection offers an admirable example of cooperation between groups interested in the cultural and horticultural riches of a municipality . . . . none other is known to the write to be existing elsewhere in the country."

To quote Miss Halloway, "each year the trees continue to be beautiful and a joy, if not forever, at least for many years."

Under "The Iris Garden"

A president of the American Iris Society described the Cedar Brook Park Iris Garden as "the best public planting of Iris in this country, unsurpassed in arrangement of varieties in color, in interest, in the large number of fine varieties and in the careful and instructive labeling."

In 1932, an enthusiastic member of the Iris Society, Miss Harriette R. Halloway, planned and designed the Iris Garden by agreement with the Union County Park Commission through its engineer, W. R. Tracy. The first planting was large. Included were 3,340 plants and 460 varieties, representing all types, bearded and bulbous. The fine beginning was made possible thorugh the backing of the Garden Club, the American Iris Society, and interested individuals.

Miss Halloway insisted on curving beds instead of the usual square ones, because as she put it, "Iris flowers are round." These curving beds fitted beautifully into the hillside plot backed by woodlands, and could be seen from the drive below as a "glorious river of color."

In four years, the Iris Garden had grown to include 32,207 plants and 1,173 varieties and the Park Commission estimated fifteen thousand people visited it. Many a gardener was inspired to start or improve an iris bed, after viewing ours. Of particular educational value was the labeling of each variety.

During the war years, the Iris Garden suffered, but afterwards, it was revitalized to peak performance. It attained national importance, was written about in many horticultural magazines, and visited by so many people that Garden Club members were on duty in the Park to answer questions. Always, the color effects were lavishly praised. Most of the beds were massed color groups of the best tall bearded varieties. Of these, Miss Halloway has written, "Our color scheme as been a constant pleasure. We never place a pale-toned flower next to a strong deep one to be killed by it. We grade the entire color range from light to dark, carrying the eye along without kaleidoscopic jerks."

In 1956, we made new friends with a "flowers across the sea" project. Forty-six plants of Native Iris (species), seventeen varieties, were sent to the Arboretum in Cologne, Germany. In 1963, seeds were sent to Taiwan, after students had read an article by Miss Halloway and wished to try iris in a tropical country.

On the 25th anniversary of the Iris Garden, John Wister wrote, "the collection is well rounded to contain some types from every botanical division or horticultural group of the great genus Iris. So far as is known, no other public collection is all-embracing as this." About 1500 varieties and 100 species were now in the Garden.

In a lovely ceremony where "sunny skies and colorful irises in bloom provided the setting", a medal was presented to Miss Halloway from the Plainfield Garden Club. Also the entrance to the garden was marked by a bronze plaque affixed to a stone boulder. That same year (1957) an iris was named Harriette Halloway. It is described as being a clear blue color of exceptional fragrance. Surely this beautiful flower must have made Miss Halloway feel the time, work, courage and patience she put into the Iris Garden worthwhile.

The year 1961 was highlighted by a visit from the American Iris Society during their annual meeting. About five hundred people atteneded from all over the country, with our Club members acting as hostesses.

For thirty-three years Miss Halloway supervised the planting, replanting and general care of the Iris beds, often working every day. A committee of club members, headed by Mrs. Frederick M. Lockwood, assists her and labor is supplied by park gardeners. Frequent droughts, deplorable vandalism and ignorance of helpers plagues the Iris Garden today, but it continues to bring joy to all who behold its rich succession of bloom from late March to July.

(EDITOR'S NOTE (April 22, 2010): This history was published in 1965 so the Iris Garden, west of The Shakespeare Garden, still existed. In an interview with Plainfield Club member Barbara Sandford, (who joined the PGC in 1950), she readily remembered Harriette Halloway. She reported that Miss Halloway was a math teacher at Wardlaw-Hartridge School in Plainfield. Barbara also recalls that she and some other members would "choose to work in the Shakespeare Garden" over the Iris Garden due to Miss Halloway working in the Iris garden. Sadly, Barbara recounted the demise of the Iris Garden. She said several members had complained about the tedious work involved in the garden, in particular, the weeding of grass between the thick iris roots in August. One day, the parks department bulldozed the whole garden under.)

(EDITOR'S NOTE (April 23, 2010): Bernice Paglia, local Plainfield reporter and blogger, wrote "I saw the last remnants of the Iris Garden in 1983, before it was bulldozed. Irises are a lot of work. Here is a link to a blog post I did on irises:

http://plaintalker.blogspot.com/2008/08/irises-divide-to-multiply.html"

Under "Garden Club of America"

In 1958, we were deeply proud of Miss Harriette R. Halloway, who recieved The Distinguished Service Medal. Her citation read: For distinguished service in the field of horticulture and as an outstanding gardener, an expert grower and particularly as the creator of the Cornus Arboretum, the Iris and other gardens in Cedar Brook Park, New Jersey; for your good judgement, your ability, your energy and tenacity in starting public projects and keeping them functioning, the Garden Club of America takes pleasure in awarding to you its Distinguished Service Medal." (45th annual meeting, York Harbor, Maine)

Under "Garden Club of New Jersey"

Miss Harriette R. Halloway received a Certificate of Commendation for Iris Planting in 1947.

Iris 'Harriette Halloway'

Hybridized by Smith, 1951

Garden Club of America Distinguished Service Medal

The Garden Club of American awards 18 national awards annually. Harriette R. Halloway is the only Plainfield Garden Club member to receive a national GCA award.

The Distinguished Service Medal
"Awarded to a Member or a Member Club for distinguished service in the field of horticulture. Although preference is given to The Garden Club of America members, the medal may be given to a non-member."

Designed in 1954 by Elizabeth Rhoades Reynolds, presented and endowed by Mrs. Robert D. Sterling, Garden Club of Dublin and Monadnock Garden Club, in 1953. Although Mrs. Sterling's primary interest was in conservation, she believed that horticulture played an integral part in the quality of life.

In 1989, Dr. Elwin R. Orton, Jr. won the award for his outstanding breeding program of woody ornamental plants. Dr. Orton, a Rutgers professor, is world renown for many things including developing Cornus, which of course Harriette Halloway was also interested.

The New York Botanical Garden

Archives & Manuscripts, Mertz Library

Wild Flower Preservation Society of America Records (RA)

http://library.nybg.org/finding_guide/archv/wfps_a_b.html

Correspondence 1920 -1929 Harriette Halloway

In 1901 Olivia and Caroline Phelps Stokes presented three-thousand dollars to the New York Botanical Garden designated as the Olivia E. and Caroline Phelps Stokes Fund for the Protection of Native Plants. A monetary prize was established soliciting essays that would encourage a public dialogue regarding the preservation of both native and wild plants.

A portion of the Stokes Fund was earmarked for use as the Wild Flower Preservation Society of America in 1902 under the founder, Elizabeth Gertrude Knight Britton. Britton remained a driving force behind the organization until the mid-nineteen twenties.

The Society was incorporated by the state of New York in April of 1915.In addition to Elizabeth Britton, the Society's directors included Robert A. Harper, Arthur Hollick, Marshall A. Howe, and Norman Taylor. According to the certificate of incorporation, the goals of the organization were to encourage the preservation and protection of native plants, promote the enactment of laws furthering such preservation, organizing local societies, and to publish, print and disseminate literature to educate the public.

After 1924, the scope of the Society was restricted to the state of New York. Following this change of focus, in 1933 the Society was officially dissolved, as it was determined that the society's mission was being carried on effectively by the Garden Club of America, various state federations of garden clubs, and by the Wild Flower Preservation Society which had been established in 1925 in Washington, D.C. The remaining assets of the Society were turned over to the New York Botanical Garden to be added to the principal of the Olivia E. and Caroline Philips Stokes Fund.


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Scope and Content
Records consist primarily of Britton's correspondence with local wild flower preservation groups in the United States. Prominent correspondents include Alice Owen Anderson, Margaret E. Allen, Edward Fuller Bigelow, Emma Lucy Braun, Thornton Waldo Burgess, Henry Chandler Cowles, Fanny Day Farwell, Charles Frederick Millspaugh, Percy L. Ricker, and Edgar T. Wherry. Also included is a small amount of correspondence conducted by Charles Louis Pollard, 1902-1903.

The collection includes materials on the history of the group, it's constitution, minutes, Stokes prize essays, articles written by Elizabeth Britton, club lists and literature, and promotional posters and buttons highlighting the WPFSA mission.

Miss Harriette R. Halloway

Photo by Darlene Kasten
Presby Memorial Iris Garden, Upper Montclair
May 6, 2010

the bloom is early this year with the peak expected around May 22.

Miss Harriette R. Halloway

Photo by Darlene Kasten

Had a nice chat with Fran Liscio, president of the American Iris Society.

Miss Harriette R. Halloway

Photo by Darlene Kasten

The Harriette Halloway iris is located in bed 12, "Antique Historical Tall Bearded Irises 1940's - 1950's". It was just planted last year and rhizomes could be available for us as early as next year! Note: the bloom in the background is of another variety, not Harriette.

Miss Harriette R. Halloway

Photo by Darlene Kasten

TB means it is a tall bearded iris. It was hybridized by Ken Smith on Staten Island in 1951. There may be additional Harriette Halloway irises on his son's property in NJ!

Miss Harriette R. Halloway

Photo by Darlene Kasten

Presby Executive Director Linda Sercus was kind enough to guide me right to Harriette's namesake iris. Although she knew exactly where it was located, Presby documents everything about the irises in their garden. They have over 10,000 plants, 3000 varieties and 100,000 blooms during peak bloom period!

Description of the color: "Pallid blush violet self."

Miss Harriette R. Halloway

scanned from the Presby brochure.

Miss Harriette R. Halloway

Map of Presby Iris Beds.

June 2010

Veteran Plainfield Garden Club member, Barbara Sandford, was asked about her recollections of Miss Halloway. She said she did know her and described Miss Halloway as quite "formidable." Barbara pointed to the area across the small Cedar Brook stream where the Iris garden was once admired by people from around the world. She said that when Miss Halloway passed away, two members that were exhausted from weeding the Iris garden in August, had it plowed under. Barbara said it was a real shame. (Local resident and blogger Bernice Paglia remembers seeing remnants of the garden about thirty years ago.)

Barbara said that Miss Halloway moved a lot around Plainfield and was a teacher at the Wardlaw-Hartridge school. Whenever Barbara came to the park to weed, she always chose to weed the Shakespeare Garden as Miss Halloway was very particular about the iris. In her opinion, Barbara felt that the Cedar Brook Park Iris garden was far better than the current Presby Iris garden in Montclair.

November 19, 2010

In remembering the Iris Garden, Anne Morrell Shepherd '77 recalled that members referred to Harriette as "Hattie." Anne also remembered the sad time when the club decided to get rid of the Iris garden as they could not properly maintain it. Off the top of her head, she put the date sometime between 1986 - 1988. She said the club took a vote and that was the end.

Anne's mother was also a member of the PGC – Mrs. William Morrell '41.

The Iris Garden (page 1)

The Iris Garden In Cedar Brook Park, Plainfield, New Jersey
by Harriette R. Halloway

from the American Iris Society Bulletin, April 1960

The Iris Garden (page 2)

This was obtained from the publication The History of the Plainfield Garden Club 1915 - 1965 by Victoria Furman

This was obtained from the publication The History of the Plainfield Garden Club 1915 - 1965 by Victoria Furman

This was obtained from the publication The History of the Plainfield Garden Club 1915 - 1965 by Victoria Furman

This was obtained from the publication The History of the Plainfield Garden Club 1915 - 1965 by Victoria Furman

This was obtained from the publication The History of the Plainfield Garden Club 1915 - 1965 by Victoria Furman

This was obtained from the publication The History of the Plainfield Garden Club 1915 - 1965 by Victoria Furman

This was obtained from the publication The History of the Plainfield Garden Club 1915 - 1965 by Victoria Furman

This was obtained from the publication The History of the Plainfield Garden Club 1915 - 1965 by Victoria Furman

This was obtained from the publication The History of the Plainfield Garden Club 1915 - 1965 by Victoria Furman

Photo of Harriette Halloway being presented her Distinguished Service Medal

AP Wirephoto copyright info

Harriette R. Halloway Medal

Front: FROM THE GRATEFUL MEMBERS OF THE PLAINFIELD GARDEN CLUB

Harriette R. Halloway Medal

Back: HARRIETTE R. HALLOWAY FOUNDER AND MENTOR OF THE IRIS GARDENS OF CEDAR BROOK PARK PLAINFIELD NEW JERSEY

20TH ANNIVERSARY 1932 - 1952

25TH ANNIVERSARY 1932 - 1957

Mrs. William Morrell '41 Yearbooks for 1958-1959; 1953-1954; 1960-1961; Program 1963-1964; Iris Garden Calendar

http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=4286

Mrs. William Morrell '41 Yearbooks and Iris Garden Calendar

http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=4286

October 17, 1894 New York Times article A Silver Wedding in Plainfield

Miss Halloway in attendance with her parents Mrs. and Mrs. Henry R. Halloway

March 13, 1941 Westfield Leader article on lecture given by Harriet Halloway of the Plainfield Garden Club

to the Men's Garden Club in Westfield, NJ

Plainfield Courier News June 27, 1958

Wins Horticulture Award

The New York Times October15, 1966

Harriet Rice Halloway; Jersey Horticulturist 91

The Courier News October 14, 1966

Harriet R. Halloway, Known for Flowers, Dies

Miss Harriette R. Halloway, who helped found and develop the Iris Garden in Cedar Brook Park, died early today (Oct. 14, 1966) in Muhlenberg Hospital where she had been a patient for two days.

She would have been 92 years old next month. She had been living at the McCutchen Home, 21 Rockview Ave., North Plainfield.

Studied at Columbia

After attending the Scribner-Newton School here, a forerunner of the Hartridge School, Miss Halloway studied at Columbia University.

For several years she was actively interested in the promotion of church missions and was the first secretary of the Presbyterian synod. She also wrote pamphlets for the Board of Foreign Missions.

Started as Teacher

She was hired by John Lesl in 1916 as a teacher in his school in the same year that Charles D. Wardlaw began his career with the school that he later headed. Miss Halloway remained on the faculty until 1949.

"To the end she was a devoted friend of the school," Prentice C. Horne, headmaster of the Wardlaw School, said today.

Miss Halloway earned many awards for flowers and flower arrangements and was recognized internationally for her work in horticulture.

Received Many Honors

Besides being honored by the Royal Horticultural Society in England, Miss Halloway was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal by the Garden Club of America in 1958.

In 1931 she helped establish the nationally known dogwood area of Cedar Brook Park and the famous Iris Gardens was founded by her the following year. In 1936 she directed the daffodil plantings there and later a peony garden.

She also served as a consultant to the Union County Park Commission. During her lifetime she was honored with membership in the American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboretums and the New York Botanical Gardens and the American Horticultural Society are among the national groups who recognized her accomplishments.

She also was the author of many horticultural writings.

Garden Club Member

A member of the Plainfield Garden Club since 1920, she served at various times as chairman of the conservation program and horticultural committee.

Mrs. Edward H. Ladd, 3rd, president of the Garden Club, said that Miss Halloway had asked the members of the club long ago that in lieu of flowers she would prefer a memorial plaque "Halloway Collection" to be placed in the Cornus (dogwood) planting area in Cedar Brook Park, since the collection was her chief love.

Contributions to the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church Endowment fund were also mentioned by Miss Halloway in lieu of flowers.

The A. M. Runyon and Son Funeral Home which is in charge of funeral arrangements has announced services will be held Monday at 2:30 p.m. in the chapel of the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church with the pastor, the Rev. Dr. Charles L. Mead officiating. Interment will be in Hillside Cemetary.

There will be no calling hours at the funeral home.

Distinguished Service Medal

Distinguished Service Medal

Bulletin of The GCA September 1958

Courier News June 20, 1958

Horticulturist Gets National Recognition

Miss Harriette R. Halloway of 332 Madison Ave., member of the Plainfield Garden Club and founder of Cedar Brook Park's many special gardens, last night received the Distinguished Service Medal of the Garden Club of America at the group's annual awards dinner meeting in York Harbor, Me. Miss Halloway was present to receive her award.

The citation given at the discretion of the awards committee only when a candidate is proposed read: "For distinguished service in the field of horticulture, and as an outstanding gardener and expert grower of authority on iris, daffodils and peonies, for your good judgment, your ability, your energy and tenacity in starting public projects and keep them functioning, the Garden Club of America takes pleasure awarding you its Distinguished Service Medal."

Albert Barrage, awards chairman presented medals to five other horticulturalists from other parts of the country for achievements in landscaping, natural history, conservation and civic accomplishments.

Miss Halloway's lifelong interest in horticulture was developed in her "own back yard" at her old Central Ave. home. She said many of her unusual specimens there in flower arrangements and horticultural exhibits which won her ribbons in local and other area flower shows.

In 1931 she was active in establishing the dogwood area in Cedar Brook Park, and one year later she founded the park's iris garden. She is still chairman of the garden committee and on its 25th anniversary last year was presented a medal from the Plainfield Garden Club for her work.

Her desire to perpetuate the park's beauty prompted Miss Halloway to direct the daffodil planting there in 1936 and to develop the peony garden three years later. She was also a consultant in the park's day lily and chrysanthemum plantings.

In 1946 she was named chairman of a committee which initiated the development of a section of the dogwood planting into an arboretum which today includes nearly 50 varieties.

British Recognition

Her long career reached a climax in 1950 when she was elected a fellow of the Royal Horticultural Society of England, partly in recognition of her work in Cedar Brook Park's special gardens.

Besides the Plainfield Garden Club, Miss Halloway is a member of the New York Horticultural Society, the American Horticultural Society, the American Iris and Daffodil societies and the New York Botanical Garden, and has served as a consultant for the Union County Park Commission.

She holds associate membership in the American Horticultural Council and the American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboretum.

She has also had two newly hybridized plants named for her: Chrysanthemum "H. R. H." and Iris "Harriette Halloway" developed by Charles H. Totty and Kenneth D. Smith respectively.

Miss Halloway has lectured on both iris and peonies at the New York Botanical Garden and has had many articles published, including about 25 requested b the editors of Horticulture Magazine.

NY Herald Rribune June 29, 1958

6 Honored By Garden Club Group

Index of the Bulletin of the Garden Club of America November 1958

American Species Iris in Germany

Harriette R. Halloway
Plainfield Garden Club, NJ

Iris: Harriette Halloway

Friday, May 17, 1957

Club Commemorates Founding of Iris Garden

Caption: GARDEN MARKER VIEWED – Standing before the marker commemorating the 25th anniversary of the Iris Garden in Cedar Brook Park are (left to right) Mrs. Frederick Lockwood, Victor B. King, Jr., John C. Wister, Mr. Richard Tracy and Miss Harriette R. Halloway, founder of this garden. (Courier photo by E. T. Wiggins)

The Plainfield Garden Club and guests yersterday dedicated the the entranceway of the of the Iris Garden in Cedar Brook Park.

Miss Harriette R. Halloway, found of the garden and chairman of the garden of the Iris Garden [not legible] the project was started in 1932, was presented a medal by Mrs. Frederick M. Lockwood, president of the Garden Club.

The medal is [not legible] "from the grateful members of the Plainfield Garden Club Harriette R. Halloway founder and director of the Iris gardens of Cedar Brook Park, Plainfield, 1932 - 1957."

[Not legible] viewed a recently installed [not legible] tablet marking the anniversary of the garden.

"Excercise in Perfection"
Victor R. King, president of the Union County Park Commission, led the gathering [not legible] the garden display was "an excercise in perfection is [not legible]," he said.

The park commission provides the setting for the garden and have [not legible] in the project [not legible]

W. [not legible] Tracy, executive had of the Park Commission when the Iris Garden was started paid tribute to Miss Halloway for her "tireless work and painstaking effort."

Another speaker was Dr. John C. Wister of Swarthmore, Pa., president of the American Iris Society when the garden was started and author of [not legible] article about the garden in the current issue of the Journal of the New York Botanical Gardens.

Miss Halloway spoke briefly and [not legible] on the work of the [not legible] who care for the Iris Garden. She introduced Kenneth Smith, one of the largest contributors of plants to the garden [not legible]

Mrs. Lockwood presided at the program. Guests included members of [not legible] garden clubs and contributors to the garden.

The Iris Garden Committee includes Mrs. Morris E. Benton, Mrs. Alden de Hart, Mrs. Lockwood, Mrs. Donald E. Luce, Mrs. William K. Dunbar, Jr., Mrs. C. Northrop Pond, Mrs. Webster Sandford, Mrs. Arthur D. Seybold, Mrs. John R. Wells, Mrs. Willian G. Wigton, Mrs. Robert MacLeod, vice chairman, and Miss Halloway, chairman.

Special slides [not legible] for the chairman were Mrs. Charles A. Eaton, Jr., Mrs. F. Willoughby Frost ad Mrs. Edwin M. Treat, Jr.

Mrs. Victor M. King was chairman of the special committee assisted by Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux, Mrs. E. B. Newberry, and Miss Margaret Tyler. Also cooperating were Mrs. N. C. Barnhart, Jr., Mrs. William P. Elliott, Mrs. Homer Cochran and Mrs. H. I. Flanders.

Hostesses (not legible)
Other hostesses were Mrs. William W. Coriell, Mrs. Leslie E. Fort, Mrs. William A. Holliday, Mrs. Richard M. Lawton, Mrs. Robert T. Stevens, Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler, Mrs. William S. Tyler. Mrs. Thomas Van Boskerck and Mrs. Orville G. Waring.

The Iris Garden now has more than 1,800 named varieties properly labeled, representing all types of Iris and totaling more than 75,000 plants.

The main part of the garden is [not legible] caring Iris [not legible] and is expected to be is good blooms thorugh the rest of the month.

Cornelian Cherry Dogwoods line entrance to Cedar Brook Park

Spring arrives in Plainfield before the vernal equinox. Its coming is announced by the bloom of the mysterious yellow-flowered trees lining both sides of the Park Avenue entrance to Cedarbrook Park. Blooming with the earliest crocuses, these trees announce that winter is over and brook no argument. The best time to view them is in the morning, when the sunlight comes streaming over the rooftops to illuminate the yellow flowers and make them glow. It's a sight that enlivens many a morning commute. Surely these trees are one of the best features of Cedarbrook Park, which was designed by the Olmsted firm.

from Gregory Palermo's Plainfield Tree Blog, 2008

Cornelian Cherry Dogwoods

I have heard the trees identified as witch hazel (They're not.) Or spice bush. (Not that either.) Nonagenarian Barbara Sandford tells me that, when her children were very young, she taught them that the Cedarbrook Park trees were called Cornus mas (a.k.a. Cornelian cherry dogwood. Barbara has known that the trees were dogwoods for quite a while.) After I planted some Cornus mas in my own garden, I noticed that the Cedarbrook Park trees invariably flowered two weeks before my trees or anyone else's Cornelian cherry dogwoods. So my bet is that the Cedarbrook Park trees are not Cornus mas, but rather Cornus officinalis, a very rare bird and a close Japanese cousin to the European Cornus mas. Cornus officinalis is supposed to flower earlier than Cornus mas and berry later. Whereas Cornus mas berries in July, Cornus officinalis is supposed to berry in September. I have never gotten myself well enough organized to check for berries in September, though. This season I'll do it without fail.

2008 Gregory Palermo's Plainfield Tree Blog

Memories of Hattie

When discussing Harriette Halloway with PGC Member Anne Shepherd, she admitted that she was a little scared of Hattie. After chuckling, she added, "So was my mother!" Anne's mother is Mrs. Margaret Morrell '41

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Von Boskerck

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Plainfield Garden Club by Lucy Von Boskerck

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg version 2

[Editor's note: The original document was too faded to scan. This is a different version of a history written by Mrs. Etheldreda Anderegg from 1941 – 1947]

Plainfield Garden Club History
Continued to 1947

On May 14th, 1941 – six years ago to-day in Cedarbrook Park – the Anniversary Dogwood Trees were formally presented to the Park Commission. In making the presentation, Mrs. Arthur Nelson, president, said the garden club wished to make a gift of lasting beauty to mark its anniversary. Mr. Tracey responding for the Park Commissioners commended the club for its civic interest and declared the trees would bring a touch of beauty to thousands of lives. The gift was identified by a large boulder bearing a bronze marker. Mrs. Holliday as chairman of the Dogwood Tree Committee and of the Boulder Committee arranged the anniversary celebration.

That year, 1941, an article appeared in Horticulture in praise of our Shakespeare Garden.

A teacher of the Jefferson School staff was sent to the Audubon Nature Camp in Maine.

Handsome new yearbooks containing a revised constitution, membership lists and permanent covers with loose leaves were issued. About this time some of our members looking back upon some of our achievements of the past, and forward for new horizons to explore, agreed that once more we should storm the ramparts of the Garden Club of America. No organization in garden club circles offers to its members such a wide field of opportunities and assured prestige. This reporter has sat in many important national and state conferences were the effect of this prestige could be observed. When important decisions were due there was an intangible inference in the atmosphere which stemmed to imply – "All those not members of the Garden State of America may now retire to the Jim Crow car."

Better to have failed in the high aim than to succeed vulgarly in the low one" said Browning.

So a committee to explore the possibilities of our being accepted for membership was named by Mrs. Nelson. With Mrs. Corriel as chairman, the committee consisted of Miss Elsie Harmon, Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler, Miss Elizabeth Browne, Miss William Tyler, Mrs. William A. Holliday, Mrs. James Devlin and your historian. Our search for new worlds to conquer began with a meeting at the home of Mrs. William Tyler, on February 21, 1941, when your historian read a letter she had been asked to write to Mrs. Frederic Kellogg, of Morristown Garden Club, prominent garden club personality. The letter would be interesting at this point, but unfortunately it has been lost. Suffice to say, our prise of ourselves was so completely uninhibited that the committee itself was profoundly impressed by the record of performance of the Plainfield Garden Club set forth therein. Shakespeare said "Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful." After all they could not know our worth unless we told them. This time we forestalled a verdict that we had "accomplished nothing."

It might be interjected here that during Mrs. Goddard's regime an effort was made to join the Garden Club of America. Mrs. Kellogg, approached on that occasion, graciously entertained Mrs. Goddard and Mrs. Holliday at luncheon, and they left with the impression that Plainfield, having rejected an invitation to become a charter member of that organization during Mrs. Herring's tenure, it would be futile ever to hope for membership.

An active campaign was launched by all who had relatives or friends in member clubs. This was accelerated when it was learned that a neighboring club had an identical ambition, and had found a sponsor. Because of geographical allocation, we realized that only one of us would be admitted. When it became apparent that we had aroused interest, and had a semblance of chance for acceptance, a special meeting was called at the home of Mrs. Corriel, and the advantages of membership in the Garden Club of America, as well as the financial obligations thoroughly explored. The club was asked to decide whether they wished the committee to proceed with the negotiations. The vote was unanimously affirmative.

Subsequently Mrs. Kellogg requested that the Morristown Club have the pleasure of proposing us, and Mrs. Lauderdale of Short Hills offered to have that club second us. While we waited for the verdict, our campaign never waned.

On May 11th, 1941, tenth anniversary of Iris Garden, the executive board gave a tea to honor Miss Halloway. Mrs. Holliday arranged a delightful affair in the field house. Members of the garden club and thirty guests were invited. Miss Halloway's friends came from far and near while the Iris Garden glowed in a rainbow of colors for the occasion.

The war which was sweeping over France while Mrs. VanBoskerck's history concluded had now reached our shores. "Come to open purple testament of bleeding war." (King Richard) Our members were working for the U.S.O., the Red Cross and Camp Kilmer, apart and in conjunction with the garden club. Plans were sent to the camp to enhance its barren scenes, and seeds to Brittain. Victory gardens were planted, two new chairmanships were added to the executive board – War Activities and Victory Gardens.

In May 1943, we provided vases and began to send flowers regularly to the chapels at Camp Kilmer. This is still being done. Garden books from the Garden Center were placed in the Public Library. Because of gasoline and food rationing it was becoming difficult to hold meetings. Speakers were reluctant to use scarce gasoline and tires for small groups. The war organizations were asking for more things, more effort and more money. The garden club was striving to provide all three.

In June 1943 a delegation from the Garden Club of America came to inspect our members' gardens. Those gardens chosen to head the list were duly explored and approved, but unfortunately the sand of time ran out before they could see them all, and they will never realize all they missed. However, they did see the dogwood planting, the Shakespeare and Iris gardens.

At the annual meeting Mrs. Samuel Carter gave a particularly interesting history of the Shakespeare garden, which was later read by request at the Shakespeare Club. Mrs. Carter said in part: "It has been said that we of the Western World love flowers for what they are, and that the peoples in the East love them for what they suggest. A Shakespeare Garden is full of suggestions, a speaking garden revealing the tradition, folklore and romance of the ancient and timeless plants." Mr. Tracey quoted an authority on the subject as saying that Mrs. Carter's was the finest Shakespeare Garden in the country and that over 15,000 people visited it last year.

Mrs. Coriell announced at the executive board meeting February 2nd, 1944, that Plainfield Garden Club had been elected to membership in the Garden Club of America, and letters of welcome received from sponsoring clubs. It had required three years to reach the new horizons, but a poet once said, "A horizon is nothing but the limit of our sight" so each one attained shows another beckoning in the distance.

Because of rationing, meetings were held in semi-public places of central location. Speakers stressed every phase of conservation. Garden club members were working hard at Camp Kilmer, for the Red Cross and the U.S.O.

In 1945 we became a Founder of the Blue Star Drive, our members contributing generously to this beautiful tribute to the men who served in the armed forces. It is hoped, and the hope is rapidly being fulfilled, that ultimately it will stretch from New Jersey to California.

A new custom was instituted, that of sending a sum of money to the Red Wood Tribute Grove in memory of deceased members. This year, 1945, a dance recital was given to help defray expenses of war activities. Naturally it was under the chairmanship of Miss Maud vonBoskerck, whose motto might well be "Music is my talent – my dearest one." It was very successful artistically and financially.

We helped the New York Botanical Garden celebrate its Fiftieth Anniversary by sending hostesses every day for a week, and by a substantial sum of money for plant research.

In 1945 Lyons Hospital was included on our flower and plant list, and we have continued to supply it weekly for two months of each year. Flowering trees were planted along Blue Star Drive in memory of members' sons lost in the war.

Mrs. Samuel Carter and Miss Harriette Halloway received awards from the Garden Club of New Jersey for their work in Shakespeare and Iris gardens respectively.

Besides bouquets were made twice a week for the wards at Camp Kilmer, beginning in May. Our members volunteered to arrange them.

By this time we were discovering that those "new worlds to conquer" for which we had longed, were providing more opportunities than we could well cope with, and so a junior membership was formed, now numbering six.

The associate membership was enlarged to thirty-five so that active members might be enabled to transfer to it. A questionnaire was sent of work they wished to do. In a Garden Club of America contest for a year's program, Miss Halloway's won honorable mention.

Beginning early in December members of the club met every day in Mrs. Boardman Tyler's studio to make Christmas decorations for the hospital at Camp Kilmer. A big fire blazed in the stove, tons of varied evergreens were provided as well as all other necessary equipment. The studio hummed like Santa Claus' workshop, and great quantities of wreaths with large red bows, small bouquets and other favors emerged to cheer the soldiers at Camp Kilmer and Lyons Hospitals. Joyce Kilmer, for whom the camp was named, wrote of his experience in the other World War: "My shoulders ache beneath my pack, Lie easier cross upon his back" We hoped we eased their burden just a little.

The opportunities offered by the Garden Club of America in the field of conservation are so many and so varied, it was necessary to choose which tangent to pursue. In view of the community and national problems of vandalism and child delinquency, it was thought wise to concentrate the major effort in combating these evils. Working through the public schools seemed the most logical procedure. Mr. Wimer of Jefferson School and Mrs. Rulison of the Park Commission have offered sympathetic cooperation. The first step in the program is the establishment of school gardens, now in process of being planted. The garden club provided the funds. A trial garden, or proving bed was started in Cedarbrook Park in 1946. This year many new perennials were added.

Mrs. Hubble's artistic ability was employed so successfully in redecorating the Garden Center, this observer could scarcely recognize it.

The Garden Club of New Jersey bestowed an award upon us for meritorious work at Camp Kilmer. Miss Halloway has made additions to the peony, Iris and Narcissus gardens. It again became necessary to raise money, and a repeat performance by request, of the dance recital was staged by Miss Van Boskerck.

A suggestion from the Garden Club of New Jersey that we plant a tree to honor garden weekled, after consultation with Mr. Tracey, to the beginning of a dogwood arboretum comprising all the varieties that will grow in this vicinity. Twenty-five varieties have already been planted.

Santa Claus helpers gathered again in Mrs. Tyler's studio to make decorations for Camp Kilmer, and surpassed their effort of the previous year. Our work in this Project was not equaled by that of any club either year.

A thrill of pride must have quivered through our membership from founders to newest recruits, triumphs of our members who exhibited in the New York Flower Show. In the realm of flower arrangement there is no more coveted award than the Fenwick Medal. Our Mrs. deHart was runner up fro that prize last year. This year four exhibits won three blue ribbons and two special awards. It was a magnificent performance which won for us third place in the sweepstakes.

Chapel flowers still are sent to Camp Kilmer. Our members arrange them. We take our turn with the other clubs supplying flowers for the entire hospital regularly from gardens when possible, from florists in cold weather. Two gray Ladies representing Plainfield Garden Club, arrange and distribute the flowers through the wards. The by-laws were again revised and new books issued for the permanent covers.

The executive committee has not overlooked the fact that a War Memorial is of paramount interest to the garden club. Much time as been spent in discussion and deep thought given the matter. Mrs. Boardman Tyler has been named a member of the committee. This year we are sending a teacher to the Audubon Nature Camp in Maine, and another to the Conservation Workshop in Trenton.

Several members have been invited to speak on varied subjects, notably Mrs. Garret Smith on Church Gardens, and Miss Halloway on horticultural subjects. Mrs. Garret has been honored as founder of the Little Garden Club of New York City, of which she is honorary president.

A big of biographical information picked up while perusing the minutes is that our new president, Mrs. Loziuex, became a member of the club in 1940, second vice president in 1942, again in 1945, first vice president in 1946 and president in 1947.

Having been a member of the club only ten years, your historian cannot speak with absolute authority, but thinks it probably that the club reached greater heights of achievement under this administration of Mrs. Tyler than during any comparable period of time. This is partly true because of the new opportunities offered by affiliation with the Garden Club of America, and partly due to Mrs. Tyler's dynamic energy and her determination that the Plainfield Garden Club take advantage of these opportunities and assume its rightful position in the vanguard of progressive garden clubs.

Junius described Mrs. Tyler perfectly when he wrote: "the heart to conceive, the understanding to direct and the hand to execute."

We notice as we go over the chronicles of the garden club, the absence of names once listed so frequently:

Those whom we loved so long, and see no more
Loved and still love,
Not dead, but gone before.

If we ever adopt a coat of arms, it might well show crossed trowels over a field of flower arrangements, the other expounding the futility of vandalism to a young cub. And the motto? It must be from Shakespeare, and it is from The Tempest: Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground.

Or if we choose to abandon the classics: Never a dull moment!

Etheldreda Anderegg
Historian, 1947

New Jersey (from Peonies, Outdoors and In)

Cedar Brook Park, Plainfield (Union County Park Commission)

Peony planting for over 40 years thanks to Mrs. Edward Harding. Just south of the Japanese iris, planted in fall 1939. Paeonia tenuifolia – single and double – with P. emodi, the lovely species from India, open the season early in May. A half dozen more varieties of species follow them.

In mid-May the small collection, about a hundred of the highest rated herbaceous peonies, is usually in full bloom during the last week in May or very often, the first week of June. These include all types.

This autumn, 1959, there will be planted a sizable new bed, made especially for a collection of Dr. Saunders hybrids, adding greatly to the interest and educational value of the Peony Garden.

Harriette Halloway, a guiding light in the project, received the distinguished service medal of the Garden Club of America for distinguished service in the field of horticulture and as an outstanding gardener, expert grower and authority on iris, daffodils and peonies.

Peonies, Outdoors and In

by Arno & Irene Nehrling
drawings by Charlotte E. Bowden

Copyright 1960 by the authors

Diane: Here is an entry under 'public plantings' (to see peonies) in this book. I picked up at BBG's used book sale in Jan.

EDITOR'S NOTE: June 1, 2011. These two pages were given to the PGC by Westfield Resident, Diane Genco, who operates a Monarch butterfly station, is a member of Westfield's Rake and Hoe and a researcher of Alice Harding.

October 20, 2011 Hillside Cemetery

October 20, 2011 Hillside Cemetery

Photo by Diana Madsen

October 20, 2011

List of Courier News articles

Halloway Cordelia (Price) husband Henry Rice 4/12/1940 News
Halloway Cordelia (Price) husband Henry Rice 11/2/1940 News
Halloway Cordelia (Price) husband Henry Rice 11/3/1941 News
Halloway Cordelia (Price) husband Henry Rice 11/3/1942 News
Halloway Cordelia (Price) husband Henry Rice 1/28/1944 Annotation death
Halloway Harriette R. 5/25/1949 News
Halloway Harriette R. 10/4/1950 News
Halloway Harriette R. 4/14/1954 News
Halloway Harriette R. 5/10/1956 News
Halloway Harriette R. 7/7/1956 News
Halloway Harriette R. 5/17/1957 News
Halloway Harriette R. 6/26/1958 News
Halloway Harriette R. 4/21/1965 News
Halloway Harriette R. 10/14/1966 News death

October 14, 1966 Harriette Halloway Obituary

Plainfield Public Library Archive

June 17, 1938

Editor's Note: Members of the Plainfield Garden Club prepared material for this week's garden page exclusively for Jersey Life. Guest contributors next wee will be members of the Northfield Garden Club of Livingston

Plainfield Garden Club Began Iris Garden
Inspiration Came From Iris Society
by Harriette Halloway

Two questions frequently asked about this garden are answered in the following paragraph; but the answer to a third – constantly asked – requires all the rest of the space!

The Iris Garden was inspired by The American Iris Socity whose officers and members give nearly all the plants. The Plainfield Garden Club, after having a share in establishment and development, continues active interest in it; and the Union County Par Commission which supplies the land and the labor is officially in charge.

"When is the best time to see the iris?"

The dwarf border – so suitable for the front of borders, for rock gardens, for groups with daffodils – usually are in full bloom duirng the first wee of May. There are rug-like masses – a hundred varieties – in all colors except pink. So that the first week in May is a "best" time.

The last of the these dwards and the first of the intermediate bearded always overlap. Between the 15th and the 20th of May there can be seen about 80 varieties of intermediate some of the crested and a few of the species, and the majority of the superb progocyclus. The handsome new intermediates cannot be ever-praised; and the same is true of the pogocylus. Although the colors of the later are not gay like the former, they are of Persian richness; and the one huge beg with 40 varieties, is an unforgettable mass of breath-taing beauty. No other public planting or garden has such a collection of these royal artistocrats. As just stated, their maximum bloom usually occurs between the 15th and the 20th of May, and consequently that is another "best" time.

The greatest numbers of flowers of the tall bearded iris in all colors are open between the 20th and the 25th and as there are 800 varieties that is the most spectacular (thought not the most interesting, nor the most important) week of bloom. It is also one of the two most enjoyable times for people who can see the garden only by driving past it – because unable to walk around in it. So the third week in May is another "best" time.

At the same time, the Siberians – over 40 varieties – have been blooming and the species getting under way. This collection of Siberian includes some of the handsome new orginations from Canada. The iris species, which are native wild iris of our own and other lands, and their hybrids – 50 varieties – fill three beds. These latter in fascinating shades and charming forms – the most pleasing of all iris for flower arrangements – are far too little known and used. For seeing these, the "best" time is the latter part of May and the first week in June.

The Japanese – over 100 varieties – which begin to open before the last of the species have gone, continue all through June and well over the Fourth of July holiday.

So the answer is – "What kind of iris does the questioner want to see?" For there are these five "best" times – all of them average dates, depending on the weather!

In Honor Of Shakespeare
by Dorothea Tingley

What more fertile field for the exercise of creative imagination than gardening! Few can resist it. In 1928 the Plainfield Shakespeare Club became imbued with the unique idea of making an old English Garden full of plants and flowers mentioned in Shakespeare's palys. They turned for help to the Plainfield Garden Club and the Union County Park Commission. The idea appealed to them. The Shakespeare Garden in Cedarbrook Park came into being.

The rustic arbor which forms its upper boundary can be seen from the drive on the left. The garden occupies a curving, shallow terrace, with a rustid fence along the back and a low retaining wall in front. The flower beds have sawtooth brick edgings and their contents are all mared with two kinds of labels – one with the correct botanical names of the sweet growing things; the others with appropriate quotations from Shakespeare's plays.

The four beds at the lower end of the garden are devoted to herbs. All of the flowers used in this garden are old-fashioned varieties. No modern hybrid, however lovely, is allowed. Beneath the arbor are some seats, and at one end a modest boulder with a bronze commemorative plaque.

Plainfield Garden Club
by Alice R. Welles

Shortly after its organization, the Plainfield Garden Club began a policy of putting aside every year a sum of money to be used in "the beautifying of the city. The first of the activities which have grown from this policy was the gift of a number of dogwood trees to Cedar Brook Park.

The interest and the aid of Mr. R. W. Tracy, the Union County Park executive, was secured and with his help, trees were purchased and a suitable place selected for planting.

Shortly before the committee . . . .

Plainfield Public Library Archive

Plainfield Public Library Archive

Plainfield Public Library Archive

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Attractive arrangements of Spring flowers are featured in the section occupied by the Federated Garden Clubs of New Jersey at the International Flower Show in Grand Central Palace, New York, this week.

Upper Left – Four members of the Plainfield Garden Club with Mrs. H. P. Marshall's prize winning arrangemnet of early tulips. They are Miss H. R. Halloway, Mrs. James Devlin, Mrs. Lester R. Fort and Mrs. Henry L. DeForest. Mrs. Marshall, a fellow member, was not present when the award was made.

circa 1930's

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Plainfield Public Library Archive

Plainfield Public Library Archive

Plainfield Public Library Archive

1936

Garden Club Plans For Flower Show

Plans were about completed for the flower show of the Plainfield Garden Club at a meeting yesterday in the home of the chairman. Mrs. Wallace Coriel, 963 Central Avenue. The show is to be held May 5 and 6 in the Assembly Room of the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church.

Mrs. Richard Lawton, a prize winner in many horticultural exhibitions, is schedule chairman, and is spected to have schedules printed soon for distribution.

Fully two-thirds of the 50 classes scheduled are listed as "horticultural." The flower arrangment classes are in the minority. The schedule is planned to be of educational value to both experienced gardeners and beginners.

The committee includes Mrs. Corriell, chairman, Mrs. Dudley H. Barrows, secretary; Mrs. Harry Williams, treasurer; Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler and Mrs. William K. Dunbar, decoration and floor plan; Mrs. Henry L. DeForest, properties; Mrs. Henry Marshall, staging; Mrs. Lawton and Mrs. Henry C. Wells, schedule; Mrs. William S. Tyler, exhibits.

Also Miss Harriette R. Halloway, specimens; Miss Josephine Lapslety, entries; Mrs. Garret Smith, publicity; Mrs. Leslie R. Fort and Mrs. Edward H. Ladd Jr., judges, and Mrs. Clifford M. Baker, prizes.

Plainfield Public Library Archive

Plainfield Public Library Archive

New York Times, Saturday, October 15, 1966

Harriette Rice Halloway: Jersey Horticulturalist, 91

PLAINFIELD, N. J., Oct. 14 – Harriette Rice Halloway a nationally known horticulturalist died today in Muhlenberg Hospital. Her age was 91 and her home was at 112 Linden Avenue, North Plainfield.

Miss Halloway designed the iris garden in Cedarbrook Park in 1932, was consultant to the Union County Park Commission and helped to set up the cornus (dogwood) collection in Cedarbrook Park in 1946.

She received many honors for her work, among them a distinguished service medal from the Garden Club of America in 1958, and had been active as a horticultural judge. She was a member of the Royal Horticultural Society. In 1957 a iris was named for her.

Miss Halloway was born in Newark and attended Columbia University. She taught geography at the Wardlaw School, a country day school for boys, from 1916 to 1949.

Plainfield Library Archive

April 27, 1956

25TH ANNIVERSARY – A dogwood tree commerating the 25th anniversary of Cornus Arboretum was planted yesterday in Cedar Brook Park by the Plainfield Garden Club. Ralph H. Carver, chief forester of the Union County Park Commission, is turning a spade of earth. Left to right are: Mrs. W. K. Dunbar Jr., horticulture chairman; Mrs. Georges J. His, chairman of the Cornus Arboretum Committee; Mrs. Robert T. Stevens, chairman of the 25th anniversary project and past chairman of the Cornus Arboretum Committee; Mrs. Victor R. King, retiring president; Miss Harriette R. Halloway, founder of the Cornus Arboretum who served as its chairman for eight yeras, and Mrs. Frederick Lockwood, incoming president. Mrs. Thomas VanBoskerck, one of the original committee members, is not shown here.

Plainfield Public Library Archive

May 12, 2012 GCA Zone IV Meeting and Awards Luncheon

PGC Members Jeanne Turner, Patti Dunstan and Phyllis Alexander researched over 275 members chronicled on our website, www.plainfieldgardenclub.org, and chose the following ladies as "themes" for the luncheon tables:

Eight Notable Women of the PGC

1958 Garden Club of America Distinguished Service Medal

This medal is now passed to different Plainfield Garden Club members as an honor for hard work performed during the year.

June 11, 2012 – This year's recipient (formerly possessed by Mandy Zachariades) is Kathy Andrews.

2010 PGC Introduces the Harriette R. Halloway Award

A new award, the Harriette R. Halloway Award, named after a former member of our club, Harriette R. Halloway, was introduced in June, 2010. This award was not in our Yellow Yearbook, and was found by accident. In 1958 Harriette Halloway received the GCA Distinguished Service Medal at the 45th annual meeting in York Harbor, Maine. Her citation read, "For distinguished service in the field of horticulture and as an outstanding gardener, an expert grower and particularly as the creator of the Cornus Arboretum, the Iris and other Gardnes at Cedar Brook Park, NJ, for your good judgment, your ability, your energy and tenacity in starting public projects and keeping them functioning, the Garden Club of America takes pleasure in awarding to you its Distinguished Service Medal."

This award will be given at the discretion of the PGC President to a member or members who have followed the example of Harriette Halloway in their energy and tenacity in initiating projects and keeping them functioning. The Harriette Halloway medals will be presented to recipients to keep for a period of one year.

In the inaugural year of this award, 2010, the Harriette R. Halloway Award was presented to the co-Chairs of the Shakespeare Garden for their initiation of the renovation of the garden in particular the East Border: Mandy Zachariades & Susan Fraser

1951 Check Book

No. 907
July 13, 1951
Harriette R. Halloway
Iris Garden
$50.00

1952 Check Book

No. 969
Aug. 12, 1952
Hariette R. Halloway
Iris Garden
$50.00

1952 Check Book

No. 952
June 27, 1952
Medallic Art Co.
Misc.
Miss H's medal
$25.77

1953 Check Book

No. 1000
March 31, 1953
Jeanette Stuart
Exhibitor Flower Show
$12.50

No. 1001
March 31, 1953
Harriette Halloway
Shipping charge on arboretum
$1.61

No. 1002
Mar. 31, 1953
G.C.A.
dues for Luce & Heely
1/2 year
$5.00

1953 Check Book

No. 1042
July 13, 1953
Harriet R .Halloway
Iris Fund
$50.00

1954 Check Book

No. 1114
Von Graff Greenhouses
flowers for Lyons
June 4 & 11
$10.00

No. 1115
Gray's Florist
flowers for Lyons
June 4 & 11
$10.00

No. 1116
July 7, 1954
Harriet R. Halloway
purchase for Iris garden
$50.00

1955 Check Book

No. 1168
July 30. 1955
Harriette R. Halloway
Iris Garden
$50.00

No. 1169
July 30, 1955
Harriette R. Halloway
Iris shipped to Cologne, Germany
$25.00

No. 1170
Sept. 17, 1955
Elizabeth B. Browne
writing paper & marking
$7.50

1956 Check Book

No. 1219
June 28, 1956
Harriette R. Halloway
for Iris Garden
$75.00

1957 Check Book

No. 1258
May 13, 1957
Grove P. Hinman
Memorial Bronze
Tablet - Iris Garden
$50.00

No. 1259
May 13, 1957
Harriette R. Halloway
Phone calls in regards
to Tablet
$2.64

1957 Check Book

No. 1266
July 2, 1957
Harriette R. Halloway
for Iris Garden
$75.00

1958 Check Book

No. 1284
Jan. 11, 1958
Margery C. Ladd
Expenses for H. R. Halloway
awards
$8.12

1958 Check Book

No. 1312
June 23, 1958
cash - Miss Halloway
$75.00

1958 Check Book

No. 1317
July 12, 1958
Harriette Halloway
Iris Garden
$75.00

1958 Check Book

Note in the margin:

July 30
Miss Halloway reimbursement $50.00

1959 Check Book

No. 1342
Jan. 20, 1959
Harriette Halloway
iris book
$6.50

No. 1343
Jan. 20, 1959
Katrina Benton
open house (exp)
$32.30

No. 1344
Jan. 28. 1959
Myou Kistler
open house pictures
$20.00

1946 Check Book

No. 607
June 5, 1946
Herbert C. Brownwell
Lecture
Budget - Programs
$30.00

No. 608
June 10, 1946
Elsie Harman
For Shakespeare Garden
(sale of plants)
$10.00
Budget

No. 609
June 12, 1946
Harriette R. Halloway
Iris Budget
$25.00

1946 Check Book

No. 613
Oct. 14, 1946
Harriette R. Halloway
Horticulture Comm.
Iris - Budget
$10.00

No. 614
Nov. 13, 1946
Harriette R. Halloway
Iris Budget
$15.00

No. 615
Nov. 13, 1946
American Red Cross
flowers for Kilmer
through April 1st 7.00
Bedside flowers for November 10.00

In margin:

Gift (Mrs. McLellan 5.00)
Mrs. Anderegg
for war services
$15.00

1947 Check Book

No. 662
July 14, 1947
Harriette R. Halloway
Iris Budget: 1947 - 1948
Iris
$50.00

1948 Check Book

No. 691
Jan. 20, 1948
Garden Club of
America
flower Show
Exhibitions
$25.00

No. 692
Jan. 20, 1948
Garden Club of
America
Founders Fund
Dues
$25.00

No. 693
Jan. 20, 1948
Harriette R. Halloway
Horticulture
$19.10
Xmas wreaths

1948 Check Book

No. 724
July 19, 1948
Marion Loizeaux
Annual Meeting Expenses
$66.00

No. 725
July 19, 1948
Marjorie B. Elliott
repayment for telephone calls
made for Fall Benefit
$1.10

No. 726
August 12, 1948
Harriette R. Halloway
advance for Iris Garden
$25.00

1948 Check Book

No. 730
Sept. 9, 1948
Harriette R. Halloway
Iris Garden
$25.00

No. 731
Oct. 19, 1948
Interstate Printing Corporation
Postals for Sec.
Printing & Postage
$34.25

No. 732
Oct. 19, 1948
Interstate Printing Corp.
Painting tickets
Madame Arai Benefit

In left margin:

Dues – Munger – Hubbell $25.00
Dues (Mrs. Mead) $15.00
less Mrs. E. H. Ladd's ck
deposit in November -9.00

1949 Check Book

No. 757
March 8, 1949
Interstate Printing Corp.
membership sheets
Printing
$7.25

No. 758
March 30, 1949
National Audubon Society
Allen Cruikshank's lecture
Program
$75.00

No. 759
April 1, 1949
Margaret C. Ladd
Conservation Committee
Film 10.90 pamphlets 3.51 Bird exhibit 5.45
Tel. 2.54 Seeds for Schools 7.25
$29.65

In left margin:
Apr. 7 Dues (Halloway) 10.00

1949 Check Book

No. 772
May 10, 1949
Florence N. Scott
Public Stenographer
DDT letters - Miss Halloway
Misc.
$3.50

No. 773
May 10, 1949
The N. Y. Botanical Garden
dues
$25.00

No. 774
May 10, 1949
The Plainfield Book Shop
Stationery
$2.40

1949 Check Book

No. 778
June 15, 1949
Pennsbury Manor Trip
Program
$11.00

No. 779
June 21, 1949
Harriette R. Halloway
Iris Garden
$50.00

No. 780
June 21, 1949
Garden Club of New Jersey
for Garden State Flower Show
$25.00
misc.

1949 Check Book

No. 799
Nov. 4, 1949
Garden Club of America
Contributors Fund
$25.00

No. 800
Nov. 4, 1949
Garden Club of America
Dues for 49 active
22 Associate
1 Honorary (Mrs. Carter)
$360.00

No. 801
Nov. 10, 1949
Garden Club of America
dues Honorary Member
(Miss Halloway)
$5.00

1950 Check Book

No, 841
June 15, 1950
Easel
Paint for Exhibit in
Arts Festival
$2.22

No. 842
June 21, 1950
Clare Ogden Davis
Program 1949 - 50
$37.00

No. 843
June 30, 1950
Harriette R. Halloway
Iris Garden
$50.00

October 15, 2012 Royal Horticulture Society

Subject: FW: RHS Lindley Library
From: LizGilbert@rhs.org.uk
Date: Mon, October 15, 2012 5:30 am
To: PlainfieldGC@plainfieldgardenclub.org
Priority: Normal
Options: View Full Header | View Printable Version | Download this as a file | View as plain text | View Message details

From: Liz Gilbert
Sent: 12 October 2012 14:10
To: PlainfieldGC@plainfiledgardenclub.org
Cc: Fiona Davison
Subject: RHS Lindley Library

To Susan Fraser
Co-President , Plainfield Garden Club

Thank you for your enquiry regarding early RHS Fellows .

We have checked through the printed lists we hold of RHS Fellows and confirm an entry for Alice Harding in our records for 1920 and 1929 .

Mrs Edward Harding R.F.D. No 1 Plainfield N. Jersey .

In 1930 Mrs S. G. Van Hoesen 145, North Avenue Fanwood, N Jersey listed as a new overseas member .

Regret we have not been able to trace any records for Miss Harriette Halloway .

The last list of new fellows of the RHS was printed in 1934 , so it is possible she became a fellow after this date?

The library holds handwritten volumes of plants and seeds donated to Wisley and have checked the volumes from

1915- through to 1943.

Regret have not found an entry under the name Harding or Plainsfield in the index of donors .

Sadly we are unable to confirm the details of any plants donated by Alice Harding to Wisley .

Finally, just to confirm that the library has in reference collection the books by Alice Harding on ‘The Peony' and also' The Lilac ‘.

Please let us know if there is anything else we help you with .

Yours sincerely

Elizabeth Gilbert
RHS Lindley Library


Visit our RHS Plant centres for top tips and free talks throughout Autumn about the benefits of planting now. You can also pick up free Autumn Planting Cards for ideas and inspiration.

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The Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) is the UK's leading gardening charity dedicated to advancing horticulture and promoting good gardening. Anyone with an interest in gardening can enjoy the benefits of RHS Membership and help us to secure a healthy future for gardening. For more information call: 0845 130 4646, or visit www.rhs.org.uk.

The contents of this email and any files transmitted with it are confidential, proprietary and may be legally privileged. They are intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If you have received this email in error please notify the sender. If you are not the intended recipient you may not use, disclose, distribute, copy, print or rely on this email. The sender is not responsible for any changes made to any part of this email after transmission. Any views or opinions presented are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of the Society. Although this email and any attachments are believed to be free from any virus or other defects which might affect any computer or IT system into which they are received, no responsibility is accepted by the Society or any of its associated companies for any loss or damage arising in any way from the receipt or use thereof.

1920 Muhlenberg Hospital Womens Auxiliary

Miss H. P. Halloway
225 East Seventh Street

New Covenant Church of God, 225 East 7th Street, Plainfield NJ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FDO6r_k3V1c

http://www.newcovenantnj.com/

1915 - 1923 List of Meetings

1925 Meeting Minutes

April 8, 1925 Meeting Minutes

May 13, 1925 Meeting Minutes

May 27, 1925 Meeting Minutes

May 27, 1925 Meeting Minutes

June 24, 1925 Meeting Minutes

July 8, 1925 Meeting Minutes

August 26, 1925 Meeting Minutes

Miss Halloway

1936 - 1937 Meeting Minutes

1938-1939 Meeting Minutes

February 12, 2013

A reader of the website sent us three photographs of the no-longer existing Iris Garden in Cedar Brook Park. The Iris Garden was located across from the still-existing Shakespeare Garden on the hillside. The large dedication rock still marks its entrance, although the bronze plaque has long been missing.

The reader indicated that these three photos belong to her aunt but had no date. Since the Iris Garden was begun in 1932 and ceased to exist in the 1980's we can narrow the age of the photographs to that 50-year period. A good guess would be in the 1950s when the Iris Garden peaked in popularity.

February 12, 2013

This yellow Iris may be significant to the photographer as it may be an example of the garden's founder, Iris 'Harriette Halloway'

February 12, 2013

This blue Iris may be significant to the photographer as it may be an example of the garden's founder, Iris 'Harriette Halloway'

February 12, 2013

This yellow Iris could be the variety 'Alice Harding' – another great Plainfield Garden Club member and Iris enthusiast.

1920 Meeting Minutes

Photo Not Dated

This image of an Iris was taken from a slide on March 22, 2013 at the Plainfield Library. It was with the following image in a box of images spanning form 1965 through the 1980's.

Photo Not Dated

Iris Garden, Cedar Brook Park

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

May 21, 1954

May 21, 1959

April 23, 1965 Garden Club History Reviews Past 50 Years

A history of the Plainfield Garden Club was presented to members Wednesday by Mrs. Edward H. Ladd 3rd at the club's annual meeting in the home of Mrs. Edgar F. Davis, 1080 Rahway Rd. Mrs. Alexander Kroll was co-hostess.

The history has been published to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Garden Club, which was formed in 1915.

The first part of the history was written by a charter member, now deceased, Mrs. Thomas Van Boskerck. The second part, covering the years from 1940-1965, was written by Mrs. Gerald Furman, and highlights the accomplishment of all the departments of the club.

Special emphasis is given to the three continuing projects: the Shakespeare Garden started in 1927; the Dogwood Collection, sponsored since 1946; and the Iris Garden begun in 1932; all in Cedar Brook Park. These three gardens have received national recognition and many awards for excellence.

The Union County Park Commission has just named the dogwood planting, "The Harriette R. Halloway Cornus Collection," in appreciation of the club's many years of service to park activities. Miss Halloway, 90, is the Garden Club's oldest living member and an authority on cornus and iris.

Mrs. Edwin J. Fitzpatrick, nominating chairman, present the slate of officers which was elected as follows: President, Mrs. Wayne J. Holman Jr.; first vice president, Mrs. David Sanders; second vice president, Mrs. F. Gregg Burger; treasurer, Mrs. William K. Dunbar Jr.; recording secretary, Mrs. C. Northrup Pond; and corresponding secretary, Mrs. C. Benson Wigton Jr.

Mrs. Holman and Mrs. Sandford will attend the annual meeting of the Garden Club of America in Cleveland, Ohio from May 10-14. Mrs. Holman will present a resume of recent program given by members of the Plainfield Club on the botanical background of the mallow plant family.

Mrs. John Wells of Valley Road, Watchung, said the club will again give scholarships to the Audubon summer camps or the N. J. State School of Conservation at Stokes Forest, as has been done since 1941. School teachers and scout leaders are eligible to apply for the scholarships.

A colored movie, entitled "Wings Over Blitzen," was shown, picturing wildlife in its natural state in the Malheur Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Ore.

Tea followed the meeting. Mrs. C. Benson Wigton and Mrs. Blanche P. Nash presided at the tea table, which was decorated with an arrangement of white spring flowers.

Taken Friday April 27, 1956

Miss Harriette R. Halloway

Tuesday, May 8, 1956

Tea to Honor Pioneer in Planting of Dogwood

Almost as though it had the power of imagination, the dogwood in Cornus (Dogwood) Dr., Cedar Brook Park, is expected to reach its annual stage of flowering beauty this week.

For tomorrow, at 4 p.m., members of the Plainfield Garden Club and its Cornus Arboretum Committee will hold a tea and reception to honor two pioneers in the 25-year-ago development of what has become the most outstanding horticultural display in this section of the country.

They are Mrs. Thomas van Boskerck and Miss Harriette R. Halloway and the tribute will be paid to them in the Field House of Cedar Brook Park, with Mrs. Robert T. Stevens acting as chairman, assisted by Mrs. Georges J. His and Mrs. William K. Dunbar Jr.

Commission Cooperated

Mrs. Van Boskerck suggested the planting of a vacant space in Cedar Brook park – then under development – with dogwood, in 1931, a suggestion which aroused immediately the interest of the Garden Club members. Support came from Miss Halloway and the then club president, Mrs. Henry Wells. Cooperation of the Union County Park Commission was obtained.

In 1940, plans were made for an extended planting, with Mrs. William A. Holliday and Mrs. William Tyler as co-chairmen. They approached the Park Commission and that body furnished a large boulder and suitable tablet for the drive entrance.

The 1931 planting had included 78 white and 17 pink dogwoods. In 1940, another 110 were added, on both sides of the drive. The Park Commission added a background of evergreens to make the setting even more attractive.

Plantings Expanded

The suggestion of W. R. Tracey of the commission led, in 1946, to further expansion of the plantings into a full arboretum. In its development, the advice and cooperation of Ralph H. Carver of the commission, was an important factor.

There are now 45 varieties of dogwood in the Arboretum, and some young trees are grown to add to the arboretum in the commission's nurseries. So extensive was the local display grown that it now is necessary to exchange with other arboretums in the nations, since the average nursery no longer has the capacity to supply rare and beautiful varieties.

By request, articles on the Cedar Brook Arboretum have been written for the Bulletin of the Garden Club of America and the Bulletin of the Arboretum organization in Seattle, Wash.

Dr. Donald Wyman, head of the Arnold Arboretum, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., has listed the Cedar Brook plantings in his authoritative "Arboretums and Botanical Gardens of America," a unique distinction.

One rare species is the "Cornus Nuttalli," native of the West Coast from British Columbia to Seattle, Wash. Told that it had once held a single bloom here, Dr. Wyman was astounded.

This year, the rare tree, planted by Miss Halloway, has nine buds.

Tuesday, May 8, 1956

Tuesday, May 8, 1956

Tuesday, May 8, 1956

November 20, 2013

At a meeting of the Plainfield Garden Club, two boxes of books from the Barbara Tracy Sandford estate were brought to the meeting to disperse among the membership and donate to the Plainfield Library.

A particular book came under scrutiny as it contained not only a photo of the Cedar Brook Iris garden with an article, but a handwritten note from Harriette Halloway.

To see the events of the meeting, Click Here.

For a better look at all the documents, Click Here.

Inside Cover

Table of Contents

Cedar Brook Iris Garden

Cedar Brook Iris Garden

Article on the Cedar Brook Iris Garden - i

[In the margin on the left "I did not write this article. Harriette Halloway"]

The Cedar Brook Park Iris Garden
Plainfield, New Jersey

Harriette Rice Halloway

The Cedar Brook Park Iris Garden differs from other public iris plantings in content, in the unique spacing of the contoured beds, and in its distinctive color scheme. It is truly a garden where many kinds of irises are arranged to produce pleasing color combinations surrounded by fine trees and superb shrubbery.

Established in 1932 with the active cooperation of the Union County Park Commission which provided the land, and the Plainfield Garden Club, which planned and developed the area in cooperation with the American Iris Society, a continuity of administrative supervision has been maintained.

The Cedar Brook Garden differs from other public iris gardens in content more than in any other feature. A diversity of iris types produces a very prolonged season of iris bloom, which opens in late March and ends in August. Named varieties of the early reticulata irises abound in a variety of colors.

By mid-April the junos in a half-dozen varieites begin to open followed by some of the regelias – Iris hoogiana, koralkowii, and their hybrids. About a dozen varieties are represented.

Onococyclus irises are not too dependable in this area, but Itis susiana has flowered for several years and in some years I. sara is lovely. The oncos begin in early Mary and are follwed by a sizable are of evansias, I. cristata and I. tectorum.

In late April and early May there are quantities of handsome dwarf bearded varieties approximately seventy, old and new. Seven varieties of standard dwarfs, over fifty of medians, nine of miniature talls precede spectacular masses of tall bearded varieties.

Over 1,000 varieties of tall bearded iris make a tremendous display beginning about the third week of May. Many are older varieties used for color effects and to permit visitors to identify their own. Many come from the New York Botanical Garden, and others from that of Mrs. Wheeler Peckham. More newly-introduced varieties give conspicuous accent and add to the educational value of the collection.

Article on the Cedar Brook Iris Garden - ii

Extending the season both fore and aft of the tall bearded varieties, are the "Arilbred" hybrids in a large bed by themselves, including combinations of onococylus and regelias with eupogons. This collection was started many years ago with plants sent by George Reed, then at the Brooklyn Botanical Garden. Older varieties, such as Congress, Dorak, Ciran, Shirin, and Shiraz have been augmented by the popular Lady Mohr plus mothers of that group, and by recent additions including Real Gold and Coronation Tapestry.

About forty varieties of Siberians show masses of flowers at the same time in the lower level of the garden. Groups of native species provide added color and extend the season appreciably.

When the Japanese irises make their show, the bed filled with the large-flowered Iris kampferi is most interesting. There are three beds of varieties including some of the new Higos. These beds bloom from late June well into July.

At the Garden entrance there is a an iris bed having one or more kinds in bloom from late March until late July, and sometimes into August. Here are early bulbous irises, some regelias, oncos, western natives, several Siberians and Japanese, and a few Dutch bulbous varieties plus the Chinese Iris dichotoma.

Adding to the Garden's attractiveness is the arrangement of the beds. The bearded types cascade from a plateau down an opening and spread along a slope below where, on an adjacent meadow, the Japanese, Siberians and other species too are backed by fine trees and attractive shrubbery. The Garden is planned on curves and the beds are sufficiently narrow so that the centers may be reached from the edges. The groups are well separated and are fitted to the contours.

The Garden's color scheme is the subject of careful planning. The whites, yellows and blues of tall bearded iris are separated. One ninety-foot bed contains light pinks, shading to darker pinks, and then to red-browns and copper shades. In other beds there are amoenas with white standards, and falls of purple or other colors; plicatas with white or yellow ground color and plicate margins in other colors. Each distinctive color pattern has a sizable bed. In the lower section are four beds of Japanese iris, two of Siberians, and three of species, where separation by colors is not attempted.

The result is far more pleasing and restful than eye-disturbing mixtures of commercial iris fields, and helps visitors to make

Article on the Cedar Brook Iris Garden - iii

comparisons when considering varieties for their own gardens. Persons not keenly interested in iris appreciate the beauty of the whole picture and sense a feeling of spaciousness occasioned by the ample room for people to circulate without crowding.

At the time of the Twenty-Fifth Anniversary of the establishment of the Garden, May 1957, the Cedar Brook Park Commission moved a boulder into the Garden and affixed to it a bronze tablet given by the Plainfield Garden Club, identifying its origins and cooperating agencies.

The Plainfield Garden Club has helped support the Garden and has furnished a working committee for its administration. American Iris Society members have made many generous contributions of plants. The Union County Park Commission has provided labor for maintenance. This arrangement has provided the Iris Garden Committee with the support needed for the care of more than 1,500 named varieties and species of iris, totaling more than 75,000 plants.

Harriette's envelope taped to the back of the book

Harriette's envelope taped to the back of the book

Harriette's article page 1

[Handwritten on the top of the page: Written – on d??? of Editor for "Garden Irises." Changed by "Acting" editor.

The Iris Garden
CEDAR BROOK PARK - PLAINFIELD, NEW JERSEY
HARRIETTE RICE HALLOWAY

A repor of this Iris Garden – truly a garden – is included because it is conspicuously different, in three fundamental was, from usual collections and plantings.

The most important difference is in content.

The season opens late in March when a sizable clump of reticulata, plus seven named varieties, Danfordiae, and Korolkowi Major, maintains flowers for days – even in the year 1957 through the snow of the last week.

By Mid-April this Junos – a half dozen varieties – open followed closely by some of the Regelias, Hoogianas, Korolkowis and their hybrids – good representation, about a dozen varieties all told, although no quantity of an one of them. In 1957 the beauty of Ulysus, new in the garden, was especially enjoyed.

Although the aucocycius are not too dependable in this area Susianus has flowered several years, and in 1957 Sari was lovely.

Late April, early Mary, quantities of handsome dwarf bearded – approximately seventy varieties old and new – seven varieties of Lilliputs, nine of Table iris, and over fifty Medians open the season of the Pogon's mass bloom.

Beginning to open at the same time the Evansias – Cristata and Testorum with their alba forms – carpet a sizable area.

Over a thousand varieties of Tall-bearded make a tremendous display during the third week of May – many of which are old varieties used for color and to permit visitors to identify their own. Frequently cut flowers are brought – sometimes even in water – to learn their names. Among the varieties used when the Garden was establish were large quantities from The New York Botanical Garden through its then Iris Curator – Mrs. Wheeler Peckham – and a sizable amount form the originator's own garden.

Harriette's article page 2

Like the other types this group has had constant additions. Some of these later acquisitions – as in the beginning – were given by officials of the American Iris Society. Plants of Golden Hawk, Silver Hawk, East Indies, South Pacific, and others – including one named for this recorder – attest the generosity of their hybridizer and donor, Mr. Kenneth Smith. All these more recent additions – handsome newly introduced varieties – give conspicuous accent and add educational value.

Extending the season, both fore and aft, in a large bed by themselves, are the Oncocyclus, started with plants sent by Dr. George Reed, then at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden – Handsome old Congres, Dorak, Giran, Shirin, Shiraz, etc., have been augmented by the popular Lady Mohr plus others of that tribe, and a number of recent additions including Real Gold and Coronation Tapestry.

At the same time, chiefly in the lower level, about forty varieties of Siberians show masses of flowers. Fortunately they carry on a little longer than the pogons.

Continuing with the Siberians and even a little later native and other species give color. A storm-felled tree caused wash-out destruction in the three beds of these – Hexagonas, Longipetalas, Spurias, Louisiana – all of which must be re-identified for re-establishment.

When the four beds of the Japanese are making their spectacular show – three beds of standard varieties with some of the new "Higos" – this one that is most interesting to iris enthusiasts is the sizable one filled with "Kaempfer" ("ensata variety Spontanaea") another highly valued gift through Dr. Reed. These four beds carry bloom not only in late June but well into July.

There is a bed at the entrance to the Garden which has one or more flowers constantly from late March until late July – sometimes into August. In this bed are all the early bulbous, representation of regelias, oncos, some western natives – innominata Aurea is charming – a few Siberians and Japanese, a few Dutch bulbous, plus, as finis, the Chinese Dichotoma.

Harriette's article page 3

In an article in the 1957 May-June issue of The Journal of the New York Botanical Garden, Dr. John C. Wister – who gave encouragements in every way all through the years – noting the Twenty-Fifth Anniversary of this Garden, states what its originator also believes to be true: "The collections are well rounded to contain some types from every botanical division or horticultural group of the great genus Iris. So far as is known no other public collection is as all embracing as this."

Two fundamental but important factors make this collection "a true Iris Garden" – not merely a collection or planting.

The first is in location. The bearded types on a long plateau – except where cascading down an open and flowing gradual slope – are surrounded by fine trees and superb shrubbery. The Japanese, Siberians, and other species, on an adjacent Meadow, are backed by more fine trees and good shrubbery.

The second difference is in outline and color. When plans were in the making it was especially requested that square corners be completely omitted and the beds be so narrow that, as far as possible, the centers could be reached from the edges.

The architect – from the Olmsted firm – sent in a perfect outline sketch for the beds – beautiful curves, well separated groups, fitted to the contours of the land.

The tall-bearded iris are planted in a definite color scheme. The whites, yellows and blues are completely segregated. One ninety foot bed contains light pinks, shading to darker, and then to red-browns (aqua lens), coppers, white standards (amoebas), whites with colored edges (placatos), lavendars (pollidas), purples, blends, (light, medium, dark) each have their own sizable beds.

This color scheme, highly praised, is not only far more pleasing and restful than the eye-disturbing color mixtures of commercial fields and public plantings, but gives much greater opportunity for visitors to make comparisons when selecting varieties for their own gardens. Even people who are not keenly interested in iris exclaim at the beauty of the

Harriette's article page 4

flowers and of the whole picture. Others comment on the sense of spaciousness – room for people without crowing.

In the lower section of the Garden the Japanese (four large beds) the Siberian (two large beds) and some of the Species (three large beds) having more harmonious natures are not divided for color.

This Garden was started by a member of the American Iris Society who felt that there should be one in Plainfield. Because of the immediately cordial response of Mr. Richmond Tracy – engineer and secretary – it was not difficult to secure the interest and agreement of the Union County Park Commission to have such a Garden in Cedar Brook Park one of their units. Then the Plainfield Garden Club was told of the plan, invited to cooperate, and the invitation promptly accepted.

The latter – as all through the years – contributes money to buy plants, and a working committee is drawn from its membership.

The former carries the responsibility for spraying, any other special activity, and the very heavy load of labor for weeding, fertilizing, and helping with transplanting.

At the time of the Twenty-Fifth Anniversary – May 1957 – The Park Commission placed a bouler and affixed to it a bronze tablet given by The Garden Club.

The Iris Garden was Established in 1932
with
Aid from Officials of the American Iris Society
By
The Plainfield Garden Club
And
The Union County Park Commission

Contributor page

Saturday, May 21, 1966 Something to Be proud of . . . Many Worked Together for County Park Display

Caption: DOGWOOD IN FLOWER – Cedar Brook Park's Dogwood Arboretum is a horticultural collection of 61 varieties that is the pride of Plainfield Garden Club and the Union County Park Commission. The display of dogwood blossoms is not the showiest, but it's the most complete in the country. Each year the trees in bloom are a joy to those who visit the planting or follow the drive through Cedar Brook Park. The trees in the Cornus Collections line both sides of the Park Drive.

Something to be Proud of . . .

Many Worked Together for County Park Display

Horticulturalists know it as the "Cornus Collection in Plainfield." The Plainfield Garden Club speaks of it as "our dogwood plantings in Cedar Brook Park." Since last year, the double line of pink and white flowering trees at the Park Ave. entrance to the park as been officially named "The Harriette R. Halloway Cornus Collection."

But to most admirers of the annual evidence that spring is here, it is just "those beautiful trees in the park" whether they refer to them by their botanical or popular name – cornus or dogwood.

Many who come to see the trees are unaware that this collection includes ore than 60 varieties of dogwood, every kind that can grow in this climate. While the trees are beautiful, it is the horticultural collection of so many varieties that counts to the credit of the Plainfield Garden Club even more than the display. It is not the greatest show, but it's the most complete collection.

Dr. Benjamin Blackburn of Drew University in Madison has remarked that this group of trees, growing in a compact reserved area, is a marked achievement on the part of the Union Count Park Commission, the Plainfield Garden Club and Miss Halloway, who served for more than 35 years as a volunteer consultant to the Park Commission and in keeping records of all the plantings.

Miss Halloway, for whom the grove is named, still watches for the flowering season of the dogwood. Now 91, Miss Halloway is a resident at the McCutchen Nursing Home, North Plainfield.

Among the personal possession she treasurers is the Distinguished Service Medal of the Garden Club of America. Also she is a fellow of the Royal Horticultural Society of England and a member of the American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboretums. She is a member of the Plainfield Garden Club and has earned recognition from the New York Botanical Gardens, American Horticultural Society and other organizations for her work and her writings about gardens, flowers, and flowering shrubs and trees.

A great part of the reward to her and the Plainfield Garden Club is that so many people can enjoy the cornus collection in the park. Miss Halloway says: "Each year the trees continue to be beautiful and a joy, if not forever, at least for many years."

THE CEDAR BROOK Park Dogwood Collection is unique, Dr. Blackburn believes. "None other is known to exist in this county," he said, "and a match for it is not be found growing in the Royal Botanic Gardens in London or in Edinburgh or other famous gardens in Great Britain and Europe."

The dogwood collection got its start in 1931 when W. R. Tracy, superintendent of the Union County Park Commission, decided to turn an old city dump into a beauty spot and the Plainfield Garden Club contributed 75 white dogwoods to help the project.

In 1940 the club gave an additional 110 trees to balance the two sides of the drive and complete the groupings. The 61 species now flourishing in the park include nine from Asia, two from Europe and 12 from North America, a number of hybrids and "cultivars," special horticultural selections that have been propagated vegetatively.

The Park Commission has planted a background of evergreens, including hemlocks and pines, to enhance the effect of the dogwoods. Enlarging on its original purpose to beautify the area, the Plainfield Garden Club cooperated throughout the year with the commission in developing the collection and all varieties are now labelled with correct names. A boulder with a tablet also has been installed in the area..

At the 25th anniversary of the Garden Club, held in 1940, Mrs. Thomas R. VanBoskerck, who had written a history of the club's first quarter century, recalled that the members had anticipated the park's work in beautifying the dump area and first had presented 50 dogwood trees to the park through the generosity of Mrs. Charles A. Eaton who took them from her own woods in Watchung. A fund to beautify the park had been started originally in 1924 with Mrs. William Halliday in charge.

Dr. Blackburn points to the Cornus Collection in Plainfield as an admirable example of cooperation among groups interested in the cultural and horticultural riches of a municipality.

25 Years Ago, 1941

Clifford M. Baker, president of the Muhlenberg Hospital board of governors announced that Allen V. Heely, headmaster of the Lawrenceville School, would speak at the graduation exercises for the hospital's school of nursing. Mr. Heely's sister-in-law, Mrs. Lawrence S. Heely, was president of the Women's Auxiliary Hospital. Dr. William B. Fort, senior attending surgeon, was to award the prizes, and William Whitwell Robison and Mrs. Edward Leroy Voorhees were to present diplomas and pins.

The Rev. Harry James Knickle, rector of Grace Episcopal Church, was observing the 10th anniversary of his priesthood.

George A. Ballantyne of 30 Westervelt Ave. was honored by the First Presbyterian Church Session for years of faithful service as head usher.

Saturday, May 21, 1966 Something to Be proud of . . . Many Worked Together for County Park Display

Saturday, May 21, 1966 Something to Be proud of . . . Many Worked Together for County Park Display

Saturday, May 21, 1966 Something to Be proud of . . . Many Worked Together for County Park Display

Cornus Arboretum

From the 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

Our beautiful dogwood trees stand on what was once the city dump. The story of this evolution of beauty began in 1929 when Mrs. Charles Eaton presented 50 dogwood trees to Cedar Brook Park from her own woods. In 1931, with Mrs. Henry Wells as Chairman, 45 dogwood trees, white and pink, were donated by the Plainfield Garden Club and were planted on one side of the drive entering from Park Avenue. Nine years later, (1940), under the guidance of Mrs. Thomas R. Van Boskerck and Mrs. William Holliday, 110 trees were added to extend the first row and to form another on the opposite side of the road. Since this planting coincided with our own 25th anniversary, a large boulder bearing a bronze marker was placed near the entrance.

In 1946, the Park Commission, a group of progressive and dedicated gentlemen, asked our Club if we would sponsor a Cornus Arboretum, using the Dogwood Drive as a foundation. We accepted – indeed, yes! A committee was formed with Miss Harriette R. Halloway as Secretary and Advisor, whose goal it was to include every Cornus, Specie and Cultivar, which was obtainable and which would thrive in this climate. Through the years, chairmen have included Mrs. R. T. Stevens, Mrs. George His, and Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler. As in our other gardens, the Park Commission has planted, raised seedlings in their nursery and provided maintenance.

Through purchases, gifts and exchanges with other Arboretums, 26 varieties were planted in the next five years. By 1948, there were 219 trees, giving masses of beautiful spring bloom as well as fall display of foliage and berries. Thousands of visitors walked or drove through this fairyland of beauty, surely the better for having seen it.

Today, through the inspired leadership of Miss Halloway, the Cornus Collection contains more than sixty varieties, some quite rare. All the others being horticultural selections of "clones" (cultivars). Experts consider the Cornus Collection to be the outstanding horticultural and civic achievement of our Club. It was highly gratifying in 1957, when officials from the New York Botanical Garden came out to see it.

Prof. Benjamin Blackburn, in a recent article in the American Horticulture Magazine says, 'It does not appear that a comparable collection exists. The Cornus Collection offers an admirable example of cooperation between groups interested in the cultural and horticultural riches of a municipality . . . none other is known to the writer to be existing elsewhere in the country."

To quote Miss Halloway, "each year the trees continue to be beautiful and a joy, if not forever, at least for many years."

Written by Victoria Furman